Sunday, August 20, 2017

Drone flies close to Southwest flight on its way to Denver International Airport (KDEN)

DENVER - A Southwest Airlines flight on its way to Denver International Airport Saturday evening came close to a drone about 8 miles northeast of the airport, a spokesperson told 9NEWS.

Heath Montgomery with DIA said the drone flew near the plane just before 4 p.m. but doesn't have the distance confirmed - early reports put it at 100 feet from the plane.

The plane was able to land without diverting or any other type of incident, Montgomery said.

FAA controls the airspace five miles out from the airport and said the issue was more about altitude than how close it was to the airport.

Drones get close to planes about a dozen times per year, Montgomery said.

He said the reason the airport is putting out the information at all is so people know the rules regarding drones: no drone can interfere with, or cause a collision hazard with a manned aircraft.

Ian Gregor with the FAA said people who do fly drones close to aircraft can face civil penalties - fines - from the FAA of more than $1,400 per violation.

If the drone operator violates public safety laws, they could face criminal charges up to federal criminal charges.

Story and video ➤ http://www.9news.com

Boeing A75N1(PT17), N26M, Mid Atlantic Air Museum: Accident occurred June 08, 2014 at Reading Regional Airport (KRDG), Berks County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N26M

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA280
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 08, 2014 in Reading, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: BOEING A75N1(PT17), registration: N26M
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane prepared for landing with a reported 70-degree quartering left headwind at 9 knots. After touching down on the main landing gear, and as the pilot lowered the tail, the airplane began turning to the left. The pilot applied right rudder and brake in an attempt to arrest the turn, but was unsuccessful. The airplane turned 90 degrees to the left and skidded sideways before the right wheel separated from the landing gear. The lower right wing then contacted the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the outboard portion of the wing. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot further commented that during the landing, the wind appeared to be in a state of change and that the winds had shifted to a quartering tailwind during the accident sequence.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of control while landing the tailwheel-equipped airplane in a quartering tailwind. A factor in the accident was the changing wind conditions.

Conyers, Georgia: No-drone ordinance for horse park



CONYERS — The Georgia International Horse Park is officially a no-drone zone.

The Conyers City Council passed on Wednesday an ordinance prohibiting the use of unmanned aircraft systems – or drones – within the boundaries of the horse park, including Cherokee Run Golf Course.

City Councilman Chris Bowen introduced the measure and said that the issue was raised when some visitors to the horse park complained that drones had come into close contact with them while they were walking or biking on the trails.

“There was also a concern with spooking horses on the trails,” Bowen said.

While the Federal Aviation Administration controls the airspace, the ordinance states that the city can adopt prohibitions on unmanned aircraft systems that “interfere with or harass an individual who is engaged in” recreational pursuits such as equine events, hiking, bicycling, canoeing and nature observation.

The penalty for violating the ordinance, like any other city ordinance, is up to six months in jail and $1,000 fine per violation.

Professional filming and production will be permitted if the city is first notified and gives approval for that filming.

Read more here ➤ http://www.rockdalenewtoncitizen.com

Cessna 170B, N3442D: Accident occurred June 04, 2014 at Totatlanika River Airport (9AK), Nenana, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC14CA037
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 04, 2014 in Fairbanks, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/07/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3442D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he was departing in his airplane from the downhill-sloping (east) runway at 9AK with a slight tailwind. He said that, as the airplane tried to become airborne, the tailwind increased considerably, and the airplane would not climb. The airplane struck brush that encroached the east end of the runway area and veered left into brush and small trees. He stated that no mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airplane precluded normal operation. Damage included the separation of the right outboard elevator. Photographs of the airstrip provided by the pilot showed that 9AK was a short, narrow, rough-surfaced airstrip with brush growth encroachment.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The airplane's encounter with a tailwind during takeoff from a short, narrow airstrip, which resulted in a loss of lift and collision with brush and small trees.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3442D

NTSB Identification: ANC14CA037
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 04, 2014 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N3442D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he was departing in his airplane from the downhill-sloping (east) runway at 9AK with a slight tailwind. He said that, as the airplane tried to become airborne, the tailwind increased considerably, and the airplane would not climb. The airplane struck brush that encroached the east end of the runway area and veered left into brush and small trees. He stated that no mechanical failures or malfunction of the airplane precluded normal operation. Damage included the separation of the right outboard elevator. (Note: Photographs of the airstrip provided by the pilot showed that 9AK was a short, narrow, rough-surfaced airstrip with brush growth encroachment.)

Piper J3C-65 Cub Special, N46286, Paramount Air Service: Accident occurred August 20, 2017 in Green Creek, Middle Township, Cape May County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N46286

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA281
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 20, 2017 in Green Creek, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER J3C, registration: N46286
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 20, 2017, about 1345 eastern daylight time, a Piper J3C-65, N46286, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power while on approach to Paramount Air Strip (JY04), Green Creek, New Jersey. The commercial pilot sustained a minor injury. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the banner-tow flight, which departed JY04 about 0945, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot's written statement and company records, he picked up his first banner at 0948, and subsequently dropped and picked up five more banners. About 1340, he dropped the sixth banner, retracted the tow boom, and entered the downwind leg of the traffic pattern for landing at JY04. At the point where the airplane entered the downwind leg, the engine stopped producing power. The pilot turned the airplane away from a line of trees in the airplane's path, and performed a forced landing to a marsh which resulted in substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage. In a telephone interview with a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector, the pilot reported that he switched fuel tanks and attempted an engine restart during the forced landing, but the attempt was unsuccessful.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued October 4, 2016. He reported 650 total hours of flight experience of which 500 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

The one-place, high-wing airplane was manufactured in 1942 and powered by a Lycoming O-290D2, 135-horsepower engine. It was originally configured with a 12-gallon fuel capacity but was subsequently modified with a 36-gallon fuel system. The most recent annual inspection was completed on August 9, 2016 at 11,517 total aircraft hours.

At 1355, the weather recorded at Cape May County Airport (WWD), 3 miles south of JY04, included clear skies, wind from 290° at 9 knots, and visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 26°C, and the dew point was 18°C. The altimeter setting was 30.12 inches of mercury.

The airplane was examined at the scene by an FAA aviation safety inspector. Examination revealed the firewall and the tubular structure of the fuselage were substantially damaged. Flight control continuity was confirmed, and about 1 gallon of fuel was drained from the airplane.


A pilot was injured after a banner plane made a hard landing in Middle Township, Cape May County, New Jersey Sunday afternoon.

The 20-year-old pilot was flying a Piper J3C-65 banner tow aircraft from Paramount Air around 2 p.m. As he was circling to land, the aircraft lost power and made a hard landing in a marsh area near the Paramount Air Service building on Stites Avenue. 

The pilot, who was the only person inside the plane, suffered lacerations to his head and was taken to the hospital. Officials have not yet revealed his condition.

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and police are investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: NYC89LA147
The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 40774.
Accident occurred Saturday, June 10, 1989 in ERMA, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/1991
Aircraft: PIPER J-3C-65, registration: N46286
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

THE PILOT WAS UNDER TRAINING FOR A BANNER TOWING LETTER OF AUTHORIZATION AND WAS PRACTICING PICKUPS OF FULL SIZE BANNERS. AFTER PICKUP, AND AT AN ALTITUDE OF 250 FEET, THE AIRPLANE STALLED AND DESCENDED INTO THE TREES. THE PILOT STATED THAT THE PICKUP WAS O.K., BUT THE WINDS WERE GUSTY AND IT WAS A HOT DAY.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
FAILURE OF THE PILOT TO MAINTAIN AIRSPEED DURING A BANNER PICKUP.

Piper PA-18-150, N8929L: Accident occurred May 28, 2014 in Cordova, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC14CA031
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 28, 2014 in Cordova, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/07/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N8929L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he made low passes over the flat, tundra site to assess its suitability for landing. He said that, on the second pass, he touched the airplane's wheels down to verify that the surface was firm and then returned for landing. He said that, both visually and during the test-touch, the surface appeared to be "100 percent hard-surface tundra," and the vegetation appeared dry; however, during the end of the landing roll, when the airplane was traveling about 10 mph, the wheels sank into unexpectedly "mushy" ground, and the airplane slowly nosed over. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The rudder, strut, and wing rib sustained damage. The airplane was equipped with tundra tires. Photographs of the airplane at the accident site showed it inverted in a broad area of flat, grassy tundra, consistent with the pilot's description.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate remedial action during landing on soft terrain, which resulted in a nose-over.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8929L

NTSB Identification: ANC14CA031
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 28, 2014 in Cordova, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N8929L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he made low passes over the flat, tundra site to assess its suitability for landing. He said that, on the second pass, he touched the airplane's wheels down to verify that the surface was firm and then returned for landing. He said that both visually and during the test-touch, the surface appeared to be "100 percent hard-surface tundra," and the vegetation appeared dry; however, during the end of the landing roll, when the airplane was traveling about 10 mph, the wheels sank into unexpectedly "mushy" ground, and the airplane slowly nosed over. The pilot reported no mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation. Damage to the airplane included rudder, strut, and wing rib damage. The airplane was equipped with tundra tires. Photographs of the airplane at the accident site showed it inverted in a broad area of flat, grassy tundra, consistent with the pilot's description.

Oklahoma drone hobbyist hopes to dispel rumors



Hovering above the park, the remotely operated drone flies around. Some parents give a nervous glance, like the government may be watching them or someone is filming their every move. Little do they know, it’s just a hobbyist enjoying a sunny day.

Blake Scott, 21, is the hobbyist, and as remote controlled aircraft have taken off, he hopes to dispel some of the rumors around the hobby and encourage more people to take up flying.

“In the hobby world we don’t call them drones,” Scott said. “We call them quadcopters, or tricopters, depending on the number of blades. It’s really something fun to get started into and it’s getting a lot more affordable.“

Scott said when the media called the devices drones, it gave the remote controlled flying hobby a bad name, and scared everyday citizens.

“It used to be easy to find places to fly, but because of the media’s hype people get scared,” he said. “Not every flying thing has a camera on it. I don’t spy on people - that’s an invasion of privacy.“

By educating people about the hobby, not only can youth find their passion in flying, he said. But, people will be less inclined to think every flying object is a government-spying machine.

Laws set forth by Congress govern all those who fly quad-copters, model helicopters and model planes, but the Academy of Model Aeronautics helps lobby on behalf of those who fly model aircraft. The AMA’s policies don’t advocate for complete freedom, they respect the rights of those that hobbyists may be flying near.

According to AMA’s policy, “The use of imaging technology for aerial surveillance with radio control model aircraft having the capability of obtaining high-resolution photographs and/or video, for the collection, retention, or dissemination of surveillance data or information on individuals where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy is strictly prohibited.“

While there are rules, flying RC can help those interested in aviation recognize their passion. Scott said it was his interest in RC that made him realize his dream of becoming a pilot.

Scott took interest in flying remote control aircraft when he was 14 years old. His first experience was with a remote controlled RC Helicopter. Scott saved up money from his first job to purchase the helicopter.

He then took up flying with a local group in Ponca City, where he grew up, called the Good Ole Okie Flying Society. During that time, they flew the helicopters using radio frequencies. If someone was on the same radio frequency as the device it could interfere with its flying pattern—something Scott said doesn’t happen with today’s technology.

Scott said when he was learning to fly in GOOFS, a more experienced pilot would hard wire controllers with a less experienced one, that way if the pilot in training messed up they wouldn’t crash the helicopter or plane.

“When I was a child I always wanted to fly,” Scott said. “There was never a doubt in my mind that I wanted to fly.

He now attends Southeastern State University in Durant and is studying to be a pilot. Scott attributes his love of RC to being interested in aviation, and said that as a kid it helped him understand the basics of flying.

Both remote controlled helicopters and planes use the same laws of physics to get off the ground.

Scott said for any kids who are interested in flying, be sure to know what you’re getting into. According to Federal Aviation Administration regulation, those who fly remote control crafts as a hobby should be mindful that the law prohibits any hobbyists from flying above 400 feet, and within five nautical miles of an airport. Also be mindful of power lines when learning to fly.

“People who just want to fly should get something with a panic mode switch on it,” he said. “That way you can flip the switch and it will just hover. “

As technology improves so will the flying capabilities of quadcopters. Scott said the next advancement could be virtual reality—making the experience more immersive and realistic for hobbyists.

“The hobby is so huge, it’s just completely blown up,” he said. “What I can recommend for people is to know what you’re getting into beforehand. It can be hard to re-sell, so just do your research. Also, be courteous because you’re representing all drone hobbyists.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ardmoreite.com

Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow II, N32195, Prescott Flying Club Inc: Accident occurred May 24, 2014 at Major Gilbert Field Airport (4R5), La Pointe, Ashland County, Wisconsin



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N32195 

NTSB Identification: CEN14CA257 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 24, 2014 in La Pointe, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200, registration: N32195
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the airplane encountered a strong gust of wind from the right during final approach to an island airport. The pilot applied aileron and rudder to correct, but the airplane touched down "awkwardly" on the runway. The pilot then applied back pressure on the yoke and the airplane became airborne before landing hard onto the runway. The airplane then veered to the right then to the left at which time it departed the left side of the runway. The right wing separated from the airplane when it contacted a tree before the airplane came to rest. The recorded wind condition at an airport located 18 miles from the accident site had a variable direction at 5 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during the landing.

Bell 47G-2A, N9526: Accident occurred August 20, 2017 in St. Marys, Elk County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9526

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA285
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 20, 2017 in St Marys, PA
Aircraft: BELL 47G, registration: N9526
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 20, 2017, at 1200 eastern daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N9526, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at St Marys, Pennsylvania. The student pilot was not injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, solo-instructional flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated at St Marys Municipal Airport (OYM), St Marys, Pennsylvania about 1030.

The pilot reported that he had been flying in the local area for about 90 minutes when the engine abruptly stopped running. He selected a small, grass lot to perform an autorotation. During the touchdown, the helicopter landed hard. He egressed from the helicopter and was assisted by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration reported that the helicopter came to rest upright in a grassy lot, about 2.6 miles west of OYM. The fuselage was structurally damaged. The landing gear skids were spread and forced up, against the fuselage. The main rotor blades were bent. There was no fire.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.



ST. MARYS – Emergency crews were called to the scene of a helicopter crash in Elk County Saturday.

Elk County dispatchers said a private helicopter crashed along South St. Mary’s Street behind a NAPA Auto Parts store. The crash occurred just after noon.

There were two occupants in the helicopter. Neither were injured, St. Marys police said.

The Federal Aviation Administration was called to the crash site and is investigating, dispatchers said.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://wjactv.com

Evolution Trikes Revo Rival, N2264X: Fatal accident occurred September 05, 2015 in Laconia, Belknap County, New Hampshire -and- Accident occurred April 20, 2014 at Concord Municipal Airport (KCON), Merrimack County, New Hampshire



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N2264X



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA339 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Laconia, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/29/2016
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Review of GPS information revealed that the sport pilot/owner of the weight-shift-control aircraft completed one left circuit over a beach at a low altitude. During a second circuit, the aircraft was about 100 ft or less above the ground for several minutes before it descended and impacted the backyard of a residence. Examination of the wreckage, which included a successful test run of the engine, did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The sport pilot’s improper decision to operate the weight-shift-control aircraft at low altitude and his subsequent failure to maintain control of the aircraft, which resulted in a subsequent collision with terrain.




On September 5, 2015, about 1538 eastern daylight time, a special-light-sport, weight-shift-control Evolution Aircraft Revo, N2264X, was substantially damaged when it impacted the backyard of a residence, following a loss of control while circling a nearby beach at low altitude in Laconia, New Hampshire. The sport pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI), Laconia, New Hampshire, about 1530.

Several witnesses reported that the aircraft circled very low over the beach and looked like it was going to land. It then banked sharply left and descended nose-down near a residence. Two of the witnesses reported a sputtering or loss of engine noise, while five witnesses reported continuous or an increase in engine noise.

The wreckage came to rest inverted. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The pilot's four-point restraint system remained intact. The inspector noted that fuel remained in the two carburetor fuel bowls and in the single-fuel tank. He was able to rotate the propeller by hand, confirm valve train continuity and attain thumb compression on all cylinders.

Under the direction of the FAA inspector, a mechanic subsequently recovered the aircraft and was able to verify control continuity. Once he replaced a water pump that had sustained impact damage, he was able to successfully test-run the engine on the airframe.

Review of the sport pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated about 102 hours of flight experience; of which, 91 hours were in the same make and model as the accident aircraft. About 7 of the hours were flown during the 30-day period preceding the accident. Additionally, the sport pilot had recently ferried the accident aircraft from Florida to New Hampshire, but had not recorded that trip in his logbook. Review of the NTSB database revealed that the sport pilot was involved in a landing accident in the same make and model aircraft on April 20, 2014. The probable cause of that accident was his failure to maintain control during a go-around (ERA14CA203).

The two-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle gear, weight-shift-control aircraft, serial number 000594, was manufactured in 2013 and issued a special-light-sport airworthiness certificate by the FAA. It was powered by a Rotax 912ULS, 100-horsepower engine, equipped with three-blade composite propeller. The aircraft logbooks were not recovered and no determination could be made regarding the aircraft's most recent inspection.

The aircraft was equipped with an electronic flight information system (EFIS), which was retained and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC. Data were successfully downloaded from the EFIS and plotted. Although no engine data were recovered, a GPS plot of the accident flight was generated. Review of the plot revealed that the aircraft departed LCI at 1530, climbed to an altitude about 1,300 feet above ground level (agl), and flew west for about 1 minute. It then turned north and paralleled the shore of Lake Winnipesaukee, descended to about 300 feet agl, where it remained for the majority of the flight. The aircraft completed one left circuit near a beach uneventfully. During a second, wider left circuit, the aircraft descended to about 100 feet agl or less over the lake, where it remained until impacting the backyard of the residence approximately 2 minutes later.

The pilot succumbed to his injuries on September 6, 2015 and an autopsy was not performed; however, the New Hampshire Medical Examiner's report noted the cause of death as "Complications of Blunt Head Trauma." Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the test results revealed:

"Etomidate detected in Blood
Metoprolol detected in Blood"

Etomidate was consistent with emergency treatment the pilot received in the hospital and Metoprolol was an antihypertensive that was not impairing.

The recorded weather at LCI, at 1535, included wind from 190 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 9 miles and clear sky.



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Laconia, NH
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 5, 2015, about 1540 eastern daylight time, a special-light-sport, weight-shift-control Evolution Aircraft Revo, N2264X, was substantially damaged when it impacted the backyard of a residence, following a loss of control while circling a nearby beach at low altitude in Laconia, New Hampshire. The sport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI), Laconia, New Hampshire, about 1520.

Several witnesses reported that the aircraft circled very low over the beach and looked like it was going to land. It then banked sharply left and descended nose-down near a residence. Two of the witnesses reported a sputtering or loss of engine noise, while five witnesses reported good or an increase in engine noise.

The wreckage came to rest nose-down and upright. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The inspector noted that fuel remained in the two carburetor fuel bowls and in the single-fuel tank. He was able to rotate the propeller by hand, confirm valve train continuity and attain thumb compression on all cylinders.

The recorded weather at LCI, at 1535, included wind from 190 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 9 miles and clear sky.

The engine and an electronic flight information system were retained for further examination.



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA203 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 20, 2014 in Concord, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the student pilot he was returning from a local flight and had entered the pattern with the intent to land. After turning final the pilot noticed he was right of the runway centerline and attempted a left turn to realign the airplane with the runway. During the turn the pilot was forced to correct more due to a slight crosswind. When he finally centered the airplane it was aligned with the left side of the runway, 25 feet over the runway lighting and descending. The pilot then discontinued the landing and initiated a go around maneuver; however, the airplane "dropped 12-15 feet", impacted the ground and the nose gear collapsed before coming to rest on the runway. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed substantial damage to both wings. The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that could have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The student pilot's failure to maintain control during a go around, which resulted in a collision with terrain.

Freedom of flight: Cleburne Regional Airport (KCPT)




Inside Stuart Nielson’s hangar at the Cleburne Regional Airport is a piece of aviation history.

It doesn’t look like much now, but once the 1946 Taylorcraft single engine plane gets restored, Nielson will have — for the second time — a ready-to-fly classic on his hands. He bought the plane recently after having sold it years ago.

By several accounts, during the ’30s and ’40s Taylorcraft planes were some of the most common available for personal and commercial use. One version, the L2-M, was used as an observation and spotting aircraft in World War II.

Currently, Nielson’s plane is just a frame of steel tubing, cables and bicycle chains awaiting a sock of monofilament fabric to cover it. Once that’s done, he and his son will install its wings, which sit in the back of the hangar, along with the landing gear, nose cone, engine and propeller.   

“It’s kind of like a big puzzle,” he said of putting the plane together.

Nielson and his wife, Fran, moved to Cleburne 25 years ago after he retired as a pilot with Republic Airlines. Since then he has been involved with the airport in a variety of ways, serving on the airport board for two terms and flying vintage historic planes, from the Taylorcraft he’s building now to a World War II era C-46 transport plane to a classic DC-9 jet airliner.

“It’s kind of been my second home,” he said about the airport.

The city-owned airport first opened in 1960 with a 3,000-foot by 40-foot runway, according to city records. That runway now extends to 5,700 feet by 100 feet, which allows a variety of commercial and private aircraft to take off and land there. Planes range from single-engine prop planes to heavyweights like the Gulfstream V or “Gee-5” passenger jet.

Vestiges of the original airport can be seen on the north end of today’s airport where the old office still stands. It also used to house the Civil Air Patrol and their old building still stands as well.

Although plenty of single-engine prop planes and private jets travel the tarmac, business jets fly in executives and other representatives of Johnson County’s major businesses and industries from Wal-Mart to H-E-B to First Financial Bank, said Airport Manager Sharlette Wright. It also draws traffic from flight schools in the DFW area.

The airport’s major source of revenue is fuel, she said, but they also provide maintenance, hangars and tie-downs for planes.

 It also draws out crowds at various times of the year for events like the Grand Texas Air Show that was held on July 1.

The municipal airport wasn’t the first airport in Cleburne, according to a master airport plan the city put out a few years ago. Since the 1920s Cleburne and surrounding areas have had plenty of mostly private airstrips, many of which were just grass or dirt landing fields.

Slats Rodgers

Cleburne stands tall not only in the county’s aviation history but also in the state’s history, thanks to one lanky railroad man, Slats Rodgers.

Floyd “Slats” Rodgers — people say he was thin as a bed slat — came to Johnson County as a teenager from Georgia and settled in Keene with his family. It was about this time, while flying kites, that Rodgers became fascinated by flight. He also spent hours poring over what he could find about aviation, some of it written by aviators Orville and Wilbur Wright.

His fascination was spurred further when he went to work for the Santa Fe Railroad in Cleburne, where, according to writer Clay Coppedge, he “enjoyed the speed and thunder of a locomotive, but thought it was a real shame that engine power was devoted to something that stayed on the ground.”

So obsessed with flying was Rodgers, he decided to build his own flying machine, first building a model that he stored on an engine tank at the depot until crowds coming to see it got so thick he was asked to move it. Which he did — to a theater, paying the theater owner $75 to display the model inside the theater. That move seeded airplane fever in town even more.

From that publicity, Rodgers took it upon himself to build the real thing in 1911, just eight years after the Wright brothers made their historic flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The plane is reputed to be the first ever built in Texas.

Still, Old Soggy, as the plane came to be known, was pretty primitive, closer to the Wright’s plane than some of the sleeker designs being developed internationally that would fly over the trenches of France three years later in the First World War.

Moreover, Rodgers was no pilot and Old Soggy’s first flight in 1912 came about accidentally: taxiing the plane through a field, Rodgers forced it into the air to avoid a ditch. The plane flew about 200 feet before it came down in a crash that broke off the wheels and tore away the right wing.

Fourteen years later, Rodgers finally got his pilot’s license, the first in Texas. He was also the first to lose it — for accepting a challenge to successfully fly between two downtown Dallas skyscrapers.

Most of Rodgers’ life was caught up flying, including barnstorming with the Love Field Lunatics in Dallas, a reported front for smuggling whiskey during Prohibition. He died in McAllen, not as a pilot, but as owner of steak houses in Bandera and McAllen.

Although Rodgers’ history is colorful, Johnson County has firm roots in aviation history beyond his exploits. In the 1920s, a German immigrant to Cleburne, Adolph Schad designed a single-engine plane that burned a combination of gasoline and castor oil. He patented the design and sold the patent to the government in 1929.

Fly-in bank

In the 1960s, the county boasted a unique financial institution in Rio Vista. While most banks have drive-through windows, Lowell “Stretch” Smith’s Cow Pasture Bank in Rio Vista — a First State Bank located in a former cow pasture — had a fly-in feature.

Smith and his father owned an airstrip behind the bank building.

“We financed a lot of airplanes, the bank did,” Smith said. “It was an easy way to let people fly in and we would look at the airplane and that sort of thing and decide if we wanted to finance it.”

It was an unusual offering in those days, he said. “Banks normally didn’t do that.”

The bank kept up the airstrip until Smith and his sister sold the bank to Wells Fargo in 1999.

The airstrip itself they donated to the city of Rio Vista, with the hope the city might find a good use for it, he said.

In November, Rio Vista City Council elected to develop the airstrip into a park that will feature walking trails, playgrounds and plenty of space for events.

Free flying

So, what is it that makes people want to fly? Maybe it’s just the rush of flying that’s attractive? That certainly seems to be what Charles Lindbergh, who made the first nonstop solo transatlantic flight from New York to Paris in 1927, meant when he said, “It is the greatest shot of adrenaline to be doing what you have wanted to do so badly. You almost feel like you could fly without the plane.”

Or maybe it’s something loftier, as pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart said, “I have often said the lure of flying is the lure of beauty.”

Perhaps the truth is somewhere in the middle. Or maybe there’s just something in the simple elegance of the machinery that allows humans to apply the basic principles of lift, thrust, weight and drag to slip the surly bonds of earth for as long as the fuel holds out?

Stuart Nielson hints at that when he smiles at the Taylorcraft in his hangar and thinks about simplicity of the 1930s technology of wood, steel tubing, fabric,  levers, pulleys and even bicycle chains — the Wright brothers began in a bicycle shop — that will soon have him and his son in the air.

But, the allure of flight just might be held in the human urge for freedom, as Nielson hints:

“The freedom,” he said. “That’s why you fly. It’s the next best thing to being a bird.”

Original article ➤ http://www.cleburnetimesreview.com

Champion Aeronca 7AC, N82206: Accident occurred April 19, 2014 in Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Mississippi

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N82206

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA267
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 19, 2014 in Port Gibson, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: CHAMPION AERONCA 7AC, registration: N82206
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing to the west, on a private, grass airstrip. He stated that as the airplane touched down, he became blinded by the setting sun that was located low on the horizon. The airplane subsequently veered to the right into a tree line, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings and the right main landing gear. The pilot reported that he did not experience any preaccident malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. Winds reported an airport that was located about 30 miles north of the accident site, around the time of the accident, were from 360 degrees at 7 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll. Contributing to the accident was sun glare.

Piper PA-28R-200, N9431N: Incident occurred August 20, 2017 near Northeast Florida Regional Airport (KSGJ), St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N9431N

Aircraft force landed in a marsh area short of the airport.

Date: 20-AUG-17
Time: 15:20:00Z
Regis#: N9431N
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: SAINT AUGUSTINE
State: FLORIDA






It took time, patience and some specialized equipment as SJCFR crews trained in Marine Rescue helped two people involved in a plane crash this morning in St. Augustine out of a muddy marsh and to safety. 

The plane, a single-engine Piper Aircraft, crashed approximately 200 yards off Northeast Florida Regional Airport's Runway 31 at about 11:15 a.m.

Due to the outgoing tide, rescuers had trouble reaching the plane by boat. 

So crews donned specially designed boots to traverse the deep mud and reach the plane. 

They then assisted the plane's occupants, who were uninjured, to solid ground. 

No one was injured.

The cause of the crash will be investigated by the local authorities and the National Transportation Safety Board.



First Responders from SJSO, SJFR and FHP are on-scene of a small general aviation aircraft which went down in the marsh near The St. Augustine Airport. 

The pilot reported a mechanical issue shortly before putting the aircraft down.

Currently there are no reported injuries.

Fire Rescue personnel are retrieving the occupants of the plane and bringing them to shore. 

FHP is investigating the incident.




ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. - A single-engine airplane crash-landed Sunday in the marsh near the Northeast Florida Regional Airport after experiencing an engine failure during practice maneuvers, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office said.  

The St. Johns County Fire Rescue Department said the small, Piper aircraft crashed near the end of runway 31. 

Officials said the two people who were on board were able to safely exit the airplane. Neither person was injured in the crash. 

Both people were escorted safely through the marsh by fire rescue personnel. Due to the muddy conditions, and the outgoing tide, rescue crews were forced to take them back to the dry land on an airboat supplied by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. 

Officials have not released the identity of the pilot or the passenger. 

Fire rescue officials said the Florida Highway Patrol has taken over the investigation.

There was no word if the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash. 

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.news4jax.com






Two people escaped injury when their small private airplane went down in shallow water Sunday morning in marsh at the end of the runway at Northeast Florida Regional Airport in St. Augustine.

The pilot and passenger were able to get out by themselves, and were walking around after the four-seat fixed wing aircraft landed in the marsh about 11:45 a.m. Cmdr. Chuck Mulligan of the St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office told the Times-Union.

“The pilot reported some sort of a mechanical issue, put it down in the marsh. There were no injuries and we’re recovering them from the plane,” Mulligan said of the general aviation aircraft. There was no fire, he said.

The plane’s engine failed during practice maneuvers, according to the Florida Highway Patrol, which is investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://jacksonville.com