Monday, January 30, 2017

Two hunters being investigated for using a plane to spot and hunt elk in the Chewelah Valley, Washington

COLVILLE – State wildlife agents are investigating two men suspected of using an airplane to spot elk and call in locations to hunters on the ground.

One of the men denied the allegations during a phone call Monday.

“That is ridiculous and that never happens,” he said. “I didn’t even shoot an elk this year, for your information.”

It’s illegal to use an aircraft to “spot, locate or report the location of wildlife for the purpose of hunting” under Washington law.

According to a search warrant on file in Stevens County Superior Court, a red and white single-engine prop plane was observed in November flying low and circling timbered areas near Valley, Washington.

The Washington state Department of Fish and Wildlife investigation began with an anonymous complaint.

One man, interviewed by investigators, said he watched as the plane circled low, and then shortly after hunters would show up.

“They are pack hunters,” the witness said. “When they hunt there are always four to six of them or more.”

Other witnesses also claimed seeing the plane and hearing gunshots a short time later.

Stevens County Deputy Travis Frizzell told wildlife agents he also saw a red and white plane circling timber near his home. Shortly after he watched the airplane, a friend texted him: “there is a plane circling over my elk.”

About an hour later the same friend again texted Frizzell telling him he heard gunshots coming from the timbered area the plane had circled.

“I have not seen the plane flying low and circling after the close of elk season,” Frizzell wrote in court documents.

Investigators searched the cell phone records of the man who owns the red and white airplane, according to court documents. Phone records provided by AT&T indicated that he’d been in contact with the suspected hunter multiple times during the two-day period neighbors complained about the circling aircraft and gunshots.

According to GPS data most of the calls and texts originated from within the Chewelah Valley, near the area where witnesses claim to have seen the plane.

The suspected hunter said the allegations were made by a neighbor who is angry he has hunting rights on a nearby piece of property.

“Do we fly over that property? Of course, we fly the whole valley,” he said in an interview Monday. “Now do we see elk? Heck yeah we do. Because they are all over the valley. Do we coordinate? No, there is no reason to.”

The search warrant filed Jan. 6 seeks the suspected hunter’s phone records from Nov. 1 and 2.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.spokesman.com

Cessna P210N Centurion, N4796P: Accident occurred January 30, 2017 near Schuylkill County Airport (KZER), Pottsville, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N4796P 


Location: Pottsville, PA
Accident Number: ERA17LA098
Date & Time: 01/30/2017, 1404 EST
Registration: N4796P
Aircraft: CESSNA P210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 30, 2017, at 1404 eastern standard time, a Cessna P210N, N4796P, sustained substantial damage when it made a forced landing about 1-mile north of the Schuykill County Airport (ZER), Pottsville, Pennsylvania, after a total loss of engine power. The private pilot/registered owner and the passenger sustained minor injuries. A visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at the Allentown Queen City Municipal Airport (XLL), Allentown, Pennsylvania, about 1330, destined for the Erie-Ottawa International Airport (PCW), Port Clinton, Ohio. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that the day before the accident he topped the airplane off with fuel (for 90 gallons total), completed a preflight inspection, started the engine, and taxied a short distance to make sure the airplane was operating okay. Everything was normal and he parked the airplane outside overnight. The following day, he arrived at the airport but did not do a preflight inspection or sump the fuel tanks. He started the engine and departed. The pilot climbed to 12,500 ft mean sea level (msl) and leveled off. When he reduced engine rpm for cruise flight, the engine "just shut off immediately." There was no warning or any indication of an engine problem prior to it shutting down and the propeller continued to windmill. The pilot attempted to re-start the engine for 3-4 minutes to no avail. He declared an emergency and proceeded to ZER, the nearest airport, but landed off field about 1 mile north of the airport. The airplane collided with trees and came to rest upright on an embankment. The left and right wings sustained substantial damage and the engine had separated from the firewall. The tail section also sustained structural damage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that left and right-wing fuel tanks were breached and the fuel selector rotated freely to each detent. The fuel sump drains were removed, and both were heavily corroded due to exposure to moisture.

The engine sustained impact damage but the cylinders, components, and accessories remained attached to the engine. The oil pan was damaged, and the engine could not be test run. The engine was manually rotated, and compression and valve train continuity were established on each cylinder. Engine timing was also confirmed. Both magnetos were placed on a test-bench and produced spark to their respective leads. The spark plugs were removed and compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Each plug exhibited normal operating signatures.

The fuel pump was removed, and the coupling was intact, but the pump was locked up and could not be rotated. The pump was disassembled and the internal components (including the housing bolts and screws) were corroded due to exposure with moisture. The fuel manifold was removed and placed on a test-bench. The flow check was normal. The manifold's fuel inlet screen was removed, and a small amount of debris was observed. The fuel metering unit sustained impact damage and the mixture control was bent and the fuel inlet AN fitting was broken. The screen was removed and absent of debris. The unit was disassembled, and the mixture cam, throttle cam, and the metering plug exhibited a large amount of corrosion consistent with exposure to moisture. The airplane had been sitting outside exposed to snow before and after it was recovered. Since the fuel system had been breached, it could not be determined when the corrosion occurred. The pilot confirmed he had no previous issues with water in the airplane's fuel system.

The oil sump was removed, and some residual oil remained. No metallic material was observed. The oil pick-up tube and screen were absent of debris. The oil pump was disassembled, and no anomalies were noted. The oil filter was opened, and the element was absent of debris. No mechanical anomalies were noted that would have precluded normal operation of the engine.

The last annual inspection for the airplane and engine were completed on June 8, 2016, at a tachometer time of 3,663 hours. The engine was installed new in 2010, and had accrued about 644.6 hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on October 9, 2015. The pilot reported a total of 3,000 flight hours and 1,500 hours in the same make/model as the accident airplane.

A weather observation taken about 19 miles southwest of the accident site, at Muir Army Airfield (MUI), Fort Indiantown Gap (Annville), Pennsylvania, at 1358, reported wind from 280 degrees at 7 knots, with variable wind between 240 and 310 degrees, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 7,500 feet, temperature -1-degree C, dew point -4 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.81 inches of mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/05/2017
Flight Time:  3000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1500 hours (Total, this make and model), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N4796P
Model/Series: P210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: P21000110
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/08/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4001 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3686 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MUI, 487 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1358 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 220°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 7500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Allentown, PA (XLL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Erie-Ottawa, OH (PCW)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1330 EST
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: SCHUYLKILL COUNTY /JOE ZERBEY/ (ZER)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 1729 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  40.000000, -76.000000 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 30, 2017 in Pottsville, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA P210, registration: N4796P
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 30, 2017, at 1404 eastern standard time, a Cessna P210N, N4796P, sustained substantial damage when it made a forced landing about 1 mile north of the Schuykill County Airport (ZER), Pottsville, Pennsylvania, after a total loss of engine power. The private pilot/registered owner and his passenger sustained minor injuries. A visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at the Allentown Queen City Municipal Airport (XLL), Allentown, Pennsylvania, about 1330, destined for the Erie-Ottawa International Airport (PCW), Port Clinton, Ohio. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that after departure, he climbed to 12,500 feet mean sea level (msl) and leveled off. When he reduced engine rpm for cruise flight the engine "just shut off immediately." The pilot said there was no warning or any indication of an engine problem prior to it shutting down and fuel pressure was normal. The propeller continued to windmill after the power loss. The pilot attempted to re-start the engine for 3-4 minutes to no avail. He declared an emergency and proceeded to ZER, the nearest airport, but landed off field about 1 mile north of the airport. The airplane collided with trees and came to rest upright on an embankment. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed the left and right wing fuel tanks were breached and the engine had separated from the firewall. The tail section also sustained structural damage.

A weather observation taken about 19 miles southwest of the accident site, at Muir Army Airfield (MUI), Fort Indiantown Gap (Annville), Pennsylvania, at 1358, reported wind from 280 degrees at 7 knots, with variable wind between 240 and 310 degrees, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 7,500 feet, temperature -1 degree C, dew point -4 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.81 inches of mercury.



POTTSVILLE, Pa. (WHTM) – No injuries were reported after an airplane crash Monday afternoon in Schuylkill County.

According to a Schuylkill County 911 dispatcher, a twin-engine airplane had mechanical issues and went down just after 2 p.m. in Foster Township.

The crash scene was in the 1800 block of Sunbury Road, a bit north of the Schuylkill County Airport.

Two people in the airplane refused EMS treatment.

Source:  http://abc27.com




Two people escaped serious injury when the small plane they were flying crashed along Route 901 in Foster Township, near the Schuylkill County Airport, on Monday afternoon.

The crash occurred around 2 p.m.

Story and video: http://www.mcall.com

Beechcraft 58TC Baron, Laguna Aviation Inc., N2081L: Incident occurred January 28, 2017 at Bishop Airport (KBIH), Inyo County, California

LAGUNA AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2081L

FAA Flight Standards District Office: RNO FSDO

LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED AFTER LANDING.AT BIH.

Date: 28-JAN-17
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N2081L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BISHOP
State: CALIFORNIA

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, N16GL: Accident occurred January 28, 2017 at Fremont County Airport (1V6), Canon City, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA125 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2017 in Canon City, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: GREAT LAKES 2T1A, registration: N16GL
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane reported that she extended the downwind leg due to other aircraft in the traffic pattern and that, while on the extended final, she put the biplane in a “slip.” During the slip, the windsock was out of view. She further reported that, during the landing flare, she noticed that the “ground-speed” was higher than normal and that “about 800 ft” after touchdown, the biplane “violently swerved to the right.” She attempted to recover with rudder inputs; however, the biplane veered off the runway and came to rest inverted.

The biplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s unstabilized approach.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N16GL

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA125
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2017 in Canon City, CO
Aircraft: GREAT LAKES 2T1A, registration: N16GL
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped biplane reported that she extended her downwind due to other aircraft in the traffic pattern, and that while on the extended final she put the biplane in a "slip". During the slip, she reported that the windsock was out of view. She further reported that during the landing flare she noticed her "ground-speed" was higher than normal, and that "about 800 ft." after touchdown, the biplane "violently swerved to the right". She attempted to recover with rudder inputs, however the biplane veered off the runway and came to rest inverted.

The biplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage.

The pilot reported there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Piper PA-32-260, N3938W: Incident occurred January 27, 2017 in Kim, Las Animas County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N3938W

FAA Flight Standards District Office: DENVER FSDO NM-03

AIRCRAFT MADE AN EMERGENCY DESCENT DUE TO AN ENGINE FAILURE, KIM, COLORADO 

Date: 27-JAN-17
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N3938W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: KIM
State: COLORADO

Eurocopter, MBB-BK 117 C-2, N911MK: Incident occurred January 26, 2017 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident. 

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N911MK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: RAP FSDO


NTSB Identification: CEN17IA094
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Incident occurred Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Sioux Falls, SD
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER DEUTSCHLAND GMBH MBB BK 117 C-2, registration: N911MK
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On January 26, 2017, about 2145 central standard time, a Eurocopter Deutschland GMBH MBB-BK 117 C-2 helicopter, N911MK, experienced an inflight engine fire and made an emergency landing at Joe Foss Field Airport (FSD), Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The airline transport rated pilot and two crewmembers were not injured. The helicopter sustained minor damage. The helicopter was registered to Avera McKennan and operated by MRIS, LLC., doing business as Avera McKennan Careflight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an air medical flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the incident and a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed. The helicopter departed McKennan Hospital Heliport (2SD1), Sioux Falls, at 2128 and was en route to Douglas County Memorial Hospital Heliport (08SD), Armour, South Dakota. 

The pilot reported that while flying westbound about 800 ft above ground level (agl), he noticed several caution lights illuminate and heard a "hissing sound and the smell of exhaust in the cabin." The pilot initiated a turn back to Sioux Falls when the No. 2 engine fire light illuminated and he noticed an "orange glow" from the rear of the helicopter. He activated both fire extinguisher bottles and the engine fire light switched off. The pilot continued toward Sioux Falls about 500 ft agl with the No. 2 engine inoperative. The pilot communicated the emergency to the FSD air traffic controller and executed a running landing on runway 3 without further incident. 

An initial examination of the helicopter revealed fire damage to the No. 2 engine and cowling. The helicopter was retained for further examination.

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters Inc dba Tampa Bay Aviation: Accident occurred January 26, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Pinellas County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Tampa, Florida  

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N2382R

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA095
Date & Time: 01/26/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N2382R
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 26, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172R, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters, Inc., dba Tampa Bay Aviation, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at the Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated about 30 minutes earlier from CLW.

The pilot stated that he performed a preflight inspection of the rental airplane but elected to have it fueled because of the on-board fuel load. He finished his preflight inspection after fueling, which included an inspection of the undamaged propeller, but did note the passenger door was difficult to close, and he had an issue with his lap belt, but was able to secure it. After engine start, he taxied to runway 16, where he performed an engine run-up with no discrepancies noted.

After takeoff, he flew west towards the beach but elected to return after seeing adverse weather nearby. He entered the traffic pattern at CLW for runway 16, which was equipped with a visual approach slope indicator, but he did not turn it on. He turned the airplane onto the base leg of the traffic pattern and then onto final approach leg of the traffic pattern, where he maintained 65 mph with the flaps extended 30 degrees, and reported descending at the standard rate with no airspeed fluctuations. On his first landing attempt about at touchdown, the airplane encountered a strong wind gust which caused the airplane to climb "a little bit", or about 10 feet. He performed a go-around, and re-entered the traffic pattern for runway 16. The pilot conducted the second landing attempt with 10 degrees of flaps extended, maintaining 65 mph while on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, and reported the, "touchdown was perfect soft" on the numbers. He did not experience a propeller strike on landing, and then taxied to the tie-down area where he secured the airplane. He then went inside the fixed-base operator and wrote up the discrepancies related to the lap belt, and for a fuel gauge which indicated 5 gallons after fueling.

According to the operator, their review of airport surveillance video revealed that later that same day, maintenance personnel of the operator went to the airplane, which had not been moved or damaged, and observed damage to the propeller. Additionally, review of aircraft operational records and the airplane's hour meter revealed that the airplane had not been operated since it was returned. During hand rotation of the propeller, maintenance personnel heard internal engine damage, and subsequently noted damage to the firewall. The oil pressure-activated hour meter reading when the mechanics inspected the airplane was the same as when the pilot returned the airplane. Subsequent testing of the hour meter with FAA oversight revealed it operated satisfactory with no discrepancies.

The operator reported that the airplane was flown the evening before on a training flight with a student and instructor, and at the conclusion of their uneventful flight, the airplane was secured. They also indicated that airport surveillance video depicted the accident pilot inspecting the propeller after securing the airplane at the conclusion of the flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/02/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/09/2016
Flight Time:  450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 300 hours (Total, this make and model), 450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2382R
Model/Series: 172 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17280700
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/12/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6955.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: CLEARWATER HELICOPTERS INC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: CLEARWATER HELICOPTERS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Tampa Bay Aviation
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CLW, 71 ft msl
Observation Time: 1255 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1900 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 20°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots/ 16 knots, 220°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 EST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Clearwater Airpark (CLW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:  4108 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  27.977222, -82.759167 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2382R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 26, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172R, N2382R, registered to Clearwater Helicopters, Inc., dba Tampa Bay Aviation, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at the Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local, personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated about 30 minutes earlier from CLW.

The pilot stated that he performed a preflight inspection of the airplane which included a check of the propeller and did not notice any damage. He did note the passenger door was difficult to close, and had an issue with his lap belt, but was able to secure it. After engine start, he taxied to runway 16, where he performed an engine run-up with no discrepancies noted. After takeoff, he flew west towards the beach but noticed adverse weather to the north and south of their location. He elected to return to CLW and entered the traffic pattern for runway 16, which was equipped with a visual approach slope indicator, but he did not turn it on. He turned the airplane onto the base leg of the traffic pattern and then onto final approach leg of the traffic pattern, where he maintained 65 mph with the flaps extended 30 degrees, and reported descending at the standard rate with no airspeed fluctuations. On his first landing attempt about at touchdown, the airplane encountered a strong wind gust which caused the airplane to climb "a little bit." He performed a go-around, and re-entered the traffic pattern for runway 16. The pilot conducted the second landing attempt with 10 degrees of flaps extended. He maintained 65 mph while on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, and reported the, "touchdown was perfect soft" on the numbers. He further reported the airplane did not have a propeller strike on landing, and he taxied to the tie-down area, secured the airplane, then went inside the fixed-base operator and wrote up the discrepancies related to the door and lap belt.

Later that same day, maintenance personnel of the operator went to the airplane, which had not been moved or operated since it was returned, and observed damage to the propeller. After noting internal engine damage, they towed the airplane into their hangar, and upon removal of the engine cowling, noticed firewall damage.

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, P D Q Space Arrow Inc., N7545J: Incident occurred January 29, 2017 in Chamblee, DeKalb County, Georgia

P D Q SPACE ARROW INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7545J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ATL FSDO

UPON LANDING AIRCRAFT VEERED INTO GRASS.

Date: 29-JAN-17
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N7545J
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHAMBLEE
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 182T Skylane, Cora & Associates LLC, N65507: Incident occurred January 29, 2017 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia

CORA & ASSOCIATES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N65507

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ATLANTA

AIRCRFT WAS LANDING RWY 21L AT PDK WHEN IT DEPARTED LEFT SIDE OF RWY STRIKING PROP AND DAMAGING 2 RUNWAY LIGHTS. ATLANTA, GA

Date: 29-JAN-17
Time: 16:19:00Z
Regis#: N65507
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Buckeye 582 Dream Machine, N7057X: Incident occurred January 28, 2017 in Valdosta, Lowndes County, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N7057X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ATLANTA FSDO SO-11

POWERED PARACHUTE CRASHED INTO TREES UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

Date: 28-JAN-17
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N7057X
Aircraft Make: BUCKEYE PWR PARACHUTE
Aircraft Model: 58S DREAM MACHINE
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: VALDOSTA
State: GEORGIA

Side Winder TD, N60JV: Accident occurred January 28, 2017 at McCook Ben Nelson Regional Airport (KMCK), Red Willow County, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2017 in McCook, NE
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: VAUGHAN GERALD R SIDE WINDER TD, registration: N60JV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions, the airplane veered to the left. He applied right rudder and brake, but the airplane struck a runway sign on the left side of the runway and exited the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.
A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, about 8 minutes after the accident, the wind was 320° true at 19 knots, gusting to 25 knots, and peak wind was 300° true at 27 knots. The airplane landed on runway 30.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N60JV

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2017 in McCook, NE
Aircraft: VAUGHAN GERALD R SIDE WINDER TD, registration: N60JV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions, the airplane veered to the left. He further reported that he applied right rudder and brake, but the airplane struck a runway sign on the left side of the runway and exited the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that about 8 minutes after the accident the wind was 320° true at 19 knots, wind gust 25 knots, peak wind was 300° true at 27 knots. The airplane landed on runway 30.

McCOOK, Neb. -- A single engine airplane had a mishap while landing at McCook Ben Nelson Regional Airport Saturday afternoon.

Airport officials said the small aircraft came in with "wind issues" and pushed off to the left of the runway shortly after touching down, making contact with a taxiing sign and two runway lights. No one was injured as a result.

A replacement sign was priced out at $1,200 early Monday and, according to information city staff received from the pilot, damage to the aircraft was fairly extensive.

McCook Fire and Rescue, police officers and airport management responded to the scene after receiving a report at just past 5 p.m. of a single engine plane crash.

"The plane, piloted by a Montana male, crashed into the grass off the south end of the runway.

There were no injuries and no fire or disruption to the airport.

There was minor damage to a sign and runway lights as a result of the crash," said Chief of Police Isaac Brown.

Aviat A-1C-200, Canyon State Aviation, N382US: Accident occurred January 27, 2017 at Pilot Creek Ranches Airport (NV67), Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration; Salt Lake City, Utah 
Federal Aviation Administration /Flight Standards District Office: Reno, Nevada 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Canyon State Aviation LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N382US

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA062
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 27, 2017 in Jiggs, NV
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1C-200, registration: N382US
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 27, 2017, about 1645 Pacific standard time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1C, N382US, was substantially damaged when it nosed over in the snow during a precautionary landing at an airstrip near Jiggs, Nevada. The airplane was owned by Canyon State Aviation LLC., and the pilot was operating it under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot was not injured. The local personal flight originated from Elko Regional Airport, Elko, Nevada, around 1630. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to overfly the vicinity of his ranch and look for horse tracks. About 10 minutes after departure, with the airplane at an altitude of about 1,000 feet above ground level (agl), the engine began to run rough and the rpm surged several times. The cockpit gauges and engine monitoring device all indicated normal ranges, with no anomalies. The pilot opted to make a precautionary landing and observed he was about 2 miles from the snow-covered dirt airstrip on Corta Ranch, which his family owns and where he frequently lands during the summer months. He touched down about five minutes later and during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over in the snow coming to rest inverted. He estimated the snow was between 24 to 30 inches deep. The airplane incurred damage to the struts and wings as a result of the impact.


The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, Ameriflyers of Florida LLC, N6392V: Incident occurred January 28, 2017 at Morristown Municipal Airport (KMMU), Morris County, New Jersey

AMERIFLYERS OF FLORIDA LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6392V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: TEB FSDO

TAXIING TO PARKING SPOT AIRCRAFT LEFT WING STRUCK PROP OF PARKED C172 (N540CF), MORRISTOWN, NEW JERSEY.

Date: 28-JAN-17
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N6392V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: MORRISTOWN
State: NEW JERSEY

Cirrus SR22, Tango Juliet Corp, N523GB: Incident occurred January 28, 2017 at Westchester County Airport (KHPN), White Plains, New York

Tango Juliet Corp: http://registry.faa.gov/N523GB

Type Registration: Non Citizen Corporation 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FRG FSDO

Aircraft struck trees on approach to runway 34.  Aircraft landed and taxiied to ramp. 

Date: 28-JAN-17
Time: 01:33:00Z
Regis#: N523GB
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: 22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WHITE PLAINS
State: NEW YORK

Beech 35-A33 Debonair, N498T: Incident occurred January 27, 2017 at Ardmore Municipal Airport (KADM), Carter County, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N498T

FAA Flight Standards District Office: OKC FSDO

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 27-JAN-17
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N498T
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 33
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ARDMORE
State: OKLAHOMA

Mooney M20J, N201SE: Incident occurred January 28, 2017 at Fort Worth Spinks Airport (KFWS), Fort Worth, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N201SE 

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, FORT WORTH SPINKS (FWS), FORT WORTH, TEXAS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: North Texas FSDO SW-19

Date: 28-JAN-17
Time: 22:31:00Z
Regis#: N201SE
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M020
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FORT WORTH
State: TEXAS