Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Beechcraft 35 Bonanza, N80462: Accident occurred March 29, 2015 near Cedar Mills Airport (3T0), Gordonville, Grayson County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N80462



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Gordonville, TX
Accident Number: CEN15LA183
Date & Time: 03/29/2015, 1600 CDT
Registration: N80462
Aircraft: BEECH 35
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 29, 2015, about 1600 central daylight time, a Beech 35 single-engine airplane, N80462, impacted terrain, after departing the Cedar Mills Airport (3T0), Gordonville, Texas. The pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, and two passengers received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal cross-country flight which was destined for the Tyler Pounds Regional Airport (TYR), Tyler, Texas.

The pilot reported that he performed a soft field takeoff from the turf runway, and the airplane lifted off at an indicated airspeed of 80 mph. As the airplane neared the departure end of the runway, the pilot noticed the airplane was not climbing as expected, the indicated airspeed seemed unreliable, and the controls felt mushy and near stall speed. The airplane impacted trees and the roof of an unoccupied home. The airplane then impacted terrain, about 50 ft from the house and came to rest upright after impacting two propane storage tanks. There was no release of propane and there was no postimpact fire at the main wreckage.

Two witnesses observed the airplane depart from the runway. They stated that the airplane traveled quite a distance, or halfway down the runway before it became airborne. They added the right wing dropped, with one witness stating that he thought the airplane, "was going to crash right there". The witness stated he didn't think the engine speed was right and the airplane was slowly gaining altitude. The other witness reported that the airplane wasn't gaining any altitude and the engine sounded "strong" and did not cut out.

In a post-accident interview, the pilot stated that that it took longer than expected to get airborne because the ground was soft, but the engine was developing full power. Adding that he thought that a gust of wind hit the airplane, causing the right wing to dip and lose airspeed. He added that the windsock showed light and variable winds. The runway was lined with thick trees on both sides. He added that he considered doing a downhill takeoff toward the lake, but because of the possibility of a tail wind after passing tree line, he chose to do a soft field takeoff in the other direction.

The engine and airframe were examined by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and technical representatives from the engine and airframe manufacturers. The exam noted that the landing gear was in the down position and the flap actuator corresponded to flaps up (retracted) position. The constant speed, two-bladed propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. One blade was twisted and bent rearward beginning about 8 inches from the hub. The other blade had chordwise scratching with a portion of the blade tip broken off. The engine received thermal and impact damage; however, no preimpact abnormalities were noted with the engine or airframe.

A review of aircraft maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was conducted on November 21, 2014. The last weight and balance sheet was completed on June 18, 2013, with an airplane empty weight of 1,765 lbs. The maximum gross weight of the airplane is 2,500 lbs. Using the pilot's listed weight and 28 gallons of fuel on-board, the remaining useful load for the remaining three passengers and any cargo would be about 379 lbs.

The automated weather reporting station located about 10 miles southeast of the accident site recorded wind from 210 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 15 knots.

3T0's runway 7/25, is described as a turf/grass runway 3,000 ft long by 60 ft wide. Runway 7/25 is surrounded by trees on three sides, and a lake on the departure end of runway 7. The chart supplement notes: 40 ft and 80 ft trees north and south of runway 25's centerline.

A review of the airplane's pilot operating handbook (POH) revealed that take-off performance charts did not have a correction factor for grass/turf runways. The POH was not required to have the correction factors.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/16/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/27/2014
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2165 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1513 hours (Total, this make and model), 2044 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N80462
Model/Series: 35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: D-62
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/21/2014, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 19 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4608 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: E-228-8
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 225 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGYI, 749 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 136°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots/ 15 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Gordonville, TX (3T0)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: TYLER, TX (TYR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1700 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G



Airport Information

Airport: CEDAR MILLS (3T0)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 640 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  33.837500, -96.816111 (est)



NTSB Identification: CEN15LA183 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 29, 2015 in Gordonville, TX
Aircraft: BEECH 35, registration: N80462
Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 29, 2015, about 1600 central daylight time, a Beech 35, single-engine airplane, N80462, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain during initial climb at Cedar Mills Airport (3T0), Gordonville, Texas. The pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, and two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight which was destined for Tyler Pounds Regional Airport (TYR), Tyler, Texas.

The pilot reported that during his soft field takeoff from the turf runway the airplane had lifted off at an indicated airspeed of 80 mph. As the airplane neared the departure end of the runway the pilot noticed the airplane was not climbing as expected, the indicated airspeed seemed unreliable, and the controls felt mushy and near stall speed. The airplane then impacted trees and the roof of an unoccupied home. The engine separated and fell inside the home which resulted in a structure fire that substantially damaged the home. The airplane impacted terrain about 50 feet from the burning home and came to rest upright after impacting two nearly full propane storage tanks. There was no release of propane and there was no postimpact fire at the location of the main wreckage. Several persons at another nearby home witness the impact and responded immediately to assist the four occupants to exit the wreckage.

Cessna 310Q, N7770Q: Accident occurred March 20, 2015 at St. George Municipal Airport (KSGU), Washington County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7770Q


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: St. George, UT
Accident Number: WPR15LA129
Date & Time: 03/20/2015, 1900 MDT
Registration: N7770Q
Aircraft: CESSNA 310Q
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 20, 2015, about 1900 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 310Q airplane, N7770Q, experienced a left main gear collapse during the landing roll at St. George Regional Airport (SGU), St. George, Utah. The commercial pilot and one passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left aileron. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed SGU about 1800.

The pilot reported that the purpose of this flight was to regain currency after the airplane had been in maintenance for an extended period of time. During the flight, three takeoff and landings were completed before the pilot departed the traffic pattern to practice inflight maneuvers. After finishing the maneuvers, he reentered the traffic pattern for landing. With normal landing gear indications in the cockpit, the pilot landed the airplane normally and uneventfully. During the landing roll, the left wing lowered more than normal; subsequently, the engine propellers and wingtip impacted the runway surface. The airplane slowly slid to the left and exited the runway surface.

A postaccident examination conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector revealed that the lower adjusting bolt on the left main landing gear was fracture separated. High quality photos of the fracture surfaces were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further examination. The NTSB Materials Laboratory specialist reported that both fracture surfaces exhibited fractographic features consistent with overstress fracture due to tensile and cantilever bending loads applied to the tie-rod end fitting. No indications of preexisting cracking was observed.

Review of maintenance logbooks revealed the last annual inspection was completed the same day as the accident. During the inspection, the left and right landing gear side brace bolts and bushings were replaced, and a gear retraction test was satisfactory.

According to a Cessna Representative, the area of the fracture is where a mechanic would place the spring scale to measure the down lock force. This area is one of two main fracture locations when the down lock is improperly adjusted. 


Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/16/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/14/2013
Flight Time:  1071 hours (Total, all aircraft), 199 hours (Total, this make and model), 950 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N7770Q
Model/Series: 310Q
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 310Q0270
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/20/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5302 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 2 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8704 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSGU, 2884 ft msl
Observation Time: 1835 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 325°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / -8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 240°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: St. George, UT (SGU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: St. George, UT (SGU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1800 MDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: ST GEORGE REGIONAL AIRPORT (SGU)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2884 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19
IFR Approach: Unknown
Runway Length/Width: 9300 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  37.091667, -113.592778 (est)


NTSB Identification: WPR15LA129
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 20, 2015 in St. George, UT
Aircraft: CESSNA 310Q, registration: N7770Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 20, 2015, about 1930 mountain daylight time (MDT), a Cessna 310Q, N7770Q, sustained substantial damage follow a main gear collapse during rollout at St. George Municipal Airport (SGU), St. George, Utah. The owner/pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and one passenger were not injured. The local personal flight departed St George, Utah, about 1845. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. 

The pilot reported that during rollout on runway 19, the left main landing gear collapsed. The airplane veered left and exited the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. 

The airplane was recovered for further examination.

Grant County, Washington: Air Force seeks airspace closure for training

MOSES LAKE — The commission overseeing the Port of Moses Lake will be holding a public hearing sometime in late May to consider a request from the U.S. Air Force to temporarily close air space over and around the Grant County International Airport for training.

According to Port Director Jeffry Bishop, the Air Force wants to test the maneuverability of its new KC-47 tanker under “simulated enemy activity.”

“They are asking for four, four-hour blocks on a Saturday and Sunday, with one to hours in-between,” Bishop told commissioners during a regular meeting Monday morning.

The Air Force has used Grant County for special training in early October, 2016, Bishop said.

“What’s unique about this is that during the exercise, it would be more complicated, with moving aircraft and moving ground equipment,” Bishop said.

The airspace would be closed during the four-hour training blocks, Bishop said, but the air traffic control center would still be in charge, and could cancel the tests in the event of an emergency.

“Flight testing and supporting the military is a big part of our mission. Sixty-six percent of our income comes from the military,” Bishop said. “We do not enter into these lightly.”

“I think it’s a big deal, anything we can do to support the military without screwing things up around here we should do,” said Commission Chair David “Kent” Jones.

The port will announce a formal date for the public hearing soon.

Original article ➤ http://www.columbiabasinherald.com

Feds say 10 airline workers at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW) used flights to distribute 'methamphetamine'

DALLAS — Federal authorities say ten airline employees who worked at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport used commercial flights to distribute methamphetamine in exchange for pay.

But they didn't know the drugs were actually fake -- and they were working with undercover officers.

The counterfeit meth was flown to other states, including Arizona, New Jersey, and North Carolina. Authorities say they ended the sting operation when at least one worker said he was willing to smuggle guns and explosives on board.

The employees were arrested Monday and are charged with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance.

"Like many cases that my office prosecutes, this is about greed and people who abuse their positions of trust. This case shows the lengths that these individuals would go to -- individuals who are trusted with insider knowledge of our commercial airport system -- that they will go to to just obtain cash. It shows that these criminal defendants were more than willing to use their trusted positions at the airport to bypass security measures and to exploit security vulnerabilities. This case also highlights something else, something that is important. It is what can be accomplished when we work together -- federal and local law enforcement, airport facilities, security personnel, as well as the airlines themselves -- in making sure that the safety and security of the traveling public is priority number one, and that contraband -- whether dangerous drugs, guns, or explosives -- are kept out of the hands of employees that cannot be trusted. We continue to work with our partners, including dfw airport, the transportation security administration, and others to ensure that these individuals will be brought to justice as quickly as possible," said Erin Nealy Cox, U.S. attorney with the Northern District of Texas.

Cox said no actual drugs, explosives, or guns were transported on the flights.

The defendants worked for Envoy air, which is a regional carrier owned by American Airlines and for Spirit Airlines. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://foxsanantonio.com

Man who ignited midair brawl on Seattle-to-Beijing flight sentenced to 2 years in prison

Joseph D. Hudek IV claimed that his bizarre, violent behavior on a Seattle-to-Beijing flight in July came after he ingested edible marijuana just before he boarded the plane. “I’m deeply sorry for everything that’s happened,” he told the court.

Joseph Hudek IV (in the tie) greets some of the dozens of supporters from Florida and Texas who attended his sentencing Tuesday. Hudek, who had ingested edible marijuana candies before causing a midair melee on a Delta flight from Seattle to Beijing last summer, was sentenced Tuesday to two years in federal prison. 


A Florida man who went berserk last July on a Seattle-to-Beijing flight, beating passengers and crew members with a wine bottle before being subdued, was sentenced Tuesday to two years in prison.

“I’m deeply sorry for everything that’s happened,” Joseph D. Hudek IV, 24, said in a Seattle federal courtroom filled with his supporters and Delta Air Lines employees and passengers. Hudek had pleaded guilty in February to one count of interfering with a flight-crew member and three counts of assault on an aircraft.

Defense attorney Robert Flennaugh II told U.S. District Judge John Coughenour that Hudek had been a model citizen for all but two hours of his life. He had taken 193 prior flights all without incident, Flennaugh said.

But on July 6, 2017, Hudek wanted to sleep on the overseas flight and ingested at least three, and maybe more, 10-gram marijuana candies before boarding the airliner, Flennaugh. Hudek suffered delusions, hallucinations and “marijuana-induced psychosis,” he said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Hobbs likened the case to a person who chooses to drink and drive, endangering other motorists. But in this instance, Hudek put hundreds of people in danger.

“He recklessly created a risk that endangered all the individuals flying at 30,000 feet on that flight that day,” said Hobbs.

According to federal charges, Hudek — whose mother worked for the airline at the time but has since lost her job — was flying first class on a “dependent pass” aboard Delta Air Lines Flight 129 along with 209 other passengers and 11 crew members.

Prosecutors said Hudek tried to open an exit door while the flight was over the Pacific Ocean, managing to move the lever about halfway up.

When two flight attendants tried to stop him from opening the door, Hudek became violent, federal prosecutors said. A melee ensued in which Hudek punched one of the attendants twice in the face and hit a fellow passenger with a wine bottle and with his fists.

A flight attendant grabbed two wine bottles and hit Hudek with both, breaking one over his head.

“Hudek did not seem impacted by the breaking of a full liter red wine bottle over his head, and instead shouted, ‘Do you know who I am?’ or words to that effect,” according to a complaint filed by the FBI in Seattle.

Several passengers eventually restrained him before the plane returned to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, according to a federal complaint.
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Lon Arnold, the passenger who suffered facial injuries when he tried to help flight attendants subdue Hudek, said during the sentencing hearing that he suffered permanent damage to one eye and a brain injury that prevents him from reading and writing as he once did.

He told Hudek that he will not be able to erase the injuries “by paying restitution” and urged the judge to impose the five-year prison sentence requested by prosecutors.

In issuing the sentence, Coughenour said he had to balance the severity of the attack and the terror that Hudek caused, with his youth, lack of criminal history and the 300 letters of support the court had received on Hudek’s behalf.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.seattletimes.com

Class action: Justice for the friendly skies?

William Hamilton
Central View
Bill Hamiliton

Prior to the Obama Administration, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) partnered with 36 college aviation programs to provide the FAA with a pool of highly qualified applicants to take the examination to become air traffic controllers. The FAA also worked with the military to hire veterans with previous air traffic control experience. But the Obama Administration decided that neither the FAA's College Training Initiative (CTI) Program nor the military were producing enough air traffic control examinees of color.

So, despite the fact of their earning four-year degrees from CTI-accredited universities, and despite their high scores on the FAA's Air Traffic Selection & Training (AT-SAT) test, hundreds of aviation college graduates and veterans were told their test results were purged and they would have to reapply under new criteria that required only a high-school diploma and the passage of a "personality-biography" test. No previous aviation training was required.

The personality-biography test wanted to know if applicants had played "mid-night" basketball and how many other urban activities they had or had not engaged in. Clearly, a test designed to weed out applicants from rural/mountain America. When Congress got wind of this "psycho-babble" test that had nothing to do with aviation safety, the Obama Administration was forced to open a one-week window during which those who had not engaged in a sufficient number of urban activities were allowed to reapply. But, by that time, many of the aviation college graduates and military veterans had taken other jobs or switched to other careers. Quickly, the FAA snapped the window shut.

But wait. There is still hope for those rejected aviation college graduates and military veterans to become air traffic controllers. On behalf of between 2,000 and 3,500 highly qualified air traffic controller wannabes, the Mountain States Legal Foundation (MSLF) has filed a class-action lawsuit citing Adarand Constructors, Inc. vs. Pena in which the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the federal courts to apply "strict scrutiny in assessing the constitutionality of a government use of racial classifications." In a concurring opinion, the late Justice Scalia wrote: "In the eyes of the government, there is just one race. It is American."

The poster plaintiff for the MSLF class-action lawsuit is a young man with two B.S. degrees. Plus, he completed the CTI program and scored 100-percent score on the AT-SAT. But the FAA sent him an e-mail saying that his application had been purged and he must reapply and take the personality-biography test. He failed the psycho-babble test.

It will take some time for the class-action lawsuit to reach a federal court with the power to apply Adarand vs. Pena and correct this injustice. It will take some time for members of this class to become air traffic controllers.

But, meanwhile, as I wrote satirically back on June 15, 2015: "So folks, sit back and relax and know that your flight is being controlled from the ground by people who are just learning about aviation and air traffic control with the fresh enthusiasm of beginners who have just learned something new and do not suffer from the, say, complacency of having studied air traffic control for four years of college or operated military control towers."

Nationally syndicated columnist, William Hamilton, is a laureate of the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame, the Nebraska Aviation Hall of Fame, the Colorado Aviation Hall of Fame, and the Oklahoma University Army ROTC Wall of Fame. In 2015, he was named an Outstanding Alumnus of the University of Nebraska. Dr. Hamilton is the author of The Wit and Wisdom of William Hamilton: the Sage of Sheepdog Hill, Pegasus Imprimis Press (2017). "Central View," can also be seen at: http://www.central-view.com.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.skyhinews.com

Cessna 162 Skycatcher, N263VX: Accident occurred May 05, 2018 at Waterloo Regional Airport (KALO), DeKalb County, Indiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Waterloo

http://registry.faa.gov/N263VX

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 05, 2018 in Waterloo, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA AIRCRAFT CO E162, registration: N263VX

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Nose gear collapsed on landing. 

Date: 05-MAY-18
Time: 13:30:00Z
Regis#: 263VX
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 162
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WATERLOO
State: INDIANA

Yakovlev YAK 52, N81FS: Accident occurred May 05, 2018 at Roy E. Ray Airport (5R7), Bayou La Batre, Mobile County, Alabama,

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Red Star Aero Services LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N81FS

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA284
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 05, 2018 in Bayou La Batre, AL
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK 52, registration: N81FS

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck a fence at the end of the runway.

Date: 05-MAY-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N81FS
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: YAK 52
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BAYOU LA BATRE
State: ALABAMA

Piper PA-32R-301, N25WE: Accident occurred May 14, 2018 at Triple M Airport (4NC5), Cape Carteret, Carteret County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Axiom Capital Solutions LLC


http://registry.faa.gov/N25WE

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA281
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 14, 2018 in Cape Carteret, NC
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R, registration: N25WE

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landing gear collapsed.

Date: 14-MAY-18
Time: 17:17:00Z
Regis#: N25WE
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32R 301
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CAPE CARTERET
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Beech A23, N1470L: Accident occurred May 14, 2018 in Fort Worth, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft made emergency landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N1470L

Date: 15-MAY-18
Time: 00:35:00Z
Regis#: N1470L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A23
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: FIRE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FORT WORTH
State: TEXAS

Grumman AA-1B Trainer, N6550L: Accident occurred May 15, 2018 at Butler County Regional Airport (KHAO), Hamilton, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6550L 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Hamilton, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA173
Date & Time: 05/15/2018, 0945 EDT
Registration: N6550L
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1B
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 103: Ultralight 

On May 15, 2018, about 0945 eastern daylight time, a Grumman American Aviation Corporation AA 1B airplane, N6550L, impacted terrain during a forced landing at the Butler County Regional Airport-Hogan Field (HAO), near Hamilton, Ohio, following a loss of engine power. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane received substantial wing and fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to an individual was registered to an individual and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 test flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from HAO at the time of the accident.

According to preliminary information, a witness heard the sound of the airplane's engine stop during the takeoff. The witness then saw the airplane return to the airport for a landing. The airplane impacted terrain during the landing where it sustained the substantial damage.

At 0953, the recorded weather at HAO was: Wind variable at 5 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 26° C; dew point 17° C; altimeter 29.93 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP.
Registration: N6550L
Model/Series: AA 1B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHAO, 634 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hamilton, OH (HAO)
Destination: Hamilton, OH (HAO) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 39.363889, -84.521944 (est)



HAMILTON —   A Loveland man was piloting a single-engine plane Tuesday morning when it crashed about 100 yards from the runway at Butler County Regional Airport.

Henry Rosche III, 63, of Loveland, was injured in the crash when his 1974 Grumman plane experienced engine failure, according to Ohio Highway Patrol Lt. Clint Arnold, commander of the Hamilton Post.

The investigation is ongoing, but preliminary results show the plane was about 500 feet in the air when its engine stopped. The pilot turned to attempt an emergency landing, but failed to return to the runway.

Witnesses said the plane went sideways, then crashed, but never caught fire.

Rosche, who was the only person in the plane, was extricated by Hamilton fire crews and airlifted to University of Cincinnati Medical Center, according to Hamilton Fire Chief Mark Mercer.

Those at the scene said Rosche was breathing but not conscious when they reached him.

“His breathing is labored and slow,” one 911 caller said, adding “there is no smoke or fire at the scene.”

The caller told the 911 dispatcher he was reaching into the plane’s cockpit to get Rosche’s vital signs.

“They’re gonna have to extricate him,” the caller said.

Later in the call as Air Care arrived, Rosche seemed to be “coming to” as emergency responders could be heard telling him repeatedly not to move.

“He hit pretty hard,” a witness at the scene told a 911 dispatcher, describing the plane crash on the west end of the runway.

Brenda Deborde said she witnessed the crash while driving her son to work. She saw the plane flying “sideways” and said that’s when she told her son it was going to crash.

“I seen the plane going sideways and I told my son, ‘He’s getting ready to hit’ and about that time it hit and when it did pieces started flying off and you see a little bit of black dust,” she told the Journal-News. “Well I come on up, right up this way, and I call 911 and I looked to see if I could see anybody and I couldn’t see nobody.”

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.journal-news.com



FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP, OH (FOX19) - A man was injured in a plane crash at the Butler County Regional Airport in Hamilton, fire officials said.

Emergency crews responded after the plane crashed around 9:45 a.m. Tuesday.

City of Hamilton Fire Chief Mark Mercer said the plane's engine stopped just after take off and the pilot attempted to turn around and land the plane.

“Shortly after takeoff the engine for the plane quit, the pilot circled back but was unable to land on the runway. The pilot was removed from the plane by Hamilton fire crews and was treated by Hamilton paramedics and University flight crew, then transported by UC Air Care to University of Cincinnati Hospital.” Mercer said.

A witness to the crash said she saw the plane going sideways before crashing.

“I seen the plane going sideways and I told my son, I said ‘he’s getting ready to hit’ and about that time it hit and when it did pieces started flying off and you see a little bit of black dust. Well I come on up, right up this way, and I call 911 and I looked to see if I could see anybody and I couldn’t see nobody.” the witness said.

She said she was scared for the man inside the plane.

“It’s scary cause I didn’t know. I didn’t know if they was laying in there dead, how many was in there, and I couldn’t get through the fencing to go check on them.” she said.

Mercer said the man had to be cut out of the plane using extrication tools. Crews cut away pieces of the plane so the pilot could be removed without any further injuries.

Officials are unsure of what type of plane it was but said it was a single engine, small plane with one occupant.

Mercer said flight staff saw the plane turning back toward the runway and as far as he knows there was no flight plan filed.

The airport has seen very few crashes and very few engines, Mercer said. He said the Butler County Regional Airport has a great safety record.

There's no word on the extent of the man's injuries or his identity.

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox19.com






BUTLER COUNTY, Ohio —  A small plane crashed Tuesday morning at the Butler County Regional Airport, dispatchers confirm.

The single-engine AA-1B plane crashed on the runway during takeoff around 10 a.m., officials said.

The pilot was the only person on-board, and had to be extricated from the wreckage.

The pilot was flown to University of Cincinnati Medical Center, where his condition is unknown. His name has not been released.

According to crash investigators, the pilot was taking off when his plane had engine issues. The plane went down as the pilot tried to circle back to land.

The Federal Aviation Administration is now investigating.

“(We’ve had) very few crashes, very few instances here at the airport. Great safety record,” said Hamilton Fire Chief Mark Mercer.

The airport’s runways are in the city of Hamilton, therefore Mercer’s teams were the first on scene.

“We had to cut out little pieces of the plane so we could remove the pilot without any more injuries," Mercer said. 

The Butler County Regional Airport is a small airport owned by the Butler County Board of Commissioners. Most planes that take off or land at the airport are single-engine planes.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wlwt.com






A pilot had to be cut out of his plane after crashing at the Butler County Regional Airport Tuesday morning, officials said.

Hamilton Fire Chief Mark Mercer said the pilot had taken off from the airport just before 10 a.m. when the engine cut out. He said the man attempted to circle back to the runway, but ended up crashing.

The single-engine plane came to rest on a concrete pad surrounded by grass. The port side wing was torn off and one side of the landing gear has collapsed. The propeller had also come off the plane.

Mercer said the pilot, whose identity has not been released, was flown by helicopter to University of Cincinnati Medical Center for treatment. The chief did not know the extent of the man's injuries.

Hamilton emergency crews responded to the airport in about four minutes, Mercer said. He explained that the pilot was trapped in the plane and had to be cut out of it.

Mercer said the pilot was conscious and breathing when he was flown to the hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cincinnati.com





BUTLER COUNTY, Ohio (WKRC) - A small plane crashed at the Butler County Regional Airport Tuesday morning. A medical helicopter took the pilot to UC Medical Center.

The plan crashed at about 9:45 a.m. at the airport. It ended up on its top.

Investigators said the engine quit shortly after takeoff. He circled back but was unable to land.

Only the pilot was in the plane. He was trapped inside the plane until firefighters got him out. There is no word on his condition.

Federal investigators are looking into the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://kutv.com