Saturday, July 21, 2018

Piper PA-18: Incident occurred July 20, 2018 at the Grand Pacific Glacier, Alaska

News Release Date: July 20, 2018

BARTLETT COVE, AK, 6PM AKDT - The National Park Service (NPS) received a relayed radio call from the cruise ship Island Princess at 1pm today reporting an aircraft down in front of the Grand Pacific Glacier at the head of Glacier Bay’s Tarr Inlet. Park rangers responded to the scene and contacted the uninjured pilot, Thorsten Kampe of Germany. Mr. Kampe reported landing due to an apparent engine malfunction. The nose of the plane subsequently buried, breaking the propeller as he taxied through soft sand. The pilot is being transported onboard an NPS vessel to Bartlett Cove. Temsco helicopters plans to salvage the aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board, United States Coast Guard, and Alaska State Troopers have been informed.

A small plane nosed over into sand after landing due to engine problems near Southeast Alaska's Grand Pacific Glacier on Friday, July 20, 2018.
(Credit: Courtesy National Park Service)


A second pilot has been rescued from an aircraft accident this week in Southeast Alaska’s Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

Park officials received word of a Friday incident at about 1 p.m., in front of the Grand Pacific Glacier near the head of Glacier Bay’s Tarr Inlet, via a radio call relayed by the cruise ship Island Princess. Responding rangers spoke with the pilot, Thorsten Kampe of Germany.

“Kampe reported landing due to an apparent engine malfunction,” park officials wrote. “The nose of the plane subsequently buried, breaking the propeller as he taxied through soft sand.”

A National Park Service boat took Kampe, who was unhurt, to Bartlett Cove. Plans were being made Friday to salvage the small plane using a helicopter.

A Wednesday crash west of Gustavus, in which a plane flipped into the park’s Crillon Lake, left a 34-year-old pilot with “minimal injuries” according to park staff. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter crew picked the man up, after he swam to shore and started a fire while he awaited rescue.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.ktva.com

Rush, Monroe County, New York: Man's aircraft goes off radar, sparks search

Rochester, New York Airport Firefighters - IAFF Local 1636

Off Airport incidents

This afternoon, we were notified by #ROC ATC of a possible aircraft down in Rush. Two Airport Firefighters immediately responded with Rescue 5 to assist Rush Volunteer Fire Department and others at the scene. After an extensive search by several fire and law enforcement agencies, it was discovered a local resident had been flying in the area earlier in the day and did not require any assistance. Our members are glad that this incident turned out the way it did.

This is the second consecutive day that Rescue 5 has responded off-field to assist another agency. As we’ve stated before, this is a testament to the inter-agency cooperation that exists in our area.

Several law enforcement agencies responded to a field in Rush Saturday afternoon, after it was believed that a small plane may have crashed in the area.


Rush, N.Y. - Several law enforcement agencies responded to a field in Rush Saturday afternoon, after it was believed that a small plane may have crashed in the area.

Monroe County Sheriff's deputies arrived to the area of 7465 West Henrietta around 2:30 pm, after a small plane went off the radar in the vicinity.

A State Police helicopter, along with members of the Rochester/Monroe County Airport Professional Fire Fighters Association assisted in the search for the plane.

Turns out, a resident in the neighborhood had been been operating the aircraft, which he safely landed on his property without incident, according to deputies.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://13wham.com

A drone delayed a helicopter from landing at the Rupert hospital during the Fourth of July parade

An air ambulance helicopter hovers over the hospital during the Rupert Fourth of July parade after the pilot spotted a drone flying in the vicinity.
 PHOTO COURTESY OF MINIDOKA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL


RUPERT — A drone in flight over Minidoka Memorial Hospital created a hazard for a medical helicopter crew during the Rupert Fourth of July parade and delayed transport for a patient involved in an interstate crash.

Hospital employee Tammy Hanks said she was videoing parade footage when the incident occurred.

“The helicopter had to hover over the hospital for a long time because of the drone,” Hanks said. “It could have been potentially life-threatening if the pilot hadn’t recognized there was a drone there. It could have caused a crash. It was critical for the patient, too. In a situation where Life Flight is used, a moment can be a matter of life and death.”

Minidoka Memorial Hospital Administrator Tom Murphy said the helicopter was trying to land at the hospital to pick up a patient that was in a crash on Interstate 84.

“The chopper coming in spotted the drone and called the dispatcher,” Murphy said.

Luckily, he said, the pilot spotted the drone and bypassed what could have been a worse event.

The drone could have caused a crash and endangered the flight crew and patient along with other hospital staff and bystanders, he said. Hospital officials ask the public not to fly drones within two miles of the hospital.

“We don’t know one minute from the next when we’ll need a helicopter,” Murphy said. “None of our flights are planned. Obviously we want to be able to get those flights in and out of our emergency department and time is of the essence, that’s why we call a helicopter in the first place.”

Rupert Police Lieutenant Jeff McEwen said he was in the area by the hospital when he heard the police chief say over the radio that there was a drone being flown near the hospital.

“As we tried to find it people along the way pointed us in the direction to go, so he was easy to find,” McEwen said. “We asked him to take it out of the air immediately and he did.”

Because the man was compliant and did not realize the turmoil he was causing, police did not forward a report to the Federal Aviation Administration, and no criminal charges were filed.

“Drones are becoming so popular and widespread due to the ease of access and affordability, but certain responsibilities come with it. That’s really important for people to understand,” McEwen said. “It’s a really big deal when Life Flight can’t land.”

Fly by the rules

Brandi Milliron, who teaches drone classes to students at West Minico Middle School said drone use exploded before guidelines were established. The task was turned over to the Academy of Model Aeronautics, which established the guidelines later adopted by the FAA.

Milliron said most drones equipped with cameras today won’t even power up unless the user has read the rules and regulations on its use.

Officer James Bonzo, who flies the Rupert PD’s drone, said there are FAA rules for recreational drone use and state and local ordinances also apply.

“You can’t claim that you didn’t know,” Milliron said. “It’s your responsibility as a pilot to know. You could be taking people’s lives in your hands. I teach my students that first and foremost you have to be aware of the rules and ethics involved.”

Idaho laws prohibit flying unmanned aircraft over private property or for voyeurism and agriculture structures cannot be filmed. Other laws prevent the sale of images or video without the consent of the property owner.

A person violating the law could be charged with reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, voyeurism and inciting violence, depending on the circumstances.

Penalties could include civil action and fines of $1,000 or actual damages.

FAA rules for recreational use include yielding to manned aircraft and giving notice to the air traffic control tower when a person flies a drone within five miles of an airport.

“You have to abide by air traffic control’s wishes. If they deny you permission to fly within five miles of the airport, you can’t fly,” McEwen said. “If you do it anyway, they will report it to the FAA. You don’t want to mess around with that. We’re not talking local fines; the federal fines can be thousands of dollars.”

The FAA’s smartphone mobile app B4UFLY is available for free and helps unmanned aircraft operators determine if there are restrictions or requirements in effect at the location where they want to fly.

The FAA gives hobbyists two options to fly unmanned aircraft under a special rule. The first requires operators to register the craft with the FAA, fly for recreational purposes only, follow a community-based set of safety guidelines, fly within visual line of sight, give way to manned aircraft, report to the air control towers when flying within 5 miles of an airport and fly a craft that weighs no more than 55 lbs.

The second option requires the user to register with the FAA as a non-modeler, obtain an FAA remote pilot certificate and follow the agency’s operational requirements.

Operators can also request a waiver from the FAA to operate within the 5-mile rule or during certain conditions, like flying at night.

FAA rules also restrict flying in the airspace around Washington DC and any prohibited, restricted or warning areas, military operations, alert or controlled firing areas. Drones should not be flown around stadiums and sporting events for major or national leagues along with others, around wildfire firefighting operations.

All accidents involving serious injury to a person or property damage in excess of $500 must be reported to the FAA within 10 days.

Pilots should fly at or below 400 feet, avoid gathering places of 3,000 people or more and emergencies and not operate a drone while intoxicated.

Flying drones for work or business purposes falls under a different set of rules.

But Milliron said, anyone receiving financial compensation for video or footage—even from Youtube—must complete the requirements to fly commercially.

People flying drones in rural area should also be mindful that farmers may be flying spray planes in the area, Bonzo said.

Milliron said hospital helipads will show up in the B4UFLY app but private crop duster airstrips do not and those planes fly under 400 feet.

“People have to be aware of their surroundings,” Bonzo said.

Residents complain about cameras in the sky


The police are starting to receive more drone complaints than in past years.

“Most of the complaints are coming from residents who are concerned about the cameras that can be attached to them,” Bonzo said.

The Rupert police station has not written any citations for drone use, yet, McEwen said.

“We haven’t had that many serious cases except the recent one at the hospital,” Bonzo said. “And we haven’t run into anyone using one maliciously, which is the type of case we’d forward to the FAA.”

Drones can be fun and very useful, McEwen said.

The police department has used a drone for about a year.

It affords officers a bird’s-eye-view of areas and has been used downtown to check out the rooftops before large events like the parade.

Bonzo said the drone was used to make sure there were no unauthorized people lurking on the roofs or suspicious objects.

“It works well to increase public safety,” McEwen said.

The department has also used it a couple of times to quickly scan canal banks when parents reported missing children, Bonzo said.

The aircraft provides a valuable resource for a small department with less manpower, McEwen said.

The drone can also be used to map crime scenes or accidents and for criminal surveillance but only after a warrant is issued, McEwen said.

Many businesses also use drones for various purposes.

Murphy said he’s not against the recreational use of drones and his son owns one, but users have to obey the rules.

“I want people to follow the rules so we can continue to have fun flying these drones,” Murphy said.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://magicvalley.com

Boeing 757, VH-TCA: Incident occurred Monday, February 05, 2018 in Auckland, New Zealand

Hydraulic system failure involving Boeing 757, VH-TCA, Auckland International Airport, New Zealand, on February 05, 2018 

The ATSB is investigating a hydraulic system failure involving a Boeing 757, VH-TCA, Auckland International Airport, New Zealand, on 5 February 2018.

While passing 6,000 ft on climb from Auckland Airport, the flight crew received a left hydraulic system warning. After they actioned the appropriate checklist, the right hydraulic system also failed. The flight crew elected to return to Auckland, and the aircraft landed without further incident.

As part of the investigation, the ATSB will interview the flight crew, obtain engineering reports, review recorded data, and gather additional information.

A final report will be released at the end of the investigation.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

NTSB Identification: ENG18RA015
14 CFR Unknown
Incident occurred Monday, February 05, 2018 in Auckland, New Zealand
Aircraft: BOEING 757, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has notified the NTSB of an incident involving a Boeing 757-236, which occurred on February 5,2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacture and Design of the airplane.

All investigative information will be released by the ATSB.

de Havilland DH.112 Venom FB54, registered to World Heritage Air Museum and operated by the pilot, N747J: Fatal accident occurred July 20, 2018 near Sheboygan County Memorial Airport (KSBM), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N747J


Location: Sheboygan, WI
Accident Number: WPR18FA200
Date & Time: 07/20/2018, 1604 CDT
Registration: N747J
Aircraft: De Havilland DH112 VENOM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 20, 2018, about 1604 central daylight time, a De Havilland DH112 Venom airplane, N747J, impacted a structure shortly after takeoff near Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. Two people in the structure sustained serious injuries. The airplane was destroyed during a post impact fire. The airplane was registered to World Heritage Air Museum and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal formation training flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time.

The airplane departed SBM as part of a formation training flight; the accident airplane was in the number two position and staggered to the right of the lead airplane. Review of video provided by a witness showed the lead airplane depart, followed by the accident airplane about 8 seconds later. About 6 seconds after the accident airplane lifted off, the left wing rocked downward then upward.

Multiple witnesses reported that the airplane appeared to be sluggish and not climbing. The airplane climbed to about 200 ft above ground level (agl), then started a descent. The airplane impacted flat vegetated terrain, slid through the structure and continued another about 175 ft before coming to a stop. The airplane came to rest on a magnetic heading of 140°; the debris path was 200 ft by 40 ft. The entire airplane was located at the accident site.

The wreckage was transported to a secure facility for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: De Havilland
Registration: N747J
Model/Series: DH112 VENOM FB54
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: World Heritage Air Museum
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSBM, 746 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1700 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.64 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Sheboygan, WI (SBM)
Destination:  Sheboygan, WI (SBM) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.760833, -87.835000 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Rachel Kroeplien standing near a combine head that was partially melted by burning aviation fuel. Sadly, the pilot was killed, two employees were injured, numerous calves died or were injured, one calf barn was destroyed and three other buildings were damaged. The Kroeplien family is working to determine the best course of action moving forward.


























Marty Tibbitts

SHEBOYGAN COUNTY -- The Sheboygan County Sheriff’s Office says the pilot killed in a plane crash in Sheboygan Falls is 50-year-old Martin Tibbitts of Grosse Pointe, Michigan. Tibbitts had just taken off from the Sheboygan County Memorial Airport when he went down and hit a farm building on Friday, July 20.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is leading the investigation into the crash with help from the FAA. Officials were on scene Saturday, July 21 and will continue to be there through the weekend, and possibly early next week.

Just hours into the Aviation Heritage Center of Wisconsin's 11th annual Air Clinic, Pilot Martin "Marty" Tibbitts encountered trouble in the air soon after takeoff. His vintage, single-engine, military-style plane went down just a half-mile from the airport. Tibbitts was killed on impact.

The crash has left fellow Warbird flyers devastated and puzzled.

"These planes, every year, have to be inspected," said Paul Walter, former president of the Aviation Heritage Center of Wisconsin.

The crash happened at Fly By Acres Farm, injuring two people -- one seriously -- and killing several animals.

"There were workers in there feeding cattle or calves in the building where the plane came through and were hit by the airplane," said Sheboygan Falls Fire Chief Bob Kroeplien.

Several nearby buildings caught fire, producing a black cloud of smoke visible for miles away. First responders from all around the area battled the flames. Chief Bob Kroeplien, with the Sheboygan Falls Fire Department, the loss is personal.

"It's the farm I grew up on," Kroeplien said. "The farm happened to be my brother's farm."

Officials with the NTSB will look at the pilot’s training and flight track, the aircraft and weather to determine what happened and ensure it doesn't ever happen again.

"We don't know what caused this accident," said Air Safety Investigator Jack Vanover, with the NTSB.

Tibbitts' brother, JC, shared the following statement:

“Our family is devastated by the loss of Marty. To say he was passionate about all things in his life - family, business and aviation would be to immensely understate the case. He died pursuing one of his passions. This past Tuesday before leaving for Wisconsin he showed us aerial photos of the formation he would be flying at Oshkosh. He was a highly skilled pilot who enjoyed the history and camaraderie that came with flying vintage military planes. Beyond his family, friends and business associates, many will miss this unique and special person.”

An event these pilots look forward to all year long is now marked by tragedy; one of their own killed pursuing their shared passion.

"They're your family members and of course whenever you lose a family member, it's a sombering[sp] event," said Walter.

The NTSB says a preliminary report will be released within the next week. It could take more than a year to determine probable cause of the crash.

As for the people injured, the male victim remains in serious condition while the female victim's condition has improved. Initial reports also indicated all 40-some calves in the barn died. The fire chief says that's not the case -- several calves survived and are being cared for at another facility.

Story and video ➤ https://fox6now.com

Marty Tibbitts of Grosse Pointe is shown with Greg Morris of Chicago in an August 19, 2015, photo at the World Heritage Air Museum at the Oakland County International Airport in Waterford. Tibbitts a pilot and co-founder of the museum, died Friday when a de Havilland DH.112 Venom FB54 aircraft he was piloting crashed shortly after take-off in Sheboygan, Wisconsin.

Jack Vanover, an air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, speaks at a press conference at the Aviation Heritage Center in Sheboygan Falls on July 21st.


Martin J. Tibbitts was an entrepreneur but his passion was flying vintage military aircraft.

“I fell in love with Cold War jet aviation,” Tibbitts, who went by Marty, told the Free Press in 2015. 

Tibbitts was at the controls of one such plane, a de Havilland  DH112 Venom, on Friday when it crashed shortly after takeoff from Sheboygan County Memorial Airport in Wisconsin.

Tibbitts was killed when the plane struck a barn. Two farm workers also were injured. One of them was airlifted to a hospital. Between 40 and 50 cattle died in the ensuing fire, investigators said.

The cause of the crash remains unclear. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating, but it sometimes takes weeks or months to reach a conclusion.

Tibbitts, 50, of Grosse Pointe Park, was a co-founder of the World Heritage Air Museum, which owns eight vintage planes, including the one he was flying Friday.

"Marty was a joy," said Joe Walker, a long-time friend and business associate. "He was one of those visionaries in business, always had great vision, great ideas."

Tibbitts' day job was CEO of Clementine Lives Answering Service in Harper Woods and he also was active in the Young Presidents Organization, a professional group for executives.

Walker said Tibbitts had flown the plane to Wisconsin to take part in the EAA Airventure Oshkosh, an annual event billed as the "world's largest gathering of aviation enthusiasts." Tibbitts had attended the event for years.

The Sheboygan airport was hosting a vintage aircraft formation flying clinic ahead of the larger Oshkosh event, which begins Monday.

"He texted me on Wednesday to say that he'd just landed in Sheboygan," Walker said.

Tibbitts was taking the plane up Friday to fly in formation with two other military planes. He was first to take off with the other two right behind him.

The plane crashed just seconds after takeoff.

The plane was one of only a handful of de Havilland  DH112 Venoms in the world that was still flying, according to the museum website.

The plane is a British postwar single-engine jet flown by Switzerland until 1983 and imported into the U.S. in the 1990s. The Venom served as a single-seat fighter-bomber and two-seat night fighter. It first flew in 1949, and was designed to be a faster, more agile replacement to the Vampire, according to the museum

Tibbitts co-founded the museum telling the Free Press in 2015 that prices of used military jets have fallen as much as 90 percent in the last decade, in part because new regulations made it harder to get the special pilots’ licenses required.

But that made the hobby far more affordable, Tibbitts said. He had recently bought a plane for $75,000 “that had cost about 10 times that” a decade ago, he said.

Still, flying a vintage fighter is far more demanding, physically and mentally, than piloting a propeller-driven plane, Tibbitts said.

“When you’re going as fast as we do, you don’t have much time to correct a mistake,” he said at the time.

Tibbitts is survived by his wife, Belinda; children Mason and Julia; and stepdaughter, Cameron. Funeral arrangements are pending, Walker said. 

Original article ➤ https://www.freep.com






SHEBOYGAN – Town of Sheboygan Falls Fire Chief Bob Kroeplien said Friday’s plane crash into a Sheboygan County farm struck particularly close to home—it happened to be the farm he grew up on.

The pilot, 50-year-old Martin J. Tibbitts, from Grosse Pointe, Michigan, was flying a DE Havlon DH112 Venom that crashed into a farm building shortly after taking off from the Sheboygan County airport.

The plane burst into flames after the crash, killing Tibbitts and injuring two farm workers, as well as killing or injuring about 40-50 cattle.

The farm is owned by the chief’s brother.

“Talking to my brother and sister-in-law, they want to send condolences to the pilot and his family and ask for prayers for the workers who were injured yesterday,” Kroeplien said at a press conference on Saturday at the Aviation Heritage Center in Sheboygan Falls.

Kroeplien said the farm workers were struck by the plane and debris while feeding cattle in a farm building. He couldn’t speak in depth on the extent of the workers’ injuries, but described them as severe.

He said the female worker is said to be “doing pretty decent,” but he did not have an update on the male worker. The workers have not been identified by officials pending notification of families and are not related to the Kroepliens.

Jack Vanover, an air safety investigator with The National Traffic Safety Board, is investigating the crash.

“Why are we here? We are here to gather the facts so we can attempt to determine probable cause so we can try to prevent this from happening ever again,” Vanover said at a press conference on Saturday.

Vanover said the investigation will look at multiple factors, including the pilot, the plane and the environment.

He said in five days the NTSB will issue a preliminary report with initial information; in six months to a year they will issue a factual with concrete information and facts; and in 12 to 18 months they will issue a probable cause, with the intention of “improving aviation safety.”

Officials said the community can help by limiting their use of County Highway O as the investigation continues.

Paul Walter, vice president of the board for the Aviation Heritage Center, said the support from the community since the incident has been a light in a difficult time.

“We’re really pleased, as a pilot and as a board member of the Aviation Heritage Center, with the support and understanding that we’re all getting from the people of Sheboygan,” he said. “As any community, we’ve lost one of our members, so that is a very sad thing. With time and the NTSB, we’re going to learn from this.”

The center is currently hosting a formation clinic ahead of EAA AirVenture. Walter said this is the first of any kind of incident to happen over the 11 years they’ve had the clinic and that it has a great safety record.

While the clinic will continue on Sunday and part of Monday, the center made the decision to “stand down” on Saturday.

“We decided to stand down and think about what we are doing, why we are here and put safety first,” Walter said.

Original article ➤ https://www.sheboyganpress.com

Douglas C-47B (DC-3), registered to American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum Inc and operated by the Commemorative Air Force (CAF), N47HL: Accident occurred July 21, 2018 at Burnet Municipal Airport (KBMQ), Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Commemorative Air Force; Dallas, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N47HL

Location: Burnet, TX
Accident Number: WPR18FA201
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 0915 CDT
Registration: N47HL
Aircraft: Douglas DC3
Injuries: 6 Serious, 1 Minor, 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On July 21, 2018, about 0915 central daylight time, a tailwheel equipped Douglas DC-3 twin-engine airplane, N47HL, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during takeoff from the Burnet Municipal Airport, Burnet, Texas. The airplane was registered to American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum Inc., and operated by the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The airline transport captain, crew chief, and 4 passengers sustained serious injuries, 1 passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airline transport co-pilot and 5 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Sedalia Regional Airport (DMO), Sedalia, Missouri.

Representatives from the CAF reported that the intention of the flight was to travel to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, to attend an airshow, with an intermediate fuel stop at DMO.

The co-pilot, who was the flying pilot (FP) reported that prior to the flight, it was briefed that he would perform the takeoff. He stated that the captain taxied the airplane to the runup area, where all pre-takeoff checks were completed; the captain then taxied the airplane onto runway 19. The co-pilot further stated that he then took control of the airplane, provided a pre-takeoff brief, and initiated the takeoff sequence. About 10 seconds into the takeoff roll, the airplane drifted right, at which time he applied left rudder input. This was followed shortly by the captain saying that he had the airplane.

The captain, who was the non-flying pilot (NFP), reported that during the initial stages of the takeoff roll, he didn't recall the airplane swerving to the right, however, recalled telling the co-pilot not to push the tail up because it was heavy; he also remembered the airplane swerving to the left shortly thereafter. The captain stated that he yelled "right rudder" three times before taking control of the airplane. He said that as he put his hands on the control yoke, he noticed that either the tail started to come down or the main wheels were either light or were just coming off the ground as it exited the left side of the runway. The captain said that he knew the airplane was slow as he tried to ease it [the airplane] over [to the runway] and set it back down. Subsequently, he felt the 'shutter of a stall," and the airplane turned to the left and impacted the ground. After the airplane came to a stop, a postimpact fire ensued, during which all the occupants of the airplane egressed through the aft left door.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest upright on a heading of about 113° magnetic, about 145 ft east of the left side, and 2,638 ft from the approach end of runway 19. The postimpact fire consumed the fuselage from the nose cone aft to about 3 ft forward of the left side cargo door along with a majority of the wing center section. No evidence of any flight control locks was found installed. The tailwheel locking pin was found in place and was sheered into multiple pieces. Vegetation (grass) within about 200 ft of the main wreckage was burnt from the postimpact fire. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Douglas
Registration: N47HL
Model/Series: DC3 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:Commemorative Air Force 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None  

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBMQ, 1284 ft msl
Observation Time: 1431 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 300 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burnet, TX (BMQ)
Destination: Sedalia, MO (DMO) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 Serious, 1 Minor, 5 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Serious, 1 Minor, 6 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.737222, -98.238611 (est)


Chris Dowell
 Highland Lakes Squadron, Commemorative Air Force



Thirteen people survived a plane crash at the Burnet Municipal Airport on Saturday morning.

The Burnet County Sheriff's Office said they received a call about the crash around 9:00 a.m.

The plane, a C-47 vintage plane called the "Bluebonnet Belle," crashed during take off, according to the Commemorative Air Force.

The Commemorative Air Force own the plane, which was heading to Oshkosh Wisconsin for an airshow.

All 13 people on board were able to exit the aircraft, according to the Burnet County Sheriff's Office.

One person was airlifted by helicopter to with significant burn injuries to the San Antonio burn unit, according to a spokesperson with the Commemorative Air Force.

The aircraft caught on fire and ignited nearby grass. Firefighters were able to extinguish the fire.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the accident.

Raw video:  https://www.facebook.com/mattgallagher20/video

Story, photo gallery and video ➤ https://ktxs.com



The famed Bluebonnet Belle C47 Skytrain, which assisted in Hurricane Harvey relief efforts and was an integral part of the Highland Lakes Squadron of the Commemorative Air Force, crashed Saturday morning, July 21, at Burnet Municipal Airport's Kate Craddock Field in Burnet while attempting to take off for an air show in Wisconsin.

Fourteen people were aboard the Belle, headed for the annual Oshkosh Air Show when the plane left the runway shortly after 9 a.m. Saturday and crashed before catching fire and eventually exploding. Miraculously, all 14 people aboard the craft survived the crash and made it out of the plane before the explosion.

Video footage of the Belle's takeoff taken and uploaded to Facebook by Matt Gallagher, an Austin-based pilot who was scheduled to take off after the Belle, shows the historic 1944 transport aircraft appear to struggle to get airborne, tilt right and then veer left before digging its left wing into the ground and collapsing upon its landing gear. A second video shows the Belle burning as emergency vehicles respond.

One individual was airlifted to San Antonio Military Medical Center with significant burn injuries, though witnesses at the scene reported he was able to walk out of the crash site. Seven other individuals were transported to Seton Highland Lakes Hospital in Burnet with minor injuries.

The fire spread as well to grass along the runway. Area fire departments, especially the Burnet Fire Department, which is located next door to the airport, and the Burnet Volunteer Fire Department, responded quickly and were able to extinguish the grass fire after keeping it contained.

The crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration, which had agents on the ground interviewing passengers Saturday morning. 

Dave Hargett, a member of the Highland Lakes Squadron, said the Belle was on its way back to 2018 EEA AirVenture Oshkosh air show, the same show where the Belle had engine trouble in 2015.

Three years ago, the Belle had performed several air jumps in Wisconsin and was going to make a low pass over the airfield when a noise coming from the right engine forced the pilot to land the plane at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh.

The plane had a crack on the exhaust side of an engine cylinder as well as burn marks and a hole in the baffle and metal particles in the oil, which grounded the Belle in Wisconsin until a new engine could be installed and the plane was returned to Burnet in May 2016.

This is the third aircraft the Highland Lakes Squadron has lost or had grounded due to engine trouble in the past year. A T-6 SNJ Texan advanced trainer is currently grounded after losing an engine during a trip to a Mississippi air show, while the squadron's L-17 Navion reconnaissance airplane is also grounded due to engine trouble, leaving the PT-19 Cornell as the squadron's only operable plane at this time.

The Bluebonnet Belle has long been the featured aircraft at the annual Airsho, held the second weekend of September at the Burnet Municipal Airport by the Highland Lakes Squadron. Officials said the show is expected to continue without the famed aircraft.

“It's a huge loss for the city and for the Commemorative Air Force,” Burnet Mayor Christa Bromley said Saturday. “It was the star attraction for our local airport. We have the SNJ as well, but the Belle was a tremendous asset for the CAF.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.burnetbulletin.com

Embraer ERJ 190: Incident occurred January 29, 2018 in Mar Del Plata, Argentina

NTSB Identification: ENG18RA012
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign Austral Lineas Aeras Cielos Del Sur S.A
Incident occurred Monday, January 29, 2018 in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
Aircraft: EMBRAER ERJ190, registration:
Injuries: 101 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Junta de Investigacion de Accidentes de Avicion Civil (JIAAC) Republica Argentina has notified the NTSB of an incident involving an Embraer ERJ 190 which occurred on January 29, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a US Accredited Representative to assist the JIAAC investigation in accordance with ICAO Annex 13 as the state of manufacturer and design of the component.

All investigative information will be released by the JIAAC.

Beechcraft F35 Bonanza, PT-AVO: Fatal accident occurred February 07, 2018 in Itaituba, Brazil

Uma das vítimas foi identificada como Marinho, piloto e proprietário da aeronave que caiu, segundo o delegado Vicente Gomes


NTSB Identification: ERA18WA085
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, February 07, 2018 in Itaituba, Brazil
Aircraft: BEECH F35, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Brazil has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a BEECH F35 airplane that occurred on February 07, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Brazil's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Brazil. 





A Força Aérea Brasileira (FAB) confirmou a queda de um avião de pequeno porte nesta quarta-feira (7) na região do Crepurizão, distrito de Itaituba, no sudoeste do Pará. De acordo o delegado Vicente Gomes, superintendente regional da Polícia Civil no Tapajós, três pessoas estavam dentro da aeronave e morreram na explosão no momento da queda.

“Tinham três pessoas. Dois pilotos, sendo que um estava com passageiros e o terceiro seria um comprador de ouro. Os corpos já foram removidos e estão sendo deslocados para Itaituba. Inclusive, o filho de uma das vítimas, que é piloto também, está à frente desta situação”, detalhou Vicente Gomes.

Segundo o delegado, uma das vítimas foi identificada como Marinho, piloto e proprietário da aeronave que caiu. O avião, modelo Beechcraft Bonanza, tinha o prefixo PT-AVO e estava com a documentação em ordem, segundo os dados da Agência Nacional de Aviação Civil (ANAC).

https://g1.globo.com

Boeing 757-23A: Incident occurred January 30, 2018 in Tel Aviv, Israel

NTSB Identification: DCA18WA088
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier
Incident occurred Tuesday, January 30, 2018 in Tel Aviv, Israel
Aircraft: BOEING 757 23A, registration: N919FD
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Israel's Ministry of Transport has notified the NTSB of an incident involving a Boeing 757, which occurred on January 30, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S Accredited Representative to assist under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13, as the State of Manufacture and Design of the airplane.

All investigative information will be released by the Israeli Ministry of Transport.