Sunday, June 18, 2017

BDK Carbon Concepts, N8008Z: Accident occurred September 16, 2016 near Anderson Lake Airport (0AK1), Wasilla, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: JEFFERY D TUTTLE BDK Carbon Concepts, registration: N8008Z
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot reported that the accident flight was the first flight in the experimental, amateur-built airplane since he had completed building it. He added that, shortly after departure, while in level cruise flight, he heard a loud “pop” and immediately saw that the left wing’s leading-edge slat had buckled and distorted, which made the airplane difficult to control. While maneuvering for an emergency landing, the pilot had to make significant power adjustments to maintain control. After making a right turn to begin the approach to the airport, the right wing’s leading-edge slat failed, which resulted in an almost complete loss of airplane control. Subsequently, he guided the airplane to an open road using the rudder and varying the engine power settings. The airplane struck the top of a tree before impacting the road in a nose-low attitude, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. 

Each wing was equipped with three carbon fiber leading-edge slats located center, inboard, and outboard. A detailed examination of the airframe and engine revealed that the right wing’s leading-edge slats exhibited features consistent with compression failure of the leading edge, trailing edge bond failure, lack of adhesive in the joints, and ply bridging. In addition, the right inboard slat attachment bracket exhibited deformation patterns consistent with an overload failure. The left wing leading edge slats exhibited no leading-edge damage but had signatures consistent with resin starvation. In addition, the left attachment bracket between the inboard and center slats exhibited features consistent with an adhesive failure in the joint and a disbond at the attachment. Microscopic examination of the attachment bracket revealed a lack of adhesion, improper surface preparation, and improper adhesive thickness. No other airframe or engine anomalies were noted. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The structural failure of both wings’ leading-edge slats, which resulted in a loss of airplane control.





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Wasilla, Alaska 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8008Z



NTSB Identification: ANC16LA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: JEFFERY D TUTTLE BDK Carbon Concepts, registration: N8008Z
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 1104 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped, experimental amateur-built, Tuttle BDK Carbon Concepts airplane, N8008Z, sustained substantial damage following an inflight structural failure of the leading-edge wing slats, followed by a loss of control, and subsequent impact with terrain. The accident occurred as the pilot was attempting to return for an emergency landing near Wasilla, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local area flight departed Anderson Lake Airport, Wasilla, Alaska at about 1100 with a planned stop at Palmer Airport, Palmer, Alaska for touch-and-go landings prior to returning to Anderson Lake Airport.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on September 21, the pilot reported, from his hospital room, that the accident flight was the first flight after he completed building the experimental, amateur-built airplane. He added that the airplane was equipped with carbon fiber, leading-edge wing slats, manufactured by Carbon Concepts LLC, Wasilla. 

The pilot said that after departure from Anderson Lake Airport, he flew the airplane westbound while climbing to an altitude of about 1,000 feet, followed by a turn to the east. After completing the turn to the east, the pilot heard a loud "pop" and he immediately saw that the airplane's left wing leading-edge wing slat had buckled and distorted making the airplane difficult to control about the longitudinal and vertical axis. He stated that while struggling to maintain control of the airplane he realized that he was too high to make an emergency, straight in approach to the Anderson Lake Airport, so he chose to overfly the airport while descending. He added that during the emergency descent to the airport, he was forced to make significant engine power adjustments in an effort to maintain control of the airplane. After overflying the airport, he made a right turn to begin the approach to the Anderson Lake Airport when the right wing leading-edge wing slat failed, resulting in almost a complete loss of control. He guided the airplane using the rudder and varying the engine power settings to an open road, with his main concern being not to cause undue harm to people or property on the ground. During the emergency descent the airplane struck the top of a tree before impacting the road in a nose low attitude, sustaining substantial damage to wings and fuselage. 

On September 29, 2016, the NTSB IIC, along with the rest of the investigative team examined the airframe and engine at a private residence in Wasilla. All the primary flight control surfaces remained connected to their respective attach points, and flight control continuity was verified from all of the primary flight control surfaces to the cockpit.

Each wing was equipped with three carbon fiber leading-edge slats located center, inboard and outboard. The right wing's leading-edge slats revealed features consistent with a compression failure of the leading edge, trailing edge bond failure, lack of adhesive in the joints, and ply bridging. In addition, the inboard slat attachment bracket exhibited deformation patterns consistent with an overload failure.

The left wing leading-edge slats had no apparent leading edge damage but revealed signatures consistent with resin starvation. In addition, the attach bracket between the inboard and center slat exhibited features consistent with an adhesive failure in the joint and a disbond at the attachment. Microscopic inspection of the attachment bracket revealed a lack of adhesion, improper surface preparation, and improper adhesive thickness. 

The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft and one of the propeller blades exhibited chordwise scratching. Examination of the Lycoming O-320-A2B engine revealed no anomalies, contamination, or evidence of malfunction in any of the engine accessories. The cylinders, pistons, valve train, crankshaft, and other internal components were all without evidence of anomaly or malfunction. 

The closest weather reporting facility is Wasilla Airport, Wasilla, Alaska about 8 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1056, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Wasilla, reported: wind from 070° at 5 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, scattered clouds 7,000 feet, scattered clouds 8,000 feet; temperature, 54° F; dew point 41° F; altimeter, 29.38 inHG.

After repeated attempts, the pilot did not submit an NTSB Pilot/Operator Accident Report form (NTSB Form 6120.1) as required.



NTSB Identification: ANC16LA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: JEFFERY D TUTTLE BDK Carbon Concepts, registration: N8008Z
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 1104 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped, experimental amateur-built, Tuttle BDK Carbon Concepts airplane, N8008Z, sustained substantial damage following an in-flight structural failure of the leading-edge wing slats, followed by a loss of control, and subsequent impact with terrain. The accident occurred as the pilot was attempting to return for an emergency landing near Wasilla, Alaska. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local area flight departed Anderson Lake Airport, Wasilla, about 1100, with a planned stop at Palmer Airport, Palmer, Alaska, for touch-and-go landings prior to returning to Anderson Lake Airport. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge on September 21, the pilot reported, from his hospital room, that the accident flight was the first flight after he completed building the experimental, amateur-built airplane. He added that the airplane was equipped with carbon fiber, leading-edge wing slats, manufactured by Carbon Concepts LLC, Wasilla. 

The pilot said that after departure from Anderson Lake Airport, he flew the airplane eastbound while climbing to an altitude of about 1,000 feet, followed by a turn to the west. After completing the turn to the west, the pilot heard a loud "pop" and he immediately saw that the airplane's left wing leading-edge wing slat had buckled and distorted making the airplane difficult to control about the longitudinal and vertical axis. He stated that while struggling to maintain control of the airplane he realized that he was too high to make an emergency, straight-in approach to the Anderson Lake Airport, so he chose to overfly the airport while descending. He added that during the emergency descent to the airport, he was forced to make significant engine power adjustments in an effort to maintain control of the airplane. After overflying the airport, he made a right turn to begin the approach to the Anderson Lake Airport when the right wing leading-edge wing slat failed, resulting in almost a complete loss of control. He guided the airplane using the rudder and varying the engine power settings to an open road, with his main concern being not to cause undue harm to people or property on the ground. During the emergency descent the airplane struck the top of a tree before impacting the road in a nose low attitude, sustaining substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

The closest weather reporting facility is Wasilla Airport. At 1056, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Wasilla, reported: wind from 070 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition, scattered clouds 7,000 feet, scattered clouds 8,000 feet; temperature 54 degrees F; dew point 41 degrees F; altimeter 29.38 inHg.

Boeing sees strong interest in potential new 737 model



Boeing has received strong interest in a potential new member of its best-selling 737 aircraft range, the planemaker's new commercial chief said on Sunday.

Boeing is expected to launch the 190-230 seat 737 MAX 10 with more seats and a modified landing gear at the opening of the Paris Airshow on Monday, adding a larger, new version to its narrowbody medium-haul family to plug a gap against Airbus.

"We are working very closely with a large number of customers, with offers on the table," Boeing Commercial Airplanes Chief Executive Kevin McAllister said in a briefing.

He dismissed concerns by some financiers about fragmentation of the Boeing 737 MAX family into what would now be five separate models, potentially making some harder to finance.

"There is significant demand for each model," he said.

Speaking before the world's largest air show at Le Bourget from June 19 to 25, McAllister offered a glimpse of new Boeing market forecasts due to be published on Tuesday.

The world will need 41,000 commercial jets over the next 20 years, he said, a 4 percent increase from last year's Boeing forecast. By comparison, Airbus last week forecast 34,899 jets over the same period, which was 6 percent above its own 2016 forecast. Boeing will unveil detailed figures on Tuesday.




SERVICES PUSH

Boeing is working to complete a three-year study on the potential for a so-called "mid-market" jet that would sit between the existing narrowbody and widebody categories. The company is working on a cost and business case for such a plane.

"I would like to do it as quickly as we can," McAllister said, but added: "I would rather take the time to do it right."

Airbus has dismissed the case for such an aircraft, saying its A321neo, which can seat up to 240 people in an all-economy layout, mostly fits the gap. Boeing says the potential market spans 200 to 270 seats and requires an all-new plane.

McAllister, a former General Electric executive who was appointed in November, said there was huge potential for new digital technologies in production and in providing aftermarket services. Such services, which are key to engine makers and are now working their way into aircraft manufacturing, will be part of the decisions on whether to launch the mid-market jet.

The Boeing official called for greater efficiency from suppliers including Spirit AeroSystems, which builds the fuselage of 737 jets and parts of the 787 Dreamliner.

Boeing is involved in pricing negotiations with its former subsidiary, formed in 2005 from the sale of its Wichita base.






"We are still negotiating with Spirit. I expect the same accountability from the supply chain as we place on ourselves," McAllister said.

Spirit said in May talks were taking longer than expected and that there was still a gap on 737 and 787..

On the 777 mini-jumbo, whose production is slowing before the transition to a new model due to enter service in 2020, McAllister said the plane was sold out for 2017 but the firm had "some holes to fill" in the order book in 2018 and 2019.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.reuters.com

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University receives $1M grant to create self-piloting drone

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has received a $1 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, an arm of the Department of Defense, to develop a flight control system that will allow drones to pilot themselves.

“Potential uses for this technology include search and rescue missions or remote surveillance and assessment of conditions too hazardous for humans,” said Richard Prazenica, assistant professor of Aerospace Engineering at ERAU in a press release. “This intelligent, autonomous UAV could explore unmapped or unsafe environments to locate someone injured in an earthquake, or assist and communicate with firefighters while gathering information as it moves through a smoke-filled building.”

The grant will be split with Creare LLC, a New Hampshire based engineering research and development firm. ERAU received $45,000 previously for the first phase of the project.

“The UAV would be able to autonomously plan and execute a path by creating a three-dimensional map of any given environment to enable obstacle avoidance,” Prazenica said. “This intelligent flying platform should, without a human operator, be able to simultaneously map and fly a mission to a specific location within a changing environment, regardless of visibility, to gather data and images or perhaps to deliver life-saving medical supplies.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.news-journalonline.com

Zenith STOL CH 701, N999WX: Accident occurred June 18, 2017 near Fremont County Airport (1V6), Canon City, Fremont County, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Canon City, CO
Accident Number: CEN17LA236
Date & Time: 06/18/2017, 0715 MDT
Registration: N999WX
Aircraft:  WELLS JOHN L JR STOL CH 701
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test

On June 18, 2017, about 715 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Wells STOL CH701 airplane, N999WX, sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and firewall during a forced landing to a field near Canon City, Colorado, after the airplane's engine lost power during initial climb after takeoff from the Fremont County Airport (1V6), Canon City, Colorado. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating from 1V6 when the accident occurred.

The pilot reported that the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power during initial climb about 6,500 feet msl. As he attempted to return to 1V6, the engine suddenly lost complete power. A forced landing was completed to rough terrain. The airplane incurred damage to the right wing and fuselage during the landing attempt. The pilot reported that after the accident he found that the fuel hose from the left fuel tank had deteriorated from the inside causing an obstruction to the normal flow of fuel.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 74, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: 
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: WELLS JOHN L JR
Registration: N999WX
Model/Series: STOL CH 701 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 7-6078
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/21/2016, Conditional
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: 
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FCS, 5874 ft msl
Observation Time: 1258 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 225°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 7°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 160°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Canon City, CO (1V6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Canon City, CO (1V6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0715 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: FREMONT COUNTY (1V6)
Runway Surface Type:  
Airport Elevation: 5442 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Rough; Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 38.428611, -105.106944

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N999WX


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 18, 2017 in Canon City, CO
Aircraft: WELLS JOHN L JR STOL CH 701, registration: N999WX
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 18, 2017, about 715 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Wells STOL CH701, N999WX, sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and firewall during a forced landing to a field near Canon City, Colorado, after the airplane's engine lost power during initial climb after takeoff from the Fremont County Airport (1V6), Canon City, Colorado. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating from 1V6 when the accident occurred.





FREMONT COUNTY, Colo. (KKTV) - The pilot of a homemade aircraft was injured after crashing in a field near Highway 50 and Highway 67, east of Canon City, on Sunday morning.

The plane crashed around 8 a.m., and the pilot waved down officers in the area for help, police said.

The pilot's injuries were reported minor but unknown, police said.

The Fremont County Sheriff's Office is contacting the property owner where the crash occurred so that they can access the property and recover the plane.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.kktv.com

Summer in the Hamptons: Oysters, Rosé, and Helicopter Noise? While the U.S. Supreme Court considers reviewing a case involving East Hampton Airport, town officials deal with a slew of complaints





The Wall Street Journal
By Joseph De Avila
Updated June 18, 2017 10:33 a.m. ET

Summer isn’t even officially here, but noise complaints at an airport in the Hamptons have started pouring in—1,000 on Memorial Day weekend alone.

It is a long-running problem for this tony Long Island spot about a four-hour drive east of New York City where the population quadruples during the steamy summer and commuters increasingly use helicopters to avoid the congested Long Island Expressway and Sunrise Highway.

With all those trips—at costs starting at $500 a seat on a shared helicopter from New York City—comes noise, which irks many of the area’s 21,500 year-round residents. More than 26,000 aircraft-related noise complaints were registered in 2016, up from about 24,000 the previous year, according to the town of East Hampton. Most come during the summer.

Kathleen Cunningham, who has lived in East Hampton for 40 years about 3 miles from East Hampton Airport, said she can feel the aircraft coming.




 

“The physical pulsing you can actually feel it in your chest when it’s low enough,” said Ms. Cunningham, who is chair of a group called the Quiet Skies Coalition. “It vibrates the house. It vibrates the glassware.”

According to the town, there are about 25,000 takeoffs and landings a year and more than 8,000 helicopter landings and departures at East Hampton Airport. Commercial airlines can’t use the airport, which opened in the 1930s and sits about 5 miles west from town hall, but private jets can.

Larry Cantwell, the East Hampton town supervisor, said he and the town board want to keep the airport open, but are sensitive to residents’ concerns. The roughly $5 million in annual revenue generated by the airport goes toward its budget, which generally is about the same, he noted.

“I love the airport. I hate the noise,” Mr. Cantwell said. “We believe, with some local restrictions, we can help control the problem. And right now our hands are tied.”

Other East End communities grapple with air-traffic noise—Southampton has a heliport, Westhampton Beach has a county-run airport and Montauk is home to a privately-owned airport.

The town is limited in what it can do because of a legal fight that sits at the U.S. Supreme Court. The case landed there after air-charter operators sued the town, which owns the airport, in federal court in 2015 for setting morning and evening curfews on flights and limiting the number of trips certain aircraft can make. The limitations were enacted to address the noise complaints.




The lower court sided in part with the town in 2015. The Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the companies. The Supreme Court is considering reviewing the case.

The legal debate rests on whether a federal-aviation law enacted by Congress in 1990 pre-empts East Hampton’s ability to pass its own restrictions on air travel. The aviation companies contend this law pre-empts the town’s control. The town disagrees.

“Congress perceived that a ‘patchwork quilt’ of local noise restrictions continued to stymie the airport development required for the nation’s aviation” when it passed a federal law regulating air traffic, the appeals court wrote in its November ruling.

Attorneys for the aviation companies that sued the town declined to comment. In court papers to the Supreme Court, the attorneys said the quarrel is “properly addressed to Congress, not the Court.”

The Supreme Court, which will recess at the end of June, could announce whether it will hear the town’s appeal later this month, Mr. Cantwell said.

The noise complaints started mounting a few years ago after ride-share apps made it easier to catch a helicopter ride, primarily from New York City, for a Hampton jaunt. Helicopter landings and departures increased to nearly 8,400 in 2014, up 47% from the previous year, according to court papers filed by the town.

John Kelly, director of operations for Shoreline Aviation, a firm that offers chartered seaplane service, said his company has flown into East Hampton for nearly four decades.

“We’ve done everything we can to mitigate our noise,” Mr. Kelly said. “We fly at the highest altitude available depending on weather and safety.”

Some locals say there is only one solution.

“Close the airport,” said Patricia Currie of the group Say No to KHTO, which is the airport code for the East Hampton Airport.

“Thousands and thousands of people are impacted by this so that a handful can travel for convenience and to save themselves a couple of hours journey on the highway,” said Ms. Currie, who lives in Noyack, N.Y., about 7 miles from the airport.

Ms. Cunningham, whose glassware chatters when aircraft land, said the town should be able to set its own flying curfews because it owns the airport.

“Every taxpayer in the town of East Hampton owns that airport,” Ms. Cunningham said. “They should have a right to govern it as benefits the entire community, not just the flying public.”

If the Supreme Court declines to hear the case, Mr. Cantwell said the town will ask the Federal Aviation Administration for permission to set restrictions. He concedes that both are long shots.

So, for now, East Hampton will have to tolerate the noise—and the complaints.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Aeronca 65-CA Champ, N33778: Fatal accident occurred June 17, 2017 at Knox County Airport (4I3), Mount Vernon, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA234 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 17, 2017 in Mount Vernon, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 65 CA, registration: N33778
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot prepared to hand-prop the airplane, which was not equipped with an electrical starter, by tying the tail down with a nylon rope. The pilot then hand-propped the engine, which started at a high power setting. The airplane moved forward, breaking the rope, and continued to taxi in circles. The pilot and another individual tried to stop the airplane; however, the propeller struck the pilot, resulting in fatal injuries. The airplane eventually came to stop farther down the runway. Although the pilot attempted to secure the airplane by tying down the tail, the throttle was set at a high engine power setting, allowing the airplane's movement.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper starting procedure before hand propping the engine, and his subsequent attempt to stop the moving airplane, which resulted in him being struck by the propeller.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Larry L. Hoover: http://registry.faa.gov/N33778 

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 17, 2017 in Mount Vernon, OH
Aircraft: AERONCA 65 CA, registration: N33778
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 65-CA airplane, N33778, experienced a propeller blade strike during an attempted hand prop of the engine at the Wynkoop Airport (6G4), Mount Vernon, Ohio. The pilot, and intended sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane sustained minor damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the planned flight.

Information collected by the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and an Ohio State Patrol officer, indicate the pilot attempted to start the engine by hand-propping the airplane. 

According to a person located at 6G4, the pilot had flown in arrived at 6G4 earlier and was to depart. The person added that the pilot tied the tail of the airplane off with a nylon rope that he had brought with him. The airplane wheels were not chocked and the pilot was having difficulties starting the engine. The witness was in the hangar when he heard the airplane start at a high rpm, so he quickly stepped outside. The witness reported the airplane had broken the rope and was taxiing around in circles while the pilot attempted to stop the airplane. The witness joined the pilot in trying to stop the airplane; however, the propeller struck the pilot, knocking him down. 

The airplane eventually came to stop further down the runway. 

The vintage airplane was not equipped with an electrical system or an electric starter.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 17, 2017 in Mount Vernon, OH
Aircraft: AERONCA 65 CA, registration: N33778
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 65-CA airplane, N33778, experienced a propeller blade strike during an attempted hand prop of the engine at the Wynkoop Airport, (6G4), Mount Vernon, Ohio. The commercial-rated pilot, and intended sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane sustained minor damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. 

Initial information collected by the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, indicate the pilot attempted to start the engine by hand-propping the airplane. The engine started, and the propeller struck the pilot.



Larry Hoover 1938 - 2017

~

MILLERSPORT: Larry L. Hoover, 79, of Millersport passed away June 17,2017 at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center with his family at his side. He was born January 14, 1938 at Dunkirk, Ohio in the home of his parents Leland and Lillian Miller Hoover.

Larry was a graduate of OSU College of Agriculture and a member of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. 

It was while he was a student at OSU that his love of flying became a reality when he earned his private pilot license as a student at Don Scott Field.

He was a lifelong farmer and agribusinessman. He was the founder of Millersport Agri Service, Inc., Millersport Fertilizer Service, Inc., and Hoover Farms Partnership. He was a member of Millersport Community Theatre, Farm Bureau Council 18, and attended Millersport United Methodist Church.

Larry is survived by a loving family which includes his mother, Lillian Hoover of Bellefontaine, his wife of 57 years Julia E., daughters: Rebecca Hoover, Millersport, Melissa (Michael) Hoover Connor, Pleasantville, and son Michael (Elizabeth) Hoover, Millersport. In addition, he leaves nine incredible grandchildren to cherish his memory: Alex, Eric, Luke, Claire, Grace, Isabelle, Ian, Evan and Robert, step-grandsons Derek (Erin) Connor and Tyler Connor. He is also survived by sister-in-law Martha Hoover of Indianapolis and nieces and nephew Susan Hoover, Kathleen Hoover, Brian (Tanya) Hoover and Jennifer (Jim) Denice.

Larry was preceded in death by his father, his brother, James R. Hoover, sister-in-law and brother-in-law Carolyn and Stanley Morrison, and step-grandson Trevor Connor.

The family will receive friends to celebrate Larry's life at Johnson-Smith Funeral Home, 207 South Main St., Baltimore on Thursday, June 22nd from 2-4 and 6-8 P.M. Service will be held at the funeral home on Friday, June 23rd at 10:00 A.M., officiated by Pastor Clarence Hensel. Following burial at Millersport Cemetery, the family requests that friends join them at Millersport United Methodist Church for a time of sharing memories of their friendship with Larry over the years.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Larry L. Hoover Memorial Scholarship Fund, c/o PNC, P.O. Box 245, Thornville, OH 43076, to help further the education of young people in Larry's memory.


KNOX CO., OHIO — A Millersport man is dead after being struck by the propeller blades of his single-engine airplane.

According to the Mount Gilead Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol, Larry Hoover, 79, was  hand-propping his 1941 Aeronca 65-CA fixed-wing plane Saturday afternoon when he was struck by the propeller blades.

Hoover was transported to the OSU Wexner Medical center by MedFlight, where he was pronounced dead at 5:50pm.

The accident remains under investigation by the Mount Gilead post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Troopers were assisted by the Mount Vernon Fire Department and the Knox County Sheriff’s Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and responded to the scene.

Officials say alcohol or drugs do not appear to be a factor in the accident.

Original article can be found here:  http://nbc4i.com


KNOX COUNTY, Ohio - A 79-year-old man was killed by the propeller blades of his plane Saturday afternoon.

It happened around 1:30 p.m. at Knox County's Wynkoop Airport near Mount Vernon.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol says Larry Hoover of Millersport was starting his 1941 Aeronca 65-CA fixed wing single engine plane when he was struck by the blade.

A MedFlight helicopter took Hoover to Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, where he died from his injuries.

Highway Patrol troopers are investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.10tv.com

Zodiac CH601XL, N650WP: Accident occurred July 17, 2016 at Green Landings Airport (WV22), Hedgesville, Berkeley County, West Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA259
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Hedgesville, WV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/07/2017
Aircraft: HIRN ASSOCIATES LTD ZODIAC CH601XL, registration: N650WP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the experimental, amateur-built airplane reported that, during the takeoff roll while about 35 knots, he realized that he forgot to turn on the airplane's anticollision lights. He reached over to turn them on, and his forearm brushed across the top of the control stick and activated the electric trim to a full, nose-up position. The airplane suddenly climbed in a steep, nose-high attitude to about 60 ft before it started to roll left toward trees. As the airplane rolled left, the pilot attempted to compensate with right rudder and aileron input, but it had little effect on directional control, so he chose to turn back to the left and try to climb over the trees. The airplane impacted the top of the tree canopy then descended through the trees and impacted the ground. The wings and fuselage were substantially damaged.

The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s inadvertent activation of the elevator trim, which resulted in a premature takeoff and subsequent loss of airplane control and collision with trees.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N650WP

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA259
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Hedgesville, WV
Aircraft: HIRN ASSOCIATES LTD ZODIAC CH601XL, registration: N650WP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the experimental amateur-built airplane reported that during the takeoff roll at approximately 35 knots, he realized that he forgot to turn on the airplane's anti-collision lights. He reached over to turn them on and his forearm brushed across the top of the control stick and activated the electric trim to a full nose up position. The airplane suddenly climbed off the runway in a steep nose high attitude to an altitude of about 60 ft before it started a roll to the left towards trees. As the airplane rolled left, the pilot attempted to compensate with right rudder and aileron input, but it had little effect on directional control, so he elected to turn back to the left and try to climb over the trees. The airplane impacted the top of the tree canopy then descended through the trees and impacted the ground. The wings and fuselage were substantially damaged. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.<

Cessna 207 Stationair 7, N91170, registered to DIO Air LLC, and operated by Renfro's Alaskan Adventures Inc: Accident occurred June 17, 2016 near Goodnews Airport (GNU), Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA032 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Goodnews Bay, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N91170
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During cruise flight through an area of mountainous terrain, the commercial pilot became geographically disoriented and selected the incorrect route through the mountains. Upon realizing it was the incorrect route, he initiated a steep climb while executing a 180° turn. During the steep climbing turn, the airplane inadvertently entered instrument meteorological conditions, and the airplane subsequently impacted an area of rocky, rising terrain. The pilot reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to select the correct route through the mountains as a result of geographic disorientation, and his subsequent visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in collision with terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered to DIO Air, LLC
Operated by Renfro's Alaskan Adventures, Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N91170

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA032

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Goodnews Bay, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N91170
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, about 1200 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N91170, sustained substantial damage after impacting steep, rising terrain about 8 miles northwest of the Goodnews Airport, Goodnews Bay, Alaska. The airplane was registered to DIO Air, LLC, and operated by Renfro's Alaskan Adventures, Inc., Bethel, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) repositioning flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the accident location, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed about 1020 from the Quinhagak Airport (AQH), Quinhagak, Alaska, destined for Goodnews Airport (GNU).

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on June 19, in Anchorage, Alaska, the pilot stated that after departing AQH, and as the flight progressed into an area of mountainous terrain, low clouds inhibited his ability to distinguish the correct route through the mountains from the incorrect route. When he discovered he had chosen the incorrect route, he was in an area that was too narrow and steep to safely turn around. In an effort to reduce his turning radius and avoid the rising terrain ahead, he initiated a steep climb while turning the airplane 180 degrees. During the steep climbing turn, the airplane entered IMC, and the airplane subsequently impacted an area of rock-covered rising terrain. He estimated the cloud ceilings to be about 800 feet mean sea level (msl) and his cruise altitude was about 700 feet msl before initiating the climbing turn.

The closest weather reporting facility is Platinum Airport, about 14 southwest of the accident site. At 1156, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Platinum Airport was reporting in part: wind from 210 degrees at 12 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 48 degrees F, dewpoint 45 degrees F; altimeter 29.85 inHg.

The pilot reported no mechanical malfunctions of anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.



NTSB Identification: ANC16LA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Goodnews Bay, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N91170
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, about 1200 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N91170, sustained substantial damage after impacting steep, rising terrain about 8 miles northwest of the Goodnews Airport, Goodnews Bay, Alaska. The airplane was registered DIO Air, LLC, and operated by Renfrow's Alaskan Adventures, Inc., Bethel, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) repositioning flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed about 1020 from the Quinhagak Airport (AQH), Quinhagak, Alaska, destined for Goodnews Airport (GNU). 

During a hospital room interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on June 19, in Anchorage, Alaska, the pilot stated that after departing AQH, and as the flight progressed into an area of mountainous terrain, low clouds inhibited his ability to distinguish the correct route through the mountains from the incorrect route. When he discovered he had chosen the incorrect route, he was in an area that was too narrow and steep to safely turn around. In an effort to reduce his turning radius and avoid the rising terrain ahead, he initiated a steep climb while turning the airplane 180 degrees. During the steep climbing turn, the airplane entered IMC, and the airplane subsequently impacted an area of rock-covered rising terrain. He estimated the cloud ceilings to be about 800 feet mean sea level (msl) and his cruise altitude was about 700 feet msl before initiating the climbing turn.

The closest weather reporting facility is Platinum Airport, about 14 southwest of the accident site. At 1156, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Platinum Airport was reporting in part: wind from 210 degrees at 12 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 48 degrees F, dewpoint 45 degrees F; altimeter 29.85 inHg.

At Paris Air Show, Plane Makers Tout Busy Production Schedules as New Orders Slow: Boeing, Airbus say a years-long backlog of orders ensures continued cash flow




The Wall Street Journal
By Robert Wall and  Doug Cameron

Updated June 18, 2017 11:06 a.m. ET

PARIS—It’s show time for the world’s top plane makers.

For much of the year, Boeing Co. and Airbus SE, the world’s top two jetliner makers, have warned investors that orders for new planes would decline this year. But they have said that airline customers generally still want plenty of new aircraft and there is no danger production plans—key to earnings—are in jeopardy. Order books stretch out for years, ensuring plenty of cash flow, even if buyers slow the recent blistering pace of new purchases.

They have a chance to prove that this week, as top aerospace executives, suppliers and airline buyers converge here for the Paris Air Show, which kicks off Monday. Over croissants and foie gras at Le Bourget Airport north of the French capital, Boeing, Airbus and smaller rivals will jostle for sales in what is typically the best opportunity of the year to announce new orders.

For industry watchers, the event will go some way in determining whether the recent orders slowdown is simply a cooling-off period amid years of supercharged growth, or something more worrisome. Few, however, are expecting a sudden turnaround.

“We expect a quiet show on the order front,” said Ken Herbert, an analyst at Canaccord Genuity. In particular, Middle East airline buyers and plane lessors that drove deals at recent shows have largely filled their appetite, Mr. Herbert said.

In the first five months of the year, Airbus has secured 73 net orders, compared with 162 deals signed for the comparable period a year earlier. Airbus says it expects plane deliveries to outpace new order bookings this year—the first time that has happened since 2009.

Boeing has done better. The Chicago-based plane maker has secured 176 net commercial jetliner orders as of June 13, 10 more than the same period last year.

Airbus and Boeing are expected to announce deals for as many as 680 jets in Paris, estimates consultant Deloitte. That is down 10% from the 2015 Paris Air Show. Paris alternates with Farnborough, England, as the host of the annual aviation event.

Amid the big, existing order books, shareholders have become somewhat less sensitive to deal announcements, focusing instead on deliveries. Those dictate when plane makers are paid.

Both plane makers have backlogs stretching past 2020 for their most popular models, underpinning big expected increases in output in the coming years. Boeing had a backlog of 5,646 planes at the end of May. Airbus’s stood at 6,705 planes.

“We could have no sales for a number of years and we would still have to increase production to chew down that backlog,” Airbus chief plane salesman John Leahy said. Especially popular are the two manufacturers’ single-aisle planes, models for which demand so far has remained buoyant.

That has created its own problems, as both Boeing and Airbus have struggled over the past few years with stretched supply lines. Seats, toilets and engines have all been in short supply for both companies at different times amid their recent production increase.

“Orders don’t matter, it’s deliveries that count,” said Aengus Kelly, chief executive of leasing company AerCap Holdings NV, one of the largest buyers of Airbus and Boeing planes.

Still, any sense at the end of the week that orders are dropping off faster than the industry has expected could spook investors. Especially vulnerable is demand for some of the biggest planes, such as Boeing’s 777 long-range jet and Airbus’s A350. Airlines such as American Airlines Group Inc. and Delta Air Lines Inc. are among the carriers in recent weeks to announce deferrals of some big plane orders.

Airlines in the Middle East, large buyers of big planes, are grappling with multiple headwinds. Low oil prices have depressed lucrative business travel, and a U.S. ban on the use of laptops and tablets on inbound flights from some Middle East airports has dented bookings for Persian Gulf carriers.

Emirates Airline, the world’s largest by international traffic, has signaled a wait-and-see approach on new long-haul plane purchases for now. Qatar Airways is facing even more pressure, after Persian Gulf neighbors essentially slapped Qatar with an air blockade over long-simmering political squabbles.

Airbus has booked 30 net deals for its A330 and A350 widebody jetliners this year, 46% fewer than at the end of May in 2016. Boeing has sold only 32 of its 777s and 787 Dreamliners through June 13.

“We are seeing a slight pause in widebody orders,” said Robin Lineberger, head of Deloitte’s aerospace and defense practice.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Cirrus SR22, A J Air Inc., N508AJ: Fatal accident occurred June 10, 2016 at Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA) Marion, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Missouri
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors, Inc; Mobile, Alabama 


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA214
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Marion, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/26/2017
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N508AJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After performing six touch-and-go maneuvers without incident, the pilot receiving instruction and flight instructor contacted air traffic control and requested a climb to 3,000 ft to perform a simulated engine failure and landing maneuver. The air traffic controller cleared the pilots for the maneuver and requested that they report the base-to-final turn to the runway, and the pilot acknowledged the instructions. The controller reported that, about 4 minutes later, he observed the airplane in a descending left turn. As the airplane approached the runway, he observed the right wing lift, and the airplane appeared to stall and roll to the right before it impacted terrain. Another witness reported that she could see the entire top of the airplane with the wings pointed up and down, and that she saw one wing strike the terrain shortly thereafter. The flight instructor had no recollection of the accident.

Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. A review of the flight and engine data from the accident flight revealed that the airplane climbed to about 3,000 ft, and then circled while remaining in the airport traffic pattern area. The airplane then descended, and the airspeed gradually decreased from about 110 to about 87 kts. During the final 3 seconds of the recording, vertical, lateral, and longitudinal accelerations increased to recorded peaks of 1.4 g, -0.2 g, and 0.4 g, respectively. During the final second of the recording, the airplane was at 646 ft when it entered a descending left turn; the roll value increased from 36 degrees to 45 degrees left, and the pitch value ranged from -0.5 degrees to 2.4 degrees.

The witness statements and flight data are consistent with a the pilots failing to maintain adequate airspeed and exceeding the wing's critical angle of attack, which resulted in a subsequent aerodynamic stall and loss of control. The airplane's parachute system was found deployed, which likely occurred during the impact sequence. Given the low altitude at which the aerodynamic stall occurred (about 646 ft), it is unlikely that preimpact deployment of the system would have positively affected the outcome of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilots' failure to maintain adequate airspeed while executing a simulated engine failure and landing maneuver, which resulted in the wing's critical angle of attack being exceeded and a subsequent aerodynamic stall and loss of control.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 10, 2016, about 1634 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 airplane, N508AJ, impacted terrain following a loss of control during a simulated engine failure and landing maneuver at the Williamson County Regional Airport (MWA), Marion, Illinois. The private pilot, who was receiving instruction, sustained fatal injuries, the flight instructor sustained serious injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and being operated by AJ Air, Inc, Carbondale, Illinois, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed MWA at 1627.

According to a tower controller and air traffic control transcripts provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot and flight instructor were performing touch and go maneuvers, then requested a climb to 3,000 feet to perform a simulated engine failure descent to land maneuver. The controller cleared the pilots for the maneuver and requested that they report the base to final turn to runway 20, and the pilot acknowledged the instructions. The controller reported that about 4 minutes later, he observed the airplane in a descending left turn. He added that as the airplane approached the runway, he observed "the right wing to go up as if the [right] aileron and [left] rudder were selected" and that the airplane then appeared to stall, and roll to the right. The airplane impacted terrain short of the runway threshold and west of the runway approach lights.

A witness reported to local authorities that she was driving in her vehicle adjacent to the airport when she observed an airplane low in the sky. She stated that the airplane was at an odd angle because she could see the entire top side of the airplane with the wings pointed up and down. She observed one wing strike the ground followed by the entire airplane.

The flight instructor reported to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge that he had no recollection of the accident.



PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Pilot/Owner

The pilot/owner held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA medical certificate was issued August 3, 2015, as a special issuance third-class medical certificate with the following limitations: Must wear corrective lenses. Not valid for any class after 08/31/2016. The pilot reported using the medications amlodipine and metoprolol on his medical application.

According to the pilot's logbook at the time of the accident, he had accumulated about 626 total flight hours, about 540 hours of which were in the accident airplane. The pilot's most recent flight review was satisfactorily completed on June 23, 2015, with the flight instructor who was involved in the accident. The last flight recorded in the pilot's logbook was dated November 15, 2015.

On his most recent airman medical application, the pilot reported a total of 750 flight hours, and 25 hours in the previous 6 months.

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate and a ground instructor certificate. The flight instructor's most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on October 27, 2015, with the limitation: Must have available glasses for near vision.

The flight instructor reported to the NTSB that, at the time of the accident, he had accumulated 3,477 total flight hours, 2,406 total flight instructor hours, and 255 hours in Cirrus airplanes.

The flight instructor reported that he and pilot had accumulated 16 total flight hours together, from September 2012 to the date of the accident. Most of the flight hours were accumulated during flight reviews and recurrent instrument flight training.

The flight instructor met the course requirements and was recognized as a Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilot (CSIP) on June 30, 2011. The flight instructor reported that his CSIP status was terminated in March 2013 because he did not renew it due to the total cost of the program.

 AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cirrus SR22 is a single-engine, low-wing airplane with four seats, fixed tricycle landing gear, and dual-side yoke controls. The accident airplane, serial number 1160, was manufactured in 2004. It was equipped with a 310-horsepower Teledyne Continental Motors IO-550-N six-cylinder, air-cooled, fuel-injected, horizontally opposed reciprocating engine. The three-blade, constant speed propeller was a Hartzell Model PHC-J3YF-1RF. The accident airplane was equipped with a Cirrus Airplane Parachute System designed to recover the airplane from catastrophic emergencies in which normal emergency procedures are ineffective. The airplane was also equipped with an electro-pneumatic stall warning system that provided audible warning of an approach to an aerodynamic stall.

The airplane was registered to the pilot/owner on November 30, 2004. A review of the airplane records showed that the most recent annual inspection had been completed on December 10, 2015, at a total time of 712.6 hours. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that all applicable service bulletins and airworthiness directives had been accomplished.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1657, the MWA automated weather observing system, reported the wind from 170 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 20 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 32 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed an initial impact point that contained fractured portions of the green navigation light lens, consistent with the right wing. The debris field was about 242 feet long and on a magnetic heading of about 250 degrees from the initial impact to the main wreckage. The debris field contained fragmented sections of the right wing, propeller assembly, and forward fuselage structure. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, and a portion of the right wing, and came to rest upright about 555 ft from the edge of the runway. The airframe parachute was found deployed and lying next to the main wreckage. The parachute deployment was consistent with impact damage activation.

The right wing flap and right aileron remained partially attached, the right main landing gear was separated, and the fuel cap was secure.

The left wing main spar was fractured near the mid-span of the wing. The left flap and left aileron remained partially attached, the left main landing gear remained attached, and the left wing tip was separated.

The empennage remained intact and was separated from the aft fuselage. The elevators and rudder remained attached to their respective fittings.

The engine was separated at the firewall and remained partially attached to the mount. The engine came to rest inverted adjacent to the fuselage. The propeller assembly was separated from the engine at the engine crankshaft propeller flange. Mechanical continuity was established throughout the engine, and thumb compression was noted on each cylinder.

The cockpit and cabin area was fragmented. The fuel selector was found positioned to the right fuel tank position. The Hobbs meter indicated 718.3 hours. The power and mixture control levers were in the full forward position.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to all flight control surfaces. The flaps were found in the retracted position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Williamson County Coroner's Office, Marion, Illinois, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report stated that the cause of death was "multiple blunt impact trauma."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. An unspecified amount of Amlodipine was detected in the blood and urine, and an unspecified amount of metoprolol was detected in the urine. Amlodipine and metoprolol are prescription medication used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure and are not impairing.

TEST AND RESEARCH

On July 19, 2016, the engine was examined at AMF Aviation, Springfield, Tennessee. The examination revealed no anomalies that would have resulted in the engine not producing full power when needed.

Primary Flight Display (PFD) and Multifunction Display (MFD) Information

The airplane's PFD unit and MFD memory card were forwarded them to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory in Washington, D.C., for evaluation.

The Avidyne PFD unit includes a solid-state Air Data and Attitude Heading Reference System (ADAHRS), and displays aircraft parameter data including altitude, airspeed, attitude, vertical speed, and heading. The PFD unit has external pitot/static inputs for altitude, airspeed, and vertical speed information. The PFD contains two flash memory devices mounted on a riser card. The flash memory stores information the PFD unit uses to generate the various PFD displays. Additionally, the PFD has a data logging function, which is used by the manufacturer for maintenance and diagnostics. Maintenance and diagnostic information recording consists of system information, event data, and flight data.

The PFD samples and stores several data streams in a sequential fashion; when the recording limit of the PFD is reached, the oldest record is dropped and a new record is added. Data from the Attitude/Heading Reference System (AHRS) is recorded at a rate of 5 Hz. Air data information such as pressure altitude, indicated airspeed, and vertical speed are recorded at 1 Hz. Global Positioning System (GPS) and navigation display and setting data are recorded at a rate of 0.25 Hz, and information about pilot settings of heading, altitude, and vertical speed references are recorded when changes are made.

An examination of the PFD revealed that while it had been damaged by impact forces, the specialist was successful in extracting the data using NTSB surrogate hardware. The download revealed that the PFD contained about 25 hours of flight data, including the accident flight.

The MFD unit is able to display the pilot checklist, terrain/map information, approach chart information, and other aircraft/operational information depending on the specific configuration and options that are installed. One of the options available is a display of comprehensive engine monitoring and performance data.

Each MFD contains a compact flash (CF) memory card located in a slot on the side of the unit. This memory card contains all of the software that the MFD needs to operate. Additionally, this card contains all of the checklist, approach charts, and map information that the unit uses to generate the various cockpit displays.

The MFD generates new data files for each MFD power-on cycle. The oldest file is dropped and replaced by a new recording once the storage limit has been reached. MFD data are sampled every six seconds, and are recorded to memory once every minute. If an interruption of power occurs during the minute between MFD memory write cycles, data sampled during that portion of a minute are not recorded.

The accident MFD CF data card was in good condition and the data were downloaded using the manufacturer's procedure and NTSB surrogate hardware. The card contained 220 data files corresponding to 110 flights. One data file was identified as recording during the accident flight. The data file was approximately 35 minutes in duration.

A review of the basic flight data and engine data from the accident flight revealed that prior to the accident, the airplane performed a total of six touch and go maneuvers using a left turning traffic pattern. For all but the last maneuver, the aircraft climbed to about 1,500 ft before descending back to the airport. Aircraft roll during the left turns typically reached between 30-40 degrees.

After the final touch and go maneuver, the airplane climbed to about 3,000 ft, and circled while remaining in the airport traffic pattern area. The airplane then descended, and the airspeed gradually decreased from about 110 kts to about 87 kts. In the final three seconds, vertical, lateral, and longitudinal accelerations all increased to recorded peaks of 1.4 g, -0.2 g, and 0.4 g, respectively. During the last second of the recording, the airplane was at 646 ft when it entered a tight descending left turn of nearly 360 degrees. During this time, the roll values increased from 36 degrees to 45 degrees left, and the pitch values ranged from -0.5 degrees to 2.4 degrees.

Engine parameters varied during the recording from values similar to those typically seen at takeoff to reduced power settings similar to those seen at engine idle during descent.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilot (CSIP) Qualifications

According to the Cirrus CSIP qualifications, the following criteria are used to establish initial and renewal of CSIP status.

Initial CSIP Qualifications:

- Current CFII (Instrument Flight Instructor)

- 500 total flight hours

- 250 total hours of instruction given

- Professional and moral character

Initial CSIP Training

According to Cirrus, CSIP training is a comprehensive course and requires dedicated pre-training to be prepared for the intensive flight training segment. Flight training occurs only with a Cirrus headquarters professional flight instructor with emphasis on developing abilities to fly and teach in a standardized fashion using Cirrus' proven syllabi. Closely mirroring the style of the customer Transition Training program, CSIP training goes one big step further as you will be required to demonstrate an instructor level of knowledge. By the end of the course, you will be expected to teach the last few lessons.

For most flight instructors, CSIP training is scheduled to occur over the course of 3 days with a mix of ground and flight lessons. The price is approximately $2,700 which includes 3 days of flight instruction, 1 hour in our flight training device (FTD), and a training kit. Aircraft rental/use, fuel, travel, and accommodations are not included in the estimate. Since the course is completely proficiency based, the course may be longer or shorter depending on experience and aptitude. Cirrus requires that all CSIP applicants have sufficient knowledge of systems and operations before on-site training can take place. Failure to properly prepare for CSIP training will increase overall training time and expense.

CSIP Renewal

To retain status as an active and current CSIP, you must renew your status annually. To renew status, each CSIP must earn at least 10 credits during the past year of activity. Credits can be earned for overall experience, qualifications and ratings, flight activity, event attendance, and membership in professional organizations.

In addition to the credits required, there is a variable fee associated with the renewal, but commonly about $100.00.

FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-67C - Stall and Spin Awareness Training

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-67C Stall and Spin Awareness Training:

"Power-off stalls (also known as approach-to-landing stalls) are practiced to simulate normal approach-to-landing conditions and configuration. Many stall/spin accidents have occurred in these power-off situations, such as crossed control turns from base leg to final approach (resulting in a skidding or slipping turn); attempting to recover from a high sink rate on final approach by using only an increased pitch attitude; and improper airspeed control on final approach or in other segments of the traffic pattern."

"Accelerated stalls can occur at higher-than-normal airspeeds due to abrupt and/or excessive control applications. These stalls may occur in steep turns, pullups, or other abrupt changes in flightpath. Accelerated stalls usually are more severe than unaccelerated stalls and are often unexpected because they occur at higher-than-normal airspeeds."


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA214
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Marion, IL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N508AJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, at 1634 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 single-engine airplane, N508AJ, impacted terrain following a loss of control during a simulated engine failure maneuver at the Williamson County Regional Airport (MWA), Marion, Illinois. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, the flight instructor sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by AJ Air, Inc, Carbondale, Illinois, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed MWA at 1605.

According to the air traffic control tower personnel, the airplane was performing touch and go maneuvers, then requested a climb to 3,000 feet to perform a simulated engine failure descent to land maneuver. The air traffic controller observed the airplane in a left turn descent. As the airplane approached the runway, the controller observed the right wing lift, the airplane stall and impact terrain.

Examination of the accident site revealed an initial impact point which contained fractured portions of the green navigation lens, consistent with the right wing. The debris field measured approximately 242 feet in length from the initial impact to main wreckage. The debris field contained fragmented sections of the right wing, propeller assembly, and forward fuselage structure. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, and a portion of the right wing. The airframe parachute was found deployed and lying next to the main wreckage. The deployment was consistent with impact activation.

At 1657, the MWA automated weather observing system, reported the wind from 170 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 20 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 32 degrees Celsius, dew point 19 degrees Celsius, an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.

Todd Greiner,  Flight instructor 

If you would like to contact Todd Greiner to hear him share his story, you can contact him at Todd@toddgreiner.com.






 

CARTERVILLE -- A Williamson County plane crash survivor recalls a terrifying day.

A flight instructor explains how he survived a deadly plane crash at the Williamson County Airport.

"The Lord has done absolute miracles. It was a miracle from the very beginning." says Todd Greiner.

One year ago Saturday, Greiner took off with student John Alleman on a fateful flight.

"People don't appreciate what the Lord has done unless they appreciate how bad things were," says Greiner. 

Pictures tell a story of tragedy and faith that Greiner sums up in one word: "miraculous." 

On June 10, 2016, around 4:30 p.m., fight instructor Todd Greiner took off for a training flight with long-time pilot and friend, John Alleman.

The two performed what he calls an "engine out" maneuver, when he says something went wrong.

"We were coming around what's called a left base to come in to land, and the plane did a couple of very erratic maneuvers I would never do, and John would never do so their had to be a reason," explains Greiner. 

Greiner has no independent memory of what happened that day. All of his accounts were told to him by others.

"There's speculation, but nobody really truly knows exactly what happened," says Greiner. 

The accident left him with severe traumatic brain injury. Alleman died from multiple impact trauma.

"We had a good friendship. He was a lawyer in Carbondale and very well liked by many people. Highly respected. A very kindhearted man." 

Greiner spent months in different hospitals over the past year.

"I had a broken palate, a broken jaw. My mandible was broken. I had both lungs were bleeding very bad, one of them had collapsed," explained Greiner.

 Just eight months after the crash, Greiner, took to the skies again. He admits to being scared at first.

"I didn't want to let fear win. I just couldn't do and actually, the moment I took off it was very exhilarating again and I felt like I had never missed a day flying." 

He says the FAA has since grounded him for a minimum of four years, due to his brain injury.

"I did come extremely close to losing it all. I mean, I was certainly ready for heaven, but I do greatly appreciate all that's been given to me and I'm so deeply thankful," says Greiner.

He hopes one day to return back to instructing from the sky, and on June 10 he'll be thinking of Alleman. He says the National Transportation Safety Board has not yet released a full report on the crash, but expects the full report soon. In the meantime, Greiner he says he is doing well and will face more minor medical procedures, but says that's nothing compared to what he went through.

He recently began telling his story to schools and churches and believes there's only one reason he survived.

"It's not a testimony about me. It's a testimony about Jesus Christ and His grace and power in what he did in my life," says Greiner.

If you would like to contact Greiner to hear him share his story, you can contact him at Todd@toddgreiner.com.


Story and video:  http://www.wsiltv.com



John Alleman
Pilot/owner 

Todd Greiner
Flight instructor


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Missouri
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors, Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



Aaron Sauer, Investigator In Charge
 National Transportation Safety Board


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA214
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Marion, IL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N508AJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 10, 2016, about 1634 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 airplane, N508AJ, impacted terrain following a loss of control during a simulated engine failure and landing maneuver at the Williamson County Regional Airport (MWA), Marion, Illinois. The private pilot, who was receiving instruction, sustained fatal injuries, the flight instructor sustained serious injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and being operated by AJ Air, Inc, Carbondale, Illinois, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed MWA at 1627.

According to a tower controller and air traffic control transcripts provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot and flight instructor were performing touch and go maneuvers, then requested a climb to 3,000 feet to perform a simulated engine failure descent to land maneuver. The controller cleared the pilots for the maneuver and requested that they report the base to final turn to runway 20, and the pilot acknowledged the instructions. The controller reported that about 4 minutes later, he observed the airplane in a descending left turn. He added that as the airplane approached the runway, he observed "the right wing to go up as if the [right] aileron and [left] rudder were selected" and that the airplane then appeared to stall, and roll to the right. The airplane impacted terrain short of the runway threshold and west of the runway approach lights.

A witness reported to local authorities that she was driving in her vehicle adjacent to the airport when she observed an airplane low in the sky. She stated that the airplane was at an odd angle because she could see the entire top side of the airplane with the wings pointed up and down. She observed one wing strike the ground followed by the entire airplane.

The flight instructor reported to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge that he had no recollection of the accident.






PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Pilot/Owner

The pilot/owner held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA medical certificate was issued August 3, 2015, as a special issuance third-class medical certificate with the following limitations: Must wear corrective lenses. Not valid for any class after 08/31/2016. The pilot reported using the medications amlodipine and metoprolol on his medical application.

According to the pilot's logbook at the time of the accident, he had accumulated about 626 total flight hours, about 540 hours of which were in the accident airplane. The pilot's most recent flight review was satisfactorily completed on June 23, 2015, with the flight instructor who was involved in the accident. The last flight recorded in the pilot's logbook was dated November 15, 2015.

On his most recent airman medical application, the pilot reported a total of 750 flight hours, and 25 hours in the previous 6 months.

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate and a ground instructor certificate. The flight instructor's most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on October 27, 2015, with the limitation: Must have available glasses for near vision.

The flight instructor reported to the NTSB that, at the time of the accident, he had accumulated 3,477 total flight hours, 2,406 total flight instructor hours, and 255 hours in Cirrus airplanes.

The flight instructor reported that he and pilot had accumulated 16 total flight hours together, from September 2012 to the date of the accident. Most of the flight hours were accumulated during flight reviews and recurrent instrument flight training.

The flight instructor met the course requirements and was recognized as a Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilot (CSIP) on June 30, 2011. The flight instructor reported that his CSIP status was terminated in March 2013 because he did not renew it due to the total cost of the program.





AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cirrus SR22 is a single-engine, low-wing airplane with four seats, fixed tricycle landing gear, and dual-side yoke controls. The accident airplane, serial number 1160, was manufactured in 2004. It was equipped with a 310-horsepower Teledyne Continental Motors IO-550-N six-cylinder, air-cooled, fuel-injected, horizontally opposed reciprocating engine. The three-blade, constant speed propeller was a Hartzell Model PHC-J3YF-1RF. The accident airplane was equipped with a Cirrus Airplane Parachute System designed to recover the airplane from catastrophic emergencies in which normal emergency procedures are ineffective. The airplane was also equipped with an electro-pneumatic stall warning system that provided audible warning of an approach to an aerodynamic stall.

The airplane was registered to the pilot/owner on November 30, 2004. A review of the airplane records showed that the most recent annual inspection had been completed on December 10, 2015, at a total time of 712.6 hours. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that all applicable service bulletins and airworthiness directives had been accomplished.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1657, the MWA automated weather observing system, reported the wind from 170 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 20 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 32 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed an initial impact point that contained fractured portions of the green navigation light lens, consistent with the right wing. The debris field was about 242 feet long and on a magnetic heading of about 250 degrees from the initial impact to the main wreckage. The debris field contained fragmented sections of the right wing, propeller assembly, and forward fuselage structure. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, and a portion of the right wing, and came to rest upright about 555 ft from the edge of the runway. The airframe parachute was found deployed and lying next to the main wreckage. The parachute deployment was consistent with impact damage activation.

The right wing flap and right aileron remained partially attached, the right main landing gear was separated, and the fuel cap was secure.

The left wing main spar was fractured near the mid-span of the wing. The left flap and left aileron remained partially attached, the left main landing gear remained attached, and the left wing tip was separated.

The empennage remained intact and was separated from the aft fuselage. The elevators and rudder remained attached to their respective fittings.

The engine was separated at the firewall and remained partially attached to the mount. The engine came to rest inverted adjacent to the fuselage. The propeller assembly was separated from the engine at the engine crankshaft propeller flange. Mechanical continuity was established throughout the engine, and thumb compression was noted on each cylinder.

The cockpit and cabin area was fragmented. The fuel selector was found positioned to the right fuel tank position. The Hobbs meter indicated 718.3 hours. The power and mixture control levers were in the full forward position.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to all flight control surfaces. The flaps were found in the retracted position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Williamson County Coroner's Office, Marion, Illinois, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report stated that the cause of death was "multiple blunt impact trauma."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. An unspecified amount of Amlodipine was detected in the blood and urine, and an unspecified amount of metoprolol was detected in the urine. Amlodipine and metoprolol are prescription medication used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure and are not impairing.

TEST AND RESEARCH

On July 19, 2016, the engine was examined at AMF Aviation, Springfield, Tennessee. The examination revealed no anomalies that would have resulted in the engine not producing full power when needed.

Primary Flight Display (PFD) and Multifunction Display (MFD) Information

The airplane's PFD unit and MFD memory card were forwarded them to the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory in Washington, D.C., for evaluation.

The Avidyne PFD unit includes a solid-state Air Data and Attitude Heading Reference System (ADAHRS), and displays aircraft parameter data including altitude, airspeed, attitude, vertical speed, and heading. The PFD unit has external pitot/static inputs for altitude, airspeed, and vertical speed information. The PFD contains two flash memory devices mounted on a riser card. The flash memory stores information the PFD unit uses to generate the various PFD displays. Additionally, the PFD has a data logging function, which is used by the manufacturer for maintenance and diagnostics. Maintenance and diagnostic information recording consists of system information, event data, and flight data.

The PFD samples and stores several data streams in a sequential fashion; when the recording limit of the PFD is reached, the oldest record is dropped and a new record is added. Data from the Attitude/Heading Reference System (AHRS) is recorded at a rate of 5 Hz. Air data information such as pressure altitude, indicated airspeed, and vertical speed are recorded at 1 Hz. Global Positioning System (GPS) and navigation display and setting data are recorded at a rate of 0.25 Hz, and information about pilot settings of heading, altitude, and vertical speed references are recorded when changes are made.

An examination of the PFD revealed that while it had been damaged by impact forces, the specialist was successful in extracting the data using NTSB surrogate hardware. The download revealed that the PFD contained about 25 hours of flight data, including the accident flight.

The MFD unit is able to display the pilot checklist, terrain/map information, approach chart information, and other aircraft/operational information depending on the specific configuration and options that are installed. One of the options available is a display of comprehensive engine monitoring and performance data.

Each MFD contains a compact flash (CF) memory card located in a slot on the side of the unit. This memory card contains all of the software that the MFD needs to operate. Additionally, this card contains all of the checklist, approach charts, and map information that the unit uses to generate the various cockpit displays.

The MFD generates new data files for each MFD power-on cycle. The oldest file is dropped and replaced by a new recording once the storage limit has been reached. MFD data are sampled every six seconds, and are recorded to memory once every minute. If an interruption of power occurs during the minute between MFD memory write cycles, data sampled during that portion of a minute are not recorded.

The accident MFD CF data card was in good condition and the data were downloaded using the manufacturer's procedure and NTSB surrogate hardware. The card contained 220 data files corresponding to 110 flights. One data file was identified as recording during the accident flight. The data file was approximately 35 minutes in duration.

A review of the basic flight data and engine data from the accident flight revealed that prior to the accident, the airplane performed a total of six touch and go maneuvers using a left turning traffic pattern. For all but the last maneuver, the aircraft climbed to about 1,500 ft before descending back to the airport. Aircraft roll during the left turns typically reached between 30-40 degrees.

After the final touch and go maneuver, the airplane climbed to about 3,000 ft, and circled while remaining in the airport traffic pattern area. The airplane then descended, and the airspeed gradually decreased from about 110 kts to about 87 kts. In the final three seconds, vertical, lateral, and longitudinal accelerations all increased to recorded peaks of 1.4 g, -0.2 g, and 0.4 g, respectively. During the last second of the recording, the airplane was at 646 ft when it entered a tight descending left turn of nearly 360 degrees. During this time, the roll values increased from 36 degrees to 45 degrees left, and the pitch values ranged from -0.5 degrees to 2.4 degrees.

Engine parameters varied during the recording from values similar to those typically seen at takeoff to reduced power settings similar to those seen at engine idle during descent.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilot (CSIP) Qualifications

According to the Cirrus CSIP qualifications, the following criteria are used to establish initial and renewal of CSIP status.

Initial CSIP Qualifications:

- Current CFII (Instrument Flight Instructor)

- 500 total flight hours

- 250 total hours of instruction given

- Professional and moral character

Initial CSIP Training

According to Cirrus, CSIP training is a comprehensive course and requires dedicated pre-training to be prepared for the intensive flight training segment. Flight training occurs only with a Cirrus headquarters professional flight instructor with emphasis on developing abilities to fly and teach in a standardized fashion using Cirrus' proven syllabi. Closely mirroring the style of the customer Transition Training program, CSIP training goes one big step further as you will be required to demonstrate an instructor level of knowledge. By the end of the course, you will be expected to teach the last few lessons.

For most flight instructors, CSIP training is scheduled to occur over the course of 3 days with a mix of ground and flight lessons. The price is approximately $2,700 which includes 3 days of flight instruction, 1 hour in our flight training device (FTD), and a training kit. Aircraft rental/use, fuel, travel, and accommodations are not included in the estimate. Since the course is completely proficiency based, the course may be longer or shorter depending on experience and aptitude. Cirrus requires that all CSIP applicants have sufficient knowledge of systems and operations before on-site training can take place. Failure to properly prepare for CSIP training will increase overall training time and expense.

CSIP Renewal

To retain status as an active and current CSIP, you must renew your status annually. To renew status, each CSIP must earn at least 10 credits during the past year of activity. Credits can be earned for overall experience, qualifications and ratings, flight activity, event attendance, and membership in professional organizations.

In addition to the credits required, there is a variable fee associated with the renewal, but commonly about $100.00.

FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-67C - Stall and Spin Awareness Training

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC-61-67C Stall and Spin Awareness Training:

"Power-off stalls (also known as approach-to-landing stalls) are practiced to simulate normal approach-to-landing conditions and configuration. Many stall/spin accidents have occurred in these power-off situations, such as crossed control turns from base leg to final approach (resulting in a skidding or slipping turn); attempting to recover from a high sink rate on final approach by using only an increased pitch attitude; and improper airspeed control on final approach or in other segments of the traffic pattern."

"Accelerated stalls can occur at higher-than-normal airspeeds due to abrupt and/or excessive control applications. These stalls may occur in steep turns, pullups, or other abrupt changes in flightpath. Accelerated stalls usually are more severe than unaccelerated stalls and are often unexpected because they occur at higher-than-normal airspeeds."


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA214
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Marion, IL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N508AJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2016, at 1634 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22 single-engine airplane, N508AJ, impacted terrain following a loss of control during a simulated engine failure maneuver at the Williamson County Regional Airport (MWA), Marion, Illinois. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, the flight instructor sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by AJ Air, Inc, Carbondale, Illinois, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed MWA at 1605.

According to the air traffic control tower personnel, the airplane was performing touch and go maneuvers, then requested a climb to 3,000 feet to perform a simulated engine failure descent to land maneuver. The air traffic controller observed the airplane in a left turn descent. As the airplane approached the runway, the controller observed the right wing lift, the airplane stall and impact terrain.

Examination of the accident site revealed an initial impact point which contained fractured portions of the green navigation lens, consistent with the right wing. The debris field measured approximately 242 feet in length from the initial impact to main wreckage. The debris field contained fragmented sections of the right wing, propeller assembly, and forward fuselage structure. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, left wing, engine, and a portion of the right wing. The airframe parachute was found deployed and lying next to the main wreckage. The deployment was consistent with impact activation.

At 1657, the MWA automated weather observing system, reported the wind from 170 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 20 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 32 degrees Celsius, dew point 19 degrees Celsius, an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury.