Saturday, June 11, 2016

South Carolina Air National Guard Resumes Flight Operations

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com



Columbia, SC (WLTX) – The   South Carolina Air National Guard resumed flight operations today, less than a week after the aircraft incident in Louisville, Ga., Tuesday night. Flying was temporarily halted after two F-16s crashed while on a routine night-time training mission.

The 169th Fighter Wing, here at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, is preparing for an upcoming deployment to the Pacific Air Forces area of responsibility, and the Swamp Fox pilots and maintenance crews will resume training for the deployment.

“Over the last few days we have been focused on aircraft recovery, reviewing our processes and preparing assessments, and we are ready to get back to the business of training for combat,” said Col. Nicholas Gentile, 169th Fighter Wing commander.

Gentile added the Aerospace Control Alert unit based at McEntire, providing around-the-clock fighter aircraft capable of responding to threats along the eastern coast of the United States, remains fully operational.

“We have continued our vigilant watch in defense of the nation,” Gentile said.

The aircraft crash Tuesday night is the first loss of a Swamp Fox jet in more than 30 years. The fighter wing had more than 170,000 accident-free flying hours.

An U.S. Air Force Safety Investigation Board, made up of experienced Air Force aviation and safety experts, is convening to determine the cause.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wltx.com

Tecnam P2002 Sierra, N323TC: Accident occurred June 09, 2016 near Marshall County Airport (KMPG), Moundsville, West Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N323TC 


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA300
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 09, 2016 in Moundsville, WV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE TECNA P2002 SIERRA, registration: N323TC
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that as the airplane entered the landing flare, a crosswind gust "picked up the right wing." He further reported that he applied full power to go-around, and the airplane drifted to the left. Subsequently, the airplane struck trees next to the runway, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage, firewall, and both wings.

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The nearest automated weather observing station, which was 18 nautical miles north of the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind at 320 degrees true at 10 knots gusting to 16 knots. The pilot reported that he landed on a runway with a 240 degrees magnetic heading.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the go-around in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a collision with trees.


 
MARSHALL COUNTY, Ohio — A single-engine plane crashed in Marshall County near the airport around 1 p.m. on Thursday.

Marshall County Sheriff Kevin Cecil said the pilot was headed from Michigan to Virginia and tried to stop to refuel, but a burst of wind caused him to crash just off the runway near a hill.

Marshall Co. Sheriff Kevin Cecil said he is unsure what caused the crash, but one man has suffered minor injuries.

"He was actually approaching, getting ready to land and a gust of wind came through and threw him off the runway, off course and down into a small ravine," Cecil said.

The pilot, who was alone in the plane, suffered minor injuries and refused aid.

The sheriff says the pilot does not own the plane. It was being delivered, he believes, to a new buyer when the crash occurred.

The crash is under investigation, but right now the pilot has not been cited.

The airport is located on Roberts Ridge off Kull Lane.

Story and video: http://wtov9.com







MARSHALL COUNTY, W.Va. -

Officials in Marshall County say a small plane crashed around 1:00 p.m. Thursday.

Marshall County EMA Director Tom Hart says the pilot was flying from Michigan to Virginia and was planning to stop and fuel the plane.

According to Marshall County Sheriff Kevin Cecil, the pilot tried to land at the Marshall County airport on Robert's Ridge when a wind gust lifted the plane and caused it to land in a small ravine.

The pilot suffered injuries but refused treatment.

Officials say the light duty, small single pilot plane was a total loss.

Officials are continuing the investigation.

Van's RV-10, Sierra Papa Delta LLC, N255CP: Incident occurred June 11, 2016 in Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

SIERRA PAPA DELTA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N255CP



UNION COUNTY -- A plane involved in the Big Muddy Air Race was able to land on IL Rt. 146 after some engine troubles.

According to Sam Hoskins, the race organizer, the pilot was not hurt in the emergency landing. Hoskins identified the pilot as Pete Polete.

He added that they were able to get the plane off of the road and into a driveway to allow traffic to get back to normal.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsiltv.com

Mooney M20E Super 21, N7830V: Fatal accident occurred June 11, 2016 at Collegedale Municipal Airport (KFGU), Hamilton County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7830V

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Nashville FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA208
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in Collegedale, TN
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E, registration: N7830V
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2016, about 1245 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20E, N7830V, owned and operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while maneuvering after a go-around at the Collegedale Municipal Airport (FGU), Collegedale, Tennessee. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. One passenger was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to initial information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight originated from the North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida, and landed at the Harris County Airport, Pine Mountain (PIM), Georgia, before continuing to FGU.

A flight instructor reported that he was conducting a flight with a student pilot and was on approach runway 21 at FGU, when he witnessed the accident airplane on short final approach to runway 3. The flight instructor contacted the airport via Unicom and confirmed that the landing runway was runway 21. In addition, he did not hear any communications from the accident airplane. Shortly thereafter, he observed the accident airplane in a climbing left turn, near the departure end of runway 3, approximately 80 to 100 feet above the ground. The airplane then made a steep 45 to 60 degree bank to the right, with a nose high attitude. As it progressed through the turn, the airplane's nose dropped and it began a slow 270 degree rotation at a high decent rate.

The airplane impacted ground and came to rest upright on a grass area adjacent to the east side of runway 3, about 1,000 feet prior to the approach end of runway 21. A 70 foot-long ground scar, oriented about a magnetic heading of about 200 degrees preceded the main wreckage, which was resting on a magnetic heading of about 50 degrees.

All major portions of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The landing gear was in the retracted position and the fuel selector was positioned to the left wing fuel tank. The right wing separated near its wing root. It was also compressed aft, bent upward, and twisted at the outboard end. The right fuel tank was compromised and no fuel was observed in the right fuel tank. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The underside of the left wing was compressed upward along the entire leading edge. An undermined amount of fuel was observed leaking from the left wing fuel tank, and approximately 15 gallons of fuel was recovered from the tank. The aft 5 feet of the fuselage prior to the empennage was deformed. The airplane's flight controls were actuated by push-pull tubes. All primary flight controls remained connected at their respective attached points. Initial examination of the engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand via the three-bladed propeller assembly; which remained attached and displayed evidence consistent with rotation on two of the three blades. Valve train continuity was observed and thumb compressions were obtained on all cylinders. The oil suction and fuel servo inlet screens were absent of contamination.

A portable global positioning system receiver was recovered from the accident site and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for download.

According to FAA records, the pilot purchased the airplane on February 13, 2015. In addition, he reported 550 hours of total flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA third-class medical certificate, which was issued on January 26, 2015.


The recorded weather at an airport located approximately 9 miles west of the accident site, at 1253, included calm wind, visibility 10 statute miles, and temperature 33 degrees Celsius (91 degrees Fahrenheit).
  
Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





The pilot of an aircraft that crashed at the Collegedale airport has succumbed to his injuries, according to a statement released by his company.

"Tragically, Todd passed away suddenly on June 12, 2016 following a plane crash. His funeral will be held on Thursday, June 16, 2016, at the Collegedale Church, located at 4829 College Drive E, Collegedale, TN, 37315. This will be live streamed online and the link will be available closer to the time."

Investigators are looking into the crash of the 1964 Mooney M20E on Saturday that has now claimed the lives of three passengers, including Suzanne Silver and her juvenile grandson, according to Collegedale police.

After the crash, Todd Silver and his daughter were airlifted to Erlanger hospital for treatment.


The exact cause of the crash is still unknown, but a preliminary report will be released by the National Transportation Safety Board within the next week.






The pilot of a small plane that crashed at the Collegedale Airport on Saturday has died from his injuries.

Family members said Todd Silver passed away on Sunday.

His mother, Suzanne Silver, died in the crash along with the pilot's young son, Gerhard Silver.

His daughter was also airlifted after the crash.

The family, from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., was in Collegedale for a family gathering.


The funeral for Suzanne Silver, Todd Silver and Gerhard Silver will be Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at the Collegedale Church at 4829 College Dr. 


COLLEGEDALE, TN (WRCB) -

Aviation officials spent the early part of Sunday surveying what's left of the single-engine plane that crashed Saturday at the Collegedale Airport. They hope the wreckage will help determine what caused the Mooney M20E Super 21 to go down.

“They are going to look at how it impacted, they are going to look at what the propeller blades looked like. Was there an indication of the power on these blades when they hit,” said Dan Barks.

Collegedale police now say two of the four people on board were killed. The pilot, Todd Silver from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, survived and is in critical condition at a local hospital. 

“It is very, very sad, my family sends out condolences and prayers to all the families involved in this crash,” said Bob Etheridge, a witness to the crash.

FAA records shows Silver purchased the aircraft last spring. Not only does he enjoy flying planes, he also enjoys working on them. He's the owner of Todd’s Canopies. It is a business that designs and fits different kinds of aircrafts with canopies.

On his public Facebook page, he recently posted pictures of a trip to Key West in the same plane that crashed in Collegedale.

”Unfortunate, you're thinking of the families that are waiting for loved ones to come home and may not see them tonight. That’s the price of these crashes,” said Barks.

Eyewitnesses say they saw Silver struggling to reach altitude and could quickly tell something was wrong. Bob Etheridge believes the plane may have been returning to the airport immediately following take off due to some kind of issue.

“Circling rather quickly maybe the pilot was trying to come back. Unfortunate he didn't make it,” said the Etheridge.

As officials comb through the wreckage for answers, news of this deadly accident is still sinking in.

“Tragic, it's sad, it's tragic. You can feel it. It's terrible.. it's terrible,” said one neighbor.

Silver was flying with his mother, Suzanne Silver, and his two children, a boy and girl when the crash happened.

Silver's mother and son were pronounced dead on the scene.

Silver and his daughter were flown to a local hospital where they were listed in critical condition as of Saturday. 


Story and video:  http://www.wrcbtv.com




On Saturday, around 12:50 p.m., Collegedale Police along with Tri-Community Fire Department, the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, Hamilton County Emergency Management, Hamilton County Rescue, and Hamilton County EMS, responded to a plane crash at the Collegedale Airport.

The plane was a Mooney M20E Super 21, bearing the tail number N7830V. The aircraft was registered to the pilot, Todd Silver, of Ft. Lauderdale. The pilot was traveling with his mother, Suzanne Silver, and his two children. Ms. Silver and a male child were pronounced deceased on the scene. Mr. Silver and his daughter were air-lifted by Life Force and UT Lifestar 5 to Erlanger Hospital.

The crash is being investigated by the Collegedale Police Department, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board.

A nearby resident said the plane took off and then took a hard right as if trying to get back to the runway. 

The plane crashed just off the end of the runway.  

Residents of nearby Apison told of seeing a plane flying unusually low just before the crash.

Flights at the Collegedale Airport were canceled for the rest of the day.

Original article can be found here: http://www.chattanoogan.com



A Fort Lauderdale man was flying the Mooney M20E Super 21 aircraft that crashed Saturday at the Collegedale Municipal Airport killing his mother and his son.

Todd Silver, the pilot, and his daughter survived the crash and were airlifted to Erlanger hospital, according to Tonya Sadler with the Collegedale Police Department. 

Their conditions were not immediately available this afternoon.

Responders at the scene Saturday said Silver apparently was trying to land the craft when it crashed beside the tarmac at 12:50 p.m. 

The accident is under investigation by the Collegedale Police Department, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.timesfreepress.com



COLLEGEDALE, Tenn. (AP) — Authorities have released the name of a pilot and his mother involved in a small plane crash in Tennessee.

Collegedale police spokeswoman Tonya Sadler says the single-engine plane crashed Saturday as it was coming in to the Collegedale airport. Collegedale is about 20 miles east of Chattanooga.

Sadler said Sunday in a news release that the plane was registered to the pilot, Todd Silver, out of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The release says Silver was traveling with his mother, Suzanne Silver, and his two children.

Sadler says Suzanne Silver and a male child were pronounced dead at the scene. Todd Silver and his daughter were taken to a Chattanooga hospital. Their conditions Sunday weren’t immediately known. The children’s names weren’t released.



Hamilton County officials say a plane crashed in Collegedale on Saturday afternoon.

It happened shortly before 1:00 p.m. at the Collegedale Airport.

According to the Graysville Fire Department, two people were killed and two more are in critical condition in Erlanger Hospital.

Collegedale police say the single-engine plane was landing when it crashed just off the runway. 

With few answers, neighbors near the airport are turning to prayer.

"It's sad, it's tragic. And you can feel it. It's terrible," said Vounett Sanders, who lives just near the runway. "We hear planes take off all the time. Didn't really pay any attention. Heard a plane take off and it just.. immediately, you hear a loud crash, like maybe something ran into a tree, or a loud car back fired."

Sanders said she then saw two helicopters taking off from Erlanger Hospital.

"This thing went into a left bank and was probably 300 feet off the ground," he said. "It did probably 270 degrees and was still just barely above the trees when it started coming back toward my property. It looked like the guy tried to straighten it up and then he lost power, stalled and went into the ground nose first."

"It's like it just fell out of the sky," said the eyewitness, who stayed on scene until first responders arrived.

The airport remains closed, following the crash. It is expected to stay closed until a full investigation into what caused the crash can be completed. 

Story and video:  http://www.wbir.com




Collegedale, TN — The pilot in the deadly plane crash in Collegedale Saturday has died.

According to a statement from family members, Todd Silver passed away June 12th.

Three other people were in the plane at the time of the crash. 

Todd's mother, Suzanne Silver and a male child were pronounced dead at the scene.

His daughter was airlifted to Erlanger hospital.

The crash is being investigated by the Collegedale Police Department, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Silver's were in Collegedale because they were in for a family gathering.

Suzanne Silver, Todd Silver and Gerhard Silver funeral will be held on Thursday, June 16, at the Collegedale Church, at 4829 College Drive, in Collegedale. 

Memorial service for the victims of the Collegedale plane crash June 11, 2016 will be held June 16, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. at the Collegedale Church Sanctuary.



HAMILTON COUNTY, TN (WRCB) -

Dan Barks was getting ready to land at Collegedale Airport Saturday afternoon when he was told to divert to Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport.

“When you hear something like that in this business you know it's because of a crash. your first thought is I hope no one was injured, your second thought is I hope no one was killed,” said Barks, Aviation Attorney.

Airport officials say shortly before 1 PM this single engine airplane carrying four people attempted to land when it crashed.

Two people died at the airport. The other two were flown to Erlanger.

“We were able to land in Chattanooga and we were given a car to come back here and tidy some things up and pick up some gear, and that's when we saw what had happened,” said Barks.

Barks who works as an aviation attorney says unfortunately he's investigated hundreds of plane crashes throughout his career.

“Immediately you are thinking of the families who are waiting for loved one's to come home and may not see them come home. That’s unfortunate the price of these crashes,” said Barks.

Barks says whenever there is a plane crash the FAA steps in to investigate. He says they will take statements, pictures, and pick up the wreckage.

“So the FAA is going to come, they are going to look at how it impacted, they are going to look at what the propeller blades looked like,” said barks.

Barks says looking at the debris he can only speculate about what happened.

“It looked like it was a very flat impact, meaning not an impact where one might think of an airplane where it crashes nose down. This appeared to be very flat,” said Barks.

According to the FAA registry, the plane was registered to a pilot out of Ft. Lauderdale, FL. Officials have not confirmed the names of the four people who were on board when the plane crashed, but Barks says he will be keeping them in his thoughts.

“I cannot imagine. This is all I’ve done, dealing with families who lost everything and they lose it in an instant,” said Barks.

The NTSB will be at the Collegedale Airport Sunday doing their investigation.

Story and video:   http://www.wrcbtv.com



COLLEGEDALE, TN (WRCB) -

UPDATE: Airport officials say the single engine plane was landing in the airport when it crashed. They're hoping the FAA can answer many of their unanswered questions.

“Circling rather quickly maybe the pilot was trying to come back. Unfortunate he didn't make it,” said Bob Etheridge. It is a sight he will never forgot, a plane crashing right in front of his eyes. “It didn't gain a lot of altitude, like about 300 feet. Then it started into a hard left bank which was unusual.”

He lives right behind the Collegedale Municipal Airport. He was near the tarmac when the plane took off. He knew something wasn't right. “Bank to the left, bank to the right. And then unfortunately the plane went right into the ground.”

He immediately sprang into action hoping to help the four people on board. “I jumped out of the car and grabbed my phone and went to see if anyone got out of the plane and dialed 911.”

As we wait to learn the cause of the crash, Etheridge says the victims and their families are his number one concern. “It is very very sad, my family sends out condolences and prayers to all the families involved in this crash.”

The airport will remain closed until the FAA completes their investigation.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.wrcbtv.com



Two people are dead and two others injured after a single-engine plane crashed near the Collegedale Municipal Airport early Saturday afternoon.

Responders worked quickly to remove two severely injured people and two bodies from the crumpled husk of a single-engine plane that crashed while trying to land. The front half of the plane was obliterated by the impact, and as responders treated the occupants, they stepped over the twisted remnants of the cockpit and wings.

Investigators held up white sheets to shield the grisly scene from spectators.

The two survivors, one critically injured, were airlifted by UT Lifestar 5 and Life Force to the Erlanger trauma unit. Nothing was released about the identities of the people in the plane or the extent of the survivors' injuries.

Tonya Sadler, a public information officer for the Collegedale Police Department, described the plane as "transient" and said the crash occurred at approximately 12:50 p.m.

The Collegedale airport does not record radio traffic between the tower and pilots, but archived recordings with the Chattanooga tower just after the crash shed some light on the immediate aftermath.

Minutes after the crash, an unidentified pilot radioed the tower and said calmly, "We have something to tell you. There was an accident in Collegedale, just letting you know. It's closed."

The controller radioed back, "Is the aircraft on the runway?"

"It's just off the runway, but it's a bad accident."

"Did it look like there was emergency response en route or at the airport?"

"There were a lot of emergency vehicles on the runway, yes."

On the ground, squad cars, ambulances and firetrucks littered the runway, lights flashing. Collegedale police officers helped airport staff shut down the entire runway for several hours in anticipation of a required investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Employees at the airport declined to comment on the crash, which isn't the first fatal accident near there.

In the most recent crash, in September 2014, Don Edens was killed after his plane crashed in a nearby field as a result of equipment failure.

Alone in the craft and just moments before impact, Edens radioed air traffic control in Chattanooga and said, "I've got oil all over my windshield and am going to need some help for line-up."

After being redirected from the Chattanooga runway to Collegedale, he said,"Looks like we're not going to make it."

Original article can be found here:   http://www.timesfreepress.com







COLLEGEDALE, TN (WRCB) - A plane crashed in Collegedale on Saturday shortly before 1 p.m. and claimed two lives. 

It happened at the Collegedale Municipal Airport after a Mooney M20E took off from the runway, according to the FAA.

Graysville Fire Department asking for prayers after Collegedale plane crash with 2 reported fatalities.

Channel 3 spoke to an eyewitness who told Channel 3 he called 911 when he saw the plane go down shortly after taking off.

"This thing went into a left bank and was probably 300 feet off the ground," he told Channel 3.

"It did probably 270 degrees and was still just barely above the trees when it started coming back toward my property. It looked like the guy tried to straighten it up and then he lost power, stalled and went into the ground nose first," he described.

"It's like it just fell out of the sky," said the eyewitness, who stayed on scene until first responders arrived. 

Officials confirm two people were killed in the crash that also left two others injured.

A spokesperson for Erlanger Medical Center tells Channel 3 the two injured passengers were airlifted to their Chattanooga facility.

According to the FAA registry, the plane is registered to a pilot out of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; however, authorities have not confirmed who was on the plane at the time of the crash.

Story and video:   http://www.wrcbtv.com



COLLEGEDALE, Tenn. — Two people have died and two others suffered injuries after a plane crash at the Collegedale Airport Saturday afternoon. 

Collegedale Police tell NewsChannel 9 the plane crashed while trying to land at the airport. Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are on the way to the scene.

A helicopter rushed the two survivors to the hospital shortly after the crash. Collegedale Police say at least one of them was critically injured, and underwent surgery. NewsChannel 9 is working to get an update on the conditions of both survivors.

Later in the afternoon, the airport closed, cancelling all remaining arrivals & departures for the day.

Investigators describe the plane that went down as single engine transient plane.

The accident happened at 12:50 p.m., under a partly cloudy sky, near the Collegedale Municipal Airport. The exact address given by dispatchers was 5100 Bess More Road (the airport's main address).

NewsChannel 9 reporter Alana Laflore describes the crash site as about two miles northeast of the airport's main entrance.

As the drama unfolded other local EMS departments helped spread the word of what was happening.


Original article can be found here: http://newschannel9.com








Two people were killed and two others taken to a hospital after the crash of a small, single engine plane at Collegedale Saturday afternoon. 

Two people were air-transported by UT Lifestar 5 and Life Force to the Erlanger Trauma Unit.

A nearby resident said the plane took off and then took a hard right as if trying to get back to the runway. 

The plane crashed just off the end of the runway.  


Original article can be found here: http://www.chattanoogan.com









Two people were killed and two others airlifted to a hospital after a single engine plane crashed Saturday afternoon. 


A plane crashed near the Collegedale airport early Saturday afternoon, a dispatcher with the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office confirmed to the Times Free Press. 

Multiple agencies responded to the 4600 block of McDonald Road, east of the airport, shortly before 1 p.m.

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N82694; accident occurred June 11, 2016 in East St. Louis, Illinois -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N82694

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA W. Chicago-DuPage (NON Part 121) 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA218 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 06, 2016 in East St. Louis, IL
Aircraft: AERONCA 7AC, registration: N82694
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2016, about 1200 central daylight time (CDT), a Aeronca 7AC, N82694, experienced a complete loss of engine power and made an emergency landing on a closed section of newly constructed highway in East St. Louis, Illinois. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the tail section and wing struts during impact with a construction barricade. The commercial, airline transport-rated pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was privately registered and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed.





Brooklyn Fire Department was responding to an “aircraft incident” midday Saturday at Illinois 3 and Interstate 70, according to St. Clair County Emergency Management Agency.

A small plane went down, but there were no injuries, according to the EMA.

Two people were aboard the small plane and got out uninjured, according to the Illinois State Police. ISP received the call at noon.

State Police, at the request of the Federal Aviation Administration, closed Illinois 3 near the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge.

Original article can be found here: http://www.bnd.com

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N9297J: Accident occurred June 10, 2016 near Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport (KJGG), James City County, Virginia

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  - Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  - Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9297J

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA211
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 10, 2016 in Williamsburg, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28, registration: N9297J
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the approach to land the airplane was left of the extended runway centerline on short final approach, and he decided to go-around. When he added engine power, the airplane veered to the left, pitched up, and stalled. The airplane impacted the ground and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, and the empennage. The pilot added that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during a go-around which led to the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and experiencing aerodynamic stall.



JAMES CITY COUNTY, Va (WAVY)-  James City County Fire Chief Ryan Ashe tells WAVY.com that fire units were dispatched to a small plane crash near the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport area Saturday morning around 9:40 a.m.

The crash occurred approximately 100 yards south of the Williamsburg- Jamestown Airport landing strip in a densely wooded area. The plane had been occupied by two people, the pilot and one passenger. The passenger was able to exit the plane and call 911.

Fire personnel arrived on scene at 9:46 a.m. to find a bystander directing them to the site of the plane crash, a single engine plane. The plane was upside down and leaking fuel with the pilot trapped inside. James City County Fire personnel extricated the pilot from the wreckage and initiated medical treatment. The pilot was flown via medical helicopter to Riverside Regional Hospital and the passenger was transported by ambulance to Riverside Regional Hospital.

The Virginia State Police and the Federal Aviation Administration are conducting the crash investigation. A representative from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management responded to the crash site to assist with the fuel leak. The Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport runway remains closed.

Original article can be found here:  http://wavy.com



Two people were injured when a private plane crashed while trying to land at the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport on Saturday morning, officials say.

The pair were flying a Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee into Williamsburg from Ocean City, Md. when the plane crashed about 100 yards away from the airport's landing strip, said Nikolas B. Kubli, an aviation safety inspector for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The passenger of the airplane escaped the plane, which was upside down and leaking fuel, and called 911 around 9:40 a.m. The pilot, a man, was trapped inside the plane when James City County fire officials arrived on the scene at 9:46 a.m., the release states.

Both people were injured. The pilot was taken to Riverside Regional Hospital in a helicopter, while the passenger was driven there in an ambulance, according to the release. The pilot is licensed to fly private, single-engine planes. He is expected to survive his injuries, Kubli said. The Virginia Department of Emergency Management responded to the crash to help with the fuel leak. The agency was not available for comment at the time of publication. The airport is open for business. 2:40 p.m. update:

Two people were injured when an airplane crashed Saturday morning near the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport, officials say.

The crash occurred in a wooded area about 100 yards south of the airport's landing strip around 9:40 a.m., according to a James City County news release.

The passenger of the airplane escaped the plane, which was upside down and leaking fuel, and called 911. The pilot was trapped inside the plane when James City County fire officials arrived on the scene at 9:46 a.m., the release states.

Both people were injured. The pilot was taken to Riverside Regional Hospital in a helicopter, while the passenger was driven there in an ambulance, according to the release.

The Virginia State Police and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash, and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management responded to the scene to help clean the fuel leak.

The Virginia State Police were not available to comment at the time of publication.

After being closed due to the crash, the airport re-opened Saturday afternoon. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.vagazette.com




WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) - Two people have been injured after a small plane crash near Williamsburg.

The James City County Fire Department said units were sent Saturday morning to the crash site about 100 yards south of the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport.

The single-engine plane was upside down, leaking fuel. While the passenger was able to get out of the plane and call 911, the pilot was trapped. Fire personnel extricated the pilot from the wreckage and initiated medical treatment.

The pilot was flown by helicopter to Riverside Regional Hospital, where the passenger was taken by ambulance.

The Virginia State Police and the Federal Aviation Administration are conducting the crash investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbc12.com

JAMES CITY COUNTY  --   Two people are injured in a plane crash Saturday morning near the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport landing strip in a densely wooded area, according to the James City County Fire Department. 

The fire department arrived at the site of the crash 100 yards south of the airport to find a single-engine plane upside down and leaking fuel with one person trapped inside, according to a press release.

The plane was occupied by the pilot and a passenger, who were both injured. The passenger was able to get out of the plane and call 911, but the pilot was trapped, according to the release.

Emergency responders were able to get the pilot out of the wreckage and give medical attention. The pilot was flown on a medical helicopter to Riverside Regional Hospital and the passenger was transported by ambulance. 

Virginia State Police and the Federal Aviation Administration are conducting a crash investigation and a representative from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management is assisting with the fuel leak. The Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport runway is closed. 

The names of the pilot and the passenger have not been released. 

Original article can be found here:   http://pilotonline.com

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (WVEC) -- Two people ​were injured in a small plane crash in the area of the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport, Saturday morning.

Officials in James City County say the crash took place at 9:40 a.m., about 100 yards south of the airport landing strip, near a densely wooded area.

Fire crews arrived at 9:46 a.m. to find a bystander who directed them to the site of the crash where they found a single-engine plane upside down, leaking fuel; with one person trapped inside.

The plane had two people inside, the pilot and one passenger. Both suffered injuries. The passenger was able to exit the plane and call 911, but the pilot remained trapped inside.

Fire personnel got the pilot out of the plane and started medical treatment. The pilot was taken by helicopter to Riverside Regional Medical Center.

The passenger was taken by ambulance.

Virginia State Police, as well as the Federal Aviation Administration, are investigating the crash.

A representative from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management responded to the crash site to assist with the fuel leak.

Officials say the Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport runway remains closed.

Bellanca 17-30 Viking , N7346V: Accident occurred June 11, 2016 near Westport Airport (4F1), Pawnee County, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N7346V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in Westport, OK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17 30, registration: N7346V
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2016, about 0915 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-30 airplane, N7346V, made a forced landing after a loss of engine power in flight near Westport, Oklahoma. The private rated pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Westport Airport (4F1), Westport, Oklahoma, about 0910 and was en route to William R Pogue Municipal Airport (OWP), Sand Springs, Oklahoma.

The pilot reported that he intended to top off the fuel tanks at OWP, about 10 miles east of 4F1, and then proceed to another airport. After departure he made a turn to east then northeast over Keystone Lake. He had just adjusted the engine control for cruise flight when he noticed a loss of engine power. He initiated emergency procedures by switching from the right main fuel tank to left main fuel tank and then turned on the fuel boost pump. The pilot reported that at this point the engine "sounded like it was trying to make power but, wasn't enough to maintain altitude". During the forced landing the airplane contacted trees and then impacted an open field. The airplane came to rest upright and sustained damage to the engine mounts, both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage. 

Immediately after the accident the pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that the fuel in the tanks on the day of the accident was remaining from a previous cross country flight in March of 2016 and the accident flight was the first flight since then. He sumped all four fuel tanks prior to departure and no contamination was found. He used a homemade, calibrated fuel measuring stick to measure three of fuel tanks. There were 4 gallons in the right outboard tank, 19 gallons in the right main tank, 12 gallons in the left outboard tank, and the left main tank half full, but was not measured using the stick. He departed 4F1 with the fuel selector on the right inboard tank.

Another FAA inspector and an airplane mechanic conducted a postaccident examination of the airplane, which revealed the right main tank was about ¾ full, the right outboard auxiliary tank, left main tank, and left outboard auxiliary tank were almost empty. An examination of the engine revealed that the crankshaft rotated smoothly when the propeller was turned by hand and compression was noted in each cylinder. The engine oil sump was dented, but not breached and contained clean oil on the dip stick. No issues were noted with magneto timing, spark plugs, or engine driven fuel pump. No fuel was present in the line from the fuel manifold to the metering unit or to the engine driven fuel pump. The main fuel line to the fuel pump was pulled from firewall during the accident. The main fuel strainer was empty. The drain valve was found open and exhibited impact signatures. The fuel selector was found on the left main fuel tank. In order to test the fuel system the drain valve was closed, the fuel selector switched to the right main tank, and the boost pump was successfully tested on both high and low settings. After priming the fuel flowed freely from the main fuel line. Other than the absence of fuel, no anomalies were noted with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA217

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 11, 2016 in Westport, OK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17 30, registration: N7346V
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 11, 2016, about 0915 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-30 airplane, N7346V, made a forced landing after a loss of engine power in flight near Westport, Oklahoma. The private rated pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Westport Airport (4F1), Westport, Oklahoma, about 0910 and was en route to William R Pogue Municipal Airport (OWP), Sand Springs, Oklahoma. 

The pilot reported that he intended to top off the fuel tanks at OWP and then proceed to another airport. After departure he made a turn to east then northeast over Keystone Lake. He had just adjusted the engine control for cruise flight when he noticed a loss of engine power. He initiated emergency procedures by switching from right main fuel tank to left main fuel tank and then turned on the fuel boost pump. The pilot reported that at this point the engine "sounded like it was trying to make power but, wasn't enough to maintain altitude". During the forced landing the airplane impacted a tree line and then an open field. The airplane came to rest upright and sustained damage to the engine mounts, both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the wreckage and reported that fuel was found in three of the four fuel tanks; the right outboard tank appeared to be empty. 

The airplane has been retained for further examination.




WESTPORT, Okla. -- Oklahoma Highway Patrol says two people were injured in a small plane crash near Keystone Lake Saturday morning.

The crash happened around 9:30 a.m. Saturday after Troopers say the plane experienced mechanical failures.

OHP says firefighters from the Peninsula Fire Department responded and treated two occupants of the small plane.

The current conditions of the occupants is unknown at this time.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.kjrh.com



WESTPORT, Okla. (KTUL) - A small plane crashed near Keystone Lake Saturday morning, according to OHP Troopers.

They said one person was in the plane when it went down north of Highway 412 and Old Keystone Rd.

Officials said the pilot was walking around after he was checked out by EMSA. He was taken to the hospital with head injuries.

The FAA will look into the cause of the crash and will release information when they get more details.

Original article can be found here: http://ktul.com




KEYSTONE LAKE, Okla. —   Fire officials confirmed that a plane crashed near Keystone Lake Saturday.

Officials with Westport Fire said the plane down was down near Leroy Road and the Keystone Exit of Highway 412.

Officials said the pilot was taking of from the Westport Airport when he found he had some minor mechanical issues.

He made an emergency landing in the area.

He was taken to a Tulsa hospital for minor head injuries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fox23.com