Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, N134P: Accident occurred August 20, 2019 near Half Moon Bay Airport (KHAF), San Mateo County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N134P

Location: Half Moon Bay, CA
Accident Number: WPR19LA238
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 1754 PDT
Registration: N134P
Aircraft: Beech 36
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 20, 2019, at 1754 Pacific daylight time, Beech A36 airplane, N134P, descended into the Pacific Ocean about 7 nautical miles (nm) southwest of Half Moon Bay, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured; the airplane sank and was destroyed. The airplane was registered to the pilot who operated it as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight which departed from Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County (RHV) San Jose, California at 1722.

About 1520, the day before the accident, the pilot added 66 gallons of fuel at North Las Vegas Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Thereafter, he flew to RHV and landed, and then continued to Hayward Executive Airport, Hayward, California (HWD). He estimated that the flight was about 2-2.5 hours and recalled having to use the electric boost pump (on the "LO" setting) during the climb out of RHV which he attributed to needing because of the hot outside air temperatures. After landing at HWD about 2030, he refueled the airplane, filling the main fuel tanks by adding 20 gallons (the tip tanks were empty).

The morning of the accident the pilot performed a preflight inspection of the airplane. During the preflight he recalled sumping both the left and right fuel tanks (could not remember if he used the sump in the nose). He had to sump each tank 4 to 5 times before the fuel was clear from "flakey black sediment." He thought this was more debris than usual but was not alarmed because he was finally able to sump clean fuel.

The pilot tookoff and landed at RHV to pick up a passenger and departed about 1125, landing at Monterey Regional Airport, Monterey California about 1200. During the departure from RHV, the pilot observed the fuel flow gauge showing an unstable flow oscillating and decreasing from 16 to 11 gallons per hour (gph). He switched the fuel boost to "LO" which appeared to alleviate the problem. The pilot departed Monterey about 1550 and landing at 1600 on the turf runway at Monterey Bay Academy Airport, Watsonville, California. He departed about 1630 and landed at RHV to drop off one of his passengers. That passenger, who was also a pilot, was planning to fly a Cessna 182, in tandem with the accident airplane with the purpose of them taking pictures of one another.

A review of the Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control (ATC) transcripts revealed that the airplane departed RHV about 1722 as a flight of two with the Cessna. At 1725 a discussion transpired between an air traffic controller and the pilot of the Cessna about the transponder problems he was experiencing. They decided that the accident airplane would use a discrete squawk. The airplane continued west over the Norman Y Mineta San Jose International Airport, San Jose, California and were advised to maintain a heading of 270° and an altitude at or below 2,500 ft mean sea level (msl). At 1742, the Cessna pilot advised the controller that they were planning to descend below 1,000 ft msl and may lose radio contact, to which he replied that radar services were terminated and instructed the pilot to squawk VFR.

The accident pilot stated that he was making a descending left turn when at about 300 ft msl, the engine became quieter and stopped producing power. The JPI Engine Monitor Display 700 indicated the exhaust gas temperatures (EGTs) were declining to 0° and the fuel flow was 0 gph. He switched the boost pump to "LO" for several seconds and then "HI" and then switched it back off. He manipulated the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls full forward and about 500 ft agl, he positioned the fuel selector from the left to the right tank. The engine revved up momentarily and quit again. He stated that the propeller was windmilling and the engine was not producing power, which he described as the momentum of the turning propeller was causing the engine cylinders to keep moving, but not producing power. He stated there were no unusual vibrations, sounds, or odors.

The pilot further stated that he communicated with the pilot of the Cessna about the engine failure and he opted to ditch with the landing gear and flaps in the retracted position. He configured the airplane into a level attitude at about 10 ft above the water surface and waited for it to settle into the water. Immediately after impact, he and the passenger egressed the airplane with several items they wanted to salvage from the cockpit and stood on the wing until the airplane sank (an estimated 40 to 50 seconds).

Just prior to the engine anomaly, the passenger took two cell phone videos, both of which were posted to the social media platform Instagram. The last video was started at 1735:26 (at a location 3 nm north of the accident site) and captured 16 seconds showing the pilot making the left turn just prior to the engine losing power (reference picture 01).


Picture 01: Accident Site in Reference to Departure Airport 

A review of the video disclosed that the JPI Fuel Scan 450 instrument showed a 18.6 gph flow; that the left wing tank contained about 3/8 full fuel; the right tank was 1/2 full, and a manifold pressure of 24 inches (reference to picture 02).


Picture 02: Cockpit Instruments Prior to Engine Failure

The pilot of the Cessna began taking a video of the accident airplane ditching in the ocean at 1753:44, where the airplane touches down on the surface of the water at 1754:02 and comes to a stop about 1754:15 (reference pictures 03). The pilot began to take a video of himself and his passenger while they were standing on the wing at 1754:33.


Picture 03: Accident Site in Reference to Last Video

The ATC transcripts reveal that the pilot of the Cessna contacted a controller at 1753 advising him that the accident airplane was going into the water. The Coast Guard rescue helicopters arrived about 1830. The depth of the water is about 145 ft and the airplane wreckage is not expected to be recovered.

The pilot stated that he had recently purchased the Beech A36 airplane, serial number (s/n) E-1527, in June 2019 which was equipped with a Continental Motors IO550,B, s/n 684026. The airplane had recently undergone maintenance including on July 18, 2019, under Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) #SA02722CH, the pilot installed 20-gallon D'Shannon wingtip fuel tank. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N134P
Model/Series: 36 A36
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHAF, 66 ft msl
Observation Time: 0100 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 320°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: San Jose, CA (RHV)
Destination: Half Moon Bay, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  37.357778, -122.512222 (est)

Fuel Starvation: Bell 47G-3B-1, N1170W; accident occurred August 20, 2019 in Montrose, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N1170W


Location: Montrose, CO
Accident Number: CEN19TA280
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 1030 MDT
Registration: N1170W
Aircraft: Bell 47G
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On August 20, 2019, about 1030 mountain daylight time, a Bell 47G-3B-1, N1170W, lost engine power during aerial application near Montrose, Colorado. The commercial pilot was seriously injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail boom and fuselage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Olathe Spray Service, Inc., Olathe, Colorado, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site and at the time of the accident, and no visual flight rules flight plan had been filed for the local flight. The local flight departed about 1000.

The pilot stated that he had been performing agricultural spray operations in four different locations. He returned to Clifford Field Airport (1CO4), Olathe, Colorado, his home base, to take on additional chemical product. On the three previous trips, pesticide and about 30 gallons of Jet-A fuel were added as the helicopter sat idling. On this, the fourth trip, the helicopter was serviced with chemical, but no fuel was added.

Each spray pass was performed about 85 mph and just above the crop in order to achieve optimal product application and spray coverage to the crop. In order to do this the helicopter, at that speed, was flown in a nose-low attitude. The fuel delivery port/tube on both tanks is located at the aft, lower end of each tank, and both tanks deliver fuel to the engine simultaneously. There is no pilot-controlled fuel selector valve in the cockpit.

During the aerial application, the helicopter yawed left when the engine flamed out. The pilot slowed the airspeed and the helicopter impacted a cornfield.

The helicopter had been resting on its right side in a corn field for several days before a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and a representative of the engine manufacturer examined it. As a result, it could not be determined if fuel had drained out of the right fuel tank through a vent line, loose filler cap, or breached tank, but approximately 2/3 to 3/4 gallon of clean, clear, odor-free fuel was drained from of the right tank, and 2-1/2 gallons were drained from the left tank. Fuel was also found from the inlet side of the airframe-mounted fuel filter to the fuel spray nozzle inlet on the engine. The fuel spray nozzle appeared normal with no signs of excessive carbon deposits or blockage. Both the airframe and engine fuel filter bowls contained clean fuel, and both filters were void of contamination.

N1 (gas producer) and N2 (power turbine) rotor continuity was confirmed, and both rotors turned smoothly when rotated by hand. Cockpit controls from the throttle and collective back to the engine fuel control unit and power turbine governor were free and continuous. The engine oil system, including the filter and magnetic plugs, was checked and was unremarkable. Further examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunction or pre-existing conditions that would have precluded normal engine operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/24/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/16/2018
Flight Time:  34427 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3729 hours (Total, this make and model), 34487 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N1170W
Model/Series: 47G 3B-1
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 2944
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/24/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 13693 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20B
Registered Owner: Olathe Spray Service, Inc.
Rated Power: 420 hp
Operator: Olathe Spray Service, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: HKVG

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1100 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 123°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Olathe, CO (1CO4)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Olathe, CO (1CO4)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage:Substantial 
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  38.000000, -107.000000

Location: Montrose, CO
Accident Number: CEN19TA280
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 1030 MDT
Registration: N1170W
Aircraft: Bell 47G
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 20, 2019, about 1030 mountain daylight time, a Bell 47G-3B-1, N1170W, lost engine power during aerial application near Montrose, Colorado. The commercial pilot was seriously injured, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the tail boom and fuselage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Olathe Spray Service, Inc., Olathe, Colorado, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site and at the time of the accident, and no visual flight rules flight plan had been filed for the local flight.

The pilot stated that he had been performing agricultural spray operations in four different locations. He returned to Clifford Field Airport (1CO4), Olathe, Colorado, his home base, to take on additional chemical product. On the three previous trips, pesticide and about 30 gallons of Jet-A fuel were added as the helicopter sat idling. On this, the fourth trip, the helicopter was serviced with chemical, but no fuel was added.

The pilot stated that each spray pass was performed at approximately 85 mph and low above the crop in order to achieve optimal product application and spray coverage to the crop. In order to do this the helicopter, at that speed, flies at a nose-low attitude. The fuel delivery port/tube on both tanks is located at the aft, lower end of each tank, and both tanks deliver fuel to the engine simultaneously. There is no pilot-controlled fuel selector valve in the cockpit. During the aerial application, the helicopter yawed left when the engine flamed out. The pilot slowed the helicopter and impacted a cornfield.

The helicopter had been resting on its right side in a corn field for several days before a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and a representative of the engine manufacturer examined it. As a result, it could not be determined if fuel had drained out of the right fuel tank through a vent line, loose filler cap, or breached tank. Approximately 2/3 to 3/4 gallon of clean, clear, odor-free fuel was drained from of the right tank, and 2-1/2 gallons were drained from the left tank Fuel was also found from the inlet side of the airframe-mounted fuel filter all the way to the fuel spray nozzle inlet on the engine. The fuel spray nozzle appeared normal with no signs of excessive carbon deposits or blockage. Both the airframe and engine fuel filter bowls contained clean fuel, and both filters were void of contamination.

N1 (gas producer) and N2 (power turbine) rotor continuity was established, and both rotors turned smoothly by hand. Cockpit controls from the throttle and collective back to the engine fuel control unit and power turbine governor were free and continuous. The engine oil system (filter, mag plugs) was checked and deemed unremarkable. Further examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failure of the engine. No pre-existing conditions were found with the engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N1170W
Model/Series: 47G 3B-1
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Olathe Spray Service, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 1100 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Olathe, CO (1CO4)
Destination: Olathe, CO (1CO4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  38.000000, -107.000000


Olathe resident and well-known crop-duster Leonard Felix survived when his helicopter crashed near a cornfield off Jay Jay Road late Tuesday morning.

Felix, 74, was listed in fair condition at Montrose Memorial Hospital later in the day.

Felix’s family business, Olathe Spray Service, performs crop-dusting and has repeatedly over the years assisted in search and rescue efforts, as well as other public service work. Tuesday, Felix got that same kind of help in return, starting with Jay Jay Road property owners.

Mike Holden and his brother Drew were working in their yard just before the crash. Holden spotted Felix flying over the nearby corn.

“He was close enough I could see him. I waved, but he was concentrating. Maybe five seconds after he flew by us, we heard this crash. We saw smoke in the air. My brother took off running,” Holden said.

Holden’s wife, Irene, asked what the noise was.

“I said Felix went down; call 911,” Holden said.

As Irene went for the phone, Holden got on a side-by-side and drove down the dirt road between his yard and cornfield, collecting his brother along the way.

The corn was so dense, though, that they missed the crash site at first; even standing on the vehicle to peer over the corn did not help them locate the wreckage.

As the brothers turned their vehicle around to search again and rounded a curve, they got a surprise: Felix, walking out of the corn, holding an injured hand.

Original article  ➤ https://www.montrosepress.com

Delta Air Lines, Airbus A320: Incident occurred August 20, 2019 near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Aircraft struck bird on approach for Runway 27L

Date: 20-AUG-19
Time: 21:20:00Z
Flight Number: DAL1448
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 757-200: Incident occurred August 20, 2019 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York, New York

Aircraft landed and while taxiing lost the nose wheel and axle.

Date: 20-AUG-19
Time: 15:28:00Z
Flight Number: DAL415
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 752
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
City: NEW YORK CITY
State: NEW YORK

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – A passenger plane with nearly 200 people on board have a terrifying close call at JFK Airport Tuesday afternoon.

CBS2’s Tony Aiello reports the Delta flight from Portugal declared an emergency after the axle of its nose gear broke – causing one of the plane’s wheels to come off.

Port Authority officials report that 193 passengers were on board the flight, but luckily there were no injuries reported.

The fliers were escorted off the flight using emergency stairs by first responders around 12:30 p.m. after the damaged 757 airliner was towed to a gate.

Story and video ➤ https://newyork.cbslocal.com

Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion II, N501SF: Accident occurred August 20, 2019 at Eugene Airport - Mahlon Sweet Field (KEUG), Lane County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N501SF

Location: Eugene, OR
Accident Number: WPR19LA237
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 1435 PDT
Registration: N501SF
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Injuries:1 None 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 20, 2019, about 1435 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T210 airplane, N501SF, landed gear up following an emergency landing at Mahlon Sweet Field Airport (EUG), Eugene, Oregon. The student pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned by Nomarco Inc. and operated by the student pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the airport about the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed for the local flight, which departed about 1433.

The pilot reported that shortly after departure he smelled smoke in the cockpit and returned to the airport for an emergency landing. During the approach for the emergency landing, he said he forgot to put the landing gear down, and the airplane landed gear up, sustaining substantial damage to the fuselage.

The airplane was transported to a secure facility for further investigation and examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N501SF
Model/Series: T210
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Thomas D. Doman
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Eugene, OR (EUG)
Destination: Eugene, OR (EUG)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 44.123611, -123.202222 (est)

Piper PA-31P, N90AP: Accident occurred August 20, 2019 in East Brady, Clarion County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N90AP

Location: East Brady, PA
Accident Number: ERA19LA252
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 1430 EDT
Registration: N90AP
Aircraft: Piper PA 31P
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 20, 2019, at 1430 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31P, N90AP, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in East Brady, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania, destined for Lewis University Airport (LOT), Chicago, Illinois.

The pilot stated that the airplane was en route when the left engine experienced a total loss of power. He subsequently performed a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane impacted an electric fence, trees and came to rest 180° from the direction of travel.

Initial examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the landing gear had separated and damage was observed to the right aileron, right wing tip, elevator, and left aileron.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first class medical certificate was issued October 8, 2018. He reported 1,400 hours of flight experience on that date.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1973 and was powered by two Lycoming TIGO-541, 425-horsepower engines.

At 1430, the weather recorded at Pittsburgh / Butler Regional Airport (BTP), Butler, Pennsylvania, 16 miles southwest of the accident site included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 4,100 ft, broken clouds at 6,000 ft, temperature 29°C, dew point was 21°C and an altimeter setting of 30.09 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N90AP
Model/Series: PA 31P Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBTP, 1247 ft msl
Observation Time: 1830 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4100 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Doylestown, PA (DYL)
Destination: Chicago/Romeoville, IL (LOT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.931111, -79.662222

Beechcraft 58 Baron, N67WM: Incident occurred August 20, 2019 at Lehigh Valley International Airport (KABE), Allentown, Pennsylvania -and- Accident occurred April 13, 2018 at Easton Airport (KESN), Talbot County, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown

August 20, 2019:  Aircraft rolled in hangar.


WPMCO LLC


https://registry.faa.gov/N67WM


Date: 20-AUG-19

Time: 14:50:00Z
Regis#: N67WM
Aircraft Make: TEXTRON AVIATION
Aircraft Model: G58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: ALLENTOWN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N67WM


Location: Easton, MD

Accident Number: GAA18CA226
Date & Time: 04/13/2018, 1500 EDT
Registration: N67WM
Aircraft: TEXTRON AVIATION INC G58
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during approach, he was distracted by the right front seatback falling forward and interfering with his view of the airplane's control panel. He added that he tried numerous times to push the seatback upright, but it would not stay in the upright position. During final approach, he reached over to try to latch the seat belt to secure the seatback in an upright position. The airplane landed hard and porpoised.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system located on the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 200° at 13 knots, gusting to 17 knots. The pilot landed on runway 22.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach
Cabin safety event

Landing
Abnormal runway contact (Defining event)
Hard landing

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/15/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/15/2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 10800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 38 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: TEXTRON AVIATION INC
Registration: N67WM
Model/Series: G58 G58 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: TH-2485
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 38 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550
Registered Owner: WPMCO LLC
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KESN, 72 ft msl
Observation Time: 1848 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 352°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 9°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 17 knots, 200°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GEORGETOWN, DE (GED)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Easton, MD (ESN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1400 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: EASTON/NEWNAM FIELD (ESN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 72 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.801944, -76.068611 (est)

Cessna 180F, N180TB: Accident occurred August 20, 2019 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KAWO), Snohomish County, Washington

View of damaged right wing.


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N180TB


Location: Arlington, WA
Accident Number: GAA19CA517
Date & Time: 08/20/2019, 0950 PDT
Registration: N180TB
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, prior to takeoff, he adjusted his seat. During takeoff, his seat slid back and he was not able to reach the rudder pedals or throttle lever. The airplane accelerated, veered left, exited the runway to the left, ground looped, and impacted a berm.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer
Age:60, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/16/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 28246 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1706 hours (Total, this make and model), 20942 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 240 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 105 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N180TB
Model/Series: 180 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1963
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18051273
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3512.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental PPONK conversation
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-47050
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAWO, 137 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 34°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Arlington, WA (AWO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Langley, WA (W10)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0950 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Arlington Muni (AWO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 141 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5332 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 48.160833, -122.159167 (est)

Robinson R44, N7186P: Accident occurred August 20, 2019 - Cypress Island, Skagit County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle

Peregrine Air LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N7186P

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA509
14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 20, 2019 in Cypress Island, WA
Aircraft: Robinson R44, registration: N7186P

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck object and crashed in the water.

Date: 21-AUG-19
Time: 02:45:00Z
Regis#: N7186P
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: CYPRESS ISLAND
State: WASHINGTON

CYPRESS ISLAND, Washington – Three people escaped with minor injuries from a helicopter crash at Cypress Island Tuesday evening.

A spokesman from Coast Guard Station Bellingham reports a crew responded after the helicopter went down at about 7 p.m.

People aboard were shooting footage for a commercial when the aircraft clipped a tree and ended up in the water on the north side of Cypress Island.

The Coast Guard rescued three people including the pilot.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://kgmi.com