Sunday, October 23, 2016

Short Brothers SD3-60 Sherpa, registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a public aircraft in support of the Forest Service, N148Z: Incident occurred October 13, 2016 at Missoula International Airport (KMSO), Montana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana 

Aviation Incident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N148Z  

Location: Missoula, MT
Incident Number: WPR17IA007
Date & Time: 10/13/2016, 1645 MDT
Registration: N148Z
Aircraft: SHORT BROS SD3 60 SHERPA
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

On October 13, 2016, about 1645 mountain daylight time, a Short Bros SD3-60 Sherpa airplane, N148Z, sustained minor damage following a nose gear collapse during landing, at the Missoula International Airport (MSO) Missoula, Montana. The two airline transport pilots, were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a public aircraft in support of the Forest Service. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the ferry flight which originated from Kingman Airport, Kingman, Arizona, about 1253.

The pilots reported that prior to landing, they had an unsafe nose gear indication. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to get the nose gear to extend and indicate that it was down and locked, they decided to come in for a landing. During the landing roll, as the airplane's nose was lowered, the nose gear collapsed, and the forward section of the bottom of the fuselage, made contact with the runway surface. Once the airplane came to a stop, both pilots egressed.

Examination of the airplane by the operator revealed minor damage on the underside of the fuselage.

The airplane was returning to MSO, on its first flight, after being re-painted by a vendor in Kingman, Arizona. According to the operator, examination of the nose gear revealed that it failed to lock in the extended position and collapsed during landing. The flight crew attempted to extend and lock the nose gear during the flight but were unsuccessful.

Post incident examination of the nose gear down-lock actuator piston (plunger), revealed that its chrome surface had been painted, which resulted in the locking piston not engaging, and prevented the locking of the nose gear during landing gear extension. The painting of the nose gear down-lock actuator piston was not observed by maintenance personnel or the flight crew on their pre-flight exterior checks.

The airplane manufacturer Shorts issued a SD3-60 Sherpa Service Information Letter (SIL) Sherpa L-23, in April 2007, titled: Servicing/Painting – Removal of masking material/paint from nose landing gear down-lock actuator piston after cleaning/painting operations. The SIL described a similar incident where the nose gear failed to lock in the down position, on the first flight after the airplane had been re-painted. The subsequent investigation revealed paint spray on the exposed chrome piston of the nose landing gear down-lock actuator. The SIL stated "to ensure that all masking material has been removed from the exposed piston after cleaning/painting, and that the piston is free from any paint or cleaning materials."

Additionally, the landing gear emergency accumulator was observed during the pre-flight checks to indicate below the specified pressure. The accumulator was serviced by maintenance to an adequate pressure, prior to takeoff. However, the pressure bled down during the incident flight, and when the emergency landing gear extension was used, the accumulator did not have adequate pressure. According to the operator's maintenance inspector, when activated, a fully serviced emergency accumulator forces the rapid application of hydraulic pressure into the system, however, according to the airplane's manufacturer, this is reliant on the main system hydraulic pressure being depleted so that the emergency pressure can change a control valve position. In this situation, the emergency pressure would be greater than the residual pressure of the failed main hydraulic system.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/12/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/06/2015
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 8715 hours (Total, all aircraft), 148 hours (Total, this make and model), 7755 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 82 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 49, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/25/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/02/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6424 hours (Total, all aircraft), 210 hours (Total, this make and model), 4921 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SHORT BROS
Registration: N148Z
Model/Series: SD3 60 SHERPA SHERPA VAR
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:
Serial Number: SH3428
Landing Gear Type: Hull; Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/24/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 5203.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-65R
Registered Owner: USDA Forest Service
Rated Power: 1298 hp
Operator: USDA Forest Service
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MSO, 3206 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 7000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: KINGMAN, AZ (IGM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: MISSOULA, MT (MSO)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1253 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MISSOULA INTL (MSO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3206 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 9501 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 46.916389, -114.090556 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17IA007
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Incident occurred Thursday, October 13, 2016 in Missoula, MT
Aircraft: SHORT BROS SD3 60 SHERPA, registration: N148Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On October 13, 2016, about 1645 Mountain daylight time, a Short Bros SD3-60 Sherpa, N148Z, sustained minor damage following a nose gear collapse during landing, at the Missoula International Airport (MSO) Missoula, Montana. Two Airline Transport Pilots, the only occupants of the airplane, were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a public use aircraft in support of the Forest Service. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the ferry flight which originated from Kingman Airport, Kingman, Arizona, about 1253 Mountain standard time.

The pilots reported that prior to landing, they had an unsafe nose gear indication. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to get the nose gear to extend and indicate that it was down and locked, they came in for a landing. During the landing roll, as the airplane's nose was lowered, the nose gear collapsed, and the forward section of the bottom of the fuselage, made contact with the runway surface. Once the airplane came to a stop, the flight crew egressed.

Examination of the airplane by the operator revealed that the underside of the fuselage, near the nose wheel, sustained minor damage.

Eurocopter AS 350B3, Gallup Med Flight: Accident occurred October 22, 2016 in McKinley County, New Mexico

Photo Courtesy of McKinley County Sheriffs Office




McKinley County Sheriff’s Deputies say an alleged drunk driver ran through barricades to strike a fire truck and medical helicopter.

Frank Hernandez was at the scene and witnessed the crash. Hernandez works for Speedway Towing in Gallup. He was at the site of a crash to tow away a vehicle that had rolled over, the wreck that the medical helicopter was responding to.

“Then I noticed after we got the vehicle picked up, this black Jeep flew past us,” said Frank Hernandez. “I was thinking what the heck is this guy doing? Because they had people out there trying to stop traffic, already he almost hit two ladies.”
  
Hernandez says the Jeep plowed through the barrier around the medical helicopter before hitting the fire truck and then the helicopter.

The suspected driver has been identified as 26-year-old Glenn Livingston of Gallup.

“Our medical team did an outstanding job. The patient was extremely critical, they maintained composure, they were professional and the stabilized this patient despite the incident that occurred on the scene,” said Regional Director Julia Azua.

The patient made it safely to the hospital due to the medical crew’s efforts.

Hernandez says the accident wasn’t even a surprise.

“You’ve got to be pretty drunk. I’ve seen them where they’ve taken vehicles off the road and they don’t know they did that, or not,” said Hernandez.

Hernandez says he estimates about 95% of the cars in his lot were destroyed due to drunk drivers.

Livingston was arrested and is facing charges that include aggravated DWI and open container.

Story and video:  http://www.kob.com


GALLUP, N.M. (KRQE) –  McKinley County Sheriffs Office deputies responded to a crash early Sunday morning after a suspected drunk driver went crashing into a medical helicopter and fire truck on Highway 566 near Gallup.

Deputies say a landing zone for a medical transport helicopter had been set up by the fire department for transport of a patient from a separate crash on Navajo route 1149, when the reported drunk driver went around the barricade on Highway 566 crashing into the helicopter and fire truck.

The helicopter was unoccupied, not running and rotors were not spinning, according to McKinely County Sheriff’s Office.

McKinley County sheriff’s say the suspected drunk driver, now identified as 26-year-old Glenn Livingston of Gallup, has been arrested and is charged with aggravated DWI, resisting, evading and or obstructing an officer among other charges.

No injuries were reported at the time of the crash.

MCSO says all vehicles involved were rendered inoperable and towed from the crash scene.

Source:   http://krqe.com

The McKinley County Sheriff’s Department confirms a vehicle driven by an alleged drunk driver crashed into a medevac helicopter northeast of Gallup on Hwy 566 overnight.

The accident happened when the helicopter crew was in the process of rescuing an occupant involved in a single car rollover.

The road was shut down and two fire engines were parked on both sides of the rotorcraft to protect it.

All occupants, including the pilot were out of the rotorcraft assisting the injured occupant when the accident occurred.

The driver reportedly drove around one of the fire engines then crashed into the helicopter and continued on and crashed into the fire engine.

No injuries were reported and the driver’s name and charges have yet to be released.

The occupant of the initial rollover was transported by ambulance and expected to make a full recover.

Source:  http://www.koat.com

Boeing B75N1, 3G Classic Aviation Inc., N56200: Accident occurred May 11, 2016 near Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (KINW), Winslow, Navajo County, Arizona

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

3G CLASSIC AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N56200

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 11, 2016 in Winslow, AZ
Aircraft: BOEING B75N1, registration: N56200
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 11, 2016, about 1710 mountain standard time, a Boeing B75N1, N56200, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power during takeoff initial climb at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (INW), Winslow, Arizona. The airplane was registered to 3G Classic Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and her passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Phoenix, Arizona.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that prior to takeoff; she conducted an engine run up and pre takeoff checks, which included leaning for density altitude, and conducted a static power check, which was in the normal range. The pilot further reported that during takeoff from runway 29, the airplane accelerated and climbed out normally, with the tachometer indicating 2,250 rpm. As the airplane was about 50 feet above ground level, it began to descend. The pilot stated that in order to avoid powerlines, she performed a left turn to maintain clearance, and verified the throttle, mixture, propeller, fuel, and carburetor heat settings. Subsequently, the airplane struck the ground, rolled about 20 feet, the right main landing gear impacted vegetation, and the airplane cartwheeled. The pilot reported that just prior to landing; she observed the tachometer indicating 2,000 rpm. The pilot added that earlier in the day, they had flown three flights, totaling about 5 hours of flight time. The flights included uneventful takeoffs from two airports with a higher density altitude.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the pilot revealed that all four wings, tail, and fuselage were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered wreckage revealed that the upper and lower wings were removed by the wreckage recovery company to facilitate wreckage transport. The empennage and right gear leg were also separated from the fuselage. The engine, a Lycoming R-680-E3B, rated at 300 horsepower, remained attached to the fuselage via its mounts. The fuselage was hoisted by a forklift, and the right gear leg was subsequently removed. Throttle, mixture, and propeller control continuity was established from the rear cockpit controls to the engine.

The front spark plugs were removed and examined. All nine spark plugs were intact and undamaged. The number one and two spark plugs exhibited black deposits within the electrode area, and the remaining spark plugs exhibited gray deposits within the electrode area. All engine accessories remained attached to the engine, and exhibited no damage. The carburetor was intact, and all linkages were secure. The carburetor fuel screen was removed, and a gray / tan liquid was drained from the carburetor. The fuel screen was free of debris. The liquid smelled similar to 100 Low Lead fuel, and tested negative for water using water finding paste. The air filter was removed, and a red dirt substance was observed within the housing, however, the air filter element appeared to be mostly free of debris. The gascolator screen and bowl was free of debris.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft, and exhibited an approximate 20 degree bend aft from about mid span on either blade.

The spark plugs and carburetor fuel screen were reinstalled. About 8 gallons of fuel was added to the center wing fuel tank. The engine was primed using the airframe fuel pump, and subsequently started. The engine was run for about 10 minutes at various power settings. During the engine run, a maximum power setting of 2,200 rpm and 28 inches of manifold pressure was obtained. A magneto test was performed at 1,500 rpm with a drop of about 75 to 100 rpm noted. The engine was manually shut off using the mixture.

Using the reported airport elevation of 4,941 feet, recorded weather conditions from about 14 minutes prior to the accident, the NTSB IIC calculated the density altitude to be about 7,223 feet and a pressure altitude of 4,757 feet.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 11, 2016 in Winslow, AZ
Aircraft: BOEING B75N1, registration: N56200
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 11, 2016, about 1710 mountain standard time, a Boeing B75N1, N56200, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (INW), Winslow, Arizona. The airplane was registered to 3G Classic Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and her passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Phoenix, Arizona.

The pilot reported that during takeoff from runway 29, as the airplane ascended to about 30 to 50 feet above the ground, the engine began to lose RPM. The pilot initiated a left turn to avoid power lines and subsequently landed off airport. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear sunk into the ground and the airplane cartwheeled. The pilot reported that all four wings, tail, and fuselage were structurally damaged.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.




British 'Bird in a Biplane' stripped of flying award amid claims she wasn't flying solo

Self-styled 'Bird in a Biplane' Tracey Curtis-Taylor has been stripped of a prestigious flying award following claims she wasn’t flying solo.

The decision by The Light Aircraft Association came amid allegations she had a co-pilot on her epic flights.

The respected Light Aircraft Association has rescinded its coveted Bill Woodhams Trophy which it awarded to her in 2015 for flying from Cape Town to Britain for navigational and flying skill.

It is thought to be the first time such an award has been rescinded.

Members of the LAA voted 123 to 65 to rescind the trophy at an Annual General Meeting at Sywell Aerodrome in Northamptonshire on Saturday.

Curtis-Taylor, 54, who attended the AGM in a bid to head off the motion, has been mired in controversy after flight instructor Ewald Gritsch revealed he occupied the forward cockpit of her vintage bi-plane for most of the legs of her famous journeys.

Her former logistics manager Sam Rutherford also said Curtis-Taylor had been guilty of embellishing the truth and had only flown four of the 36 legs from Cape Town to Goodwood solo.

Veteran member of the Light Aircraft Association Barry Tempest, who proposed her award be withdrawn in the light of the revelations, said: “I am delighted the award has been rescinded and her name will removed from the annals of the Light Aircraft Association.

“I have the greatest of respect for women pilots but I think Tracey Curtis-Taylor has not done a lot the further their case.

“I think she is a boastful lady who needs bringing down a peg or two.

“She made these claims about flying solo, or at least that is what we were lead to believe, and now it has come out that they were not that at all.

“Far from it. I believe the integrity of the LAA has been restored.”

On the surface the former waitress’s trips in her 1942 Boeing Stearman mirrored some of history’s greatest exploits by solo female flyers.

The trip from Cape Town to Goodwood, West Sussex was first completed solo by Lady Mary Heath in 1928.

Curtis-Taylor completed the 36-leg, 10,000-mile-flight in 2013 and in 2015 received the award from the Light Aircraft Association for the feat.

Mr. Gritsch was also on board for parts of her trip from Farnborough to Sydney, where she arrived in January after a flight covering 23 countries in 50 legs, recreating the 1930 journey of the intrepid Amy Johnson.

When she crashed in Arizona earlier this year on the third leg of her round-the-world flights Austrian co-pilot Gritsch was seen scrambling from the wreckage and his presence triggered a storm of outrage on respected flight forums Flyer and Pprune.

More details emerged about Curtis-Taylor’s vintage plane being equipped with GPS navigational equipment and the presence a support plane.

She faced more awkward questions about why Gritsch appears to have been edited out of a BBC documentary about her first big flight from Cape Town to Goodwood.

The Light Aircraft Association said it would respect the vote of its members.

In recent months Curtis-Taylor has sought to defuse the growing controversy by stating that she never claimed to be flying solo.

Tracey Curtis-Taylor was unavailable for comment.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.mirror.co.uk

Cirrus SR20 GS, Trustees of Purdue University, N585PU: Incident occurred October 23, 2016 at Muskegon County Airport (KMKG), Norton Shores, Michigan

http://registry.faa.gov/N585PU

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Grand Rapids FSDO-09

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE WHEEL COLLAPSED, MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN

Date: 23-OCT-16
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N585PU
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MUSKEGON
State: Michigan



NORTON SHORES, Mich. (WOOD) — No one was hurt when an airplane crashed at the Muskegon County Airport in Norton Shores Sunday afternoon.

During a practice landing around 2:15 p.m., the plane’s nose fell off, the plane dropped onto its front and skidded to a stop, according to Muskegon County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Christian Stevens.

The plane seats four, but the pilot was the only person on board. She was unhurt.

The damage to the plane, a Cirrus SR20, was minor. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the mechanical problem.

The plane was on a training flight out of Purdue University near West Lafayette, Ind. The pilot has her solo license, but was undergoing further training. She left Purdue Sunday morning and performed another training landing in Traverse City before the crash at the Muskegon County Airport. Sgt. Stevens said there is no indication that she was flying fatigued or under the influence of alcohol.

“Shook up understandably,” Stevens said of the pilot. “Again, it was a routine flight, routine landing. And again, as she landed is when the nose gear broke off and at that point it was just a few seconds of the plane landing and then she got out of the plane as quickly as she could.”

Family members were coming from Indiana get to get her.

The airport was closed for a short time as crews removed the damaged plane from the runway.

Source:   http://woodtv.com


NORTON SHORES, MICH. - A pilot is OK despite her plane crashing at the Muskegon County Airport.

The plane, described as a single-engine aircraft, went down during landing just before 2:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, Muskegon County Sheriff Dean Roesler said. Its front-nose wheel collapsed and bent upon contact with the ground, causing the aircraft to skid to a stop.

The plane appeared to be largely intact and not on fire, a witness told WZZM.

"I was sitting in my living room when I heard a fire whistle go off, which I think was kind of unusual," said Terry Knoll, who then went outside to investigate the scene.

The pilot is an 18-year-old Indiana woman who was completing some advanced flying time just before the crash, Roesler said. She waved off medical help before ambulances arrived, according to dispatch traffic.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety board are tasked to continue an investigation. 

Alcohol nor drugs are not believed to be factors in the crash.

Source:   http://www.wzzm13.com






MUSKEGON, Mich. — No one was injured in a Sunday afternoon plane crash at the Muskegon County Airport.

The incident occurred at 2:18 p.m. Sunday when an airplane nosed into the ground in a heavy crosswind while it was landing at the airport, located at 99 Sinclair Drive south of Muskegon and east of Norton Shores.

There was no fire hazard and firefighters soon left the scene.

Source:   http://fox17online.com

Morton County Sheriff's Department: Helicopter attacked by drone near protest site

Mandan, ND (WDAY TV) - Authorities shot down a drone reportedly flying near a helicopter near a pipeline protest site in Morton County.

The Morton County Sheriff's Department reported two documented cases where an unmanned aircraft system flew at a helicopter in a "threatening manner."


A sheriff on board the helicopter, that was assisting in surveillance, said that the helicopter pilot and passengers were "in fear of their lives."


Authorities say that around 11 a.m., the drone was flying above officers.


Since that's a violation of Federal Aviation Administration rules, law enforcement used less-than-lethal ammunition to fire on and damage the drone. The operator of the drone then landed the UAS.


Authorities have closed Highway 1806 due to protest activity north of the camp.


Officials say 200 protesters and 8 horses entered private property east of 1806.


Source: http://www.wdaz.com


News Release
For Immediate Release
October 23, 2016

Drone Operator Attacks Helicopter Using Unmanned Aircraft

Mandan, N.D. – Authorities report two documented cases where an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) flew at a helicopter in a threatening manner.  The helicopter was assisting in surveillance in the vicinity of Highway 1806 during an active protest situation Sunday morning. A sheriff on board the helicopter reported to law enforcement on the ground that the helicopter pilot and passengers were “in fear of their lives”, and that the “drone came after us.”  

Around 11:00 a.m., the drone was flying directly above officers, in violation of FAA rules.  Law enforcement used less-than-lethal ammunition to fire on and damage the UAS, which was then landed by the drone operator.

“The FAA has strict guidelines and regulations governing the use of drones around unprotected people and manned aircraft.  The drones being operated near the local protests and the camps south of Mandan generally are not being operated within the regulations.  Reports of drones not being operated within the FAA guidelines or in a reckless and unsafe manner are being investigated and forwarded to the Morton County States Attorney’s office,” said Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier.

Two drone operators have previously been charged for crimes involving illegal use of unmanned aircraft systems during the on-going protest situation. Myron Dewey was charged with stalking and Aaron Turgeon was charged with two counts of reckless endangerment, one being a C Felony for flying an UAS at a North Dakota Highway Patrol plane. Below is the FAA’s Summary of “Small Unmanned Aircraft Rule”: https://www.faa.gov/uas/media/Part_107_Summary.pdf#page=1&zoom=auto,-127,571

Authorities are currently monitoring protest activity north of the camp, near Highway 1806. Due to the traffic hazard the public, highway 1806 has been closed due. As of this morning, 200 protesters and 8 horses had cut fence and entered private property east of 1806. This is private property that is a DAPL construction site. DAPL employees are working along the pipeline route today. 

We will send an updated release as additional information comes available. 

Airplane viewing platform to be built at Danville Park in Mississauga



Danville Park will be home to a plane-viewing platform to spot airplanes flying in and out of Toronto Pearson International Airport.

In partnership with the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA), the City of Mississauga is constructing the viewing platform at the highest point in the city, the Danville Park pinnacle. Located north of Highway 401, off Kennedy Road, the pinnacle is 25 metres above the park area.

“We’re hoping that this spot becomes a source of community pride and becomes a destination spot in Mississauga,” said Kathryn Hanford, manager of community outreach for the GTAA.

Community engagement will be a staple to the design of the viewing platform. Hanford said the GTAA and the city have reached out to residents of Wards 3 and 5, who are most impacted by proximity to the airport, to find out what features they would like to see.

Options include viewfinders, wind socks, pinnacle posts that suggest flight paths, an overhead feature, whirly gig pinwheel and seating.

The GTAA has also donated limestone from the Avro Arrow building to be incorporated into the design.

“Toronto Pearson believes it’s important to be a good neighbor,” said Hanford.

The GTAA is providing $300,000 in funding to the City of Mississauga for the construction of the platform.

It will be a key piece to the city’s vision for the revitalization of Malton.

All residents are invited to share their thoughts on what features they would like to see at the viewing platform. Comments can be made through the GTAA website until Oct. 28, after which they will be reviewed and a detailed design will be completed.

Hanford anticipates the viewing platform will be ready to go by next summer.

Source:  http://www.mississauga.com

American Airlines flight makes emergency landing at Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KATV) -- An American Airlines Airbus 319 made an emergency landing at the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport after staff reported smoke in the cockpit.

Public Affairs and Governmental Relations Director Shane Carter says flight 1134 was on its way to Los Angeles from Nashville when it safely made the emergency landing at 5:17 p.m.

The airplane was taxied to the airport, where passengers unloaded and awaited American Airlines to assist them. The plane was carrying 130 people, including staff and passengers.

Carter says American Airlines has sent a replacement airplane from Dallas to pick up the passengers and carry them to Los Angeles.

Source:  http://katv.com

2 people gain unauthorized access to American Airlines plane at Philadelphia International Airport

Security issue prompts delay for American Airlines flight to Boston, Massachusetts:   Jetway door left unlocked, captain says

BOSTON —An American Airlines flight destined for Boston was delayed after a couple walked onto the plane and took seats without notice.

A passenger on the plane told Newscenter 5 the captain of American Airlines Flight 1655 in Philadelphia said the jetway door was not locked overnight. A couple, who did not speak English, walked onto the plane around 6 a.m. and took seats.

The captain originally said the passengers were on the wrong flight, but American Airlines said they determined the couple was on the correct flight to Boston.

All passengers were told to get off the plane as officials searched the aircraft.

"This has certainly been an interesting morning," the flight's captain said. "It was a difficult decision to make, but I am sure you agree a necessary one."  

Departure to Boston was scheduled for 8 a.m.

Passengers were put on a different plane for departure.

Statement from American Airlines

"Two passengers gained unauthorized access to one of our aircraft earlier this morning. Out of an abundance of caution, we are utilizing a different aircraft for the flight to Boston. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience."

Source:   http://www.wcvb.com

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (WPVI) -- A flight from Philadelphia to Boston was delayed after two people were able to gain unauthorized access to the plane, Action News has learned.

American Airlines Flight 1655 was set to depart Philadelphia International Airport at 8 a.m. Sunday, but it did not take off on time due to the incident.

The airline issued the following statement to Action News:

"Two passengers gained unauthorized access to one of our aircraft earlier this morning. Out of an abundance of caution, we are utilizing a different aircraft for the flight to Boston. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience."

Investigators are looking into how the two people were able to open a secured door controlled by the airport.

Action News is told foul play is not suspected, as it appears the two people got on the plane by accident.

Passengers took off from Philadelphia on a new plane shortly before 11 a.m.

American Airlines says this was not considered a security breach because all passengers were vetted by the TSA.

Action News has reached out to Philadelphia International Airport officials for comment.

Source:   http://6abc.com

Socata TBM700N (TBM900), M-VNTR: Accident occurred October 15, 2016 near Fairoaks Airport, Chertsey Road, Chobham, Woking, Surrey

Dr. Taylor, who is an inventor and scientist, was travelling from Ronaldsway Airport in the Isle of Man. 



NTSB Identification: CEN17WA020
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in Surrey, United Kingdom
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM700, registration:
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 15, 2016, a Socata TBM700 airplane, M-VNTR, undershot the runway at Fairoaks Airport (EGTF), near Surrey, England. There were two persons on board, one of whom was seriously injured.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of the United Kingdom. Any further information may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB)
Telephone: +44 0 1252 510300
Facsimile: +44 0 1252 376699
Email: investigations@aaib.gov.uk

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Air Accidents Investigation Branch.



A "highly experienced pilot" was forced to make an emergency landing in a field next to an airport in Chobham after hearing a "loud noise".

John C. Taylor OBE suffered a broken arm after he crash-landed his TBM 900 aircraft in the field close to Fairoaks Airport on Saturday October 15 at around 8.35am , while his co-pilot suffered a "minor abrasion".

Dr. Taylor, who is an inventor and scientist, was travelling from Ronaldsway Airport in the Isle of Man and was due to land at the Chobham airport when the unexplained "loud noise" was heard.

A spokesman for Dr. Taylor said the cause of the accident is still unknown and will be examined by the Air Accidents Investigation Branch.

The spokesman said: “On the morning of Saturday October 15, Dr John C Taylor piloted his aircraft with a turboprop engine, travelling with his co-pilot, from Ronaldsway airport in the Isle of Man to Fairoaks airport near Chobham , Surrey in the UK.

“Shortly before landing, a loud noise was heard and it was necessary to make an emergency landing in a field close to Fairoaks airport.

“The highly experienced pilot endured a broken arm while his co-pilot suffered a minor abrasion.

“Both were treated at St Peter’s Hospital at Chertsey.

“Dr. Taylor would like to thank the South East Coast Ambulance Service (SECAmb), Surrey Police and Surrey Fire and Rescue for their support and assistance.

“The cause of the accident is unknown and will be examined by the Air Accident Investigations Branch.”

South East Coast Ambulance Service (SECAmb) sent one paramedic car and three ambulances to the scene after 8.30am.

Firefighters from Chertsey and Woking , and a water carrier from Camberley were dispatched, as well as Surrey Police officers.

The Surrey Fire and Rescue environmental protection unit was deployed from Dorking , in case of fuel spillage.

Dr. Taylor studied natural sciences at Corpus Christi College at Cambridge University and returned to live on the Isle of Man around 40 years ago after running an engineering and manufacturing company called Otter Controls in Buxton, Derbyshire.

One of his most famous inventions is the thermostat controls for the cordless kettle.

Dr. Taylor founded Strix, which holds four Queen’s Awards for the 360-degrees cordless kettle connector, and he set up a clock development company, Fromanteel Ltd, which is named after the Fromanteel family of clockmakers of 17th-century London.

In 2011 Dr Taylor was appointed an OBE in the New Year’s Honors list for services to business and horology.


Source:  http://www.getsurrey.co.uk









A plane has crash landed in a field next to Fairoaks Airport narrowly missing some large trees.

Two people were on board the private plane when came down in the field next to the Chobham airport, at 8.35am on Saturday (October 15).

Firefighters from Chertsey and Woking , and a water carrier from Camberley were sent to the scene, as well as Surrey Police officers and paramedics.

The Surrey Fire & Rescue environmental protection unit was also deployed from Dorking, in case of fuel spillage.

One of the fire officers in charge of the incident, Graham Whitfield from Woking Fire Station said the pilot and co-pilot on board were "lucky" to have narrowly missed three established oak trees in the field.

“We were told a plane had crash landed at Fairoaks and the pilot was injured," he said. "It came through from the police. There was no sign of fire but they were concerned about a fuel spillage.

“We were expecting it to have run off the end of the runway but it had crashed into a farmer's field about 100 yards from the end of the runway.

"It was coming into land to pick up a customer. There were two personnel on board- the pilot and the co-pilot.”

He said it was a brand new six person private plane.

“We had to make the scene safe," said crew commander Whitfield. "When we arrived the on site fire crews from Fairoaks were very good. They had turned up in a response vehicle and put a layer of foam down. We cooled off the engine.”

“They were very lucky,” added the crew manager. "It could have been a whole different story as they landed 50 yards from three oak trees."

It is believed the pilot sustained injuries to his wrist.

Source:   http://www.getsurrey.co.uk

Delta Air Lines Airbus A330-223, N855NW: Incident occurred October 26, 2016 in Seattle, Washington

DELTA AIR LINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N855NW

NTSB Identification: ENG17IA003
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of DELTA AIR LINES INC
Incident occurred Wednesday, October 26, 2016 in Seattle, WA
Aircraft: AIRBUS A330 223, registration: N855NW
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On October 26, 2016, at about 1550 Pacific daylight time (PDT), a Delta Air Lines Airbus A330-223, N855NW, equipped with two Pratt & Whitney (P&W) PW4168A-1D turbofan engines experienced a No. 1 (left) engine fire during initial climb from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) - Seattle, Washington. The crew declared an emergency, discharged both fire bottles, and returned to SEA for an uneventful single engine landing. The electronic centralized aircraft monitor (ECAM) system fire indication warning remained illuminated on the cockpit display after the fire bottles were discharged. Airport rescue and firefighting (ARFF) crews met the airplane on the runway and did not observe any fire or smoke coming from the engine or airplane. Water was sprayed on the landing gear as a precautionary measure. A visual examination of the No. 1 engine was conducted at SEA and the outboard side of the engine and thrust reverser cowl were thermally damaged and discolored. There were no reported injuries to the passengers or crew. The flight was a regularly scheduled flight from SEA to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) - Chep Lap Kok, Hong Kong and was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121.

Beechcraft Sierra 35: Accident occurred October 22, 2016 near Medicine Hat Regional Airport, Alberta, Canada



A small plane crash landed in a cemetery in Medicine Hat, Alta. Saturday night.

Sgt. Jeff Wieschorster of the Medicine Hat Police Service said the pilot — a 64-year-old local man — suffered serious, but non life-threatening injuries.

He was the only person on board the single engine Beechcraft Sierra 35.

Sgt. Wieschorster said the Medicine Hat control tower received a Mayday call from the plane around 8 p.m., just before it went down in the Hillside Cemetery, about one kilometre short of the airport.

There was no word late Saturday night about the exact nature of the distress call, however, Transportation Safety Board investigator John Lee said he planned to talk to the pilot on Sunday to try to determine exactly what happened.

The cemetery, meantime, sustained only minor property damage.



MEDICINE HAT, Alta. — A small plane crash landed in a cemetery in Medicine Hat, Alta. Saturday night. 

Sgt. Jeff Wieschorster of the Medicine Hat Police Service said the pilot — a 64-year-old local man — suffered serious, but non life-threatening injuries.

He was the only person on board the single-engine Beechcraft Sierra 35.

Sgt. Wieschorster said the Medicine Hat control tower received a Mayday call from the plane around 8 p.m., just before it went down in the Hillside Cemetery, about one kilometre short of the airport.

There was no word late Saturday night about the exact nature of the distress call, however, Transportation Safety Board investigator John Lee said he planned to talk to the pilot on Sunday to try to determine exactly what happened.

The cemetery, meantime, sustained only minor property damage.



A single-engine plane crashed into Hillside Cemetery Saturday evening, roughly a kilometre away from Medicine Hat Regional Airport.

Medicine Hat Fire Department platoon chief Tom Coffey said emergency crews responded to the call just before 8 p.m. 

The pilot and lone occupant of the plane was rushed to hospital, though there were no further details on the pilot’s condition.

While the plane went down inside the cemetery, Coffey says there was little-to-no damage to gravesites.

“As far as damage goes to the Hillside Cemetery, there have just been a few trees that have been damaged and that’s about the extent of it,” said Coffey.

Source:   http://medicinehatnews.com