Thursday, November 24, 2016

Cessna 310N, N126P: Accident occurred September 09, 2016 near Wickenburg Municipal Airport (E25), Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Cessna; Wichita, Kansas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N126P

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Wickenburg, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 310N, registration: N126P
Injuries: 4 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 9, 2016, about 0700 mountain standard time, a Cessna 310N, N126P, struck a refuse transfer trailer shortly after takeoff from Wickenburg Municipal Airport, Wickenburg, Arizona. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The twin-engine airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight departed Wickenburg with a planned destination of Payson, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses reported observing the airplane takeoff from runway 23, and veer to the right of centerline shortly after rotation. Having reached an altitude of about 75 ft above ground level, the airplane did not climb, and crossed over the runway verge and towards an adjacent industrial park. A witness stated that a few seconds later, the airplane rolled almost 90o to the right, and the right wing struck the refuse trailer. The right wing separated from the airframe, and the main fuselage came to rest about 75 ft downrange. The airplane came to rest within the confines of the City Sanitation Department, about 2,200 ft beyond the runway departure threshold, and about 30o right of its centerline.

The pilot and passengers sustained multiple serious injuries, and were initially treated and stabilized at the accident site by first response personnel. Due to the nature of their injuries, they were unable to recall the circumstances of the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land. He also held an instructor rating for airplane single-engine land, along with type ratings for the B-727, B-757, B-767, DC3, and N-265. He held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate with inspection authorization.

The pilot's last flight review took place in March 2014, he also reported practicing single-engine procedures in the accident airplane during July 2016.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1968, and had been owned and maintained by the pilot since 1985. It was equipped with two six-cylinder, fuel injected, Continental Motors IO-470 series engines. The right engine had been overhauled and installed in 1986, and had accrued 690.9 flight hours at the last annual inspection on July 6, 2016. The left engine was overhauled and installed in a Cessna 310N airplane in 1978, and removed and installed on the accident airplane in 1988. It had accrued 1,268.7 flight hours at the last annual inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Area winds were out of the northwest at 5 knots, with an altimeter setting at 29. 93 inches of mercury, and a temperature and dewpoint of 25° C and 16° C respectively. The corresponding density altitude for field elevation was about 4,200 ft.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Wickenburg Airport is at an elevation of 2,378 ft, and is composed of a single 6,101-ft-long asphalt runway, designated 5/23. Runway 23 is on a 1.2% uphill gradient. Terrain 1.5 miles beyond the departure end of runway 23 rises to a peak about 300 ft above runway elevation. Highway 60, which is offset about 30° right of the runway centerline, follows the foothills of the rising terrain, about 200 ft below the peak.

The only fueling facility at the airport was a self-serve pump, managed by the City of Wickenburg. During the period July 16 through 30, the pilot serviced the airplane twice at Wickenburg, and then three times at different airports in Kansas and Wisconsin. The last fuel purchased for the accident aircraft before the accident was from the Wickenburg pump on July 30, 2016. He then flew to Payson, Arizona a few days later.

The airport operations manager provided the certificate of analysis for the fuel delivered to the tank farm during that period, and the sample met the tested specifications for ASTM 5191 (vapor pressure), ASTM D86 (distillation), and IP 559 (density). Additionally, daily fuel system facility checks for the month of July and August, did not reveal any anomalies, and no pilots reported issues with fuel.

According to the operations manager, the fuel system experienced a failure on July 12, 2016, attributed to a lightning strike, and as a result, the system's computer motherboard was replaced. Metering problems persisted, and on July 30, the same day that the accident pilot purchased fuel, the system was shut down for a week because the delivery meter did not read correctly. The meter's pulse transmitter was replaced; however, anomalies persisted, and in early December, the entire fuel island was shut down for redesign. The operations manager stated that the problems were all electrical in nature, and did not require repair or replacement of any components that would have come into contact with fuel.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Toxicological tests on specimens recovered from the pilot after he was admitted to the hospital were performed by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory. Analysis revealed negative findings for ethanol and all screened drug substances except Etomidate, which is an anesthetic agent often used in emergency treatment.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Examination of the engine control quadrant at the accident site revealed that both mixture controls were in the full rich position, the propeller controls were 1-inch short of full forward, and the throttle controls had bent to the right and over the quadrant about midrange. Both the flap actuator and landing gear assemblies were in positions consistent with retraction.

Left Engine

The left engine had partially separated from the firewall during the impact sequence, sustaining damage to the throttle body and rocker covers, and exposing the valve springs and rocker assemblies for all cylinders except number 4. The propeller blades and hub assembly remained attached to the crankshaft. Both blades exhibited a 15o bend about 12 inches from the hub, along with multiple nicks and chordwise scratches to their leading edges.

The fuel lines along with both the engine and propeller controls were intact, and the spark plug electrodes exhibited normal service life wear signatures, and dark grey coloration. The magneto-to-engine timing was correct, and "thumb" compression was confirmed at all cylinders, along with drive train continuity to all valves and accessories. The fuel lines from the metering unit through to the fuel flow transducer and the fuel manifold valve were free of obstruction, and the internal impellor of the transducer could be heard spinning when low-pressure air was applied to the inlet.

Disassembly of the fuel manifold valve, engine driven fuel pump, and throttle body metering unit revealed no mechanical anomalies, and residual fuel was observed within the cavity of the manifold valve. The fuel inlet screen was found clear and free from obstructions. During disassembly of the metering unit, debris was observed on the spring side of the mixture control cam. The debris appeared to be a combination of dried grease and ferrous material.

Right Engine

The right engine sustained similar impact damage, with the propeller hub assembly remaining attached to the crankshaft. Both blades had detached from the hub, and both were straight, with neither exhibiting any damage signatures associated with rotation such as leading edge nicks or chordwise scratches. Both blades displayed blue streak marks, similar in color to the paint on the refuse trailer which was struck during impact.

The engine exhibited comparable magneto-to-engine timing, cylinder compression, and spark plug characteristics as the left engine. Disassembly of the fuel manifold valve, engine driven fuel pump, and throttle body metering unit revealed no mechanical anomalies. However, about 1/8 of one side of the surface of the throttle body inlet screen was covered in lint material, and the fuel injector nozzle for cylinder 3 was partially occluded and coated with a solid glaze. No fuel was observed within the cavity of the manifold valve or the fuel line between the fuel flow transducer and the fuel manifold valve.

Disassembly of the fuel lines revealed that a clear gelatinous substance had completely blocked the fuel flow transducer inlet port (metering orifice) (Photo 1). The material was removed, and had a slimy wet texture. After one hour of exposure to air, the material had hardened and took on a texture similar to room-temperature-vulcanization (RTV) silicone. Six fragments were recovered, which, after drying for 24 hours, ranged in size from 1 to 3 mm. Further examination of the fuel manifold valve revealed a similar fragment of the material within the manifold cavity on the pre-filtered side of its screen.



Fuel System

The airplane was equipped with a 20-gallon auxiliary fuel tank in each wing, and a 50-gallon main tank at each wingtip. The auxiliary tanks fed the system through gravity, and an electrically driven submerged fuel pump was housed in each tip tank for use during priming and starting, and for backup operation to the engine-driven fuel pump.

Each wing housed a combination fuel selector valve/strainer, which was controlled by a selector lever in the cabin via a set of cables. The mesh size of the strainer was 104 microns. The fuel flowed from the strainer to the engine driven fuel pump, and onward to the inlet port of the fuel metering unit, which was protected by a 210-micron mesh filter. Downstream of the metering unit, the fuel passed through the fuel flow transducer, and into the fuel manifold valve, which contained a 210-micron mesh filter.

Maintenance records revealed that a Shadin 910502 fuel flow indicating system was installed in 1982, in accordance with supplemental type certificate SA573GL and SE552GL. The fuel flow transducer installed at the time of the accident was a FloScan 201 series (p/n 680501), which according to the engine logbook, had been installed in 1995 as a replacement for the original unit.

The transducer inlet and outlet ports used 1/4-inch NPT threads, and the inlet metering orifice was about 0.115 inches (2.92mm) in diameter.

Both outboard tip tanks had been breached, exposing their inner surfaces. No debris was observed within the tanks. The auxiliary tanks were intact, and no debris was observed when examined through the respective fuel filler necks.

The airframe and engine fuel lines, filter plugs, fittings, and gaskets were examined to determine if RTV sealant material had been used as a sealing medium. No traces of such material were observed. Additionally, the fuel lines within the engine compartment were stiff, almost brittle, and exhibited significant chaffing damage. The owner stated that he had never used RTV silicon to seal any components within the fuel system.

Data provided by Continental Engines indicated that the fuel pressure from the engine driven fuel pump to the metering unit was between 28.8 and 31.0 psi when the engine was operating at 2,625 RPM, and 6.5 to 7.5 psi at 600 RPM. The metered fuel pressure at 2,625 RPM varies between 17.8 and 18.8 psi.

Material Examination

The rubber-like material was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory Division for analysis using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer. The results revealed spectral peaks, which when evaluated, were a strong match to polydimethylsiloxane, also known as silicone.

A survey of manufacturer's data sheets for silicon rubber compounds revealed multiple warnings regarding its soluble properties and limitations when exposed to gasoline. The data advised that silicon can swell from 75% to 260% when exposed to gasoline, with the manufacturer of a popular RTV silicon brand specifically stating:

"Do not use for gasketing carburetors or fuel control devices where it will be in constant contact with hydrocarbon fuels. Material will develop excessive swell and loss of mechanical properties."

The Floscan 200 Series Application Notes, current at the time of the accident stated the following:

"SAFETY WARNING: Never use RTV or similar sealants when installing Floscan senders or any fuel system components. Sealants can get into the fuel system and cause fuel starvation."

Performance

The pilot reported the airplanes takeoff weight was 4,900 pounds.

The airplane owner's manual stated that for a normal takeoff, the pilot should raise the nose at 90 MPH, break ground at 105 MPH, and allow the airplane to accelerate to the best "twin-engine" rate-of-climb speed of 124 MPH. It further stated that the most critical time for an engine-out condition was during the two to three second period late in takeoff, while the airplane was accelerating to a safe engine-out speed. Furthermore, during an engine-out scenario on takeoff, at a field elevation of 5,000 ft, 4,527 ft is the total distance required to accelerate to 105 MPH, recognize and respond to an engine out-event, and stop the airplane.

The manual's "Single Engine Takeoff Distance" chart provided the means to calculate the total distance required to clear a 50 ft obstacle, assuming an engine failure occurred at takeoff speed, and that the propeller was feathered, and the landing gear and flaps were retracted. Under the reported temperature, with a 4-knot headwind, and a gross weight of 4,800 pounds, the distance required would have been about 4,100 ft. Extrapolation of the graph for a gross weight of 4,900 pounds (reported takeoff weight), indicated a distance of about 6,200 ft. At airplane weights between 4,900 and 5,200 pounds (max gross weight), the distance fell beyond the 7,000 ft scale of the graph.

The manual stated that under single-engine operation at maximum gross weight, the rate of climb at sea level and standard temperature was 330 ft per minute, with a service ceiling of 6,850 ft. The minimum single-engine control speed was 87 MPH, and the best single-engine angle of climb and rate of climb speeds were 105 and 113 MPH respectively. The manual stated that although the airplane is controllable at the minimum single-engine control speed, "the performance is so far below optimum that continued flight near the ground is improbable. A more suitable recommended safe single-engine speed is 105 MPH, since at this speed, altitude can be maintained more easily while the landing gear is being retracted and the propeller is being feathered."

The propellers for both engines rotate in the same direction, with the left engine considered the, "critical engine" during engine-out conditions.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Wickenburg, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 310N, registration: N126P
Injuries: 4 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2016, about 0700 mountain standard time, a Cessna 310N, N126P, struck a refuse transfer trailer shortly after takeoff from Wickenburg Municipal Airport, Wickenburg, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight departed Wickenburg with a planned destination of Payson, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses reported observing the airplane takeoff from Runway 23, and veer to the right of centerline shortly after rotation. Having reached an altitude of about 75 ft above ground level, the airplane failed to climb, and crossed over the runway verge and towards an adjacent industrial park. A few seconds later, the airplane rolled almost 90 degrees to the right, and the right wing struck the refuse trailer. The right wing separated from airframe, and the main fuselage came to rest about 75 ft downrange.

The airplane came to rest within the confines of the City Sanitation Department, about 2,200 ft beyond the runway departure threshold, and about 30-degrees right of centerline.








WICKENBURG, Ariz. - One couple has a lot to be thankful for after surviving a plane crash. 

"Got married in Sun Valley, California in a Catholic church."
  
It was a sweet ceremony on September 9th.

"Got out of the service and my mom says, why don't you start dating that little girl down the street. I already had mom's approval."

Pat and Linda Brewster tied the knot, then 44 years to the day, who knew they'd be here.

"I thank God and Fred the pilot everyday that we made it."

There had been a horrible plane crash near the Wickenburg airport.

"We were really looking forward to it. It was our anniversary.. 44th anniversary and going to Payson for breakfast. Our friends, the pilot and his wife had asked us the day before if we wanted to fly and we said, wow, yeah," said Linda.

Linda and Pat don't remember much about the crash.

"I sat down in the cockpit and I don't remember taxiing or nothing, we just remember waking up in the hospital," said Pat.

"We had lots of broken bones, bruises.. spine, bunch of cracked ribs," said Linda.

"I had a broken elbow, broken femur above my knee," added Pat.

He says his injuries from the crash weren't much when compared to what he saw as a Los Angeles firefighter for many years.

"Most of them were fatal, but this one, for some reason, the big man upstairs decided he didn't want us yet."

Firefighters, paramedics, helicopters -- all were quickly on the scene. The four of them in the plane left the Wickenburg airport and didn't make it far. The plane crashed nearby -- and their children and the community came to the rescue as well.

"We had 30 days of meals delivered to our house, people we knew, everyone wanted to be a part of helping," said Linda.

Linda will wear a brace for a bit longer. Pat will be out of his wheelchair by Christmas. A speedy recovery with lots of well wishes for this active couple in the comforting Arizona town of Wickenburg.

"All of our friends caring about  us, everyone says if you need any help you call me, and they'll even give the phone number.. they're really serious, we are very thankful, the Thanksgiving we are most thankful for out of any Thanksgiving we've ever had," said Linda.  "It was incredible. We were very lucky and thankful."

Source:   http://www.fox10phoenix.com












WICKENBURG, AZ - Officials are investigating after a small plane crashed near Wickenburg.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Cessna 310N reportedly crashed a quarter of a mile west of the airport near Highway 60. It went down on departure, crashing in a group of bushes near a structure.

Wickenburg police said four people were seriously injured in the crash and taken to the ICU.

Police identified the plane owner as Linda Gagliano, but the pilot at the time was Fred Gagliano. Linda was a passenger, along with two others, Patrick and Linda Brewster. All four occupants are said to be in their sixties.

The cause of the crash has not yet been identified, but the FAA is investigating possible mechanical failure.

Story and video:  http://www.abc15.com







WICKENBURG, Ariz. - One couple has a lot to be thankful for after surviving a plane crash. 

"Got married in Sun Valley, California in a Catholic church."
  
It was a sweet ceremony on September 9th.

"Got out of the service and my mom says, why don't you start dating that little girl down the street. I already had mom's approval."

Pat and Linda Brewster tied the knot, then 44 years to the day, who knew they'd be here.

"I thank God and Fred the pilot everyday that we made it."

There had been a horrible plane crash near the Wickenburg airport.

"We were really looking forward to it. It was our anniversary.. 44th anniversary and going to Payson for breakfast. Our friends, the pilot and his wife had asked us the day before if we wanted to fly and we said, wow, yeah," said Linda.

Linda and Pat don't remember much about the crash.

"I sat down in the cockpit and I don't remember taxiing or nothing, we just remember waking up in the hospital," said Pat.

"We had lots of broken bones, bruises.. spine, bunch of cracked ribs," said Linda.

"I had a broken elbow, broken femur above my knee," added Pat.

He says his injuries from the crash weren't much when compared to what he saw as a Los Angeles firefighter for many years.

"Most of them were fatal, but this one, for some reason, the big man upstairs decided he didn't want us yet."

Firefighters, paramedics, helicopters -- all were quickly on the scene. The four of them in the plane left the Wickenburg airport and didn't make it far. The plane crashed nearby -- and their children and the community came to the rescue as well.

"We had 30 days of meals delivered to our house, people we knew, everyone wanted to be a part of helping," said Linda.

Linda will wear a brace for a bit longer. Pat will be out of his wheelchair by Christmas. A speedy recovery with lots of well wishes for this active couple in the comforting Arizona town of Wickenburg.

"All of our friends caring about  us, everyone says if you need any help you call me, and they'll even give the phone number.. they're really serious, we are very thankful, the Thanksgiving we are most thankful for out of any Thanksgiving we've ever had," said Linda.  "It was incredible. We were very lucky and thankful."

Source:   http://www.fox10phoenix.com











National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N126P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 09, 2016 in Wickenburg, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 310N, registration: N126P
Injuries: 4 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2016, about 0700 mountain standard time, a Cessna 310N, N126P, struck a refuse transfer trailer shortly after takeoff from Wickenburg Municipal Airport, Wickenburg, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight departed Wickenburg with a planned destination of Payson, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Witnesses reported observing the airplane takeoff from Runway 23, and veer to the right of centerline shortly after rotation. Having reached an altitude of about 75 ft above ground level, the airplane failed to climb, and crossed over the runway verge and towards an adjacent industrial park. A few seconds later, the airplane rolled almost 90 degrees to the right, and the right wing struck the refuse trailer. The right wing separated from airframe, and the main fuselage came to rest about 75 ft downrange.

The airplane came to rest within the confines of the City Sanitation Department, about 2,200 ft beyond the runway departure threshold, and about 30-degrees right of centerline.

Private aviation company Wheels Up now taking wealthy executives to Cuba



After a year flying to Cuba, membership-based private airline Wheels Up is ready to open up flights to all its members.

The New York-based startup announced Tuesday it will start offering flights to and from Havana from 18 airports in the U.S., including Miami International Airport and Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. The airline has also launched an on-the-ground booking assistance program on the island.

Wheels Up has made more than 150 trips to Cuba since August 2015, but the announcement marks the first time it’s opening up flights to all of its 3,500-plus members.

“We wanted to really get a few couple hundred flights under our belt to get all the kinks before we roll it out,” said Justin Firestone, founding partner of the aviation company.

For a $3,950 per flight hour member rate, members fly on nine-passenger Beechcraft King Air 350i and Citation Excel/XLS aircraft.

Firestone, who serves on the board of directors of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s U.S.-Cuba Business Council, said Wheels Up has flown about 20 percent of the 1,000 private jets flights to Cuba over the last year. The airline typically takes major Fortune 500 companies and wealthy Cuban Americans to the island.

Traveling to Cuba must still fall under the 12 approved categories of travel to the island.

Source: http://www.miamiherald.com

Beech 200 Super King Air, N80RT, Operated by Flight Development LLC: Accident occurred November 23, 2016 near Moorhead Municipal Airport (KJKJ), Clay County, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorhead, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 3 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting an on-demand passenger flight at night in instrument meteorological conditions that were at/near straight-in approach minimums for the runway. The pilot flew the approach as a nonprecision LNAV approach, and he reported that the approach was stabilized and that he did not notice anything unusual. A few seconds after leveling the airplane at the missed approach altitude, he saw the runway end lights, the strobe lights, and the precision approach path indicator. He then disconnected the autopilot and took his hand off the throttles to turn on the landing lights. However, before he could turn on the landing lights, the runway became obscured by clouds. The pilot immediately decided to conduct a missed approach and applied engine power, but the airplane subsequently impacted terrain short of the runway in a nose-up level attitude. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely the pilot lost sight of the runway due to the visibility being at/near the straight-in approach minimums and that the airplane got too low for a missed approach, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

A passenger stated that he and the pilot were not wearing available shoulder harnesses. The passenger said that he was not informed that the airplane was equipped with shoulder harnesses or told how to adjust the seats. The pilot sustained injuries to his face in the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain a positive climb rate during an attempted missed approach in night instrument meteorological conditions that were at/near approach minimums, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

SLICE OF THE 406 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N80RT

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorhead, MN
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 3 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, at 1759 central standard time, a Beech 200, N80RT, impacted terrain during a missed approach from runway 30 at Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota. The pilot initiated a missed approach after losing visual reference of the runway environment during the final segment of a GPS instrument approach. The pilot and two passengers sustained minor injuries and four passengers were uninjured. The airplane received substantial damage. The airplane was operated by Flight Development, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a single-pilot on-demand passenger flight. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Baudette International Airport (BDE), Baudette, Minnesota, at 1714 and was destined to JKJ.

A passenger stated that he and his work crew had been flying between Baudette and Moorhead on a weekly basis for the past 5-6 weeks to build agricultural storage facilities. The passenger stated that the pilot had flown the work crew on one of the previous flights, and the remainder of the flights were flown by the company chief pilot and the company director of operations. 

The passenger stated that the accident flight was the first flight in which he was seated in the copilot seat. The passenger stated that he and the pilot were not wearing a shoulder harness. The passenger stated that he was not informed that the airplane was equipped with shoulder harnesses, how to use them, and how to adjust the seats. The passenger stated that he would have adjusted the seat if he would have known that was an option and used his shoulder harness, as he is a safety conscious person. 

The pilot stated that before he was handed off from Minneapolis Center to Fargo Approach, he listened to the automated weather observing system (AWOS) at JKJ, which reported that light north winds, a ceiling of 300 feet above ground level, and 1.25 statute mile visibility. He checked in with Fargo Approach and informed them that he had the weather at JKJ and requested the area navigation (RNAV) approach to runway 30 starting at IVEJE, the initial approach fix (IAF). N80RT was not equipped with a wide area augmentation system (WAAS) GPS so he flew the approach as a non-precision lateral navigation (LNAV) approach (straight-in approach minima were: 300 feet above ground level and 1 statute mile visibility). He told Fargo Approach that he realized the weather was deteriorating and would make one attempt at JKJ and then divert to Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. Fargo Approach issued a clearance to the IAF, and initial approach altitude, and provided missed approach instructions. The pilot stated that he had flown this approach numerous times and briefed the approach. He stated that the approach was stabilized with the appropriate altitudes and airspeeds throughout and did not notice anything unusual. Upon leveling off at the missed approach altitude of 1,300 feet mean sea level, he looked for the runway. After what seemed like just a few seconds he saw the runway end lights, the strobe lights, and the precision approach path indicator. He disconnected the autopilot and took his hand off the throttles to turn on the landing lights for landing. Before he could even turn on the landing lights, the runway disappeared from sight due to the clouds. He immediately decided to perform a missed approach and applied engine power. He said that he referenced the flight director, but did not recall what it was indicating. He did not feel any sinking feeling indicating that he was losing altitude. He said that It seemed like just a few seconds before the airplane impacted the ground. The airplane struck the ground in somewhat of a nose-up, level bank attitude. The airplane slid along the ground and turned slightly to the right before coming to rest.

The passenger stated that prior to departure, the pilot said they needed to get going because the weather was getting bad in Fargo. While en route, the passenger heard Fargo Air Traffic Control Tower advise weather was not good, and the pilot stated he would try to fly to JKJ first and then fly to FAR, if that did not work. The passenger said the pilot asked him to be on the lookout for the runway and about 3,600 feet the airplane banked to line up for the approach. The passenger said he heard an audible "too low" warning three times, saw some runway lights at eye level, and then the airplane impacted the ground. The passenger said he did not think the pilot initiated a go-around, and he did not see him adjust engine power settings or move the control yoke. The passenger stated that he received facial injuries that required stitches.

The pilot reported that there was no mechanical malfunction/failure with the airplane.

The pilot's safety recommendation on how the accident could have been prevented was:

"Stick to my normal personal weather minimums and not attempt a non-precision approach to minimums. It would of been so easy to go to Fargo and do the ILS. I have always lectured to my students on the advantage of having two pilots when things are challenging. This is a prime example of such [an accident]. Over confidence is always something that we have to try to keep in check."

A review of the pilot's training records showed that the pilot completed the company's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved ground and flight training program, dated August 17, 2016. The ground training was conducted by the company director of operations and the company chief pilot. The pilot's flight training, which was 10.8 hours in duration, was conducted by the company chief pilot. The pilot received and passed his most recent Part 135.293 Airman Proficiency Check, dated August 18, 2016, which was conducted by an FAA inspector from the Fargo Flight Standards District Office. The check was performed using a Beech 200 and was 1.7 hours in flight duration. The pilot received a grade of satisfactory for all of the check's maneuvers/procedures.

FAA Advisory Circular 91-65, Use of Shoulder Harnesses in Passenger Seats, states in part:

On December 17, 1985, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued safety recommendation A-85-124, recommending issuance of advisory circular to provide information on crash survivability aspects of small aircraft. The recommendation was the result of an NTSB general aviation airplane crashworthiness project. In the project, the safety board examined 500 relatively severe general aviation airplane accident, to determine what proportion of the occupants would have benefited from the use of shoulder harnesses and energy-absorbing seats. The safety board found that 20 percent of the fatally-injured occupants in these accidents could have survived with shoulder harnesses (assuming the seat belt was fastened) and 88 percent of the seriously injured could have had significantly less severe injuries with the use of shoulder harnesses. Energy-absorbing seats could have benefited 34 percent

of the seriously injured. The safety board concluded that shoulder harness use is the most effective way of reducing fatalities and serious injuries in general aviation accidents.

Part 135.117, Briefing of Passengers Before Flight, states that before each takeoff each pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers shall ensure that all passengers have been orally briefed on: the use of seat belts, the placement of seat backs in an upright position before takeoff and landing, location and means for opening the passenger entry door and emergency exits, location of survival equipment, if the flight involves extended overwater operation, ditching procedures and the use of required flotation equipment, if the flight involves operations above 12,000 feet MSL, the normal and emergency use of oxygen, and location and operation of fire extinguishers.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorehead, MN
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, at 1759 central standard time, a Beech 200, N80RT, impacted terrain during a missed approach from runway 30 at Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota. The pilot initiated a missed approach after losing visual reference of the runway environment during the final segment of a GPS instrument approach. The airplane impacted a field about 0.5 miles short of runway 30. The pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and five passengers were uninjured. The airplane received substantial damage. The airplane was operated by Flight Development, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand passenger flight. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Baudette International Airport (BDE), Baudette, Minnesota, at 1714 and was destined to JKJ.




Federal Aviation Administration officials are in northwestern Minnesota looking into what caused a plane to make an emergency landing near the Moorhead Airport.

The privately owned plane landed in a field around 6 p.m. Wednesday near the airport runway. 

Clay County Sheriff's Deputy Mike Trygg says it was not a crash. 

"This was nothing like that. It just landed short of the runway,"Trygg said. "And everybody walked away alive." 

Seven people were onboard and no major injuries were reported. The pilot was taken to a hospital as a precaution. 


Authorities say the accident caused substantial damage to the airplane. 




MOORHEAD, Minn. - UPDATE (7:22pm): Clay County Sheriff's Department says they believe that fog was a contributing factor but can't confirm exact cause of crash.

UPDATE (7:00pm): Clay County Sheriff's Department confirms to Valley News Live that seven people were on board a Beech 200 Super King Air when it crashed just east of the airport in a field.

The pilot was taken to the hospital by FM Ambulance with minor injuries, the six other passengers walked away from the scene.

Some have minor injuries, but all are expected to be okay.

The plane was traveling from a location out of Minnesota.

Right now, the cause of the crash is unknown.

ORIGINAL STORY: Red River dispatch confirmed that a plane has crashed at the Moorhead municipal airport at 3309 70th St S, Glyndon, MN.

Moorhead Police, Clay County Sheriffs and fire crews are on scene.

Story and video:   http://www.valleynewslive.com




CLAY COUNTY, Minn. -

UPDATE: 9:00PM:

A plane with seven men on board crashed in a field just to the east of the Moorhead Airport and it sent emergency crews into action.

Rescue crews responded to the field at 70th Street and 40th Avenue South in Moorhead just after 6:30 p.m.

Authorities say everyone was able to get off of the plane on their own.

The pilot was taken to the hospital to be checked out for minor injuries but none of the others were seriously hurt.

Authorities were concerned about the damage to the plane.

"There's a slight fuel leak to it now," said Lt. Mark Empting with the Clay County Sheriff's Department. "The fire department has been out there. They did check it along with calling the state duty officer. At this point, it doesn't appear to have any hazard of catching fire or anything like that."

The FAA will investigate.

It is not known if the fog played a part in the crash.

UPDATE 7:00PM:

Law enforcement and rescue squads are on the scene of a site near the airport where a plane crashed before 6:20pm Wednesday night.

Crews responded to 70th Street and 40th Avenue South in Moorhead.

Clay County Deputies tell KVRR's Nick Broadway that after preliminary inspection of the plane's damage, the pilot made a crash landing.

There were six other passengers on the plane but no one was seriously injured.

Deputies say all were able to walk away from the plane but one person did need to be taken to the hospital.

At this time, investigators are not sure if fog or the weather played a factor.

Hear from rescue squads on KVRR Local News at 9.

We will update you with any details that come into the newsroom.

PREVIOUS CONTENT:

Law enforcement and rescue squads are on the scene of a possible crash site near the airport.

Clay County Sheriff Bill Bergquist is on the scene and a command post has been set up.

Multiple agencies from the surrounding communities of Moorhead, Dilworth and Glyndon are responding including police, ambulances and fire.


Story and video:  http://www.kvrr.com


Moorhead, MN (WDAY TV) - Seven adult males were able to walk away from an aircraft crash near the Moorhead Municipal Airport.

Dispatch officials say an aircraft reportedly crashed just East of the runway at the Moorhead Airport on Highway 336 around 6:05 p.m.

Emergency crews were sent to 3303 70th Street South in rural Glyndon after a business plane crashed.

The plane was arriving at the airport just east of a plowed field, according to Deputy Mark Empting, Clay County Sheriff's Department. It was coming from somewhere in the state of Minnesota. The plane is a Beech 200 Super King Air.

Seven adult males were on board at the time. The pilot and some of the others on board suffered 'slight' injuries. The pilot was able to walk away from the plane and talk with medics on scene. He was taken to a local hospital by F-M ambulance.

All passengers were able to evacuate the plane themselves.

Officials are still working on determining a cause of the crash. The pilot didn't indicate if weather was the cause but authorities say heavy fog could have possibly played a factor, but that hasn't been confirmed.

Fire officials say there was a slight gas leak coming from the plane but it's not at risk of catching fire.

No word on a damage estimate but there was visible damage to the underside of the plane and to the plane's engine.

The FAA and NTSB will be headed out to the scene to investigate the exact cause of the crash.

Source:   https://www.wday.com


MOORHEAD - Emergency crews responded to an aircraft crash near the Moorhead Municipal Airport on Wednesday night.

The crash occurred around 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 22, where crews found a privately owned, business-type aircraft in a field just east of County Road 11 near the airport runway.

Lt. Mark Empting of the Clay County Sheriff's Office said there were seven passengers on board including the pilot. There were no reports of any major injuries, but the pilot was taken to a local hospital as a precautionary measure. Empting said some passengers were "saying they were sore here and there, but it sounds like they were minor-type things." All passengers were able to evacuate the aircraft on their own.

"It's not an everyday occurrence, it's not an every year occurrence," Empting said of the plane crash. "It's a rare thing that happens which we are fortunate for."

The crash caused "substantial damage" to the plane, Empting added, and crews would be taking a closer look Thursday morning to assess the damage.

It's unknown at this time what caused the crash, but the plane was reportedly traveling from somewhere in Minnesota. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will be doing an investigation.

Responding to the scene were the Clay County Sheriff's Office, Moorhead Police Department and Moorhead Fire Department.

Source:  http://www.inforum.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N41565 LLC, N41565: Accident occurred November 23, 2016 near Columbus Airport (KCSG), Muscogee County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N41565 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N41565 



Location: Columbus, GA
Accident Number: ERA17LA057
Date & Time: 11/23/2016, 1803 EST
Registration: N41565
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On November 23, 2016, at 1803 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N41565, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Columbus Airport (CSG), Columbus, Georgia. The flight instructor and a private pilot receiving instruction were not injured. The airplane was registered to a corporation and was operated by the flight instructor under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Night, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The flight instructor reported that ground operations were normal, and 18 gallons of fuel were observed in each wing tank. The engine started normally, and the magneto checks were within limits. During the initial climb after takeoff, about 1 mile past the departure end of runway 24, the engine vibrated and experienced a total loss of power. The flight instructor assumed the controls and confirmed the fuel selector position, checked the fuel boost pump on, and turned on the carburetor heat. The pilot turned off the carburetor heat after the engine did not respond. The engine did not regain power and the airplane continued straight-ahead until it settled into the trees. The airplane fell for about 4-5 seconds and then came to an abrupt stop. After securing the engine and fuel system, the pilots exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings and fuselage was confirmed. Initial examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction. The fuel tanks were breached during the impact sequence and contained no fuel. The fuel strainer was dry and free of contaminants.

Follow-up examinations of the engine were performed by the FAA inspector and the NTSB investigator-in-charge. Impact damage to the forward section of the engine prevented rotation of the crankshaft; therefore, internal continuity of the engine was not confirmed. A visual examination of the exterior of the engine revealed no holes in the crankcase or evidence of crankcase rupture. The engine contained oil.

The carburetor was removed for examination. The accelerator pump operated normally and squirted fuel. The throttle linkage was intact. The carburetor inlet fuel screen was clean and unobstructed. The carburetor bowl was free of contamination.

The top spark plugs were removed for examination. The No. 2 sparkplug exhibited normal wear when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. The electrode was coated with a thin layer of black soot. The other plugs were normal in wear and color. The ignition leads were undamaged. The magnetos remained securely attached to the engine. Visual examination of the interior of the cylinders showed normal piston deposits and no damage.

The recorded weather at CSG, at 1751, included calm wind, temperature 66° F, and dew point 46° F. Review of an FAA Carburetor Icing Chart for the given temperature and dew point revealed that the conditions were conducive to serious icing at glide power. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/08/2015
Flight Time:   3139 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1200 hours (Total, this make and model), 3099 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 173 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 54 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 19, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/04/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 82 hours (Total, all aircraft), 72 hours (Total, this make and model), 12 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N41565
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7425260
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/10/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6118 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E3D
Registered Owner: N41565 LLC
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: CSG, 397 ft msl
Observation Time: 1751 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 240°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Smoke; No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Columbus, GA (CSG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Columbus, GA (CSG)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1759 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: Columbus Airport (CSG)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 397 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6997 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.497778, -84.971389 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA057
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Columbus, GA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N41565
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, at 1803 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N41565, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Columbus Airport, Columbus, Georgia. The flight instructor and a private pilot receiving instruction were not injured. The airplane was registered to a corporation and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Night, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The flight instructor reported that ground operations were normal and 18 gallons of fuel were observed in each wing tank. The engine started normally and the magneto checks were within limits. During the initial climb after takeoff, about 1 mile past the departure end of runway 24, the engine vibrated and lost power. The flight instructor assumed the controls and the fuel selector position, fuel pump, and carburetor heat were all checked. The engine did not regain power and the airplane continued straight ahead until it settled into the trees. The airplane fell for about 4-5 seconds and then came to an abrupt stop. After securing the engine and fuel system, the pilots exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to the wings and fuselage was confirmed. A cursory examination of the engine and fuel system did not reveal evidence of a mechanical malfunction. The fuel tanks were breached during the impact sequence.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.



A flight instructor with a student pilot aboard crashed a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee in a backyard off the 3500 block of Columbus’ Howard Avenue about 6:10 p.m. Wednesday, authorities said.

The pilot experienced mechanical problems soon after taking off from the Columbus airport, said Fire Marshal Ricky Shores.

Both pilot and passenger escaped unharmed after the planed crashed into a tree in the backyard of 3528 Howard Ave. The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee appeared mostly intact after coming to rest on its nose.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector on the scene Thursday morning said the plane’s two occupants had a hospital exam after the crash and were unscathed.

The pilot lost power after takeoff, he said.

After a crane lifts the aircraft from the backyard and investigators check the engine, the wings will be removed and the wreckage placed on a flatbed truck to be hauled to Air Salvage in Griffin, Ga., for further examination, the FAA agent said.

Police initially blocked Howard Avenue on Wednesday night, but soon reopened it to traffic, as the crash site is well off the road..

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee is a single-engine plane with low wings and tripod landing gear. It’s often used in flight instruction.


Source: http://www.ledger-enquirer.com

COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) - The pilot, passenger and residents of a home are OK after a plane made an emergency landing in the 3500 block of Howard Avenue Wednesday night.

Columbus Fire Marshal Ricky Shores says that both pilot and passenger are unharmed, and identified the plane as a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee. 

Battalion Chief Watson said the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the scene.

Officials say it appears the plane may have lost power. Preliminary reports indicate the pilot tried to turn back to the Columbus Airport but was unable to make it. 

The trees absorbed a lot of the damage, and the nose of the plane is in the ground. The pilot and passenger crawled out of the cockpit and were able to walk and talk to first responders. Both were transported to the hospital to be checked out for injuries.

Story and video:  http://www.wtvm.com




COLUMBUS, Ga. – A plane has made an emergency landing into a Columbus neighborhood Wednesday night.

According to Fire Chief Ricky Shores, the plane was taking off from Columbus Airport when it experienced some type of mechanical failure and the pilot executed an emergency landing near Howard Avenue.

Shores also says both the pilot and passenger seemed to be okay and identified the plane as a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee.

Source:  http://wrbl.com