Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Hughes 369D, N175JL: Accident occurred April 29, 2018 in Newark, Licking County, Ohio

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N175JL

Location: Newark, OH
Accident Number: GAA18CA249
Date & Time: 04/29/2018, 1145 EDT
Registration: N175JL
Aircraft: HUGHES 369
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load 

The Chief Pilot reported that, while working on transmission power wires, the pilot maneuvered the helicopter closer to the wires to give a better position for the other crew member. He added that the pilot heard a noise and felt a vibration from the tail section. The pilot moved away from the wires, noticed no abnormality of flight, and returned to the landing zone without further incident.

Postaccident examination revealed that the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail rotor.

The Chief Pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/12/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/13/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4540 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3760 hours (Total, this make and model), 4340 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 119 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HUGHES
Registration: N175JL
Model/Series: 369 D
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 270076D
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/07/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 10969.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20B
Registered Owner: HAVERFIELD INTERNATIONAL INC
Rated Power: 420 hp
Operator: HAVERFIELD INTERNATIONAL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVTA, 884 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1554 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 231°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 16 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 330°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / -3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: NEWARK, OH (VTA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Newark, OH
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0730 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.130000, -82.290000 (est)

January 25, 2016: Low Flying Helicopters Are Surveying Electric Transmission Lines

Darien police released this picture of a helicopter doing work for Eversource, the electric utility.


The Darien Police Department has been getting “hundreds and hundreds” of calls from residents concerned about low-flying helicopters in the past week, says Sgt. Jeremiah Marron, a department spokesman.

The choppers are surveying transmission lines with high-resolution cameras, according to a statement released by Eversource, formerly Connecticut Light & Power, and posted on the Internet by Darien Police. The project is “part of an ongoing effort to strengthen the power grid and increase reliability,” the utility said.

“Photographs collected during these flights will help build a more detailed record of structures, lines and other electrical equipment which will increase the efficiency of maintaining the electric system in Connecticut,” the statement reads.

The flights are expected to wrap up this week, Marron said. The utility statement said that for this week the helicopters will be flying as early as 7 a.m. and as late as dusk.

The chopper is also flying in Greenwich, Stamford, Norwalk and Westport.

Eversource added: “The helicopter assigned to this project is black with a registration number N175JL.”

In a statement posted by police on Facebook, the department said: “Please don’t call the Police Department to report it. Thank you.”

Story and photo: http://darienite.com

Zenith STOL CH 701, registered to Helix Aero LLC, N701XS: Accident occurred May 05, 2018 at Chesapeake Ranch Airport (MD50), Lusby, Calvert County, Maryland

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Herndon, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N701XS

Location: Lusby, MD
Accident Number: GAA18CA259
Date & Time: 05/05/2018, 1545 EDT
Registration: N701XS
Aircraft:  CREECH JERRY CREECH JERRY CH 701
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The owner of the airplane reported that, during the flight, he was seated in the right seat, and the pilot flying was seated in the left seat. The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with single-engine land and flight instructor ratings. He added that, the experimental amateur-built airplane had one throttle located on the far-left side of the cabin, one set of brakes located on the left side rudder pedals, and the nose wheel steering was interconnected with the rudder pedals.

He further reported that the pilot, started and taxied the airplane for takeoff, performed climbs, descents and turns, and landed. During landing, the airplane was fast, touched down hard and bounced about 20-25 ft. The pilot then said, "Oh that's alright I got it", leveled the airplane, and continued the landing. Subsequently, the airplane porpoised, landed with the nose to the left of the runway centerline, veered off the runway to the left, and struck a tree.

The owner added, that during the landing he told the pilot "nose down, right rudder", and during the runway excursion he yelled "brakes!". He added that, the pilot never reduced throttle to idle, and he never felt the application of brakes.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage.

The owner reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot's lawyer reported that his client was not the pilot flying the airplane, due to not having previous training in the category, class and type of aircraft.

The airplane was a single engine, tricycle landing gear airplane with a 100 horsepower engine. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer
Age: 83, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2016
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/11/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 20179 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: , Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2017
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CREECH JERRY
Registration: N701XS
Model/Series: CREECH JERRY CH 701 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 76489
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/15/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 43.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: HELIX AERO LLC
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNHK, 40 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1952 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 189°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 40°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: Lusby, MD (MD50)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lusby, MD (MD50)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1515 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: CHESAPEAKE RANCH (MD50)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 116 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2500 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.361111, -76.404167 (est)

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N35092: Incident occurred May 08, 2018 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

IASCO Flight Training Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N35092



UPDATE: 5/8/2018 11:38 a.m. 

Redding, Calif.—Redding Fire Chief told Action News Now that the plane likely had a malfunctioning oil pressure sensor.

The aircraft landed safely.

The Redding Fire Department was on scene and prepared for the worse-case. 

--------------------

Redding, Calif. — According to the Redding Fire Chief Gerry Gray Twitter page an aircraft with low oil pressure signal has safely landed at the Redding Municipal Airport.

Gerry Gray told Action News Now that two people were on board.

No one was injured.

Crews are still on scene. 

Original article ➤  http://www.actionnewsnow.com

Incident occurred May 07, 2018 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Flight 1772:  After taxiing a bag fell on a flight attendant, the attendant was checked by medics at the gate and released.

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 18:59:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 1772
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Grumman TBM-3, N337VT: Accident occurred May 06, 2018 in Fort Apache, Navajo County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N337VT


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Fort Apache, AZ
Accident Number: ANC18LA034
Date & Time: 05/06/2018, 1338 MST
Registration: N337VT
Aircraft: GRUMMAN TBM-3
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 6, 2018, about 1338 mountain standard time, a Grumman TBM-3E airplane, N337VT, is presumed to have impacted terrain following the bailout of the pilot and passenger due to a partial loss of engine power about 8 miles southwest of Mount Baldy, on the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane is presumed to be destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Ak-Chin Regional Airport (A39), Maricopa, Arizona, at 1251 destined for the Albuquerque International Sunport Airport (ABQ), Albuquerque, New Mexico.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to relocate a newly purchased airplane from a maintenance facility in Stockton, California, to an airport near the pilot's home in Illinois. The airplane had undergone refurbishment as well as condition inspections, during the previous 6 months. Prior to the repositioning flights, the airplane was loaded with substantial emergency and survival gear. Also, in preparation for the trip, the pilot and passenger watched the parachute manufacturer's safety video and the pilot provided an emergency brief and had the passenger practice opening the canopy and prepare for egress.

On the morning of the accident, the airplane flew from the Zamperini Field Airport (TOA) in Torrance, California, to A39. After the pilot refueled the airplane, it departed A39 to the east and climbed to an altitude between 11,500 ft and 12,000 ft. About 45 minutes into the flight, as the airplane approached the route over the highest elevation of the trip, the pilot and passenger heard a loud bang with vibrations and witnessed thick smoke entering the cockpit. The pilot stated that following the event, the engine was operating but not producing enough power to maintain altitude. The passenger stated that he observed sheets of oil exiting the right side of the engine cowling. As the airplane descended, the pilot determined there were no safe landing areas due to trees and terrain, so he decided to bailout about 2,500 ft above ground level (agl).

The passenger bailed out first followed by the pilot. Both parachutes deployed successfully, however the pilot and passenger received serious injuries after landing in trees and falling to the ground. They were unable to call for rescue due to the lack of cell phone coverage in the area, however on the following morning about 1100, a Fort Apache fire service truck that was passing through the area, found the survivors and they were subsequently transported to a nearby medical facility via ambulance.

A review of Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control radar data revealed that after the bailout the airplane continued eastbound on a stable descending flight path. The last radar return was at 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl), or about 1,900 ft agl. The airplane has not been located and is presumed to have impacted terrain in the area. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
Aircraft Manufacturer: GRUMMAN
Registration: N337VT
Model/Series: TBM-3 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCNY, 4560 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: MARICOPA, AZ (A39)
Destination: ALBUQUERQUE, NM (ABQ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 38.814444, -109.653889 (est)







Ron Carlson has been restoring a World War II vintage Grumman TBM Avenger since he brought it over from Australia.

He was flying it back to the Chicago area, from Phoenix, Arizona over a mountain range on the White River Reservation Saturday when something went wrong.

"At the worst possible moment, we were in cruise, everything looked good," he said. "I was on the instruments and a big bang in front, and everything just started shaking."

Carlson says smoke began to pour from the plane’s engine, while he and his friend Kenny looked for a place to put it down--but they saw only trees.

"The smoke was getting worse," Carlson said. "Kenny was getting a little itchy back there so I made the decision to leave the airplane."

Kenny went first but held on to the plane.

"When I banked the airplane ... that’s when he let go and I stuck my legs out and just went," Simon recalled.

The two made it to the mountainside injured and separated. They had no water.

"I literally said to myself: this is it," he said. "It's like people say, you think of your loved ones, not only how sad they would be but the one thing I thought--the biggest thing I thought--was I am not going to get to see my boys grow up."

"That’s when you kind get mad and say I am getting out of here," he added.

Carlson spent the night on a bed of pine needles.

The pair reunited the next morning, then started to hike down the mountain. Kenny went ahead when they saw a gravel road and he came back with help from the reservation.

"An hour later I was taking a rest and boom, a pickup truck comes by with Kenny in it," Carlson said. "So I know at that point, the adrenaline just went out and the next thing I knew I had a cold Gatorade in my hands--so that was the best thing."

Story and video ➤  https://www.nbcchicago.com

Stinson 108, N97504: Incident occurred May 07, 2018 at San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport (KSBP) and Incident occurred September 11, 2017 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aircraft experienced a prop strike on landing.


http://registry.faa.gov/N97504


Date: 07-MAY-18

Time: 21:43:00Z
Regis#: N97504
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN LUIS OBISPO
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

September 11, 2017: Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into the grass.

Date: 11-SEP-17
Time: 23:45:00Z
Regis#: N97504
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: REDDING
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N907JW: Accidents occurred May 07, 2018 and March 29, 2018 at Palm Beach County Park Airport (KLNA), Lantana, Palm Beach County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft experienced a gear collapsed on landing.

Palm Beach Flight Training Corporation

http://registry.faa.gov/N907JW


Date: 07-MAY-18 
Time: 11:00:00Z
Regis#: N907JW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LANTANA
State: FLORIDA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA200
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Lantana, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N907JW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Zenair CH-2000, N699ZA: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Career Flight Training and Aircraft Rental LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N699ZA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA261
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 07, 2018 in Naples, FL
Aircraft: ZENAIR LTD CH 2000, registration: N699ZA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed on landing due to unknown circumstances.

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 19:32:00Z
Regis#: N699ZA
Aircraft Make: ZENAIR
Aircraft Model: CH 2000
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

ELA 07-Scorpion, N534EA: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 and Incident occurred October 19, 2017 at Sebring Regional Airport (KSEF), Highlands County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

GyroPlaneGuy Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N534EA

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Sebring, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA144
Date & Time: 05/07/2018, 1145 EDT
Registration: N534EA
Aircraft: CHRISTOPHER LORD ELA 07 SCORPION
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 7, 2018, about 1145 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Ela 07 Scorpion gyroplane, N534EA, was substantially damaged during the landing rollout at Sebring Regional Airport (SEF), Sebring, Florida. The student pilot sustained serious injuries. The gyroplane was operated by the student pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident for the local flight.

According to a witness, after the gyroplane landed on runway 1, the rotor blades still had a "high speed" of rotation. When the aircraft started turning to a taxiway on the left, a main rotor blade struck the runway, the gyrocopter spun 180° to the right, and impacted the ground, coming to rest on its right side.

Examination of the gyroplane revealed that one of the main rotor blades impacted the front of the fuselage and a section of the other main rotor blade was impact separated and located about 350 ft from the wreckage. The tail section remained attached to the fuselage. The flight controls were intact, and no binding was noted when they were operated.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage and the propeller remained attached to the engine. All three propeller blades remained attached, and two blades were impact damaged.

An 8 ft long tire mark and a ground scar in the asphalt were also noted in the vicinity of the main wreckage.

The gyroplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CHRISTOPHER LORD
Registration: N534EA
Model/Series: ELA 07 SCORPION NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SEF, 63 ft msl
Observation Time: 1135 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sebring, FL (SEF)
Destination: Sebring, FL (SEF) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 27.448611, -81.343056 (est)

October 19, 2017: Rotorcraft made a hard landing.

Date: 19-OCT-17
Time: 13:15:00Z
Regis#: N534EA
Aircraft Make: ELA 07 ROTORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: SCORPION
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SEBRING
State: FLORIDA

HondaJet HA-420, N144FF: Incident occurred May 04, 2018 at Lebanon Springfield Airport (6I2), Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aircraft landed and went off the runway.

Fly Fast LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N144FF

Date: 04-MAY-18
Time: 19:47:00Z
Regis#: N144FF
Aircraft Make: HONDA
Aircraft Model: HA 420
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SPRINGFIELD
State: KENTUCKY

Cessna 182Q, N632EP: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Factual Report  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N632EP


Location: Albuquerque, NM
Accident Number: GAA18CA262
Date & Time: 05/07/2018, 1730 MDT
Registration: N632EP
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, while enroute, the air was "unstable and choppy", and the airplane did not climb as expected. He added that the airplane "managed to climb to 9,500 [ft mean sea level] and maintain the altitude", but then had a "sudden and violent drop in altitude followed by a down draft". Subsequently, the airplane descended to 500 ft above the ground, the airplane was between two hills and still "struggling to climb". He observed what appeared to be a dirt plateau followed by a cliff, and decided to land on the plateau to "avoid possibly falling off the cliff". During the landing, the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/14/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 112 hours (Total, all aircraft), 59 hours (Total, this make and model), 67 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N632EP
Model/Series: 182 Q
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18267695
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/20/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4070 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAEG, 5837 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 28 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2347 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 169°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / Terrain-Induced
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  N/A / Severe
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CARLSBAD, NM (CNM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: FARMINGTON, NM (FMN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:   35.595833, -106.901944 (est)

Maule M-4-220C Strata Rocket, N102MD: Incident occurred May 07, 2018 Fields, Harney County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft landed on a road, hit a road sign and spun around landing on nose.

http://registry.faa.gov/N102MD

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 19:43:00Z
Regis#: N102MD
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M 4 220C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FIELDS
State: OREGON

Jupiter, Palm Beach County, Florida: Angel Flight patients meet David, Lisa and service dog 'Lilly'

Although as a child Lisa always wanted to be a pilot, she admits, “it was more Dave’s passion, but I wanted to know what to do while we were flying so I starting taking lessons."




When Air Traffic Controllers communicate with AF3730 they automatically know this is a special flight due to the Angel Flight (AF) designation.

However, in addition to a patient on board, AF3730 is most often accompanied by aero service dog Lilly.


Angel Flight is a nonprofit volunteer pilot organization, which arranges free air transportation to distant medical facilities for patients in need when commercial service is unavailable, impractical or not affordable.


When husband and wife David Kraft and Lisa Drew, of Jupiter, began flying they knew once they had enough experience and hours they would like to be Angel Flight pilots.


David’s interest in flying began when Lisa bought him a trainer kite so he could learn to kitesurf.  “I had the sensation of flying and thought I should really learn to fly,” recalls David of the first time his trainer kite lifted him off the ground.



Lilly is very comforting to patients on Angel Flights, especially relieving stress for nervous fliers. She puts her head on patients' laps and has such a cool, calm vibe to her.


His passion for flying

David found his passion in flying and now is certified for commercial single and multi-engine, in addition to being a certified flight instructor. 

Although as a child Lisa always wanted to be a pilot, she admits, “it was more Dave’s passion, but I wanted to know what to do while we were flying so I starting taking lessons.  I never imagined myself going all the way through, but the more I got closer to doing a solo, I thought I can do this.  The more I learned, the more the fear went away and now I’m not afraid at all. 

"When you’re learning to fly you have to make the plane do all sorts of unhappy things. When I was first learning I wanted to just keep the plane happy and then my instructor would make it stall.  They pull your power and simulate an engine failure and you have to find a place to land and do all the pre-landing things and glide into it.  You practice over and over again so if an engine failure happens, its routine.”

The couple took their lessons at Treasure Coast Flight Training in Stuart, and now keep their airplanes there, a Piper Saratoga and Cessna 172.  With enough experience the couple applied to Angel Flight where they found so much joy in being able to help others in need. The first year with Angel Flight, David and Lisa flew approximately 40 missions, earning them the Rookie Pilot of the Year award. They are currently nominated for Pilot of the Year for 2018.

"Lilly is so calm and perfect for a service dog. I always thought before we were flying that she would do well in hospitals comforting kids. She just loves to be loved," Lisa Drew says.


David had cancer a couple of years ago and Lisa’s mother had cancer as well, making what they do more personal.

“Angel Flight is so important to people with illnesses, said Lisa, because it alleviates the stress of trying to get treatment at distant locations.”  David and Lisa use their Piper Saratoga for Angel Flight because it is a six-seater, air conditioned and more comfortable.

'Make the world a better place'

“We are very fortunate to have two planes and feel everyone should do something to make the world a better place.  If everyone would try then it would be a better place. There's a joke in aviation…..You go for a $100 hamburger because it costs so much to fly a plane.  Well, we go for a $3 hamburger and put the rest to work for Angel Flight. We feel privileged to be able to do so and love being able to give back that way,” said David.

Unique for AF3730 is Lilly, their service dog adopted from Big Dog Ranch when she was nine weeks old.  According to Lisa, “She was just naturally well behaved and we were so surprised because she was a wild dog.  Lilly is so calm and perfect for a service dog.  I always thought before we were flying that she would do well in hospitals comforting kids. She just loves to be loved.”


View of the Intracoastal Waterway from AF3730.

Lilly is very comforting to patients on Angel Flights, especially relieving stress for nervous fliers.  She puts her head on patients' laps and has such a cool, calm vibe to her. David and Lisa ask their passengers if they are comfortable with Lilly coming along and it depends on how sick or bad they are feeling if they want her to join.  For the most part they said everyone loves having Lilly as company and petting her.  “She really makes them laugh which is a good distraction,” said David.
Lilly hangs out

When Lisa or David have lessons or are teaching, Lilly hangs out in the office or hanger at Treasure Coast Flight Training and is known and loved by all.  Office Manager, Cindy McCabe said “Lilly is my niece and she fits in wonderfully.  Everyone just adores her. When Dave is flying she keeps me company in my office. 

At Treasure Coast Flight Training we cater to local pilots and international students that want to become professional pilots. We take them from zero time to their commercial, multi-engine license. They can become instructors to build their time and go on to work for regional airlines.  We’ve really grown and have gone from two planes to thirty. We’re very proud of our flight school and Lilly is our mascot.”


The couple took their lessons at Treasure Coast Flight Training in Stuart, and now keep their airplanes there, a Piper Saratoga and Cessna 172. Lisa Drew is pictured.

David and Lisa said how truly grateful they are for owner Brett Sipperley and the entire staff at Treasure Coast Flight Training.  “Because we are Angel Flight,” said David, “Brett lets us keep our plane in the maintenance hanger for free which lets us spend more money on gas which we can use for Angel Flight patients.  Lisa and I have such a great life and are having so much fun. 

"We are only married five years but originally met when our sons (who are now 25) were best friends in kindergarten and our families hung out together. We lost touch in 2000 and bumped into each other 13 years later. We started dating and ended up getting married.  We truly are best friends and Lisa is so awesome as a pilot and co-pilot.  It’s so much fun and even better when Lilly’s in the back.”

Angel Flight FAQ’s

According to angelflightse.org:

Where do we fly?  


Our missions are within a 1,000 nautical miles total distance from the patients home base airport.  Longer missions, which are more than 300 nautical miles, will require a hand-off with at least one to two other pilots depending on the total distance traveled. We do not fly outside the borders of the United States.

Is there ever any charge for Angel Flights?  No.  The entire cost of the flight is paid by the volunteer pilot who receives no reimbursement other than knowing their aviation skills and talents are making a difference.

Who is eligible to request an Angel Flight?

We will accept requests from anyone that is directly involved in the need (doctors,  social workers, nurses, patients or immediate family). Since the attending doctor must sign a medical release, they will be involved in the process from the beginning.

What are your requirements?

Angel Flight Southeast is not an air ambulance or on-demand service. Patients must be medically stable, ambulatory and capable of sitting upright and wearing a seat belt for the duration of the flight.  There must be either a demonstrated financial need or reason why  public transportation cannot be utilized.

What other services does Angel Flight provide?

While most missions are for scheduled treatments and surgeries, we also provide flight for organ recipients as well as organ and bone marrow donors.  We have worked with last-wish type organizations to meet their requests.

For more information on Angel Flights, visit their website at angelflightse.org.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.tcpalm.com