Saturday, March 12, 2016

WestJet employees come forward as review launched in wake of sexual assault claim: 'We are taking their concerns extremely seriously,' says WestJet spokesperson

WestJet says several employees have come forward in the wake of accusations that the airline failed to properly handle an allegation of sexual assault.

In an email to CBC News, WestJet spokesperson Lauren Stewart said "a number of employees," have now come forward, adding, "we are taking their concerns extremely seriously."

Stewart did not say how many employees are involved or describe the nature of their comments, citing privacy laws. 

She said the airline has taken "firm and decisive." steps following a complaint from Mandalena (Mandy) Lewis, a former WestJet flight attendant, who is suing her former employer.

In a civil suit filed in B.C. Supreme Court, Lewis claims she was sexually assaulted by a pilot in 2010 during a layover in Hawaii. She alleges the airline protected the pilot and fired her instead.

None of the allegations has been proven in court.

On Friday, WestJet announced that it has hired auditing firm Ernst and Young to review its reporting procedures and practices.

In the email to CBC, Stewart said the airline has encouraged WestJet employees to come forward.  

Airline 'reached out' to employees

"We engaged several teams at WestJet to immediately begin re-investigating the allegations, and we reached out to our employees to encourage anyone with information about the allegations or any other behavior that violates our respectful workplace policies to come forward," she said.

Stewart said she didn't know when the report will be complete but added that its recommendations will be made public.

Last week, WestJet president and CEO Gregg Saretsky posted a statement to the company's blog, writing that WestJet would be in court defending the lawsuit launched by Lewis.

In a statement Friday, Saretsky said, "the broader issues of sexual assault and harassment in the workplace that were raised are matters we take most seriously."

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca

Whitefish philanthropist accused in lawsuit of assaulting woman

Chief pilot Jim Bob Pierce, left, and executive director Jordan White stand next to Two Bear Air Rescue's Bell 429 helicopter at its Glacier Park International Airport hangar recently. The helicopter with its state-of-the-art search and rescue equipment and the expenses to keep it operating have been funded entirely by part-time Whitefish resident Mike Goguen.



Michael Goguen, a Whitefish philanthropist, has been named in a lawsuit that alleges he has continually sexually assaulted a woman since meeting her in 2001.

The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in San Mateo County, California, accuses Goguen of a breach of contract, saying he did not fully pay Amber Laurel Baptiste money he allegedly promised her to keep her from suing him.

Among other community projects, Goguen funds the Two Bear Air search and rescue service that, while based out of Flathead County, operates across western Montana. He also gave a $2 million grant that is paying for two detectives with the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force in both Missoula and Flathead counties who investigate online child pornography as well as sex trafficking.


Mike Goguen.


In the lawsuit, Goguen is accused of abusing Baptiste “sexually, physically and emotionally for over 13 years.” Baptiste claims that she has been involved in human trafficking since the age of 15, and that shortly after she was brought to the county in 2001, she met Goguen at a Texas strip club.

He allegedly began to pay her living expenses and other costs in exchange for a sexual relationship with her “relying on his promise that he would help her break free of the human traffickers who held her in perpetual debt.”

The lawsuit details a long chain of alleged graphic sexual and violent acts Baptiste said Goguen forced her to endure in the years after their meeting.

According to the lawsuit, in 2012 Baptiste found that she was infected with human papillomavirus that she believed was contracted from Goguen. He allegedly signed a contract to pay her $40 million, but after paying $10 million, refused to provide any more money. Baptiste’s lawsuit is seeking the remaining payments, as well as compensatory damages.

Goguen’s attorney told technology website TechCrunch that a countersuit will be filed on Monday that says Baptiste is attempting to extort Goguen. Sequoia Capital, the venture capital firm where Goguen is a partner, also told TechCrunch that he has left the company.

Original article can be found here: http://missoulian.com

Girls get up close, personal look at aviation

Sylvia Teal, 9, of Bushnell, left, gets ready for her flight with Judie Betz of Weirsdale in Betz' RV12 "Bella Rosa" aircraft during the E.A.A. Chapter 812 Young Eagles Rally For Women In Aviation at Ocala International Airport in Ocala, Fla. on Saturday, March 12, 2016.



OCALA — It was all about girl power at Ocala International Airport Saturday morning.

Girls aged 8 to 17, including members of the Young Eagle youth group of the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 812 of Ocala and the Dunnellon High School Air Force Jr. ROTC, got a close look at the world of aviation —some enjoying their first flight into the wild blue yonder — during Women of Aviation Worldwide Week.

The girls joined in a ground school class, took a tour of the airport tower, got a look at a U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopter and Florida Forest Service fire operations helicopter and chatted with pilots and crew members.

Breanna Bergeron, 16, a junior at Dunnellon High School and Air Force Junior ROTC member, was one of the about 25 first-time flyers.

“It was amazing. I was nervous but once we got up it was smoother than a car, (then) there was some turbulence. I would do it again,” Bergeron said. She said she might take up flying as a hobby, but for now, is considering ground crew and the medical aspects of aviation.

The international weeklong spotlight on women’s roles and opportunities in aviation is held during the week of March 8 to coincide with the anniversary of the first female pilot and International Women’s Day in 1914, according to the Institute for Women of Aviation Worldwide Week, a not-for-profit group supported by organizations and business “to foster gender balance, thus growth, in the air and space industry.”

The local event was spearheaded by CarolAnn Garratt, 61, Gainesville area resident who made three separate around-the-world flights in her single-engine Mooney airplane in the 2000s.

“About six percent of all pilots now are women. We would like to get that up to about 60 percent,” Garratt said.

EAA Chapter 812 provided the flights for the girls and additional support for the event. Warren Levin, Young Eagle Coordinator for the chapter, said the Young Eagle program began in the early 1990s to introduce youth to aviation and nearly two million youth have flown in the program.

Connie McConnell, a retiree and pilot and member of the "Wing Nuts" group who lives in Leeward Air Ranch, led a ground school class. She was drawn into aviation by her father, a pilot, around 1976.

The Blackhawk medical evacuation helicopter, a 2008 model, was flown in from Jacksonville's Cecil Field by Florida National Guard C-Company members, all female, CW3 Stacey Jaffett, pilot, Staff Sgt. Shonnah Adams, medic, Pfc. Kathryn Emery, crew chief and mechanic and Capt. Thea Iacomino, pilot, easily got the attendees' attention.

The four crew members, with service ranging from about 10 to 20 years, were deployed to Iraq in 2011 and evacuated wounded soldiers under combat conditions.

Chris Johnson, 33, of Coleman, looked on as his 9-year-old daughter Kaitlyn sat in the Blackhawk pilot’s seat, while Lovia Teal watched her daughter, Sylvia, also 9, look over the aircraft's passenger and cargo area. Vannette Hooten, 14, Lovia Teal’s sister, also looked over the Blackhawk.

Master Sgt. Kevin Gunter, leader of the Air Force Junior ROTC group, said the girls showed a “high interest” in the aircraft.

Marie Fredieu, pilot of a 1965 Florida Forest Service fire operations UH-1H helicopter, fielded questions about the chopper which can handle a 2,400-pound suspended water bucket for use in fire suppression.

“We have to fly low near the trees,” said Fredieu, a National Guard member who is trained to fly the Blackhawk. She was deployed to Iraq with the Army in 2011.

Ada Law, 15, daughter of Bob Law, president of EAA Chapter 812, seemed comfortable in the pilot’s seat of the Blackhawk, but said she still might prefer a jet.

“I like speed,” Ada said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ocala.com

Cessna 150M, N63507: Incident occurred March 12, 2016 near Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Boone County, Illinois

Date: 12-MAR-16
Time: 17:17:00Z
Regis#: N63507
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA W. Chicago-DuPage (NON Part 121) FSDO-03
City: POPLAR GROVE
State: Illinois

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, 2 MILES FROM POPLAR GROVE, IL

http://registry.faa.gov/N63507





 BOONE COUNTY (WREX) -

A single-engine plane lands in a wheat field in rural Boone County Saturday morning.

According to Sheriff Dave Ernest, the plane was searching for the nearest airport to land at after experiencing a mechanical failure around 11:30 a.m.

The private plane, from Hampshire, Illinois, almost made it to Poplar Grove Airport, but came up just short, making an emergency landing safely in a field near Woodstock Road and Grange Hall Road.

Sheriff Ernest says the pilot made a "perfect landing."

There were two people in the plane and they were not hurt.

What exactly caused the mechanical failure is unknown at this time, Ernest says.

The FAA is investigating this incident.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wrex.com

Van's RV-8A, N838RV: Fatal accident occurred March 12, 2016 in Clermont, Lake County, Florida

Analysis

The private pilot was in cruise flight in the experimental, amateur-built airplane. The pilot transmitted a mayday call via radio, stating that he had "lost an engine." Witnesses saw the airplane before impact and stated that the airplane was not making any sound. One witness saw the airplane enter a sharp turn before entering a nose-low descent. The airplane then impacted an open field; the sharp turn followed by the nose-low descent is consistent with an aerodynamic stall.

Examination of the experimental, kit-built engine revealed that the crankshaft had fractured forward of the No. 2 connecting rod journal. Further testing of the crankshaft revealed that the fracture was the result of fatigue cracking. There were no chemical variations or foreign material present in the metallurgical testing. The crankshaft only had 20 hours total time in service, suggesting that initiation of the cracking and the subsequent failure of the crankshaft was almost immediate. As there were no apparent metallurgical mechanical deficiencies with the crankshaft, the fatigue failure was likely the result of unusual stresses; however, there was insufficient information about the engine operation in the final 17 minutes of flight to determine the reason for the failure.

Although the pilot's toxicology results tested positive for Zolpidem, a prescription medication for the treatment of insomnia, the values were below the normal therapeutic range and there was no evidence that impairment contributed to the accident. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack while maneuvering for a forced landing; which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and loss of control. Contributing to the accident was the fatigue failure of the crankshaft for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information. 

Findings

Aircraft
Recip engine power section - Failure (Factor)
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute
Loss of engine power (total)

Emergency descent
Off-field or emergency landing
Loss of control in flight

Enroute
Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail (Defining event)

Landing-flare/touchdown
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Dane Sheahen and Buddy, his bulldog.

Dane lived in Fort Sheridan and had a second home in Spruce Creek, a fly-in community a few miles south of Daytona in northeast Florida. Friends describe him as a longtime recreational pilot based at Waukegan Airport who was a member of Lake County’s Stick and Rudder Club for many years. They also said he took no chances. “Flying was his passion,” Karen Schmid of Lake Forest told Daily North Shore. “He was a pilot who crossed his Ts and dotted his Is. He had a new engine installed in his plane in January 2016 right before he flew it to Florida with Buddy, his bulldog and frequent flying companion. He was very safe.”


James "Jim" Maurice Kos
 November 25, 1958 - March 12, 2016

In 2009 Jim started his career in the aviation industry and began classes at Canadian Valley Technology Center to obtain his airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic certification. After obtaining his certification in 2011 he later obtained his inspection authorization (AI) certification in 2013.




The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Superior; Coppell, Texas
Barrett Precision Engines; Tulsa, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N838RV



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Clermont, FL
Accident Number: ERA16FA127
Date & Time: 03/12/2016, 0847 EST
Registration: N838RV
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV-8A, N838RV, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground following a total loss of engine power near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, about 0825, and was destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida.

Two witnesses near the accident site reported seeing an airplane that matched the description of the accident airplane. They stated they did not hear any sound from the airplane as it flew overhead. One witness stated that the airplane made a "sharp" left turn and that the nose dropped before the airplane descended out of sight. The wreckage was subsequently located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to radar track data, the airplane was flying on a southerly heading about 2,100 ft mean sea level (msl) about 3 miles from the accident site. The pilot of a nearby airplane reported that, around the time of the accident, he heard the pilot of an RV airplane transmit a mayday radio call saying that he had "lost an engine." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/31/2015
Flight Time: 880 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model) 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. His most recent third-class FAA medical certificate was issued on July 8, 2014; on the application for that certificate, he reported 880 total hours of flight experience with 12 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's flight experience at the time of the accident could not be determined.

The passenger was a student pilot and held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on September 23, 2015. At that time, he reported 25 total hours of flight experience.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SHEAHEN DANE E
Registration: N838RV
Model/Series: RV-8 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 80797
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Superior
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: XP-400
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 215 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane was assembled from a kit and issued an FAA experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade constant-speed propeller.

The first entry in the engine logbook was on January 15, 2016, describing the installation of the new engine at 522.5 tachometer hours. The entry noted that the engine was run for 3 hours following assembly before installation. The last entry in the logbook was on January 31, at 531.6 tachometer hours; the oil had been changed and there were no contaminants found in the filter.

An Advanced Flight Systems Inc., AF-5800 electronic flight instrument system was installed in the airplane. The device was capable of displaying aircraft altitude, heading, moving maps, and engine information depending on options and installation. The unit recorded about 50 discrete data parameters to internal non-volatile memory. The device recorded data from flights between February 12 and March 12, totaling about 11 hours of flight time. About 18 minutes of the accident flight was recorded; the last data point was about 17 miles northeast of the accident site.

Given the logbook entries and the AF-5800 data, the estimated total engine time since installation was about 20 hours. A written record of flight time between January 31 and February 12 was not located. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ORL, 112 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 92°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Port Orange, FL (7FL6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: WINTER HAVEN, FL (GIF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0825 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

At 0853, the weather reported at Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, located 19 miles east of the accident site, included clear skies and wind from 130° at 9 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 22°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.18 inches of mercury. 




Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.557222, -81.718889 (est) 

The airplane came to rest in an open field about 307 ft msl. The field was about 2,400 ft long and about 200 ft wide; oriented east to west. There were powerlines on the eastern edge of the field and a road on the western edge. The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was 30 ft long from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage and was oriented in a westerly direction. The wreckage came to rest upright on a magnetic heading about 110°.

The right wing was intact and attached at the fuselage; the aileron and flap remained attached to the wing. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the wing. The left wingtip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer were attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open; the canopy was separated and lay over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. Both fuel tanks were breached and no residual fuel was observed; the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. The engine-driven fuel pump sustained minimal damage and operated normally during a functional test. The fuel nozzle injectors were removed; they showed normal operational signatures and no obstructions. The fuel injection lines were intact and free from obstructions. Metal debris was present in the oil sump finger screen and the oil sump.

The propeller governor, fuel servo, and engine-driven fuel pump were removed and the engine was placed on a stand for testing. The mixture control lever and throttle metering unit moved freely.

The oil pump could not be rotated by hand; the oil pump was removed from the accessory case and exhibited impact to the driveshaft. The drive and gear exhibited normal operation signatures. The oil pump cavity was free of any scuffing or scoring and exhibited normal operating signatures. The oil filter was cut off; the paper element contained metal debris. The engine could not be rotated by hand. The camshaft exhibited normal operating signatures and the crankshaft was fractured.

The fractured crankshaft was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for examination. Visual examinations of the fractured surface revealed extensive beach markings and a finely-textured surface indicative of fatigue progression from the vicinity of the connecting rod journal.

Further examination revealed that the crankshaft fractured at the forward radius of the No. 2 connecting rod journal, opposite the top-dead-center position of the piston. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) further revealed markings consistent with fatigue progression from a subsurface location. SEM examinations also revealed extensive mechanical damage consistent with crack closure and crack face recontact that obliterated the fine details of the fracture.

Energy dispersive x-ray spectra and maps of the origin location did not indicate an inclusion or chemical variations in the area. Metallographic cross sections did not reveal any inclusions of foreign material. 



Medical And Pathological Information

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Leesburg, Florida, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of specimens from the pilot. The testing was negative for ethanol and drugs of abuse. Acetaminophen, clopidogrel, metoprolol, rosuvastatin, ticlopidine, and zolpidem were detected in urine and blood.

Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter analgesic. Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet medication used to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Metoprolol is a beta-blocking agent used to treat high blood pressure and reduce the risk of recurrent heart attacks. Rosuvastatin is used to treat high cholesterol and related conditions. Salicylate is a metabolite of aspirin. Ticlopidine is a prescription platelet aggregation inhibitor. None of these medications are considered to be impairing. Zolpidem is a prescription medication used in the treatment of insomnia. This medication may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery). Due to adverse side effects, the FAA recommends waiting at least 24 hours after use before flying.



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 12, 2016 in Clermont, FL
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8, registration: N838RV
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Sheahen RV-8A, N838RV, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and the pilot-rated rear-seat passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, at about 0825. The local personal flight, destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

Multiple witnesses in the area of the accident site reported seeing an airplane that was consistent with the accident airplane inflight with a rough running engine sound. One witness stated that the engine was not making any noise as the airplane made a 180 degree turn over a field, and descended out of sight in a nose-low attitude. The airplane was located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to preliminary radar data, the airplane was flying in a southwesterly direction, at approximately 2,220 feet mean sea level, when it began a climbing left turn, and reached an altitude of about 2,600 feet (msl). The last few targets showed a rapidly decreasing airspeed. A nearby flight of three airplanes reported hearing the pilot of an "RV airplane" make a mayday distress radio call, reporting that he had "lost his engine" around the time of the accident.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage came to rest in an open field about 307 feet elevation. The wreckage path was 30 feet long, from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage, which came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of about 110 degrees. The right wing, aileron and flap were intact and attached to the main spar at the fuselage. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the left wing. The left wing tip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer was attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open, the canopy was separated and laying over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. The fuel tank was fragmented and no residual fuel was observed, the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. Initial examination of the engine revealed metal debris in the oil sump finger screen. The engine was retained for further examination to be performed at a later date.

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, was assembled from a kit and issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to FAA records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on January 19, 2011, and he reported 880 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Weather at Orlando Municipal Airport (ORL), about 19 miles east of the accident site, reported at the time of the accident included clear skies, 10 statute miles of visibility and winds from 130 degrees at 9 knots.

James "Jim" Maurice Kos
 November 25, 1958 - March 12, 2016 

 In 2009 Jim started his career in the aviation industry and began classes at Canadian Valley Technology Center to obtain his airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic certification. After obtaining his certification in 2011 he later obtained his inspection authorization (AI) certification in 2013.

Dane Sheahen and Buddy, his bulldog.

Dane lived in Fort Sheridan and had a second home in Spruce Creek, a fly-in community a few miles south of Daytona in northeast Florida. Friends describe him as a longtime recreational pilot based at Waukegan Airport who was a member of Lake County’s Stick and Rudder Club for many years. They also said he took no chances. “Flying was his passion,” Karen Schmid of Lake Forest told Daily North Shore. “He was a pilot who crossed his Ts and dotted his Is. He had a new engine installed in his plane in January 2016 right before he flew it to Florida with Buddy, his bulldog and frequent flying companion. He was very safe.”


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Superior; Coppell, Texas 
Barrett Precision Engines; Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N838RV

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Clermont, FL
Accident Number: ERA16FA127
Date & Time: 03/12/2016, 0847 EST
Registration: N838RV
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV-8A, N838RV, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground following a total loss of engine power near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, about 0825, and was destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida.

Two witnesses near the accident site reported seeing an airplane that matched the description of the accident airplane. They stated they did not hear any sound from the airplane as it flew overhead. One witness stated that the airplane made a "sharp" left turn and that the nose dropped before the airplane descended out of sight. The wreckage was subsequently located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to radar track data, the airplane was flying on a southerly heading about 2,100 ft mean sea level (msl) about 3 miles from the accident site. The pilot of a nearby airplane reported that, around the time of the accident, he heard the pilot of an RV airplane transmit a mayday radio call saying that he had "lost an engine." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/31/2015
Flight Time: 880 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model) 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. His most recent third-class FAA medical certificate was issued on July 8, 2014; on the application for that certificate, he reported 880 total hours of flight experience with 12 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's flight experience at the time of the accident could not be determined.

The passenger was a student pilot and held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on September 23, 2015. At that time, he reported 25 total hours of flight experience.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SHEAHEN DANE E
Registration: N838RV
Model/Series: RV-8 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 80797
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Superior
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: XP-400
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 215 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane was assembled from a kit and issued an FAA experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade constant-speed propeller.

The first entry in the engine logbook was on January 15, 2016, describing the installation of the new engine at 522.5 tachometer hours. The entry noted that the engine was run for 3 hours following assembly before installation. The last entry in the logbook was on January 31, at 531.6 tachometer hours; the oil had been changed and there were no contaminants found in the filter.

An Advanced Flight Systems Inc., AF-5800 electronic flight instrument system was installed in the airplane. The device was capable of displaying aircraft altitude, heading, moving maps, and engine information depending on options and installation. The unit recorded about 50 discrete data parameters to internal non-volatile memory. The device recorded data from flights between February 12 and March 12, totaling about 11 hours of flight time. About 18 minutes of the accident flight was recorded; the last data point was about 17 miles northeast of the accident site.

Given the logbook entries and the AF-5800 data, the estimated total engine time since installation was about 20 hours. A written record of flight time between January 31 and February 12 was not located. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ORL, 112 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 92°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Port Orange, FL (7FL6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: WINTER HAVEN, FL (GIF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0825 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

At 0853, the weather reported at Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, located 19 miles east of the accident site, included clear skies and wind from 130° at 9 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, temperature 22°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.18 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.557222, -81.718889 (est) 

The airplane came to rest in an open field about 307 ft msl. The field was about 2,400 ft long and about 200 ft wide; oriented east to west. There were powerlines on the eastern edge of the field and a road on the western edge. The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was 30 ft long from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage and was oriented in a westerly direction. The wreckage came to rest upright on a magnetic heading about 110°.

The right wing was intact and attached at the fuselage; the aileron and flap remained attached to the wing. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the wing. The left wingtip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer were attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open; the canopy was separated and lay over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. Both fuel tanks were breached and no residual fuel was observed; the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. The engine-driven fuel pump sustained minimal damage and operated normally during a functional test. The fuel nozzle injectors were removed; they showed normal operational signatures and no obstructions. The fuel injection lines were intact and free from obstructions. Metal debris was present in the oil sump finger screen and the oil sump.

The propeller governor, fuel servo, and engine-driven fuel pump were removed and the engine was placed on a stand for testing. The mixture control lever and throttle metering unit moved freely.

The oil pump could not be rotated by hand; the oil pump was removed from the accessory case and exhibited impact to the driveshaft. The drive and gear exhibited normal operation signatures. The oil pump cavity was free of any scuffing or scoring and exhibited normal operating signatures. The oil filter was cut off; the paper element contained metal debris. The engine could not be rotated by hand. The camshaft exhibited normal operating signatures and the crankshaft was fractured.

The fractured crankshaft was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for examination. Visual examinations of the fractured surface revealed extensive beach markings and a finely-textured surface indicative of fatigue progression from the vicinity of the connecting rod journal.

Further examination revealed that the crankshaft fractured at the forward radius of the No. 2 connecting rod journal, opposite the top-dead-center position of the piston. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) further revealed markings consistent with fatigue progression from a subsurface location. SEM examinations also revealed extensive mechanical damage consistent with crack closure and crack face recontact that obliterated the fine details of the fracture.

Energy dispersive x-ray spectra and maps of the origin location did not indicate an inclusion or chemical variations in the area. Metallographic cross sections did not reveal any inclusions of foreign material. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Leesburg, Florida, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of specimens from the pilot. The testing was negative for ethanol and drugs of abuse. Acetaminophen, clopidogrel, metoprolol, rosuvastatin, ticlopidine, and zolpidem were detected in urine and blood.

Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter analgesic. Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet medication used to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Metoprolol is a beta-blocking agent used to treat high blood pressure and reduce the risk of recurrent heart attacks. Rosuvastatin is used to treat high cholesterol and related conditions. Salicylate is a metabolite of aspirin. Ticlopidine is a prescription platelet aggregation inhibitor. None of these medications are considered to be impairing. Zolpidem is a prescription medication used in the treatment of insomnia. This medication may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery). Due to adverse side effects, the FAA recommends waiting at least 24 hours after use before flying.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 12, 2016 in Clermont, FL
Aircraft: SHEAHEN DANE E RV-8, registration: N838RV
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 12, 2016, about 0847 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Sheahen RV-8A, N838RV, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged after it impacted the ground near Clermont, Florida. The private pilot and the pilot-rated rear-seat passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Port Orange, Florida, at about 0825. The local personal flight, destined for Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

Multiple witnesses in the area of the accident site reported seeing an airplane that was consistent with the accident airplane inflight with a rough running engine sound. One witness stated that the engine was not making any noise as the airplane made a 180 degree turn over a field, and descended out of sight in a nose-low attitude. The airplane was located in an open field adjacent to a residential area.

According to preliminary radar data, the airplane was flying in a southwesterly direction, at approximately 2,220 feet mean sea level, when it began a climbing left turn, and reached an altitude of about 2,600 feet (msl). The last few targets showed a rapidly decreasing airspeed. A nearby flight of three airplanes reported hearing the pilot of an "RV airplane" make a mayday distress radio call, reporting that he had "lost his engine" around the time of the accident.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage came to rest in an open field about 307 feet elevation. The wreckage path was 30 feet long, from an initial ground scar to the main wreckage, which came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of about 110 degrees. The right wing, aileron and flap were intact and attached to the main spar at the fuselage. The left wing spar was fractured at the fuselage, the left flap connecting rod was fractured, and the left aileron was separated from the left wing. The left wing tip was separated from the airplane and located at the first observed ground scar. The rudder and vertical stabilizer was attached and undamaged. Both the left and right elevators displayed crinkling from the outboard portions inward. Flight control continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder surfaces to the cockpit controls. The cockpit was heavily damaged and folded open, the canopy was separated and laying over the right horizontal stabilizer.

One of the two composite propeller blades was fractured and found partially buried in the ground; the other blade remained intact and was undamaged. The fuel tank was fragmented and no residual fuel was observed, the fuel selector was positioned to the left main fuel tank. Initial examination of the engine revealed metal debris in the oil sump finger screen. The engine was retained for further examination to be performed at a later date.

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, was assembled from a kit and issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) experimental airworthiness certificate in 2002. It was powered by a Superior XP-400, 215-horsepower, experimental kit engine, equipped with a Whirl Wind two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. According to FAA records, the pilot was issued a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate on August 25, 2003, for the accident airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on January 19, 2011, and he reported 880 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Weather at Orlando Municipal Airport (ORL), about 19 miles east of the accident site, reported at the time of the accident included clear skies, 10 statute miles of visibility and winds from 130 degrees at 9 knots.




A Volusia County pilot was among two people who died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital in Clermont.

Dane Sheahen, who lived in the Spruce Creek Fly-In, was piloting the plane when it crashed, according to Clermont police. His passenger was James Kos, of Canute, Oklahoma. Both were licensed pilots.

The field where the crash occurred is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

The crash happened about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane .... appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don't know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We're very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.


http://www.news-journalonline.com


CLERMONT — Two people died Saturday morning when a single-engine airplane crashed into an empty field near South Lake Hospital.

The field is south of Crestridge Dive and north of the intersection of Oakley Seaver Drive and Don Wickham Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said Saturday evening the cause of the blue and yellow RV8A aircraft had not been determined.

City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said a resident reported seeing a giant shadow going past before the crash but there was no engine sound. A nearby worker also said he heard no engine or crash.

Police had not released the names as of Saturday evening.

The crash happened at about 9 a.m. and left the plane crumbled.

"The two occupants of the plane, who are not identified, appear to have died on impact," police spokesman Sgt. Shane Strickland said.

Police Capt. Michael McMaster said the plane's origin and destination are unknown at this point.

“We don’t know where it came from or where it was going," he said.

The crash site is only a few yards from some houses.

"We’re very lucky there was not an explosion or a fire or anything," McMaster said.

Not far from the crash site is the hospital's skilled nursing unit, where Ismael Sanchez was pressure washing the outside of the building Saturday morning. He said he saw the airplane, but didn't hear an engine.

“I glanced up and saw something blue," Sanchez said. "I thought it was a hang glider because it was going so low to the ground. I did not hear an engine or a loud crash or anything.”

Sanchez didn't realized the plane had crashed until he heard emergency vehicles rushing to the scene. That's when he walked over to see what had happened.

“I think that what it was doing was trying to land in the field,” he said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the crash investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.dailycommercial.com



A single-engine plane crash Saturday morning in a Clermont field left the two people on board dead, officials said.



The pilot, Dane Sheahen of Port Orange, and passenger, James Kos of Canute, Okla., were pronounced dead at the scene of the crash. Both were licensed pilots, police said.



The two-seater aircraft crashed about 8:45 a.m. in a field between South Lake Hospital and a subdivision, landing about 100 yards from nearby homes.



Witness Mark Wells was in his front yard when he heard the plane crash.



"My initial thought was that it was a car passing and backfired," said Wells, who lives just behind the scene of the crash. "I came around [the house] and a neighbor was calling the police."



Wells ran to the aircraft to see if he could help, but it was too late.



"I get out there and I can see the guy laying out but still in the cockpit," Wells said. "I was going to say 'Are you OK?' but then I got just close enough to see he was gone."



Wells said it wasn't until later that he realized there was a second victim in the plane.



Sheahen and Kos are believed to have died on impact, Clermont police Capt. Michael McMaster said. Medical examiners removed their bodies from the scene about 2 p.m.



The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal and Aviation Administration will investigate the crash and determine a cause, City of Clermont spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said. Clermont police are assisting in the investigation.



Police said it's unclear where the aircraft was coming from or where it was headed. They also did not know what type of plane it was.



Bloodsworth said the plane was possibly headed west when it crashed.



The plane's propellers appear to be undamaged, though the body and tail of the aircraft were crumpled.



Bloodsworth said officials anticipate staying overnight to secure the scene, as the aircraft likely won't be removed until Sunday.



The field where the plane crashed is near Citrus Tower Boulevard and Oakley Seaver Drive, between a subdivision and South Lake Hospital.



No other people were injured and no buildings were damaged in the crash, officials said.



Wells said he is glad the pilot seemingly attempted not to strike any homes in the neighborhood.



"I'm thankful he sacrificed trying to do the right thing," Wells said. "My thoughts are with him."



Story, photo gallery and video:   http://www.orlandosentinel.com