Saturday, April 8, 2017

Newly constructed hangar to bring economic boom in Ames, Iowa




AMES, Iowa —   

Hundreds of community members and pilots drove or flew into the Ames Municipal Airport bright early Saturday as the community came together to celebrate a major milestone.

A new airport hangar is set to change the face of Ames.

Pilots Terry Schleisman said his passion is flying his 70-year-old Piper Cub. “It’s just a tremendous sense of freedom. Just fun, just unbound," he said.

Schleisman bonded with other aviation enthusiasts while celebrating a new 11,400-square-foot hangar.

“That puts us in the class of an airport where we can get bigger planes in versus where people may just want to go to Des Moines,” said Damion Pregitzer, airport manager and traffic engineer. “That lets them come here, do business in Ames, which is important to us.”

It’s all part of a modernization project, which also includes construction of a new terminal, bringing with it an economic boost to the area.

“When you have the facilities that can support a certain level of economy, that’s when you start to see people not just wanting to come here, but actually base their business here, their aircraft here,” Pregitzer said. “It all works together in the big picture for Ames."

It’s a culmination of six years’ worth of hard work between a private-public sector partnership.

“For many people that visit Ames, this will now be our front door,” said Rick Sanders, chairman of the Story County Board of Supervisors. “This will be their first impression of Ames.”

Leaders say it opens the door for pilots like Schleisman to come to Ames more frequently.

“It’s only the beginning, so what we hope is this will be a catalyst to get more growth, maybe get more hangars, more aircraft, on the field,” Pregitzer said. “It’s only up from here, really.”

The new hanger can hold 12 business jet-size aircraft at a time. The terminal is halfway done. It is scheduled to be complete by July 1. 

Story and video:   http://www.kcci.com

Cessna 182Q Skylane, United States Forest Service, N759LV: Accident occurred July 21, 2015 in Prichard, Shoshone County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington 
USDA Forest Service; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N759LV 



NTSB Identification: WPR15LA220
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 21, 2015 in Prichard, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N759LV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 21, 2015, about 1446 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q, N759LV, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Prichard, Idaho. The airplane was registered to and operated by Interstate Aviation, Pullman, Washington, under contract with the United States Forest Service. The local fire reconnaissance flight was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. The commercial pilot and his passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for aerial observation flight. The local flight originated from Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, about 2 hours prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that during cruise flight, he heard a loud pop, followed by oil covering the windscreen. Despite the pilot's attempts, the engine would not restart and he initiated a forced landing to an open field. Subsequently, during the landing roll, the nose wheel landing gear separated from the airplane and the right wing impacted the ground.

Examination of the airplane by the pilot revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered airframe and engine revealed a large hole in the crankcase above cylinder number 6. Several pieces of the engine case and the number 6 piston pin were found outside the engine case lying between the cylinders. The upper portion of the number 6 piston was still in the cylinder. The piston could be moved by hand within the cylinder. Portions of the lower part of the piston, piston rings, the connecting rod cap and bolts were located within the oil sump. No evidence of any overheat or thermal damage was observed on the crankshaft.

The remains of the number 6 piston, piston pin, and connecting rod were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC, for further examination.

According to a materials engineer, the examination revealed that the underside of the piston crown was fractured into smaller pieces near the piston pin position. The fracture surface exhibited a rough, tortuous appearance along with a dull luster. The fracture surface of the piston crown exhibited river lines and chevron marks consistent with fracture originating at the pin position. The fracture features of the piston crown underside were consistent with overstress failure. No indications of pre-existing cracking or progressive failure were observed on the piston fracture surfaces.

One of the two connecting rod bolts was fractured in two halves, exhibiting a 45 degree slant fracture surface with localized necking adjacent to the fractures. The bolt fracture surface showed a dull luster and rough surface. All of these features were consistent with failure from tensile overstress. Only half of the other bolt was found, and was bent over, with a relatively flat fracture surface along the bolt threads. This fracture surface also exhibited dull, gray, and rough features. These characteristics were consistent with failure from overstress in bending.

The connecting rod was generally intact with no indication of cracking, fracture, twisting or gross deformation along the rod. The connecting rod cap exhibited twisting and deformation consistent with batter from impacts with an adjacent object. However, there were no indications consistent with the connecting rod or cap having failed prior to the bolts fracturing.

The piston pin exhibited some wear and impact marks along the barrel. Of note was that one of the tapered piston pin ends had separated and had become deformed into a spherical shape. Most of the fracture surface exhibited a shiny luster and general flat shape, consistent with post-fracture batter. The middle of the pin fracture had a raised, flattened feature. Around the periphery of the fracture surface, adjacent to the barrel of the pin, the fracture surface exhibited ridges consistent with ratchet marks. The ratchet marks are consistent with multiple smaller cracks that coalesce to form a larger crack. A less damaged area of the fracture surface, exhibited crack arrest marks consistent with progressive failure.

Closer examination of the visible progressive features using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), revealed striations consistent with fatigue cracking. Examination of the fatigue crack initiation site did not reveal any material or mechanical defects, such as pits, voids, or inclusions. All of the features of the pin fracture surface were consistent with fatigue cracking initiating around the outside of the pin, with the final fracture along the middle of the pin cross section.

The spherical deformed separated portion of the pin exhibited severe damage which obscured the features that would conclude fracture information. A circular impression was visible on the spherical fragment. The volume of the spherical pin remnant was consistent with a spherical impression on the underside of the piston crown and is consistent with it occurring after the severe deformation of the now spherical pin fragment.

The composition of the pin fracture surface was examined using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The composition was consistent with AA 2000 series aluminum alloy. Further inspection using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) found the pin material to be consistent with AA 2024 aluminum. The hardness was inspected per ASTM E18.2 The hardness of the section averaged 81 HRBW. The electrical conductivity of the part was inspected per ASTM E1004.3 The conductivity averaged 39.0% IACS. These data were consistent with a T6X or T8X temper for this alloy.

Review of the engine logbooks revealed that the engine was overhauled on August 8, 2008. At this time, new piston pins, part number SA 539467 were installed. The most recent logbook entry, dated July 14, 2015, was a 100-hour inspection, at a time since major overhaul (TSMOH) of 1,427.1 hours and HOBBS time of 2,344.6 hours. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 1,455 hours TSMOH.

Cork runway may be too short for Norwegian Air flights to New York: Proposed route hinges on fuel consumption of new Boeing aircraft, airline says



Norwegian Air International may not be able to fly its proposed route from Cork to New York because the Irish airport’s runway is too short, according to its group chief executive, Bjorn Kjos.

The carrier will begin flying from Ireland to the US east coast from July, including the first transatlantic service from Cork, which will serve TF Green Airport in Providence.

Norwegian is also considering a service to Stewart International in New York state from Cork next year, but Mr Kjos said the airline would have to see if it was possible to fly this route “because of the runway length”.

The length of Cork Airport’s runway, 2,133m, means Norwegian cannot fill the Boeing 737 Max aircraft it intends using on the Providence route, to ensure the aircraft can take off.

Fuel consumption

However, because New York is further south, and thus a longer journey, Mr Kjos said that it may not be possible to complete it from Cork and that this would hinge on fuel consumption.

“We have to see the reality of the Max, because we are the first ones flying it,” he said. “It might be that it is better than they guarantee, and if it’s better than they guarantee, we might be able to do it. We have to find out when we start flying.”

He pointed out that aircraft manufacturers base their guarantees on prototypes and added that the aircraft added to fleets generally surpass those standards comfortably.

Mr. Kjos is chief executive of Norwegian Air International’s parent, Norwegian Air Shuttle. He was in Dublin for the industry gala ball organised by the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA), at which he received the award for his contribution to aviation.

Norwegian Air International is an Irish-registered airline which the parent intends intends using to fly low-cost, long-haul services between Europe, the US and Asia.

Three-year battle

It fought a three-year battle to get permission to fly to the US, which it finally received last December. The company employs 85 people in Dublin and has 57 craft registered in the Republic. Overall it has 2,100 pilots and crew.The Irish office is responsible for safety – which the IAA regulates – marketing, finance and leasing.

Mr. Kjos confirmed that Norwegian now has an agreement with Ryanair enabling them to transfer passengers between each other’s flights. He said both airlines were working on a way of allowing their systems to communicate with each other. He was hopeful this would be done in weeks.

He did not rule out the possibility that Norwegian would begin flying from Dublin direct to the Far East. The airline has a base in Bangkok. As it would have to use the Boeing Dreamliner on this route, it could fly only from the capital’s airport.

From next July, Norwegian will begin flying from Belfast, Cork, Dublin and Shannon to airports in the northeast US with access to Boston and New York.

Original article can be found here:    http://www.irishtimes.com

Burr Express 2000 RG, N44508: Accident occurred May 29, 2015 at Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU), Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N44508

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA179
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 29, 2015 in Glendale, AZ
Aircraft: BURR EXPRESS 2000 RG, registration: N44508
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 29, 2015, about 1542 mountain standard time, a Burr Express 2000 RG, N44508, experienced a landing gear collapse during the landing roll at Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU) in Glendale, Arizona. The private pilot and one passenger were uninjured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and elevators. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from GEU at about 1500.

The pilot reported that he landed the airplane onto the runway normally. He applied beta thrust to decelerate the airplane and started to brake lightly. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed and the airplane swerved to the left. The airplane departed the runway surface and the left wing impacted a runway sign. It traversed along the dirt when the right landing gear collapsed and the tail impacted the ground before sliding to a rest. 

During a postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector it was revealed that the left main landing gear actuator heim rod failed where the threads meet the rod end. Given the location of the heim rod, the inspector was unable to view the fracture surface while the component was installed on the airplane. In addition, the inspector noted that the hydraulic line to the gear actuator was ripped. 

The National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-in-charge attempted to obtain the heim rod for further examination, however, the pilot had already repaired the airplane and the part was no longer available.

Navy pilots train for carrier landings using the Magic Carpet and praise the ride




Super Hornet jet pilots at Lemoore Naval Air Station have a new flight simulator that trains them to use a new flight guidance system for landing on aircraft carriers.

The Navy calls the new guidance system Precision Landing Mode.

But it was originally dubbed the “Magic Carpet,” short for (take a deep breath) Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies, according to Naval Aviation News.

The media likes Magic Carpet because it has a nice ring to it.

Whatever it’s called, it will be the norm for carrier landings by 2019.

Pilots must train and get qualified. Lemoore has a trainer, as do the naval air stations at Whidbey Island in Washington and Oceana in Virginia.

Using software on each aircraft that controls flight control surfaces, including flaps, pilots can more easily adjust their landing approach, or glidepath, onto the moving aircraft carrier.

It works well, especially for night landings, said Lt. Brant Schmall, a pilot and landing signal officer at Lemoore. When onboard, he communicates with pilots as they land.

“I would say a large percentage of pilots are happy using it,” he said. “It is absolutely appreciated – the task level is reduced, and that’s helpful … the biggest thing is when you make an adjustment, there’s a near-instantaneous correction.”

Previously, pilots would also increase or decrease power, but now that’s set to be nearly constant.

To be clear, the pilot still flies the plane. It’s not automated flying, he said.

The new system promises safe, predictable landings and so far, the number of successful landings with no need for a second pass is going up, he said.

Precision Landing Mode was rolled out for all aircraft carriers in September, and Lemoore pilots in Carrier Wing 9 started using it on the USS John C. Stennis in November in the Pacific Ocean.

It’s also used by the EA-18 Growler, a Super Hornet version for electronic warfare. The new F-35C aircraft also has a similar system.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.fresnobee.com

Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster, FedEx Express, N989FX: Accident occurred February 24, 2015 at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI), Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Federal Express Corp:   http://registry.faa.gov/N989FX

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA135
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 24, 2015 in Baltimore, MD
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration: N989FX
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 24, 2015, at 0612 eastern standard time, a Cessna 208B, N989FX, was substantially damaged when its empennage struck the ground while taxiing at Baltimore Washington International Airport (BWI), Baltimore, Maryland. The airline transport pilot was not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Newark Liberty International (EWR), Newark, New Jersey and was destined for BWI. The on-demand cargo flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

Following an uneventful flight, the pilot landed the airplane on runway 33R, before exiting to the left onto taxiway J. He then continued to taxi to the southwest and transitioned onto taxiway AA. As the airplane approached the intersection of the taxiway and a service road, a ground service vehicle approached from the airplane's right. The pilot applied the airplane's brakes and full reverse thrust, and the airplane came to a stop. The ground service vehicle passed in front of the airplane at an estimated distance of between 2 and 3 feet, and the vehicle and the airplane did not collide.

The pilot stated that the "hard" braking and reverse thrust application caused the nose landing gear strut to compress, resulting in a "spring effect that was multiplied by removing reverse thrust rapidly." The airplane then pitched up and the empennage struck the ground, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe. The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane's systems.

The operator of the ground service vehicle stated that he was proceeding to the security gate and was reaching down to grab an airport badge. The operator noticed the airplane when he looked up and immediately "slammed" on the brakes. The vehicle eventually came to a stop after crossing the taxiway.

Review of security camera video showed a sequence of events consistent with the statements provided by the pilot and the ground vehicle operator. Additionally, the airplane was taxiing with its landing lights, taxi lights, strobe lights, and rotating beacon lights on. The ground service vehicle's headlights, taillights, running lights, and a roof-mounted beacon were also on.

The 0554 weather conditions reported at BWI included 10 statute miles visibility and scattered clouds at 22,000 feet. The beginning of civil twilight occurred at 0620 and sunrise occurred at 0647. Moonrise occurred at 1024.

Code of Maryland Regulations 11.03.01.04 K(1) titled "Yielding the Right-of-Way" states "Any person operating a motor vehicle on the air operations area shall yield the right-of-way to aircraft in motion or aircraft with engines running, ready to be put in motion."

Group-owned jet use increases during Masters



More Masters Tournament patrons flew into town this year on their own planes – or at least, their “partly owned” planes.

Flexjet, a leading provider of fractionally owned private jets (think of a timeshare with wings), says business is up again this year at Augusta Regional Airport, where the roughly 3,000 private jets that descend on the Garden City during Masters Week account for nearly three-quarters of the airport’s entire private plane activity for the year.

This year’s tournament activity was a 3 percent increase over last year, Flexjet Sales Executive Christian McCracken said, adding that this year’s private jet turnout might have been the largest to date.

Fractional jet owners are (obviously) well-heeled individuals, but many are typically owned by small groups or corporations making the most out of their investment.

“In many cases, our owners will fly down several groups from differing locations through the span of competition to view the tournament, all on one set of passes,” McCracken said.

The Cleveland-based company’s hospitality lounge at the airport’s private jet terminal this year offered bourbon-tastings, a cigar bar, “locally sourced” hors d’oeuvres and a luxury candy buffet called the “Sweet Spot.”

You won’t find any of that in the main terminal, that’s for sure. And the best part? No Transportation Security Administration patdowns.

Original article can be found here: http://chronicle.augusta.com

North American T-6G Texan, SEJ Warbirds LLC, N3167G: Accident occurred April 08, 2017 at Culpeper Regional Airport (KCJR), Virginia

SEJ Warbirds LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3167G

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, DC 

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and flipped over. 

Date: 08-APR-17
Time: 17:40:00Z
Regis#: N3167G
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: T-6G
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CULPEPER
State: VIRGINIA

The 74-year-old male passenger inside the plane that crashed at Culpeper Regional Airport Saturday afternoon was listed in serious condition at INOVA Fairfax Hospital on Monday, according to a hospital spokesman.

John Reed Reavis Jr., of Bristow, who was airlifted to the hospital, was seated in the rear of the North American T-6G Texan, a  plane often used to train Air Force pilots and in combat during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

The pilot Daniel Allen Haug, 56, of Culpeper was transported to Culpeper Medical Center, but was not listed as a patient Monday.

According to the Virginia State Police, Haug was attempting to land at the airport at about 1:40 p.m. when the plane ran off the side of the runway and overturned.

Haug served as chairman of the Culpeper AirFest committee last year and is a member of the Commemorative Air Force’s National Capital Squadron. His North American T-6G Texan has been a part of many ceremonial flyovers and historical displays.

In early October, Haug, along with three other pilots, flew over a charity golf fundraiser in a missing man formation to honor the late J.J. Quinn, a Culpeper pilot who donated many hours to the Angel Flight organization.

The state police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.


Original article can be found here:   http://www.dailyprogress.com




CULPEPER COUNTY, Va. — State Police are investigating a small plane crash that left a pilot and his passenger injured Saturday afternoon.

Troopers were notified of the crash involving a 1949 North American T6G fixed-wing, single-engine, two seater aircraft around 1:45 p.m. The aircraft was attempting to land at the Culpeper Regional Airport when it ran off the side of the runway and overturned.

There were two occupants in the aircraft at the time of the crash. The pilot, 56-year-old Daniel Allen Haug of Culpeper County, was transported to Culpeper Hospital while his passenger, 74-year-old John Reed Reavis Jr. of Bristow, was flown to INOVA Fairfax Hospital.

The extent of their injuries is unknown.

The Virginia State Police are continuing to investigate the incident along with the FAA to determine the factors that lead to the crash.

Original article can be found here:   http://wtvr.com



Virginia State Police say a plane with two occupants crashed at Culpeper Regional Airport on Saturday afternoon.

The plane was a 1949 North American TG6, fixed-wing, single-engine, two-seater aircraft.

Officials say the plane was trying to land when it ran off the runway and overturned.

The pilot was identified as Daniel Haug, 56, of Culpeper and the passenger was identified as John Reavis Jr., 74 of Bristow.

Both were taken to the hospital.

Virginia State Police and the FAA are investigating to determine the cause of the crash. 

Original article can be found here:   http://wjla.com





Two men have been hospitalized after a small plane crashed Saturday afternoon at an airport in Culpeper County, Virginia, state police say.

About 1:40 p.m., the plane crashed at the Culpeper Regional Airport in Brandy Station, according to a spokesperson for Virginia State Police.

The single-engine 1949 North American T6G plane was attempting to land at the airport when it ran off the side of the runway and overturned, state police said.

Fifty-six-year-old Daniel Haug, of Culpeper, was flying the plane and 74-year-old John Reavis Jr. was riding as a passenger. Haug was taken to Culpeper Hospital and Reavis Jr. was flown to INOVA Fairfax Hospital, state police said. Their conditions are not known at this time.

Witnesses told News4 the crash happened during an event held by the Capital Wing of the Commemorative Air Force, a group that hosts airshows throughout the region.

Photos show a small yellow plane upside down on a grassy area. Video from the witness showed a medevac helicopter at the scene.

State police and the FAA are investigating.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcwashington.com



At 1:40 p.m. Saturday (April 8, 2017), Virginia State Police were notified of a plane crash that occurred at the Culpeper Regional Airport in Culpeper County.  The plane was a 1949 North American T6G, fixed-wing, single-engine, two seater aircraft.  

The aircraft was attempting to land at the airport when it ran off the side of the runway and overturned.  There were two occupants in the aircraft at the time of the crash, the pilot is identified as Daniel Allen Haug, age 56 of Culpeper, Virginia and passenger as John Reed Reavis Jr., age 74 of Bristow, Virginia.  The pilot was transported to Culpeper Hospital and the passenger was flown to INOVA Fairfax Hospital.

The Virginia State Police along with and FAA are investigating the incident to determine the causative factors that lead to the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbc29.com

United States restricts drone flights over 133 military facilities

Washington • Drone flights over 133 military facilities will be restricted for security reasons, marking the first time such flight restrictions have been applied only to drones rather than aircraft in general, the U.S. aviation safety authority said Friday.

The restrictions are in response to requests from the Defense Department and other security and intelligence agencies, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement. No specific threat was cited.

While drones can't fly over the facilities, the FAA's agreement with the Defense Department permits drone flights below 400 feet (120 meters) high within the side boundaries of the facilities, the statement said. Small drones in general are limited by the FAA to flights no higher than 400 feet anywhere without special permission.

An attorney for a coalition of companies that want to make or use drones said the language of the restriction is broadly written and may be used to apply to other types of facilities besides military installations.

The FAA announcement came as a surprise to the drone industry, said Michael Drobac of the Small UAV Coalition. Companies in general weren't asked for their views ahead of the decision despite efforts to work closely with the agency through numerous committees and working groups, he said. The "imprecise" language in the new restrictions leaves drone operators uncertain exactly what will and what won't be allowed, he said.

"We lack the kind of clarity and specificity that industry depends upon from government," Drobac said.

An aviation law passed by Congress last year requires the FAA to come up with rules to determine what types of facilities, in addition to military facilities, are safety or security critical and may be designated as no-drone zones. The agency was supposed to propose a plan to do that in January, but missed the deadline, Drobrac said.

FAA officials also promised to propose by the end of 2016 long-sought rules under which operators can fly drones over densely populated areas and crowds, which isn't permitted now except by special waiver. The rules are a necessary step to clear the way for package deliveries by drones. But that proposal was derailed at the last minute when military and law enforcement officials expressed concern that they don't have a way yet in which to identify whether drones operating present a threat or not.

FAA officials have now set aside their work on rules for flights over populated areas in order to first address the security concerns.

The new flight restrictions are effective beginning April 14. Only a few exceptions will be permitted and they must be coordinated with the individual facility or the FAA. Operators who violate the restrictions could be subject to fines or criminal charges.

 • Original article can be found here: http://www.sltrib.com

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N3280M: Fatal accident occurred April 08, 2017 at Orlando Sanford International Airport (KSFB), Orange County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Thomas Camman: http://registry.faa.gov/N3280M

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA148 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in Sanford, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 12, registration: N3280M
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 8, 2017, about 1256 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-12, N3280M, was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire after takeoff from Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to review of preliminary air traffic control communications, the pilot received a takeoff clearance for runway 27L to remain in the airport traffic pattern, which he acknowledged. There were no further communications with the pilot.

A witness to the accident recorded the flight on his cellular telephone. He provided the video, and gave a statement to airport police, which was consistent with the content of the video. According to the witness, the "airplane accelerated normally for takeoff, pitched up, and continued to pitch up into a full stall, rolled to the right and nosed in on right side of 27L." He stated a postimpact fire ensued and was extinguished by aircraft rescue and firefighting personnel.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane single and multiengine land ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on February 7, 2017, with the limitation, "must wear corrective lenses. " The pilot reported 25,000 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The three-seat, high-wing, tail-wheeled, fabric-covered airplane was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235-C1C engine, rated at 115 horsepower, that was equipped with a Sensenich two-bladed, fixed pitch propeller.

The accident flight was the first flight following a 2-year restoration of the airplane that included replacement of the wing and fuselage fabric, flight control cables, and electrical wiring.

The airplane came to rest inverted, oriented on magnetic heading of about 170°, in the grass about 9 ft north of runway 27L, adjacent to the 1,000 ft markers. 

The nose of the airplane was crushed aft.

The propeller was attached to the engine, which was located adjacent to a linear ground crater.

The empennage, fuselage, cockpit, and wings were consumed by postimpact fire.

The engine exhibited significant thermal damage, and several of its accessories were separated. 

The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand and continuity of the valve train was established from the crankshaft flange to the rear gears. Thumb compression was obtained on all four cylinders.

All flight control surfaces (ailerons, flaps, rudder, elevators, and trimmable horizontal stabilizer) were attached to their respective attach points. 

The left and right aileron cables were continuous from the control stick to their respective bell cranks. 

The rudder cables were continuous from the foot pedals to the rudder bell crank.

The elevator control cables were found attached to the upper and lower ends of the elevator control horn in the tail of the airplane.

Elevator control cable continuity was established from the control horn to the forward and rear control sticks.

Manipulation of the elevator control cables revealed that a nose-up control stick input resulted in a nose-down deflection of the elevator and vice versa. 

Further examination revealed that the elevator control cables were improperly rigged, such that they were attached to the incorrect (opposite) locations on the upper and lower elevator control horn.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



This picture was taken before the fatal accident.



SANFORD, Fla. - One person died Saturday in a plane crash at the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, officials said.

The incident involved a Piper P12 that crashed into the grass and burst into flames at the airport shortly before 1 p.m., said Lauren Rowe, with the Orlando-Sanford International Airport.

The pilot has been identified as Thomas Camman, 55, a long-time tenant at the Southeast Ramp of the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, officials announced late Saturday.

Diane Crews, president with the Orlando-Sanford International Airport, said the Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser was on its maiden voyage following its recent restoration. Crews said it appears the plane stalled, then crashed shortly after takeoff.

“This is a sad day for the Orlando Sanford International Airport. We grieve with the family and friends of Mr. Camman. 

We would also like to express our appreciation for the first responders today, including our Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Department, the Sanford Airport Police and the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office," said Crews.

Two runways will be closed until Monday for the investigation, but Rowe said it’s not impacting flights arriving or departing the airport. The runways impacted are for private and corporate planes, Rowe said.

"Planes been taking off, back and forth," said David Summerlin, who was at the airport. "(I) didn't hear nothing inside. (I have) been working all day, then we see a bunch of police and ambulance going that way. (I) didn't hear nothing."

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

No one else was injured, investigators said.


Story and video:   http://www.wftv.com




SANFORD -  Seminole County fire officials said they were investigating an incident involving a plane that came down at the Sanford International Airport and left the pilot dead Saturday afternoon.

The air traffic control tower at the airport issued an alert at 12:52 p.m. that a crash had happened in the grass on the north side of Runway 9R, airport officials said. A Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser crashed to the ground shortly after takeoff.

Airport officials said the pilot was killed upon impact. The pilot was identified by the airport as Thomas Camman, 55, a long-time tenant at the Southeast Ramp of the airport.

"This is a sad day for the Orlando Sanford International Airport, we grieve with the family and friends of Mr. Camman," Diane Crews, president and CEO of Orlando Sanford International Airport, said in a statement. "We would also like to express our appreciation for the first responders today, including our Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Department, the Sanford Airport Police and the Seminole County Sheriff's Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a statement on the incident earlier in the day.

"A Piper PA-12 aircraft veered off the runway and burst into flames as it was departing Orlando Sanford International Aircraft at about 1 p.m. today. Check with local authorities on the condition of the pilot, the only person on board. The FAA will investigate," the FAA wrote.

Airport officials said there were no other injuries to anyone on the ground, no damage to the airfield and no interruption in the airport's commercial flight operation.

Runways 18-36 and 9L are expected to remain closed until Monday following the conclusion of the investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, airport officials said.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.floridatoday.com

SANFORD, Fla. - Seminole County fire officials said they were investigating an accident involving a plane that came down at the Sanford International Airport and left one person dead Saturday afternoon.

Fire officials said a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser crash-landed on the runway and caught fire.

One person was killed in the accident, Seminole fire officials said.

A portion of the runway was closed following the accident, but did not affect operation on the main runway, airport officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a statement on the incident.

"A Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser aircraft veered off the runway and burst into flames as it was departing Orlando Sanford International Aircraft at about 1 pm today. Check with local authorities on the condition of the pilot, the only person on board. The FAA will investigate," the FAA wrote.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.clickorlando.com



SANFORD, Fla. —   A pilot was killed when a small plane went off the runway Saturday afternoon at the Orlando Sanford International Airport.

The incident occurred around 1 p.m., when a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser was taking off.

The FAA said the plane veered off of the runway and burst into flames. The pilot was the only one aboard, according to the FAA.

Airport President Diane Crews told WESH 2 News that runway 9R, the southernmost runway that runs east-west, is closed.

She said aircraft takeoffs and departures are continuing as normal, because this runway is not the airport's main runway.

She said there does not appear to be any damage to the airport. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wesh.com

The pilot of a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser aircraft is dead after a fiery crash at the Orlando-Sanford International Airport Saturday afternoon, authorities said.

Lauren Rowe, director of communications at the airport, said the incident happened between 1 and 2 p.m. The plane was taking off when it veered off the runway and burst into flames in a grassy area, she said.

There were no passengers on board, and no one else was injured, Rowe said.

The crash occurred on a runway used by private aircraft, so airport operations were not affected, she said.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the incident. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com

Ex-drug cartel pilot jailed for attempted murder with an ax



A former drug cartel's pilot has been jailed for trying to kill his unwanted lodger with an axe as he slept.

Andrew Barnes, 61, hit Luke Down with four heavy axe blows to his head, leaving him with brain injuries and close to death.

Barnes, from Topsham, Devon, admitted attempted murder and was jailed for 15 and a half years at Exeter Crown Court.

The judge described the axe attack as an "impetuous moment of madness". 

Mr. Down, 29, had been staying at Barnes's flat for free when he was attacked with the long-handled axe as he slept in the lounge.

He had been paying his way by bringing round alcohol and food, but Barnes claimed he had become violent and abusive towards him, the court heard.

The trigger for the attack was Mr. Down's threat to claim squatter's rights and barricade himself in the flat.

The court heard how the injuries would have been fatal if Barnes had removed the protective cover over the blade.

The life and crimes of Andrew Barnes

Jailed Andrew Barnes was once a drug cartel pilot, flying cocaine from Colombia to the United States.

Public school educated at Blundells in Tiverton, Barnes moved to America where he ran his own freight airline in the late 1970s.

But his business ran into financial trouble and in the early 1980s Barnes was employed by the Medellin cartel, flying their cocaine to remote US airstrips and Caribbean islands.

The planes left Colombia loaded with cocaine and returned crammed with so many dollar bills that drug lords such as Pablo Escobar built apartments with millions hidden in the cavity walls.

Barnes worked mainly for Carlos Lehder, who he testified against at his trial in Jacksonville in 1988. 

He was jailed for eight years in the US after admitting drug smuggling, before being moved to a witness protection scheme.

He returned to Britain in the late 1990s and descended into a spiral of alcohol abuse.

He moved into a flat owned by his family in Topsham and worked for 18 months at the SPCK religious bookshop on Cathedral Green.

In July 2001 he set light to the 15th century building housing the bookshop, causing £200,000 damage and forcing the evacuation of the neighboring Ship Inn.

He also set light to a boat on the banks of the River Exe after the owner refused to sell it to him, and was jailed for four years.

He was a well-known figure in Exeter, Exmouth and Topsham, regaling people with tall stories of his exploits as a drug-smuggling pilot. 

Sentencing Barnes over the axe attack, Judge Mr. Justice Dingemans told him: "You acted impetuously and on the spur of the moment.

"While he [Mr. Down] has made a remarkable physical recovery, he is going to have very serious long term health consequences.

"This was an spontaneous attempt to kill because you were fed up with Mr Down saying he was going to claim squatter's rights and also lying on your bed

"There is significant mitigation in the fact that he undoubtedly provoked you, although that is not to say there was any justification for this moment of madness."

Original article can be found here:  http://www.bbc.com

Cessna 310R, N1362G: Accident occurred April 08, 2017 at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (KLAL), Polk County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1362G

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 08, 2017 in South Lakeland, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N1362G
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 8, 2017, about 1140 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 310R, N1362G, sustained substantial damage when the left main landing gear collapsed during landing at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the airport at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida, about 1030 and was destined for LAL.

The pilot stated that he confirmed the landing gear was down and locked prior to landing. He said he landed "perfectly" but as the airplane rolled down the runway, the left wing began to sink. The pilot shut off the left engine, and the airplane veered to the left off the runway onto the grass. The pilot then shut off the right engine. When the airplane came to a stop, the pilot secured the airplane and he and his passenger exited. The airplane was towed to a maintenance facility for further examination. The left wing, and left horizontal stabilizer, and left propeller assembly were substantially damaged.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on September 19, 2016. At that time, he reported a total of 4,550 flight hours.

The weather conditions reported at LAL, at 1150, included wind 010° at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies.



LAKELAND, Fla. -- A small plane had a rough landing at the Sun 'n Fun air show at the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport on Saturday.

According to Lakeland Police Department, the 1976 Cessna 310R twin-engine plane's landing gear collapsed after it attempted a landing on Runway 27L around 11:53 a.m. The plane skidded off the runway and went into a safety area.

The plane was carrying pilot Juan G. Villanueva, 68, of Miramar and one passenger. LPD said that neither were injured during the landing.

The runway was closed for nearly an hour as emergency crews responded to the incident. The plane was moved to another location as the Federal Aviation Administration conducts its investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wtsp.com

Lancair 320, N7ZL: Fatal accident occurred January 09, 2015 near Van Nuys Airport (KVNY), California

Dr. Alberto Behar
~


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California 
Lycoming Engines; Agoura Hills, California 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7ZL

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA081
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 09, 2015 in Van Nuys, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: GIBBS LANCAIR 320, registration: N7ZL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was taking off for a personal, cross-country flight. Several witnesses reported that, shortly after takeoff, when the airplane was about 400 ft above the ground, they heard the engine "pop" at least twice, sputter, and then go silent, consistent with a loss of engine power. About this time, the pilot reported to the tower controller very quickly but not very clearly that "I have an engine failure I think." The tower controller subsequently issued the pilot the current altimeter setting and attempted to contact the pilot but did not receive any further radio transmissions. The airplane continued straight, turned right, and then spun to the ground. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The airplane was last refueled before its previous flight in Flagstaff, Arizona, 4 days before the accident; the airplane was then flown from Flagstaff to the Van Nuys Airport, Van Nuys, California. Although a narrow stream of what smelled like gasoline and engine oil was found near the wreckage, there was no fuel remaining in the fuel tanks.

The airplane was equipped with an electronic flight instrument system (EFIS), which has a low fuel alert that is set by the pilot or a mechanic. When fuel decreases to the specified amount, an alert pops up front and center on the EFIS, and it will not disappear until the pilot acknowledges it. Given that the pilot mostly conducted his own maintenance, it is highly likely he was familiar with the EFIS and knew that the airplane was low on fuel and how much fuel remained but decided to take off anyway. As a result of his decision, the engine lost engine power shortly after takeoff due to fuel exhaustion at too low of an altitude for the pilot to recover from the stall and subsequent spin.

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot texted him about 1249 when he arrived at the airport. He said that the pilot normally arrived about 1230. The pilot seemed to be in a rush that day because he was supposed to fly home the day before, and apparently he and his wife had argued about the issue. In addition, the pilot's friend noted that the pilot had recently become more conscious about where he bought fuel. Based on the directions the pilot received from the air traffic controller to stay below 2,000 ft if flying to Burbank, the friend believes it is likely the pilot was attempting to fly to Whiteman Airport about 5 nautical miles away that had cheaper fuel before continuing to his destination. 

According to the air traffic control recordings, the pilot first contacted the ground and tower controllers about 1308, and he was cleared for takeoff at 1311. Just before takeoff, the pilot's work e-mail documented nine messages, three of which were sent by the pilot, the last of which was sent at 1311. In the emails, the pilot indicated confusion about an issue, which may have been a further distraction to him. The evidence indicates that the pilot was rushed and sending e-mails, which likely distracted him during the taxi and takeoff and decreased his vigilance about the airplane's fuel status.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper decision to take off despite low fuel alerts, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion, his subsequent failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack, which led to an aerodynamic stall and loss of control at too low of an altitude to recover. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's distraction due to his sending e-mails and being rushed during taxi and takeoff, which resulted in reduced vigilance about the airplane's fuel status.


Dr. Alberto Behar

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 9, 2015, about 1313 Pacific standard time, a Lancair 320, N7ZL, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Van Nuys Airport (VNY), Van Nuys, California. The commercial pilot (sole occupant) sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was destined for Scottsdale Airport (SDL), Scottsdale, Arizona. 

The pilot contacted VNY ground control about 1308 and requested to taxi from the northwest side of the airport to runway 16R. Ground control cleared him to taxi to runway 16R via taxiways A and C. The pilot then contacted the control tower and requested to take off from runway 16R. The tower controller informed him to stand by for traffic. About 1311, the tower controller informed the pilot of traffic in the area and directed him to fly straight ahead to highway 101 and to stay below 2,000 ft if flying to Burbank; he then cleared the flight for takeoff. 

About 1313, the pilot reported very quickly but not very clearly that "I have an engine failure I think, N7ZL." The tower controller issued the pilot the current altimeter setting and attempted to contact the pilot but did not receive any further radio transmissions. The airport's crash response team was immediately alerted. 

Several witnesses reported that, shortly after takeoff, when the airplane was about 400 ft above the ground, they heard the engine "pop" at least twice, sputter, and then go silent. The airplane continued straight then turned right. Some witnesses mentioned that the airplane appeared to be very slow when the right wing and nose dropped. The airplane started to spin and impacted a nearby street in a nose-low attitude. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 47, held an air transport pilot certificate for airplane multiengine land and helicopters issued on November 18, 2011, and a commercial pilot certificate for single-engine land. The pilot also held an instrument rating and a flight instructor certificate for airplane single- and multi-engine land, helicopter, and instrument. In addition, the pilot held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate issued on February 1, 2012. The pilot's first-class medical certificate was issued on December 4, 2014, with the limitation that he must have available glasses for near vision. During his most recent medical examination, the pilot reported 2,349 total flight hours, 150 hours of which were in the previous 6 months. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle-gear airplane, serial number 137, was manufactured in October 1996. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-0320 BIA 160-horsepower engine and equipped with a Hartzell Propeller Inc., model AC-F24L-1BF controllable-pitch propeller. The maintenance logbooks were not located for examination. The tachometer and the Hobbs meter were electronic, and damage precluded determining the current readings. 

The airplane's last known refueling occurred on January 5, 2015, at the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (FLG) Flagstaff, Arizona, when 28.2 gallons of fuel was added. The airplane was fueled during the airplane's last known flight before the accident flight, during which the pilot took off from SDL and stopped at FLG for fuel before finishing the flight at VNY. The total amount of fuel on board the airplane at the time of the accident was not determined.

Electronic Flight Instrumentation System

The airplane was equipped with a GRT Avionics Horizon HX electronic flight instrument system (EFIS), which is a panel-mounted display that consolidates multiple instruments into a compact view to aid in pilot situational awareness. The Horizon HX EFIS has a flight data recording function that needs to be enabled, and a USB drive must be inserted into the EFIS for the data to record. The multifunctional display was shipped to the National Transportation Safety Board recorders laboratory for examination. The device powered on normally, and the data recording feature setting was determined to be inactive. Therefore, the device contained no pertinent information related to the accident.The Horizon HX EFIS has a low fuel alert, which is programmed by the pilot and/or mechanic to notify the pilot when the fuel reaches a specified level. This notification pops up front and center on any screen, and it does not leave the screen until the pilot acknowledges it. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1251, the VNY weather reporting station reported wind from 090 at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 21° C, dew point 04° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

VNY is located 3 miles northwest of Van Nuys, California, at an elevation of 802 ft. The airport has two hard-surfaced runways, 16R and 34L magnetic, and 16L and 34R magnetic. Runway 16R/34L is 8,001 ft long and 150 ft wide.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest at one corner of two intersecting streets. Telephone and power lines crossed all four corners of the intersection, and diagonally crossed two corners of the intersection. None of the wires appeared to be damaged, and no striations were observed on the airplane. The airplane was oriented to the southeast. The first identified point of contact was an impact crater in the street asphalt. The engine cowling and white paint transfer marks, which were almost parallel to the final orientation of the wings and were the approximate length of the wings, were found adjacent to the impact crater. The main wreckage was about 34 ft east of the impact crater; the area between the impact crater and main wreckage was covered with a sticky, dark-colored fluid. The cockpit area was destroyed, and the seats were fully exposed; the seats belts were not latched. The throttle and mixture controls were full in. 

Both wings remained attached to the fuselage; the right wing leading edge was split open the entire length, and the inboard two-thirds of the left-wing was split. The paint on both leading edges was chipped. The fuel caps for both wings and the header tank were in position and secure. Both wing tanks and the header tank on the fuselage had been breached; there was no fuel remaining in the fuel tanks, however, there was a narrow stream of what smelled like gasoline and engine oil in the gutter. 

The tail section was fractured and separated circumferentially just forward of the vertical stabilizer and horizontal stabilizer. The rudder remained attached at all hinges, and the elevators remained attached at all hinges.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The County of Los Angeles Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner, Los Angeles, California, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was reported as "multiple blunt traumatic injuries."

The Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot; 0.388 (ug/ml, ug/g) of doxylamine was detected in the pilot's blood. Doxylamine is a sedating antihistamine available in a number of over-the-counter cold and allergy products. It is also the active ingredient in a few over-the-counter sleep aids. The usual therapeutic window is considered between 0.050 and 0.150 ug/ml. However, doxylamine undergoes significant postmortem redistribution; postmortem levels in central blood may be three times higher than peripheral blood. Tolerance to the effects of doxylamine is less likely to develop than for some of the other sedating antihistamines; therefore, the use of this drug causes some degree of psychomotor slowing.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Airframe Examination

The cabin area was heavily fragmented; however, the instrument panel remained relatively whole and was still connected to the firewall. Flight control continuity was established from the cabin flight controls to their respective flight control surfaces. 

The fuel system was traced from the wing fuel tanks to the center forward cabin where it was fracture-separated and fragmented. The remaining parts of the fuel system were heavily fragmented. The fuel selector plate and two arms that appeared to be a part of the fuel selector were found loose within the cabin area. One fuel selector body was found; it contained one open end with what appeared to be a one-way check valve and one fractured rod end. 

Engine Examination

There was no evidence of catastrophic malfunction or preimpact fire. The crankcase's nose section sustained heavy impact damage. Due to the damage to the crankcase, the crankshaft would not rotate by hand. Holes were drilled into the case; the inside of the case was examined with a borescope, and there was no evidence of internal mechanical malfunction. 

The induction system sustained heavy crush damage. The fuel injection servo sustained heavy crush damage and was fragmented; however, the throttle and mixture controls were still secured to their respective control arms. The fuel pump was found displaced from its mounting pad; it was disassembled, and there was no evidence of flow obstruction or internal mechanical malfunction. The fuel flow divider remained secured at its mounting pad with the fuel lines secured at their respective fittings. The left magneto was rotated by hand, and it produced sparks at all four posts; the right magneto was an electronic ignition system and could not be tested. The ignition harness was destroyed; the spark plugs were removed, and they exhibited wear patterns consistent with normal operation. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Pilot's Friend Statement

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot would often text him when he arrived at the airport about 1230. On the day of the accident, he received a text from the pilot about 1249. He said that he seemed like he was in a hurry that day because he was supposed to have returned to SDL the day before. He later found out that the pilot and his wife had argued about it.

The friend stated that the pilot conducted most of his own maintenance. He also mentioned that the pilot had recently become conscious about where he purchased fuel. Based on the VNY tower controller's direction for the pilot to stay below 2,000 ft if flying Burbank after takeoff, he believes the pilot was flying to Whiteman Airport (WHP), which is 5 nautical miles away from VNY and is notorious for having cheaper fuel than VNY. In order to fly from VNY to WHP, one must contact Burbank air traffic control. 

E-mail Traffic

Between the time the pilot arrived at the airport and the time of the takeoff (between 1249 and 1311), the pilot's work e-mail documented nine messages, three of which were sent by the pilot. In the messages sent just prior to takeoff, the pilot mentioned that he was very confused about the discussion.











































NTSB Identification: WPR15FA081
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 09, 2015 in Van Nuys, CA
Aircraft: GIBBS LANCAIR 320, registration: N7ZL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 9, 2015, about 1300 Pacific standard time, a Lancair 320, N7ZL, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Van Nuys Airport (VNY), Van Nuys, California. The commercial pilot (sole occupant) was fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan was filed. The flight was destined for Scottsdale Airport (SDL), Scottsdale, Arizona. 

Witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff they heard the airplane's engine start to sputter and quit. They observed the airplane make a right turn; it started to shake before it nosed over and descended into an intersection below. The airplane impacted the ground hard and bounced backward about 15 feet, coming to rest upright. The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.