Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Hughes 369D, N175JL: Accident occurred April 29, 2018 in Newark, Ohio

Haverfield International Incorporated

http://registry.faa.gov/N175JL

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA249
14 CFR Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load
Accident occurred Sunday, April 29, 2018 in Newark, OH
Aircraft: HUGHES 369, registration: N175JL

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

January 25, 2016: Low Flying Helicopters Are Surveying Electric Transmission Lines

Darien police released this picture of a helicopter doing work for Eversource, the electric utility.


The Darien Police Department has been getting “hundreds and hundreds” of calls from residents concerned about low-flying helicopters in the past week, says Sgt. Jeremiah Marron, a department spokesman.

The choppers are surveying transmission lines with high-resolution cameras, according to a statement released by Eversource, formerly Connecticut Light & Power, and posted on the Internet by Darien Police. The project is “part of an ongoing effort to strengthen the power grid and increase reliability,” the utility said.

“Photographs collected during these flights will help build a more detailed record of structures, lines and other electrical equipment which will increase the efficiency of maintaining the electric system in Connecticut,” the statement reads.

The flights are expected to wrap up this week, Marron said. The utility statement said that for this week the helicopters will be flying as early as 7 a.m. and as late as dusk.

The chopper is also flying in Greenwich, Stamford, Norwalk and Westport.

Eversource added: “The helicopter assigned to this project is black with a registration number N175JL.”

In a statement posted by police on Facebook, the department said: “Please don’t call the Police Department to report it. Thank you.”

Story and photo: http://darienite.com

Zenith STOL CH 701, N701XS: Accident occurred May 05, 2018 at Chesapeake Ranch Airport (MD50), Lusby, Calvert County, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington

Helix Aero LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N701XS

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA259
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 05, 2018 in Lusby, MD
Aircraft: CREECH JERRY CREECH JERRY CH 701, registration: N701XS

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft veered off runway during landing and struck a tree.

Date: 05-MAY-18
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N701XS
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: CREECH JERRY CH 701
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LUSBY
State: MARYLAND

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N35092: Incident occurred May 08, 2018 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

IASCO Flight Training Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N35092



UPDATE: 5/8/2018 11:38 a.m. 

Redding, Calif.—Redding Fire Chief told Action News Now that the plane likely had a malfunctioning oil pressure sensor.

The aircraft landed safely.

The Redding Fire Department was on scene and prepared for the worse-case. 

--------------------

Redding, Calif. — According to the Redding Fire Chief Gerry Gray Twitter page an aircraft with low oil pressure signal has safely landed at the Redding Municipal Airport.

Gerry Gray told Action News Now that two people were on board.

No one was injured.

Crews are still on scene. 

Original article ➤  http://www.actionnewsnow.com

Incident occurred May 07, 2018 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Flight 1772:  After taxiing a bag fell on a flight attendant, the attendant was checked by medics at the gate and released.

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 18:59:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 1772
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Grumman TBM-3, N337VT: Accident occurred May 06, 2018 in Fort Apache, Navajo County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N337VT


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Fort Apache, AZ
Accident Number: ANC18LA034
Date & Time: 05/06/2018, 1338 MST
Registration: N337VT
Aircraft: GRUMMAN TBM-3
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 6, 2018, about 1338 mountain standard time, a Grumman TBM-3E airplane, N337VT, is presumed to have impacted terrain following the bailout of the pilot and passenger due to a partial loss of engine power about 8 miles southwest of Mount Baldy, on the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane is presumed to be destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Ak-Chin Regional Airport (A39), Maricopa, Arizona, at 1251 destined for the Albuquerque International Sunport Airport (ABQ), Albuquerque, New Mexico.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to relocate a newly purchased airplane from a maintenance facility in Stockton, California, to an airport near the pilot's home in Illinois. The airplane had undergone refurbishment as well as condition inspections, during the previous 6 months. Prior to the repositioning flights, the airplane was loaded with substantial emergency and survival gear. Also, in preparation for the trip, the pilot and passenger watched the parachute manufacturer's safety video and the pilot provided an emergency brief and had the passenger practice opening the canopy and prepare for egress.

On the morning of the accident, the airplane flew from the Zamperini Field Airport (TOA) in Torrance, California, to A39. After the pilot refueled the airplane, it departed A39 to the east and climbed to an altitude between 11,500 ft and 12,000 ft. About 45 minutes into the flight, as the airplane approached the route over the highest elevation of the trip, the pilot and passenger heard a loud bang with vibrations and witnessed thick smoke entering the cockpit. The pilot stated that following the event, the engine was operating but not producing enough power to maintain altitude. The passenger stated that he observed sheets of oil exiting the right side of the engine cowling. As the airplane descended, the pilot determined there were no safe landing areas due to trees and terrain, so he decided to bailout about 2,500 ft above ground level (agl).

The passenger bailed out first followed by the pilot. Both parachutes deployed successfully, however the pilot and passenger received serious injuries after landing in trees and falling to the ground. They were unable to call for rescue due to the lack of cell phone coverage in the area, however on the following morning about 1100, a Fort Apache fire service truck that was passing through the area, found the survivors and they were subsequently transported to a nearby medical facility via ambulance.

A review of Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control radar data revealed that after the bailout the airplane continued eastbound on a stable descending flight path. The last radar return was at 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl), or about 1,900 ft agl. The airplane has not been located and is presumed to have impacted terrain in the area. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
Aircraft Manufacturer: GRUMMAN
Registration: N337VT
Model/Series: TBM-3 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCNY, 4560 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: MARICOPA, AZ (A39)
Destination: ALBUQUERQUE, NM (ABQ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 38.814444, -109.653889 (est)






Ron Carlson has been restoring a World War II vintage Grumman TBM Avenger since he brought it over from Australia.

He was flying it back to the Chicago area, from Phoenix, Arizona over a mountain range on the White River Reservation Saturday when something went wrong.

"At the worst possible moment, we were in cruise, everything looked good," he said. "I was on the instruments and a big bang in front, and everything just started shaking."

Carlson says smoke began to pour from the plane’s engine, while he and his friend Kenny looked for a place to put it down--but they saw only trees.

"The smoke was getting worse," Carlson said. "Kenny was getting a little itchy back there so I made the decision to leave the airplane."

Kenny went first but held on to the plane.

"When I banked the airplane ... that’s when he let go and I stuck my legs out and just went," Simon recalled.

The two made it to the mountainside injured and separated. They had no water.

"I literally said to myself: this is it," he said. "It's like people say, you think of your loved ones, not only how sad they would be but the one thing I thought--the biggest thing I thought--was I am not going to get to see my boys grow up."

"That’s when you kind get mad and say I am getting out of here," he added.

Carlson spent the night on a bed of pine needles.

The pair reunited the next morning, then started to hike down the mountain. Kenny went ahead when they saw a gravel road and he came back with help from the reservation.

"An hour later I was taking a rest and boom, a pickup truck comes by with Kenny in it," Carlson said. "So I know at that point, the adrenaline just went out and the next thing I knew I had a cold Gatorade in my hands--so that was the best thing."

Story and video ➤  https://www.nbcchicago.com

Stinson 108, N97504: Incident occurred May 07, 2018 at San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport (KSBP) and Incident occurred September 11, 2017 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aircraft experienced a prop strike on landing.


http://registry.faa.gov/N97504


Date: 07-MAY-18

Time: 21:43:00Z
Regis#: N97504
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN LUIS OBISPO
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

September 11, 2017: Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into the grass.

Date: 11-SEP-17
Time: 23:45:00Z
Regis#: N97504
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: REDDING
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N907JW: Accidents occurred May 07, 2018 and March 29, 2018 at Palm Beach County Park Airport (KLNA), Lantana, Palm Beach County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft experienced a gear collapsed on landing.

Palm Beach Flight Training Corporation

http://registry.faa.gov/N907JW


Date: 07-MAY-18 
Time: 11:00:00Z
Regis#: N907JW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LANTANA
State: FLORIDA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA200
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Lantana, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N907JW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Zenair CH-2000, N699ZA: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Career Flight Training and Aircraft Rental LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N699ZA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA261
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 07, 2018 in Naples, FL
Aircraft: ZENAIR LTD CH 2000, registration: N699ZA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed on landing due to unknown circumstances.

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 19:32:00Z
Regis#: N699ZA
Aircraft Make: ZENAIR
Aircraft Model: CH 2000
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA

ELA 07-Scorpion, N534EA: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 and Incident occurred October 19, 2017 at Sebring Regional Airport (KSEF), Highlands County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

GyroPlaneGuy Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N534EA

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Sebring, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA144
Date & Time: 05/07/2018, 1145 EDT
Registration: N534EA
Aircraft: CHRISTOPHER LORD ELA 07 SCORPION
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 7, 2018, about 1145 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Ela 07 Scorpion gyroplane, N534EA, was substantially damaged during the landing rollout at Sebring Regional Airport (SEF), Sebring, Florida. The student pilot sustained serious injuries. The gyroplane was operated by the student pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident for the local flight.

According to a witness, after the gyroplane landed on runway 1, the rotor blades still had a "high speed" of rotation. When the aircraft started turning to a taxiway on the left, a main rotor blade struck the runway, the gyrocopter spun 180° to the right, and impacted the ground, coming to rest on its right side.

Examination of the gyroplane revealed that one of the main rotor blades impacted the front of the fuselage and a section of the other main rotor blade was impact separated and located about 350 ft from the wreckage. The tail section remained attached to the fuselage. The flight controls were intact, and no binding was noted when they were operated.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage and the propeller remained attached to the engine. All three propeller blades remained attached, and two blades were impact damaged.

An 8 ft long tire mark and a ground scar in the asphalt were also noted in the vicinity of the main wreckage.

The gyroplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CHRISTOPHER LORD
Registration: N534EA
Model/Series: ELA 07 SCORPION NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SEF, 63 ft msl
Observation Time: 1135 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sebring, FL (SEF)
Destination: Sebring, FL (SEF) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 27.448611, -81.343056 (est)

October 19, 2017: Rotorcraft made a hard landing.

Date: 19-OCT-17
Time: 13:15:00Z
Regis#: N534EA
Aircraft Make: ELA 07 ROTORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: SCORPION
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SEBRING
State: FLORIDA

HondaJet HA-420, N144FF: Incident occurred May 04, 2018 at Lebanon Springfield Airport (6I2), Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aircraft landed and went off the runway.

Fly Fast LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N144FF

Date: 04-MAY-18
Time: 19:47:00Z
Regis#: N144FF
Aircraft Make: HONDA
Aircraft Model: HA 420
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SPRINGFIELD
State: KENTUCKY

Cessna 182Q, N632EP: Accident occurred May 07, 2018 in San Ysidro, Sandoval County, New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://registry.faa.gov/N632EP

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA262
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 07, 2018 in San Ysidro, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N632EP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed due to unknown circumstances.

Date: 08-MAY-18
Time: 00:50:00Z
Regis#: N632EP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182Q
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: SAN YSIDRO
State: NEW MEXICO

Maule M-4-220C Strata Rocket, N102MD: Incident occurred May 07, 2018 Fields, Harney County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft landed on a road, hit a road sign and spun around landing on nose.

http://registry.faa.gov/N102MD

Date: 07-MAY-18
Time: 19:43:00Z
Regis#: N102MD
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M 4 220C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FIELDS
State: OREGON

Jupiter, Palm Beach County, Florida: Angel Flight patients meet David, Lisa and service dog 'Lilly'

Although as a child Lisa always wanted to be a pilot, she admits, “it was more Dave’s passion, but I wanted to know what to do while we were flying so I starting taking lessons."




When Air Traffic Controllers communicate with AF3730 they automatically know this is a special flight due to the Angel Flight (AF) designation.

However, in addition to a patient on board, AF3730 is most often accompanied by aero service dog Lilly.


Angel Flight is a nonprofit volunteer pilot organization, which arranges free air transportation to distant medical facilities for patients in need when commercial service is unavailable, impractical or not affordable.


When husband and wife David Kraft and Lisa Drew, of Jupiter, began flying they knew once they had enough experience and hours they would like to be Angel Flight pilots.


David’s interest in flying began when Lisa bought him a trainer kite so he could learn to kitesurf.  “I had the sensation of flying and thought I should really learn to fly,” recalls David of the first time his trainer kite lifted him off the ground.



Lilly is very comforting to patients on Angel Flights, especially relieving stress for nervous fliers. She puts her head on patients' laps and has such a cool, calm vibe to her.


His passion for flying

David found his passion in flying and now is certified for commercial single and multi-engine, in addition to being a certified flight instructor. 

Although as a child Lisa always wanted to be a pilot, she admits, “it was more Dave’s passion, but I wanted to know what to do while we were flying so I starting taking lessons.  I never imagined myself going all the way through, but the more I got closer to doing a solo, I thought I can do this.  The more I learned, the more the fear went away and now I’m not afraid at all. 

"When you’re learning to fly you have to make the plane do all sorts of unhappy things. When I was first learning I wanted to just keep the plane happy and then my instructor would make it stall.  They pull your power and simulate an engine failure and you have to find a place to land and do all the pre-landing things and glide into it.  You practice over and over again so if an engine failure happens, its routine.”

The couple took their lessons at Treasure Coast Flight Training in Stuart, and now keep their airplanes there, a Piper Saratoga and Cessna 172.  With enough experience the couple applied to Angel Flight where they found so much joy in being able to help others in need. The first year with Angel Flight, David and Lisa flew approximately 40 missions, earning them the Rookie Pilot of the Year award. They are currently nominated for Pilot of the Year for 2018.

"Lilly is so calm and perfect for a service dog. I always thought before we were flying that she would do well in hospitals comforting kids. She just loves to be loved," Lisa Drew says.


David had cancer a couple of years ago and Lisa’s mother had cancer as well, making what they do more personal.

“Angel Flight is so important to people with illnesses, said Lisa, because it alleviates the stress of trying to get treatment at distant locations.”  David and Lisa use their Piper Saratoga for Angel Flight because it is a six-seater, air conditioned and more comfortable.

'Make the world a better place'

“We are very fortunate to have two planes and feel everyone should do something to make the world a better place.  If everyone would try then it would be a better place. There's a joke in aviation…..You go for a $100 hamburger because it costs so much to fly a plane.  Well, we go for a $3 hamburger and put the rest to work for Angel Flight. We feel privileged to be able to do so and love being able to give back that way,” said David.

Unique for AF3730 is Lilly, their service dog adopted from Big Dog Ranch when she was nine weeks old.  According to Lisa, “She was just naturally well behaved and we were so surprised because she was a wild dog.  Lilly is so calm and perfect for a service dog.  I always thought before we were flying that she would do well in hospitals comforting kids. She just loves to be loved.”


View of the Intracoastal Waterway from AF3730.

Lilly is very comforting to patients on Angel Flights, especially relieving stress for nervous fliers.  She puts her head on patients' laps and has such a cool, calm vibe to her. David and Lisa ask their passengers if they are comfortable with Lilly coming along and it depends on how sick or bad they are feeling if they want her to join.  For the most part they said everyone loves having Lilly as company and petting her.  “She really makes them laugh which is a good distraction,” said David.
Lilly hangs out

When Lisa or David have lessons or are teaching, Lilly hangs out in the office or hanger at Treasure Coast Flight Training and is known and loved by all.  Office Manager, Cindy McCabe said “Lilly is my niece and she fits in wonderfully.  Everyone just adores her. When Dave is flying she keeps me company in my office. 

At Treasure Coast Flight Training we cater to local pilots and international students that want to become professional pilots. We take them from zero time to their commercial, multi-engine license. They can become instructors to build their time and go on to work for regional airlines.  We’ve really grown and have gone from two planes to thirty. We’re very proud of our flight school and Lilly is our mascot.”


The couple took their lessons at Treasure Coast Flight Training in Stuart, and now keep their airplanes there, a Piper Saratoga and Cessna 172. Lisa Drew is pictured.

David and Lisa said how truly grateful they are for owner Brett Sipperley and the entire staff at Treasure Coast Flight Training.  “Because we are Angel Flight,” said David, “Brett lets us keep our plane in the maintenance hanger for free which lets us spend more money on gas which we can use for Angel Flight patients.  Lisa and I have such a great life and are having so much fun. 

"We are only married five years but originally met when our sons (who are now 25) were best friends in kindergarten and our families hung out together. We lost touch in 2000 and bumped into each other 13 years later. We started dating and ended up getting married.  We truly are best friends and Lisa is so awesome as a pilot and co-pilot.  It’s so much fun and even better when Lilly’s in the back.”

Angel Flight FAQ’s

According to angelflightse.org:

Where do we fly?  


Our missions are within a 1,000 nautical miles total distance from the patients home base airport.  Longer missions, which are more than 300 nautical miles, will require a hand-off with at least one to two other pilots depending on the total distance traveled. We do not fly outside the borders of the United States.

Is there ever any charge for Angel Flights?  No.  The entire cost of the flight is paid by the volunteer pilot who receives no reimbursement other than knowing their aviation skills and talents are making a difference.

Who is eligible to request an Angel Flight?

We will accept requests from anyone that is directly involved in the need (doctors,  social workers, nurses, patients or immediate family). Since the attending doctor must sign a medical release, they will be involved in the process from the beginning.

What are your requirements?

Angel Flight Southeast is not an air ambulance or on-demand service. Patients must be medically stable, ambulatory and capable of sitting upright and wearing a seat belt for the duration of the flight.  There must be either a demonstrated financial need or reason why  public transportation cannot be utilized.

What other services does Angel Flight provide?

While most missions are for scheduled treatments and surgeries, we also provide flight for organ recipients as well as organ and bone marrow donors.  We have worked with last-wish type organizations to meet their requests.

For more information on Angel Flights, visit their website at angelflightse.org.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.tcpalm.com

Nav Canada set to shut down Buttonville Municipal Airport (YKZ) tower operations in July

Some pilots at Buttonville Airport are upset the control tower will close.


The decision to close the control tower at Markham's Buttonville Airport this summer has some pilots worried about safety.

Mark Brooks, an instructor with a flight school at the airport called Canadian Flyers Inc., says getting rid of the tower is the wrong move.

That's because Buttonville serves as a hub for commercial and recreational pilots as well as student flyers, and it's in a residential area on a flightpath to Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

"With all this mix of different traffic we need a tower here," said Brooks, who has been flying in and out of Buttonville, near Highway 404 and 16th Avenue since 1996. He also said the airport offers overflow relief for jets that can't land at Pearson if it's too busy.

Brooks described typical days teaching flight students to a maximum of 2,500 feet, with pilots travelling higher than that requiring permission from Pearson. When you add recreational pilots who are in the same airspace, any discrepancy in procedure could be dangerous, he explained.

"The danger is from wake turbulence more than a direct impact," he said, and the tower operator monitors all of the activity and advises pilots on movement.

Closing the tower, "is really downloading the responsibility of separation down to the pilot. And the busier the air space the harder it is for the pilot to keep themselves separate."

Steep drop in takeoffs and landings, Nav Canada says

Takeoffs and landings at Buttonville have seen a steep decrease in recent years, according to Nav Canada, the non-profit, private corporation that owns and operates the country's civil air navigation service.

In the spring of 2017, Nav Canada conducted an aeronautical study at the Markham-based airport, which included an assessment of the need for the control tower.

Mark Brooks, left, and Massoud Ghahremani fly at Buttonville Airport. 


Ron Singer, the corporation's spokesperson, said the study "examined all of the potential risks and safety issues" and included consultation with stakeholders.

"Before any decision is made we go through a lengthy and rigorous process," he said.

Airports require 60,000 takeoffs and landings per year in order to have a control tower, Singer said, though there are exceptions like Windsor, which operates in international airspace, and Gander, which is an emergency hub.

According to Statistics Canada, Buttonville had 26,108 in 2017, whereas in 2014, it had 84,547 with a peak average of 363 daily in June of that year.

Nav Canada "considers the level of traffic, the type of traffic, time of day — everything in terms of the operation at the airport," Singer said.

It then identifies risks and decides "if this is something that would not have any impact on aviation safety for the airport."

A recommendation to close the tower was sent to Transport Canada, which concurred with the finding in March.

Many believe the steep decline was a result of Cadillac Fairview acquiring the property with plans to close the airport.

Shahan Helvadjian's plane is stored at Buttonville for part of the year. 


That drove a lot of users, including the Seneca College aviation school, to other local airports, Brooks explained.

But he said now the airport is becoming busier as the Cadillac Fairview development has stalled and flight operations continue with expectations that the airport will remain open for at least five years.

Nav Canada's figures 'no longer valid,' pilot says

Brooks acknowledged Nav Canada did its due diligence but "the time in which they took the snapshot of data is no longer valid."

Shahan Helvadjian, who has flown commercially and recreationally for decades and stores his plane at Buttonville for half the year, says the airport is still safe without a tower.

"But there's a little bit more margin of safety when there's a tower there," he said.

Private plane owner Massoud Ghahremani said recently flying his Cirrus he could visually track three planes, though the radar indicated there were 10 in shared airspace.

Pilot Shahan Helvadjian with his private plane. 


He relied on the tower operator to control that many pilots wanting to land.

Operating without a tower "works in an airport like Parry Sound which is very few planes flying, is smaller than this and it's in the middle of nowhere," Ghahremani said.

'It just doesn't work over here'

"It just doesn't work over here," he added.

Ghahremani said he has written Nav Canada with his concerns.

Singer, Nav Canada's spokesperson, agreed "there was a slight uptick" in flight traffic in recent months but said that wasn't enough to reverse the decision.

"To say this was done without any rigorous consideration of safety concerns would just be wrong," he said.

Though there are 152 airports nationwide, only 41 currently have control towers.

Singer said about eight positions are affected but there will be no job losses as a result of the closure in July.

Original article can be found here ➤   http://www.cbc.ca

He was facing 5 years for shining a laser at a helicopter. He got 18 months



Michael Vincent Alvarez' story should stand as a reminder:

Shining a laser at an aircraft is not only dangerous, it is a federal crime.

The 32-year-old from Fresno on Monday was sentenced to 18 months in prison for it, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney's office. Alvarez pleaded guilty to the charge in March and faced a sentence of up to five years and a fine of $250,000.

Alvarez was arrested last year for shining a laser beam at a Fresno Police Department helicopter. According to federal charges made at the time, he “thought it would be funny to point the laser at a helicopter” from the car he was driving. He hit the helicopter with the laser several times, temporarily blinding the pilot and disrupting an air support response call.

Officers on the ground were able to use the laser to locate Alvarez, who led them on a high speed chase that ended when he crashed into a center divider and ditched the car. The laser pointer was left behind.

This was no isolated incident. In 2017, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reported 6,771 laser strikes on aircraft, or 18.55 per day. There were more than 170 strikes reported in the 34 counties in the eastern California alone, according to the attorney's office.

This also wasn't the first time a helicopter has been struck in the area. Similar incidents have been reported by the Fresno Police Department, the California Highway Patrol and King’s County Sheriff's Office over the past four years.

Law enforcement helicopters are particularly vulnerable to lasers, given their low flight patterns and convex-shaped windows, which cause greater refraction and visual interference.

Original article ➤ http://www.fresnobee.com

Getting the pontoons wet on Liberty Bay


by Nick Twietmeyer

Nick Twietmeyer is a reporter for Kitsap News Group


POULSBO — It was with no small amount of nostalgia that I visited the Port of Poulsbo on May 5 for the Washington Seaplane Pilots Association’s Poulsbo Splash Weekend.

It’s probably important to note that many years ago I attended flight school at a small airfield in Bremerton and while I never actually earned my pilot license, I did accrue some 20 hours of flight time and a naggingly persistent interest in aviation. Given this information, it should come as no surprise that I jumped at the opportunity to cover the event for my employer, the North Kitsap Herald.

The event actually served as the confluence of two sources of nostalgia for me: I worked under the employ of the Port of Poulsbo for one summer more than a decade ago. A little known fact about the port is that it operates a 12,000-foot-long runway on Liberty Bay and is recognized as a seaplane base by the FAA. It was always a treat to be walking down the ramp to the port offices and see a bright yellow, single-engine, Piper Cub on Pontoons, tied up at the end of the dock. Nearly without exception, the pilot would be chatting with the staff who left the offices to check out the arrival of the plane.

After arriving downtown shortly after noon for the May 5 fly-in, the Poulsbo waterfront was already abuzz with activity, families were playing with their small children in the grass at the waterfront park and visitors smiled for photos, while leaning against the railing overlooking the several aircraft that had now tied up at the docks.

I had previously spoken over the phone to my contact for the event, Don Goodman, who would be taking me up in his Cessna 182P for a little aerial photography session. Despite knowing full-well that the flight would almost certainly reignite my wallet-melting desire to become a certified pilot, I searched for Goodman among the small crowd of aviators.

I found Don’s wife, Natala, first. She was under a small tent, provided by the port to welcome the pilots and provide some refuge from the sun, which — as luck would have it — was on full-display, and working diligently to sear my nearly translucent winter palor. Natala was enjoying a chocolate ice cream cone and offered me a warm greeting while performing maintenance on the quickly liquefying cone.

After handing me a life jacket, Natala gave me a quick safety briefing.

“If we were to go upside down in the water, everything would still be on the same side, even though you’d be disoriented and feel like, ‘oh, now it’s on the other side,’” Natala explained before adding that if such an event were to occur, I should wait to inflate my life jacket since it would prevent my escape from the submerged plane.

Then, as he was preparing the plane, Don’s magnetic name tag was accidentally knocked free from his shirt and all three of us watched as it bounced off one of the plane’s pontoons, splashed into the bay and slowly sank, flashing the white face of the tag as it flipped underwater, not unlike a fishing lure. A less confident man might have been given some pause while literally watching his own name sink out of sight, mere moments before a flight above said bay, but not Don. Don started laughing hysterically.

“It’s appropriate that it’s been committed to the deep,” He said between his hearty laughs.

With that totally-not-ominous portion our excursion out of the way, it had come time to negotiate all 76 inches of a reporter and his camera bag into the back seat of the plane. As per my pre-flight safety briefing from Natala, in the event that the plane were to end up upside down in the water, the person sitting in the back seat is supposed to “kick out” the small baggage door on the left side of the plane. Natala assured me that simply a “swift kick” would be sufficient to free the door, a bit of information which prompted me to take the seat on the right side of the plane, as far away from the door as physically possible — partially out of fear that an errant knee or elbow might bust the baggage door from its hinges.

“Clear!” shouted Don as the propeller turned over and the Goodmans’ aircraft roared to life. I had been outfitted with a familiarly tight-fitting headset which rendered the growl of the engine only a light thrum. Through the headset, Don and Natala quickly ticked off each item on their pre-flight checklist. The doors to the aircraft remained open and a refreshing breeze was sneaking in as Don navigated the plane between Liberty Bay’s moored sailboats and yachts. After circling one of the yachts toward the southern end of the bay, Don ordered both doors closed and pushed the throttle forward.

With spray kicking up from the pontoons, Don expertly hurtled the plane down the bay, the waves providing a constant jostle inside the cockpit, while all the moored boats and their masts whizzed by outside the windows. All at once the jostling ceased and the marina and boats below began to drift farther and farther away. Those who have been fortunate enough to find themselves in an aircraft over the Kitsap Peninsula will likely corroborate my claims that on a clear day, the views are nothing short of spectacular. Don deftly guided the plane along the shoreline contours of liberty bay, southward to Keyport and then onto Brownsville before cutting eastward and tracing the shore back to the north — All the while, providing me with views of the boaters, docks and shore below and the Olympic Mountains flanking us to the west.

I don’t feel that I can accurately gauge how long we were up there, partially because my focus had been on snapping as many photos and capturing as much video as I possibly could; the other part is because of a phenomenon I discovered years ago at flight school: no matter how long you stay up, it never feels like enough time. It always feels like there is something more to see or do, but due to the inherent constraints of the internal combustion engine and our mandatory adherence to the laws of gravity, we must all — at some point — come back down. As such, Don began to ease back on the throttle as we approached the southern end of Liberty Bay.

It’s an unusual sight to be approaching a body of water from a high angle and with this being my first trip in a seaplane, it was one to which I had not yet had the opportunity to grow accustomed. As Don glided the aircraft steadily to the surface, the tops of masts again passed by the windows and the aircraft’s stall horn began to sound. Most people would be discomforted hearing an alarm during what is arguably the most critical moment of a flight, but I remembered that while landing in Cessnas, one of the metrics of a landing’s “smoothness” was whether or not the stall horn sounded. All good landings would sound the stall horn. As the horn heralded our return, Don wetted the pontoons in the bay once more.

I lingered only for a short while after we arrived back at the dock. Don and Natala said they would be leaving shortly, bound back for Lake Samish near Bellingham. The other pilots were making plans for their own departures as well, all headed back to their respective homes. As I walked back down the docks toward the shore, the parking lot and my car, for the second time that day I was left feeling like it was all over much too soon.

Story and video ➤  https://www.kitsapdailynews.com