Saturday, March 12, 2016

WestJet employees come forward as review launched in wake of sexual assault claim: 'We are taking their concerns extremely seriously,' says WestJet spokesperson

WestJet says several employees have come forward in the wake of accusations that the airline failed to properly handle an allegation of sexual assault.

In an email to CBC News, WestJet spokesperson Lauren Stewart said "a number of employees," have now come forward, adding, "we are taking their concerns extremely seriously."

Stewart did not say how many employees are involved or describe the nature of their comments, citing privacy laws. 

She said the airline has taken "firm and decisive." steps following a complaint from Mandalena (Mandy) Lewis, a former WestJet flight attendant, who is suing her former employer.

In a civil suit filed in B.C. Supreme Court, Lewis claims she was sexually assaulted by a pilot in 2010 during a layover in Hawaii. She alleges the airline protected the pilot and fired her instead.

None of the allegations has been proven in court.

On Friday, WestJet announced that it has hired auditing firm Ernst and Young to review its reporting procedures and practices.

In the email to CBC, Stewart said the airline has encouraged WestJet employees to come forward.  

Airline 'reached out' to employees

"We engaged several teams at WestJet to immediately begin re-investigating the allegations, and we reached out to our employees to encourage anyone with information about the allegations or any other behavior that violates our respectful workplace policies to come forward," she said.

Stewart said she didn't know when the report will be complete but added that its recommendations will be made public.

Last week, WestJet president and CEO Gregg Saretsky posted a statement to the company's blog, writing that WestJet would be in court defending the lawsuit launched by Lewis.

In a statement Friday, Saretsky said, "the broader issues of sexual assault and harassment in the workplace that were raised are matters we take most seriously."

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca

Whitefish philanthropist accused in lawsuit of assaulting woman

Chief pilot Jim Bob Pierce, left, and executive director Jordan White stand next to Two Bear Air Rescue's Bell 429 helicopter at its Glacier Park International Airport hangar recently. The helicopter with its state-of-the-art search and rescue equipment and the expenses to keep it operating have been funded entirely by part-time Whitefish resident Mike Goguen.



Michael Goguen, a Whitefish philanthropist, has been named in a lawsuit that alleges he has continually sexually assaulted a woman since meeting her in 2001.

The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in San Mateo County, California, accuses Goguen of a breach of contract, saying he did not fully pay Amber Laurel Baptiste money he allegedly promised her to keep her from suing him.

Among other community projects, Goguen funds the Two Bear Air search and rescue service that, while based out of Flathead County, operates across western Montana. He also gave a $2 million grant that is paying for two detectives with the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force in both Missoula and Flathead counties who investigate online child pornography as well as sex trafficking.


Mike Goguen.


In the lawsuit, Goguen is accused of abusing Baptiste “sexually, physically and emotionally for over 13 years.” Baptiste claims that she has been involved in human trafficking since the age of 15, and that shortly after she was brought to the county in 2001, she met Goguen at a Texas strip club.

He allegedly began to pay her living expenses and other costs in exchange for a sexual relationship with her “relying on his promise that he would help her break free of the human traffickers who held her in perpetual debt.”

The lawsuit details a long chain of alleged graphic sexual and violent acts Baptiste said Goguen forced her to endure in the years after their meeting.

According to the lawsuit, in 2012 Baptiste found that she was infected with human papillomavirus that she believed was contracted from Goguen. He allegedly signed a contract to pay her $40 million, but after paying $10 million, refused to provide any more money. Baptiste’s lawsuit is seeking the remaining payments, as well as compensatory damages.

Goguen’s attorney told technology website TechCrunch that a countersuit will be filed on Monday that says Baptiste is attempting to extort Goguen. Sequoia Capital, the venture capital firm where Goguen is a partner, also told TechCrunch that he has left the company.

Original article can be found here: http://missoulian.com

Girls get up close, personal look at aviation

Sylvia Teal, 9, of Bushnell, left, gets ready for her flight with Judie Betz of Weirsdale in Betz' RV12 "Bella Rosa" aircraft during the E.A.A. Chapter 812 Young Eagles Rally For Women In Aviation at Ocala International Airport in Ocala, Fla. on Saturday, March 12, 2016.



OCALA — It was all about girl power at Ocala International Airport Saturday morning.

Girls aged 8 to 17, including members of the Young Eagle youth group of the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 812 of Ocala and the Dunnellon High School Air Force Jr. ROTC, got a close look at the world of aviation —some enjoying their first flight into the wild blue yonder — during Women of Aviation Worldwide Week.

The girls joined in a ground school class, took a tour of the airport tower, got a look at a U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopter and Florida Forest Service fire operations helicopter and chatted with pilots and crew members.

Breanna Bergeron, 16, a junior at Dunnellon High School and Air Force Junior ROTC member, was one of the about 25 first-time flyers.

“It was amazing. I was nervous but once we got up it was smoother than a car, (then) there was some turbulence. I would do it again,” Bergeron said. She said she might take up flying as a hobby, but for now, is considering ground crew and the medical aspects of aviation.

The international weeklong spotlight on women’s roles and opportunities in aviation is held during the week of March 8 to coincide with the anniversary of the first female pilot and International Women’s Day in 1914, according to the Institute for Women of Aviation Worldwide Week, a not-for-profit group supported by organizations and business “to foster gender balance, thus growth, in the air and space industry.”

The local event was spearheaded by CarolAnn Garratt, 61, Gainesville area resident who made three separate around-the-world flights in her single-engine Mooney airplane in the 2000s.

“About six percent of all pilots now are women. We would like to get that up to about 60 percent,” Garratt said.

EAA Chapter 812 provided the flights for the girls and additional support for the event. Warren Levin, Young Eagle Coordinator for the chapter, said the Young Eagle program began in the early 1990s to introduce youth to aviation and nearly two million youth have flown in the program.

Connie McConnell, a retiree and pilot and member of the "Wing Nuts" group who lives in Leeward Air Ranch, led a ground school class. She was drawn into aviation by her father, a pilot, around 1976.

The Blackhawk medical evacuation helicopter, a 2008 model, was flown in from Jacksonville's Cecil Field by Florida National Guard C-Company members, all female, CW3 Stacey Jaffett, pilot, Staff Sgt. Shonnah Adams, medic, Pfc. Kathryn Emery, crew chief and mechanic and Capt. Thea Iacomino, pilot, easily got the attendees' attention.

The four crew members, with service ranging from about 10 to 20 years, were deployed to Iraq in 2011 and evacuated wounded soldiers under combat conditions.

Chris Johnson, 33, of Coleman, looked on as his 9-year-old daughter Kaitlyn sat in the Blackhawk pilot’s seat, while Lovia Teal watched her daughter, Sylvia, also 9, look over the aircraft's passenger and cargo area. Vannette Hooten, 14, Lovia Teal’s sister, also looked over the Blackhawk.

Master Sgt. Kevin Gunter, leader of the Air Force Junior ROTC group, said the girls showed a “high interest” in the aircraft.

Marie Fredieu, pilot of a 1965 Florida Forest Service fire operations UH-1H helicopter, fielded questions about the chopper which can handle a 2,400-pound suspended water bucket for use in fire suppression.

“We have to fly low near the trees,” said Fredieu, a National Guard member who is trained to fly the Blackhawk. She was deployed to Iraq with the Army in 2011.

Ada Law, 15, daughter of Bob Law, president of EAA Chapter 812, seemed comfortable in the pilot’s seat of the Blackhawk, but said she still might prefer a jet.

“I like speed,” Ada said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ocala.com

Cessna 150M, N63507: Incident occurred March 12, 2016 near Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Boone County, Illinois

Date: 12-MAR-16
Time: 17:17:00Z
Regis#: N63507
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA W. Chicago-DuPage (NON Part 121) FSDO-03
City: POPLAR GROVE
State: Illinois

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, 2 MILES FROM POPLAR GROVE, IL

http://registry.faa.gov/N63507





 BOONE COUNTY (WREX) -

A single-engine plane lands in a wheat field in rural Boone County Saturday morning.

According to Sheriff Dave Ernest, the plane was searching for the nearest airport to land at after experiencing a mechanical failure around 11:30 a.m.

The private plane, from Hampshire, Illinois, almost made it to Poplar Grove Airport, but came up just short, making an emergency landing safely in a field near Woodstock Road and Grange Hall Road.

Sheriff Ernest says the pilot made a "perfect landing."

There were two people in the plane and they were not hurt.

What exactly caused the mechanical failure is unknown at this time, Ernest says.

The FAA is investigating this incident.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wrex.com

Van's RV-8A, N838RV: Fatal accident occurred March 12, 2016 in Clermont, Lake County, Florida

DANE SHEAHEN: http://registry.faa.gov/N838RV

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 12, 2016 in Clermont, FL
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8, registration: N838RV
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Sheahen RV-8A, N838RV, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and the pilot-rated rear-seat passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, at about 0825. The local personal flight, destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

Multiple witnesses in the area of the accident site reported seeing an airplane that was consistent with the accident airplane inflight with a rough running engine sound. One witness stated that the engine was not making any noise as the airplane made a 180 degree turn over a field, and descended out of sight in a nose-low attitude. The airplane was located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to preliminary radar data, the airplane was flying in a southwesterly direction, at approximately 2,220 feet mean sea level, when it began a climbing left turn, and reached an altitude of about 2,600 feet (msl). The last few targets showed a rapidly decreasing airspeed. A nearby flight of three airplanes reported hearing the pilot of an "RV airplane" make a mayday distress radio call, reporting that he had "lost his engine" around the time of the accident.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage came to rest in an open field about 307 feet elevation. The wreckage path was 30 feet long, from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage, which came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of about 110 degrees. The right wing, aileron and flap were intact and attached to the main spar at the fuselage. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the left wing. The left wing tip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer was attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open, the canopy was separated and laying over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. The fuel tank was fragmented and no residual fuel was observed, the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. Initial examination of the engine revealed metal debris in the oil sump finger screen. The engine was retained for further examination to be performed at a later date.

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, was assembled from a kit and issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to FAA records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on January 19, 2011, and he reported 880 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Weather at Orlando Municipal Airport (ORL), about 19 miles east of the accident site, reported at the time of the accident included clear skies, 10 statute miles of visibility and winds from 130 degrees at 9 knots.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




A Volusia County pilot was among two people who died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital in Clermont.

Dane Sheahen, who lived in the Spruce Creek Fly-In, was piloting the plane when it crashed, according to Clermont police. His passenger was James Kos, of Canute, Oklahoma. Both were licensed pilots.

The field where the crash occurred is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

The crash happened about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane .... appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don't know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We're very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.news-journalonline.com




CLERMONT — Two people died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital.

The field is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

Police had not released the names as of Saturday evening.

The crash happened at about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane, who are not identified, appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don’t know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We’re very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dailycommercial.com



A single-engine plane crash Saturday morning in a Clermont field left the two people on board dead, officials said.

The pilot, Dane Sheahen of Port Orange, and passenger, James Kos of Canute, Okla., were pronounced dead at the scene of the crash. Both were licensed pilots, police said.

The two-seater aircraft crashed about 8:45 a.m. in a field between South Lake Hospital and a subdivision, landing about 100 yards from nearby homes.

Witness Mark Wells was in his front yard when he heard the plane crash.

"My initial thought was that it was a car passing and backfired," said Wells, who lives just behind the scene of the crash. "I came around [the house] and a neighbor was calling the police."

Wells ran to the aircraft to see if he could help, but it was too late.

"I get out there and I can see the guy laying out but still in the cockpit," Wells said. "I was going to say 'Are you OK?' but then I got just close enough to see he was gone."

Wells said it wasn't until later that he realized there was a second victim in the plane.

Sheahen and Kos are believed to have died on impact, Clermont police Capt. Michael McMaster said. Medical examiners removed their bodies from the scene about 2 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal and Aviation Administration will investigate the crash and determine a cause, City of Clermont spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said. Clermont police are assisting in the investigation.

Police said it's unclear where the aircraft was coming from or where it was headed. They also did not know what type of plane it was.

Bloodsworth said the plane was possibly headed west when it crashed.

The plane's propellers appear to be undamaged, though the body and tail of the aircraft were crumpled.

Bloodsworth said officials anticipate staying overnight to secure the scene, as the aircraft likely won't be removed until Sunday.

The field where the plane crashed is near Citrus Tower Boulevard and Oakley Seaver Drive, between a subdivision and South Lake Hospital.

No other people were injured and no buildings were damaged in the crash, officials said.

Wells said he is glad the pilot seemingly attempted not to strike any homes in the neighborhood.

"I'm thankful he sacrificed trying to do the right thing," Wells said. "My thoughts are with him."

Story, photo gallery and video:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com














Jamestown Regional Airport (KJMS) named Commercial Service Airport of the Year

Jamestown Regional Airport (KJMS)  was named the 2015 Commercial Service Airport of the Year by the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission. Accepting the award are Jamestown Airport Authority members, from left, Keith Veil, Jamestown Mayor Katie Andersen, Jim Boyd, Jeff Wilhelm, Brent Harris and Jamestown Regional Airport Manager Sam Seafeldt.



Jamestown Regional Airport is the 2015 Commercial Service Airport of the Year, as determined by the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission.

Kyle Wanner, director of the Aeronautics Commission, said Jamestown Regional Airport beat out Minot International Airport for the honor. Wanner said Jamestown Regional Airport won because of the increase in passenger boardings and improvements made on the general aviation side of the airport.

“Minot did build a new terminal that opened in 2015,” he said. “Jamestown had a great year with a full year of reliable jet service to Denver. This led to a 128 percent increase in passenger boardings from last year (2014).”

In 2015 Jamestown Regional Airport had 8,642 passenger boardings, up from 3,684 passenger boardings in 2014.

Wanner said employees and management at Jamestown Regional Airport did an “excellent” job in reaching out to the community and improving general aviation options at the airport.

General aviation improvements to the airport include the completion of a T-hangar with eight units. Airport Manager Sam Seafeldt said six of the eight units have been rented. The airport also replaced its aircraft rescue and firefighting truck.

Seafeldt said he was a little surprised Jamestown Regional Airport won as Minot also was seeking the award and had just completed construction of a new terminal. He said it is a good feeling having the airport win this award.

“This win is for everyone here at the airport,” he said. “It happened because of everyone who works here, our general aviation tenants, SkyWest Airlines, everyone helped make this happen.”

Wanner said the Jamestown Regional Airport Authority, along with Seafeldt and officials with Jamestown Public Schools and the University of Jamestown, have worked “diligently” to improve aviation education in the community as well. The Airport Authority is working on developing a two-year aviation program through Jamestown High School, James Valley Career & Technology Center and University of Jamestown. A high school student who completes this program will earn college credits through the University of Jamestown.

Jim Boyd, chairman of the Jamestown Regional Airport Authority, said he is “extremely” pleased with the airport receiving this award.

“Winning an award like this, it’s all about the support the airport receives from the community,” he said.

Boyd said the award wouldn’t be possible without the work and effort put in by his fellow Airport Authority members, airport manager and staff.

“It takes teamwork to make things happen and we have a great team,” he said.

Mayor Katie Andersen, who serves on the Airport Authority, said having the Jamestown Regional Airport recognized like this is a positive association for the community.

“We are honored for this (the Airport of the Year) designation,” she said.

Andersen said the Airport Authority worked hard with Seafeldt and the airport’s staff in getting the airport’s passenger boarding numbers up during 2015.

“We all worked really hard to accomplish that 128 percent increase in passenger boardings,” she said.

Andersen said the Airport Authority also worked hard on getting the T-hangar project done in 2015.

“A couple of years ago we started identifying some general aviation projects we wanted to get done,” she said. “The T-hangar project was our big project.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.jamestownsun.com

John Lillevold Soars As Flight Instructor

John Lillevold with the plaque he received when he was named Certified Flight Instructor of the Year for 2016 in South Dakota. Lillevold has been flying planes for 15 years and has been a flight instructor for nine years.


When some people decide to start a new career later in their lives, they usually end up behind a desk. For John Lillevold, he found himself sitting in the cockpit of a plane.

"I started flying to get to work," he said. He previously worked as an electrical engineer in Sioux Falls.

Flying cut the hour and a half drive down to 15-20 minute plane ride. He eventually became a full-time flight instructor with fellow pilot Gene Ebneter when they started the Yankton Flight Training Center in 2007 at Chan Gurney airport in Yankton.

In February, Lillevold was presented with the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) of the Year for 2016 in South Dakota award. His nomination package contained a list of professional activities, which included acting as president of the Yankton Flight Training Center and flying several hundred Boy Scouts as part of their Aviation Merit Badge requirement.

Ebneter was one of the people who nominated Lillevold for the award.

"John’s a very fine flight instructor," Ebneter said. "He’s a very good citizen in the community and is an outstanding individual. He deserves it."

The CFI award is simply an additional bonus for Lillevold.

"I feel very flattered," he said. "I really like taking students who are initially very tentative and getting them past the point of being frightened until they get the confidence and fly off. That’s my reward."

Lillevold is still a part of the flight training program, except he now works with advanced pilots in training.

"When I became a flight instructor, I thought it was foolish to sit in the right seat of an airplane and let someone that’s never flown before take off," he admitted. "But I’ve had a ball."

Lillevold also flies for his own enjoyment. He pays yearly visits to places like the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands during the wintertime. In November, he took a step outside his comfort zone and visited Cuba.

"There are very few people in this country who have flown a private plane to Cuba," he said. "I had a real adventure. I swam in the Bay of Pigs and toured the country."

Lillevold makes these trips in a Skyhawk airplane. He also regularly flies a Cirrus aircraft and is currently learning how to fly a hot air balloon.

"It’s a new form of flying," Lillevold said. "I’ve learned so many things about wind and weather that I never appreciated before in a fixed-wing private plane."

Lillevold previously worked in electronics for 30 years. His job duties ranged from working on the first cellphone systems at Motorola in Chicago to designing a rectal thermometer for cows.

Lillevold and his wife moved to South Dakota from Chicago in 1998, around the time Lillevold "got tired of driving and starting flying."

He also used his flying skills to transport his children during their time in high school and college.

"They thought everyone flew," Lillevold said. "I’m not sure they appreciated that flying was a unique thing to do, but they do now."

Lillevold is happy he can share his talent with his loved ones.

"I knew I was blessed with this and that it was a great gift," he said. "If someone is ill, I can be there within a couple hours. If I decide to go to the Bahamas, I can be there in a day or two."

His wife frequently joins him on his tropical excursions.

"We went to Sanibel Island last year and revisited the house my wife and I spent our honeymoon," Lillevold said. "I would like to go back to the Bahamas. There’s an island there where there isn’t anything to do, which is just what I want for a few days."

Self-flying has other benefits.

"If I fly to a small airport, its little hassle for me," he said. "I don’t have to take off my shoes, my baggage is not inspected and if I want to carry a firearm on my person, I do."

The process becomes difficult when traveling out of the country.

"I have to clear customs by myself and figure out who I have to talk to, who I pay the fees to and where I park the plane," Lillevold explained.

This hassle is a minor inconvenience compared to the amount of enjoyment Lillevold has piloting his own aircraft.

"Some people fly for work and others for the visceral pleasure of flying through the air," Lillevold said. "For me, it’s a time machine that allows me to do things I wouldn’t always do."

Being a flight instructor allows him to pass this experience onto other pilots.

"Flight instructors teach people how to fly, either from scratch or if they’re moving up a license," Lillevold said. "I can teach people to fly in the day time, in the clouds, for money or whatever they want."

He is happy he can teach flying at the Chan Gurney airport.

"It’s one of the nicer airports I fly to," Lillevold said. "It’s well-kept and there’s an instrument landing system that helps me land when it’s cloudy."

Chan Gurney has a continuous traffic flow of company planes and, depending on the time of year, jets bringing in hunters and crop duster planes in the summer.

"There’s constant traffic out there, big and small," Lillevold said.

Some of that traffic includes pilots in training of all ages. According to Lillevold, the youngest person he trained was 15-years old while others range between 30-40-years old.

Lillevold is currently turning his focus on teaching pilots with more experience in the air.

"Trevor Zimmer is a new instructor at the flying school and I’m giving him all the primary students that I can," he said. "I’m more focused on giving people advanced ratings in their own planes to get away from the rental business."

He added that those who think flying an airplane will save them money are mistaken.

"It seldom saves you money," Lillevold said. "But if you live a good life, it saves you time. Being able to visit my children when I wouldn’t otherwise is worth extra to me."

Anyone interested in earning a private pilot license can contact Trevor Zimmer of Yankton Aviation at 1-605-940-8495.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.yankton.net

Doctor Wanted Germanwings Co-Pilot to Be Hospitalized: Pilot’s doctors didn’t inform authorities out of fear of breaching Germany’s privacy laws

The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
Updated March 11, 2016 9:26 p.m. ET


Two weeks before a Germanwings co-pilot intentionally crashed a jet into the French Alps in March 2015, a doctor recommended psychiatric hospitalization but didn’t alert authorities out of fear of breaching Germany’s strict privacy laws, according to a draft of the final report by air-safety investigators.

Investigators are expected to recommend that such privacy laws both in Germany and across Europe need to be reassessed by aviation authorities in cases where a “threat to public safety” should trump medical confidentiality.

The final report, scheduled to be released Sunday by France’s Bureau d’Enquetes et d’Analyses, is also expected to call for enhanced screening of commercial pilots with previously diagnosed psychiatric problems.

The draft also includes recommendations to encourage European pilots to voluntarily report mental-health issues, seek psychiatric help and allow them to continue flying while taking antidepressants. The measures are meant to address criticism that aviators often fear they will be punished if they admit to psychiatric problems, as well as foster peer-pilot support groups.

The 87-page draft was written late last year but is believed to closely match the final version, according to three people familiar with the details.

The twin-engine Airbus 320 was en route to Düsseldorf from Barcelona on March 24 when Andreas Lubitz, the 27-year-old co-pilot, deliberately steered the jet into a remote mountain range, killing all 150 people on board.

A BEA spokeswoman declined to address the investigation’s findings ahead of the final report’s publication. Investigators are scheduled to brief families of the victims Friday and Saturday.

Germanwings is the low-fare unit of a Deutsche Lufthansa AG. Spokeswomen for Lufthansa weren’t immediately available to comment.

The draft provides few new specifics about the crash itself, which sparked a world-wide debate about how to screen pilots for psychological problems, provide help to those who need it and keep potentially suicidal pilots out of cockpits.

The document details how Mr. Lubitz’s private physician, who worried his patient was psychotic, and a psychiatrist who also treated the pilot—and prescribed antidepressants just eight days before the crash—“were probably aware” of his profession.

Yet the health-care providers, who aren’t identified in the draft, failed to inform “any aviation authority” or government agency “about the co-pilot’s mental state.”

German doctors operate under some of the world’s strictest patient privacy laws carrying stiff criminal penalties, though they are allowed to breach that confidentiality in cases of “imminent danger” to the public.

Despite treating Mr. Lubitz for several weeks while recognizing his deteriorating condition, the doctors perceived that warning authorities about hazards to the flying public presented “more risks, in particular for themselves, than not reporting the co-pilot,” according to the draft report.

The fatal sequence of actions—beginning with Mr. Lubitz’s putting the plane into a nose dive about 30 seconds after the captain left for a bathroom break—were laid out in a preliminary report in May. The cockpit voice recording ended roughly 10 minutes later, following sounds of violent blows on the locked cockpit door and automated calls of “pull up, pull up” from collision-warning devices.

At the time, investigators also officially confirmed that Mr. Lubitz years earlier had halted his flight training for nine months due to depression. But he was cleared to resume training by a Lufthansa-affiliated medical organization, passed all of his subsequent pilot proficiency and medical exams without any problems, and eventually was hired by Germanwings in 2013.

The latest report goes further in detailing the extent of the illness when it returned, the various physicians Mr. Lubitz sought for help and how Germany’s nearly ironclad privacy restrictions allowed him to conceal his condition from regulators, airline officials and fellow pilots.

According to the report, Mr. Lubitz began “a severe depressive episode without psychotic symptoms” starting from August 2008, when he was already undergoing basic pilot training. But he exhibited suicidal tendencies and was hospitalized, it said.

In July 2009, his psychiatrist determined that the would-be airline pilot “had fully recovered” after treatment, and Lufthansa’s Aero-Medical Center two weeks later issued him a conditional medical certificate with the proviso that “it would become invalid if there is a relapse.”

Each year after that, the same Lufthansa organization renewed or revalidated his medical certificate with those same conditions.

But in November 2014, a private physician put Mr. Lubitz on sick leave for a week. The next month, the draft indicates, he saw “various private physicians” for complaints about vision problems and sleep disorders. Several eye specialists “all came to the conclusion that there was no organic reason” and the vision issues appeared to be psychosomatic, according to the report.

By the middle of February 2015, the draft notes, Mr. Lubitz was undergoing treatment for “anxiety disorder” and had been referred to a psychiatrist and psychotherapist. He was out on sick leave for three days.

On March 10, a private physician referred him “for psychiatric hospitalization due to a possible psychosis.” Later that month, he went on sick leave and returned to work two days before the crash.

According to the draft, Mr. Lubitz never informed or sought help from aviation medical experts or Germanwings officials. Mr. Lubitz’s relatives declined to be interviewed by investigators, according to the draft.

The document concludes that at the time of the crash Mr. Lubitz was “still suffering from what was likely to be a psychotic depression and was taking medication” and receiving treatment his superiors knew nothing about.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

NTSB Identification: DCA15WA093
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 24, 2015 in Barcellonette, France
Aircraft: AIRBUS INDUSTRIE A320-211, registration:
Injuries: 150 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The BEA of France has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Airbus A320-211 airplane that occurred on March 24, 2015. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the BEA's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer and Design of the engines.

All investigative information will be released by the BEA-FR.

Lancair 320, N351E: Accident occurred February 13, 2011 in Dawsonville, Dawson County, Georgia


http://registry.faa.gov/N351E 

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA142
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 13, 2011 in Dawsonville, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/01/2011
Aircraft: KENNEDY MICHAEL M LANCAIR 320, registration: N351E
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After about 25 minutes of flight, the pilot began transferring fuel from the left and right main fuel tanks to the 10-gallon header tank which fed the engine. Ten minutes after completing that operation, the engine began to lose power. The pilot activated the fuel boost pumps and adjusted the throttle and mixture controls. He stated that the engine surged as though it was running out of fuel. When engine power could not be restored, the pilot performed a forced landing to the median of a divided highway, and a hard landing resulted in substantial damage to the left wing tip, rudder, and propeller. A postacciddent examination of the fuel filter revealed traces of sediment and water, while the gascolator bowl contained water and debris. The filter and bowl were then reinstalled and an engine run was completed using the airplane’s own battery and fuel system. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s inadequate preflight inspection and failure to detect water-contaminated fuel, which resulted in a loss of engine power.




On February 13, 2011, about 1100 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Kennedy Lancair 320, N351E, was substantially damaged after a loss of engine power and forced landing near Dawsonville, Georgia. The certificated commercial pilot/owner and the private pilot-rated passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Gwinnett County Airport (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia, about 1020, and was destined for Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia.

In a written statement, the pilot/owner gave a comprehensive account of the preflight planning, preflight inspection, takeoff, and flight to an area north of his departure airport with no anomalies noted. Once established in an area clear of traffic, the pilot allowed his passenger to do some maneuvering, and become accustomed to the airplane, as it was his first flight in a Lancair. After about 25 minutes of flight, the pilot/owner began transferring fuel from the left and right main fuel tanks to the 10-gallon “header tank” which fed the engine. Ten minutes after completing that operation, the engine began to lose power.

The pilot said that he resumed control of the airplane and performed troubleshooting that included activating the fuel boost pumps and adjusting throttle and mixture controls. When engine power could not be restored, the pilot elected to conduct a forced landing to a roadway, as the nearest airport selected on his GPS receiver was beyond the glide distance of the airplane. The pilot described the engine power as “surging, like it was running out of fuel.”

The pilot described maneuvering close to the ground to avoid wires and road traffic, and the resultant hard landing to a median in the roadway. The passenger’s account of events by telephone and his written statement were consistent with the pilot’s.

The pilot/owner held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first class medical certificate was issued April 2010. The pilot reported approximately 1,900 total hours of flight experience, and approximately 500 hours of experience in Lancair airplanes.

The pilot-rated passenger held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued June 2009. The passenger reported approximately 230 total hours of flight experience, none of which was in Lancair airplanes.

According to maintenance records, the airplane had accrued 479 total aircraft hours. Its most recent conditional inspection was completed on February 1, 2010, at 437 total aircraft hours. 

The 1105 weather observation at Cherokee County Airport (47A), 21 miles west of the accident site, included clear skies and winds from 260 degrees at 3 knots. The visibility was 10 miles. The temperature was 12 degrees C and the dew point was -1 degrees C. The altimeter setting was 30.30 inches of mercury.

Examination of the airplane at the scene by an FAA inspector revealed the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing tip, rudder, and propeller. A detailed examination was performed in Griffin, Georgia, on February 17, 2011, by the same inspector. The propeller was replaced, and the fuel filter and gascolator were inspected. The fuel filter showed only traces of sediment and water, but the gascolator bowl contained water and debris. The filter and bowl were then reinstalled in preparation for an engine run. 

An engine start was then attempted on the airframe, utilizing the airplane’s own battery and fuel system. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption.



DAWSONVILLE - A small single-engine plane made an emergency landing in the median of Georgia 400 in Dawson County Sunday.

The pilot was William Reister of Dunwoody. 

He left from Briscoe Field in Lawrenceville Sunday morning and planned to land the two-seat Lancair 320 at the same airfield. However, the plane uncontrollably lost altitude and was unable to reach its destination.

Reister reported the loss of power before landing the plane in the median of the four-lane highway near Dawson Forest Rd. No one was injured, and there were no major traffic delays resulting from the emergency landing. 

Original article can be found here: http://accesswdun.com