Thursday, August 3, 2017

Aerostar RX8, N5294Q, Skyline Hot Air Balloons LLC: Accident occurred October 10, 2015 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA030 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 10, 2015 in Albuquerque, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: AEROSTAR RX8, registration: N5294Q
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After 50 minutes of flight, the commercial pilot landed the balloon and waited for his ground handling crew to arrive. One passenger exited the basket and the pilot and second passenger remained in the basket. When the ground crew arrived, the second passenger and pilot were beginning to exit the basket when a gust of wind pushed the envelope and basket over to a 45° angle. The pilot asked the passenger to hold on and began pulling the envelope deflation line. After a few seconds, the wind shifted and rotated the basket. The pilot and passenger were tossed out of the basket onto the ground. The passenger fell, resulting in a fracture of her shoulder.

The nearest weather reporting facility, located about 15 nautical miles from the accident site, reported wind at 12 knots. The pilot reported that the wind was variable at 3 knots and gusting to 14 knots. The pilot's delay in pulling the vent line completely and deflating the balloon envelope likely made the balloon uncontrollable when the wind gusted. The pilot stated that he should have had the passenger sit down in the bottom of the basket and should have had the ground crew person release the line when the wind shifted.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's delay in deflating the balloon envelope completely after landing, which resulted in a loss of control due to a wind gust.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report -National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Skyline Hot Air Balloons LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5294Q

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA030
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 10, 2015 in Albuquerque, NM
Aircraft: AEROSTAR RX8, registration: N5294Q
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 9, 2015, about 0840 mountain standard time, a Aerostar RX8 Balloon, N5294Q, registered to the pilot, encountered a gust of wind after landing. Of the three occupants, the pilot and one passenger were not injured and one passenger sustained serious injuries. The local personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Park, Albuquerque, New Mexico, about 0750.

The pilot stated that after about 50 minutes of flight, he landed the balloon and waited for his ground crew to arrive. One passenger exited the basket and the second passenger remained in the basket. When the ground crew arrived, the second passenger and pilot were beginning to exit the basket when a gust of wind pushed the envelope and basket over at a 45-degree angle. The pilot told the passenger to hold on and began pulling the envelope deflation red line. After a few seconds, the wind shifted 90-degrees and pushed the envelope and rotated the basket 90 degrees. The pilot and passenger were tossed out of the basket onto the ground. The passenger fell on her right shoulder and struck her head on the burner frame. She was transported to the hospital by ambulance and treated for a fracture of the right shoulder.

About the time of the accident, the nearest weather reporting facility, Albuquerque International Sunport, Albuquerque, New Mexico, located about 15 nautical miles from the accident site, reported wind from 080 degrees at 12 knots. The pilot reported on NTSB Form 6120 that the winds were variable at 3 knots and gusting to 14 knots.

The pilot offered a safety recommendation in the submitted NTSB Form 6120. He stated that he should have had the passenger sit down in the bottom of the basket and should have had the ground line ground crew person release the line when the wind shifted.

Seeley Lake Drone Incursion Leads To Federal Investigation

The drone pilot allegedly responsible for temporarily shutting down aerial firefighting operations on the Rice Ridge Fire near Seeley Lake Wednesday is now the subject of a federal investigation.

The U.S. Forest Service is working in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration and U.S. Department of Justice to determine if charges are warranted.

Rice Ridge fire spokesman Mark De Gregorio says law enforcement takes these cases very seriously.

“We’re done messing around with it, quite honestly.”

It’s illegal to fly drones in closed air spaces around fires. Authorities say people could get killed if one of the machines crashed into a helicopter rotor, or a low-flying airplane’s engine.

De Gregorio says no one now has an excuse to behave so recklessly.

“There’s been a campaign now for over two years to inform people that it’s illegal to fly a drone in a fire traffic area," He says. "Now it’s time to start enforcing it, and that’s what we’re doing."

He says Wednesday’s drone incursion stalled aerial firefighting operations over the Rice Ridge Fire for 15 to 20 minutes.

“For the firefighters it’s frustrating cause we’re trying to protect people’s lives and property. and when you have somebody who does something like that for their own purposes, it’s a selfish thing to do and it puts people at risk,” De Gregorio says.

A Forest Service Law Enforcement Officer and a Missoula County Sheriff’s Deputy responded to yesterday’s drone incident in Seeley Lake. No arrests were made, but a joint federal investigation is now underway. Violators could face stiff fines and penalties.

According to the National Interagency Fire Center there have been at least 18 public drone incursions nationally, most of which resulted in the temporary shutdown of aerial firefighting efforts.

Story and audio  ►  http://mtpr.org

Beechcraft 19 Musketeer Sport, N2013G: Accident occurred August 29, 2015 near Dexter Regional Airport (1B0), Penobscot County, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA334
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 29, 2015 in Dexter, ME
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: BEECH B19, registration: N2013G
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various s
ources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot and flight instructor had flown for about 30 minutes before landing and conducting a subsequent takeoff. The instructor stated that, during the initial climb, the engine experienced a partial loss of power. He conducted a forced landing to a field during which the airplane impacted trees, resulting in substantial damage to the engine firewall, fuselage, and left wing. Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

The flight instructor calculated that the total distance required to clear a 50-ft obstacle during the takeoff was 1,300 ft; however, postaccident calculations based on performance data in the airplane’s flight manual indicated a required takeoff distance of about 1,700 ft. Given that there were 30-ft-tall trees located 50 ft beyond the departure end of the 1,250-ft-long turf runway, it is likely that the airplane had insufficient distance available for takeoff and initial climb to clear the trees.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor’s inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in collision with trees and terrain during takeoff.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Investigation Docket  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2013G

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA334
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 29, 2015 in Dexter, ME
Aircraft: BEECH B19, registration: N2013G
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 29, 2015, about 0830 eastern daylight time, a Beech B19, N2013G, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain near Dexter Regional Airport (1B0), Dexter, Maine. The flight instructor sustained serious injuries and the student pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local instructional flight, operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the flight instructor, the airplane initially departed Old Town Airport (OLD), Old Town, Maine, around 0800. There, he and the student pilot had performed a preflight inspection together with no anomalies noted. The student pilot noted that there was about 43 gallons of fuel in the airplane and drained all three sump points with no evidence of water found in the fuel tanks. The engine oil level was at 6 quarts, which was within limits, as was the drop of engine rpm during the magneto check in the engine run-up.

After taking off from runway 22, the flight proceeded toward 1B0. After about 30 minutes, the airplane overflew the runway, fuel tanks were switched, and the airplane landed uneventfully on runway 34. After landing, the flaps were fully retracted and the carburetor heat was secured. The fuel boost pump remained on.

According to the flight instructor, "We had already calculated the ground roll and 50' clearance and found that we had the length necessary with reasonable margin for error based on temperature, and expected performance and were anticipating to be off the ground in no more than 700' and clear a 50' obstacle by around 1,300'.". After taxiing to runway 25, the student pilot commenced the takeoff roll at the threshold with full power; oil pressure, fuel pressure, and temperature were "normal." In addition, the throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat were checked to be in their correct full forward positions.

According to the flight instructor, with the student pilot at the controls, the airplane lifted off the turf runway, about 600 ft down the runway. The climb was "normal" until about 50 or 60 ft above the runway, and just as the airplane was approaching the departure end the flight instructor noticed that the engine power "suddenly" dropped by 200 rpm, and that the airplane was no longer climbing. The flight instructor took the controls and saw a slight clearing ahead and to the left. He turned the airplane in a 10° bank toward the clearing, and it started slowly sinking into a tree line.

Just before the airplane hit the first tree, the instructor extended the flaps in an attempt to clear it. The propeller was still turning as the instructor heard it cut through the 50-ft tree, although "it could have been wind-milling." The instructor believed the propeller then stopped spinning entirely, the airplane descended into a second tree, and tumbled to the ground.

According to the flight instructor, the airplane was manufactured in 1978. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series, 150-hp, engine. The most recent annual inspection was performed July 21, 2015. According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the airframe had accumulated 5,168 total hours of operation at the time of the accident. According to the airplane's type certificate data sheet, its maximum gross weight was 2,150 pounds. The flight instructor reported that the airplane's weight at the time of the accident was 2,000 pounds.

The 0853 recorded weather observation at Bangor International Airport (BGR), Bangor, Maine, located about 22 nautical miles southeast of the accident location, included wind from 210° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds at 25,000 ft agl, temperature 17°C, dew point 14°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.17 inches of mercury.

1B0 was located 3 miles east of Dexter, Maine, at an elevation of 533 feet msl. It had two runways designated as 16/34 and 7/25. Runway 16/34 was an asphalt runway, which was 3,008 ft-long by 75-ft-wide. Runway 7/25 was a turf runway, which was 1,250 ft long and 120 ft wide. There were 30 ft-tall trees located about 50 feet beyond the departure end of runway 25.

The airplane came to rest inverted about 400 feet from the departure end of runway 25. The firewall, left wing, and fuselage were substantially damaged. Fuel was noted draining from the wings. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. One propeller blade remained straight and the other blade was bent aft about 30°. An examination of the engine by an FAA inspector revealed no obvious mechanical anomalies with the engine.

The carburetor icing probability chart from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, showed a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

According to manufacturer published performance information, assuming a takeoff weight of 2,150 pounds, the total ground roll required to take off on a grass surface at sea level with calm wind and a temperature of 15°C was 1,105 ft, and the total distance required to clear a 50 ft obstacle was 1,710 ft. The total ground roll required to takeoff on a grass surface at sea level with calm wind at 25°C was 1,220 ft, and the total distance required to clear a 50 ft obstacle was 1,886 ft.

Certified eyes in the sky: Midlothian Police Support Services Commander McKinney and Midlothian Firefighter Happel receive drone pilot certifications



MIDLOTHIAN — With the theoretical training wheels removed, three members of the Southern Regional Response Group took to the skies over Midlothian in search of a body, bomb and certification.

OK, so the body and bomb were just as theoretical as training wheels attached to a DJI Inspire 1, Mavic or Phantom 4 Pro. The certification, however, was very much real and very much in each of their sights. According to Gene Robinson, referred to as the “grandfather” of UAV flight and owner behind Wimberley-based Drone Pilots, Inc., the three did an “outstanding job” and passed with, literal, flying colors.

Robinson is a former general aviation pilot in the United States Air Force and programmer analyst. His program helps to train law enforcement agencies on the proper techniques of drone search and rescue, FAA regulations and how to work as a team using real-world application.




He previously told the Mirror that the Drone Pilots, Inc. mobile unit spent five years creating a standardized, 100-hour training regimen. The course concludes with a hands-on test — which is what Midlothian Police Support Services Commander Cody McKinney and Midlothian Firefighter Michael Happel recently completed at Mockingbird Nature Park.

“There are little things that will really make you a pro team,” said Robinson as the three completed the identification of a “bomb” hidden within a grove of trees in roughly 45 minutes, “but, overall, I think you all did an outstanding job.”

McKinney explained the trio now has “a basic understanding and a working knowledge of the capability of the drone and the multifaceted ideas and uses for them, so it is not just a hobby.”

“We are using these for a purpose. We are using them for search and rescue,” he continued. “We are using them to serve the community in case we have a mass causality or a lost child. There are a lot of implementations for this technology and these devices. It is fascinating, to be honest.”

During the field test, the three members of the Southern Regional Response Group (SRRG) had to demonstrate a working knowledge of maintaining a clean and secure cockpit (the area around the landing zone and drone base), utilize in-flight skills, respond to media or law enforcement requests and work together as a cohesive team.

And they had to do so while tasked with completing two objectives that were not given until minutes before takeoff: finding a bomb and body hidden within the park.

In addition to the job at hand, the SRRG was also surprised with an over-anxious sheriff demanding updates, a visit from the FAA, loss of video and an encounter with a low-flying aircraft.

Frank Buell, one of the three from Drone Pilots, Inc. administering the assessment, stated, “This is the ultimate test. Everything that can go wrong will go wrong during this test.”

“You have so many different things going on,” McKinney explained. “Not only are you responsible for flying and keeping the drone in the air but you are also trying to watch the camera and block out any distractions that are outside from people who want to know what is going on. Then you are also in the mindset of ‘I have to find this person’ so there is always a sense of urgency that puts you in a rush but you are also trying to be thorough. I like this practical application because now you can see what it is that you need to work on. Verbal communication is always the biggest thing.”

SCENARIO 1

The Ellis County Sheriff’s Office requested the SRRG to put a drone in the air to locate a 27-year-old male reported missing 24 hours prior near E. Wyatt Street. The male required medication and was believed to be lost or unconscious. He was also last seen walking in “something orange” in a general direction of a finger point to the northwest by Robinson.

After receiving the intelligence, McKinney briefed the team, and the three went to work utilizing the Inspire 1 on a predetermined flight path set by one of the team members en route to the scene using GPS coordinates. The Inspire is the largest of the three aircraft purchased by the Midlothian Police Department using funds largely from obtained through busts or seizures.

A short time after putting the drone into the air, McKinney informed the overbearing sheriff, a role played by Robinson, that the body had been located and that he appeared to be unconscious. McKinney then supplied the exact coordinates for the ground team to recover the individual.

“There were a couple of little odds and ends there, but those will clean up with experience,” said Robinson with a thumbs up.

SCENARIO 2

With Happel prepared to man the sticks of the Mavic Pro, the smaller and more nimble of the three MPD drones, the team set out in search of a bomb thought to be at the end of the property located near a scorekeeper’s box.

Approximately 450 feet from the cockpit and 3:42 into the flight, Mckinney noticed “something interesting” just as the Mavic dipped below a tree line and the team lost visual. The team then quickly decided to return to base and switch to the Phantom 4 Pro.

After a brush with a demanding FAA representative, the team identified the bomb roughly 42 minutes into the mission and after just over 11 minutes of flight time. The Phantom returned to the LZ 45 seconds later to a round of “nice job” and “well done.”

“I like the way they teach and they teach real-world applications,” McKinney said. “They have done it. There is not any other teams or organizations that I have found who offer that and they put their name on it with a policy and procedure. They will stand behind you. If you train their way after they teach you their way then they will back you and that’s great.”

Story and photo gallery ► http://www.waxahachietx.com

Bell 47G-3B-1 Sioux, N4002G, Ewing Flying Services LLC: Accident occurred August 03, 2015 in Camden, Wilcox County, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA296 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 03, 2015 in Camden, AL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: BELL 47G 3B 1, registration: N4002G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was repositioning the helicopter in preparation for spraying operations the next day. He reported that, about 1/2 mile from the intended off-airport landing area, while at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level, the helicopter’s cyclic control became very stiff, consistent with a hydraulic system failure. He continued the approach to the landing zone, which was a cleared area of forest that contained brush, fallen trees, and dirt mounds. During the approach, he unsuccessfully attempted to follow the procedure to relieve hydraulic system control pressure, which included turning off the hydraulic system switch, but was unable to remove his hands from the controls and also maintain control of the helicopter. He ultimately elected to land without turning off the hydraulic system switch. During the landing, a portion of the helicopter’s agricultural spray boom contacted the trees and brush, and the helicopter yawed to the left. The helicopter then began to oscillate as its skids contacted the uneven ground and obstructions before it ultimately rolled over, impacted the ground and caught fire. Fire damage to the engine and hydraulic system components precluded a postaccident examination, and its mode of failure could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A failure of the helicopter's hydraulic flight control systems for reasons that could not be determined due to the fire damage, and the pilot's inability to turn off the hydraulic system to relieve control pressure.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Ewing Flying Services LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4002G

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA296
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 03, 2015 in Camden, AL
Aircraft: BELL 47G 3B 1, registration: N4002G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2015, about 1600 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-3B-1, N4002G, operated by Ewing Flying Services LLC, was substantially damaged during a loss of control on landing near Camden, Alabama. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight which originated in Thomaston, Alabama and was destined for Oak Hill, Alabama. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight.

The pilot was repositioning the helicopter for spraying operations scheduled to take place the following day. He has been airborne for approximately 20 minutes, and had used 10 gallons of fuel out of the 42 gallons he reported carrying. When he was at 300 feet altitude and about a half a mile out on approach to the off-airport landing zone, the hydraulic system augmenting the controls failed and the cyclic controls became stiff. He braced his left leg under the collective pitch control and grabbed the cyclic with his left hand, but he was unable to cycle the hydraulic system switch with his right hand because the collective control had drifted down, increasing his descent rate. The pilot responded by grabbing the collective and cyclic controls and left the hydraulic switch in the on position. 

He continued the approach into the landing zone, which was a large clearing in a forest. Just prior to touchdown, the agricultural spray boom made contact with trees and brush, and yawed the helicopter to the left. During the touchdown, the heel of the left skid struck a dirt mound, rocking the helicopter forward. Subsequently the toe of the right skid struck the ground, the helicopter began to oscillate, and rolled to the left. The pilot attempted to correct, but the helicopter continued to rollover until it impacted the ground, coming to rest on the left side. After the impact, the pilot evacuated as fuel poured out of the right tank directly into the engine and cockpit area. The fuel ignited and the fire consumed the fuselage and caused significant damage to the transmission, engine and components. The hydraulic pump was extensively damaged by the fire and unable to be inspected.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness and maintenance records, the helicopter was equipped with a supplemental type certificate for the Soloy Allison 250-CID turbine engine conversion. In addition, the helicopter was equipped with an agricultural spray boom that was mounted under the forward fuselage above the skid and aft of the skid toe. It was approximately 30 feet in length and extended about 12 feet from both sides of the cockpit. The helicopter's most recent 100 hour inspection was performed on February 19, 2015. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had accumulated 13,719.2 hours total time and the engine total time was 2,906.7hours. Additionally, mast, bearing, hub and swashplate maintenance was performed on July 9, 2015 at 13,764.2 hours total time and engine total time of 2951.7. 

According to FAA records, the pilot held commercial and airline transport pilot certificates, with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane multi engine land, and rotorcraft helicopter. His last flight review was conducted on July 5, 2015 in the same make and model as the accident helicopter, and his most recent second-class medial was issued on May 14, 2015. He reported over 20,000 hours of total flight time, of which, 15,000 hours were in helicopters, and 1,080 in the same make and model as the accident helicopter.

An FAA inspector examined the helicopter at the accident site. According to the inspector, the fuselage, main rotor blades, and tail boom were substantially damaged during the accident sequence and fire consumed the fuselage and damaged the engine and components. The accident site was a forested clearing. The ground in the immediate vicinity was burned, but remnants under the helicopter and in the area around the accident site contained brush, 1-inch diameter branches and immature saplings. In addition, several larger diameter fallen pine trees were near the helicopter. A dirt mound approximately 14 to 18 inches tall and several feet long was 3 feet to the left of the helicopter near the main rotor head. 

According to the Bell Helicopter Flight Manual Model 47, Section 2 Operating Procedures, "Hydraulic boost failure will be evident by feedback forces being transmitted to the cyclic stick when a control motion is made. Feedback forces may not be present or are negligible when the cyclic stick is held fixed or during autorotation. Feed-back forces encountered when moving the cyclic stick will be proportionate in intensity to an envelope of factors directly affected by airspeed, gross weight and climatic turbulence. When hydraulic boost power loss is detected, reduce cyclic control motions to the minimum required to complete the flight…" It also stated, "If jamming of the controls or a condition of the controls tending to override the pilot is experienced, the HYD (hydraulic) SYSTEM switch, located on the instrument panel, should be immediately moved to OFF to relieve hydraulic pressure…" 

According to the FAA Helicopter Flying Handbook; FAA-H-8083-21A, under System Malfunctions & Hydraulic Failure, it states "If hydraulic power is not restored, make a shallow approach to a running or roll-on landing. This technique is used because it requires less control force and pilot workload."

Fort Wayne city police demonstrate drones



Four Fort Wayne city police officers will undergo a nine-day training program to certify them as Federal Aviation Administration remote pilot-in-command officers for two Typhoon H-Pro with Real Sense drones.

"We looked at a lot of different models and we really liked this one because it's a hex platform and it has six blades, it's very stable," Officer James Rowland said. 

The drones were demonstrated Thursday at the Ivy Tech Public Safety Academy on Fort Wayne's southeast side. The pair of drones cost just under $10,000 for the pair. Police say once the drones are in use, they will only be used under the authority of a search warrant, except in select situations. Those incidents include active shooter situations, barricade incidents, missing persons cases, terrorist attacks, natural disasters, geographical and environmental surveys and aerial photography and video images of motor vehicle accident sites. 

Mayor Tom Henry was on hand Thursday for the demonstration. He praised the purchase as a way to assist police in their duties.



"We have a limited number of police officers in an area that is pretty immense," Henry said. "Any time we can add technology to assist them in everything from Amber Alerts to hostage situations, anything we can use to assist them to raise the comfort level of our police department and of those affected is a good thing."

Aerial Support Unit officers will work in teams of two, with one officer assigned as a visual observer to assist with pre-flight, launch and landing procedures, as well as to maintain situational awareness and communications with other on-scene law enforcement personnel. The other team member, known as the remote pilot in command, will pilot the drone. 

The Fort Wayne Police Department will expand the unmanned aircraft system in the future to include nighttime mission capabilities. 

Story and photo gallery  ►  http://www.journalgazette.net

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, N9133G: Accident occurred March 01, 2015 at Roberts Field Airport (KRDM), Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA137 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 01, 2015 in Redmond, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 46-310P, registration: N9133G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, about 30 minutes into the private, cross-country flight and while the airplane was cruising at 23,000 ft mean sea level, the engine started running roughly. The pilot noticed that the No. 5 cylinder head temperature (CHT) was lower than normal. He cycled the magnetos and noticed that the engine ran rougher than normal when the left magneto was selected. He then enriched the mixture, and the engine smoothed out. He continued to monitor the engine and adjust the mixture. About 30 minutes later, the engine lost power. The pilot diverted to a nearby airport and attempted to line up for a runway but did not have sufficient altitude. He performed a forced landing to the airport infield, which resulted in the nose landing gear collapsing and structural damage to the wing spar. 

Postaccident examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. During an engine test run up to full power, the only anomaly noted was that the No. 5 CHT was 50 to 70° lower than all the other cylinders. However, the lower CHT likely would not cause a loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power during cruise flight for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On March 1, 2015, at 0940 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-46-310P, N9133G, executed a forced landing into Roberts Field Airport, Redmond, Oregon, after a loss of engine power. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Oak Harbor, Washington, at 0800.

The pilot reported that he was cruising at 23,000 feet mean sea level (msl) when he noticed the engine running a bit rough as he passed Portland, Oregon. He noticed that the number 5 cylinder head temperature (cht) was lower than normal. The pilot cycled the magnetos and noticed that the engine ran rougher than normal when the left magneto was selected. The engine smoothed out when he enriched the mixture. He continued to monitor the engine and adjusting the mixture. About 30 minutes later engine power completely dropped off. The pilot diverted to Roberts Field, Redmond, Oregon, using his GPS for navigation. About 2 miles out he acquired the airport visually, and attempted to line up for a runway but did not have enough altitude. He performed a forced landing into the airport infield. The landing resulted in a collapsed nose landing gear, and wing spar damage at both main landing gear mounts.

On March 3, 2015, an airframe and power plants (A&P) mechanic examined the airplane under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. He reported on the airframe structural damage, and that he found no obvious reason for the loss of engine power. The airplane was then relocated to a facility in Greeley, Colorado, for further examination.

The airplane was equipped with a EDM 930 engine data monitoring system. On April 14 the data from the EDM 930 was downloaded and sent to the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge (IIC). The data showed that about 25 minutes before the loss of engine power the number 5 cylinder head temperature (cht) started to trend about 50°F below its previous steady temperature (300°F), and then fluctuate twice between 300°F – 250°F during the last 12 minutes. The exhaust gas temperature (egt) remained steady for cylinder number 5 throughout the record. All the remaining cylinders exhibited steady egt and cht values.

On May 13, 2015, the NTSB IIC, and a technical representative from the engine manufacturer examined the airplane. A fuel sample was taken from the fuel strainer. The fuel sample was light green in color and tested negative for water or kerosene/jet fuel contamination. Results of a chemical analysis confirmed that the sample was chemically consistent with 100LL avgas. The engine was examined externally, the cylinders bore scoped, sparkplugs inspected, internal magneto timing verified, and internal continuity confirmed by rotating the propeller/crankshaft. The number 5 cylinder fuel injection nozzle was removed, examined, and found to be in good condition with no blockages. An external fuel tank was plumbed into the right-wing fuel outlet and an external priming pump placed inline. The engine started on the first attempt, ran smoothly at idle, magneto checked performed, and the engine was run up to red line producing full power. No anomalies were noted during the engine run other than that the number 5 cylinder head temperature was notably 50°-70°F cooler than all the other cylinders.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9133G

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA137
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 01, 2015 in Redmond, OR
Aircraft: PIPER PA 46-310P, registration: N9133G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 1, 2015, at 0940 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-46-310P, N9133G, executed a forced landing into Roberts Field Airport, Redmond, Oregon, after a loss of engine power. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Oak Harbor, Washington, at 0800.

The pilot reported that he was cruising at 23,000 feet mean sea level (msl) when he noticed the engine running a bit rough as he passed Portland, Oregon. He noticed that the number 5 cylinder head temperature (cht) was lower than normal. The pilot cycled the magnetos and noticed that the engine ran rougher than normal when the left magneto was selected. The engine smoothed out when he enriched the mixture. He continued to monitor the engine and adjusting the mixture. About 30 minutes later engine power completely dropped off. The pilot diverted to Roberts Field, Redmond, Oregon, using his GPS for navigation. About 2 miles out he acquired the airport visually, and attempted to line up for a runway but did not have enough altitude. He performed a forced landing into the airport infield. The landing resulted in a collapsed nose landing gear, and wing spar damage at both main landing gear mounts.

On March 3, 2015, an airframe and power plants (A&P) mechanic examined the airplane under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. He reported on the airframe structural damage, and that he found no obvious reason for the loss of engine power. The airplane was then relocated to a facility in Greeley, Colorado, for further examination.

The airplane was equipped with a EDM 930 engine data monitoring system. On April 14 the data from the EDM 930 was downloaded and sent to the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge (IIC). The data showed that about 25 minutes before the loss of engine power the number 5 cylinder head temperature (cht) started to trend about 50°F below its previous steady temperature (300°F), and then fluctuate twice between 300°F – 250°F during the last 12 minutes. The exhaust gas temperature (egt) remained steady for cylinder number 5 throughout the record. All the remaining cylinders exhibited steady egt and cht values.

On May 13, 2015, the NTSB IIC, and a technical representative from the engine manufacturer examined the airplane. A fuel sample was taken from the fuel strainer. The fuel sample was light green in color and tested negative for water or kerosene/jet fuel contamination. Results of a chemical analysis confirmed that the sample was chemically consistent with 100LL avgas. The engine was examined externally, the cylinders bore scoped, sparkplugs inspected, internal magneto timing verified, and internal continuity confirmed by rotating the propeller/crankshaft. The number 5 cylinder fuel injection nozzle was removed, examined, and found to be in good condition with no blockages. An external fuel tank was plumbed into the right-wing fuel outlet and an external priming pump placed inline. The engine started on the first attempt, ran smoothly at idle, magneto checked performed, and the engine was run up to red line producing full power. No anomalies were noted during the engine run other than that the number 5 cylinder head temperature was notably 50°-70°F cooler than all the other cylinders.

Lancair IV-P, N420M, Pilot Proficiency Inc: Fatal accident occurred August 03, 2017 near McClellan Airfield (KMCC), Sacramento County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Pilot Proficiency Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N420M

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA179
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Rio Linda, CA
Aircraft: Michaelian Lancair IV-TP, registration: N420M
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 03, 2017, at 1503 Pacific daylight time, a single-engine experimental Michaelian Lancair IV-TP, N420M, impacted a residential area in Rio Linda, California following a loss of engine power while on approach to Mc Clellan Airfield, Sacramento, California. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured; the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Pilot Proficiency Inc., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight departed from Auburn Municipal Airport, Auburn, California at 1455 with a planned destination of San Carlos Airport, San Carlos, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed; the pilot was receiving flight following advisories.

Located in the wreckage was a Garmin GPSMAP 396, battery-powered portable GPS receiver. The unit stores date, route-of-flight, and flight-time information; all recorded data is stored in non-volatile memory.

Recorded data plots were recovered for the time frame that matched the anticipated flight track of the airplane departing from Auburn. The track indicated that the airplane departed from runway 25 about 1455. After becoming airborne, the airplane climbed and headed toward San Carlos on a heading of about 220 degrees. At 1459:28, with the airplane about 6,800 ft msl, the airplane began a gradual descent and shifted to a 240-degree heading. The airplane continued in the direction while cruising between about 215-200 kts until 1502:02 when the airplane made a left turn to adjoin the final approach leg to runway 16 at Mc Clellan Airfield.

The last six hits of the flight track occurred over 35 seconds from 1502:06 to 1502:41. During that time the speed increased from 130 kts to 91 kts and the altitude decreased about 510 ft. The last recorded point placed the airplane approximately 790 feet north-northeast of the accident site at 155 feet msl.

Numerous witnesses observed the airplane flying south along 28th street toward Mc Clellan Airfield at a low altitude. The airplane suddenly made a sharp turn to the right and disappeared into the trees.

The accident site was in a back yard of a residence located on the corner of U street (east-west oriented) and 28th street (north-south oriented). Powerlines were located 190 ft north of the wreckage with two support structures (wood poles) on both sides of 28th street (south side of U street), at a distance of 75 ft apart. The lines had been separated from the west structure attach fittings (35-ft high) but remained attached to the east structure (about 50 ft high). The upper powerline had several bends in the center area consistent with the airplane having made contact with the wire.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dr. Marshall Michaelian 



RIO LINDA (CBS13) — The wreckage of Thursday’s deadly small plane crash was removed from the backyard of a Rio Linda home on Friday.

The pilot killed in that crash is being remembered for his giving-spirit and passion for flying.

Dr. Marshall Michaelian died when his plane crash-landed in a backyard a mile from the McClellan Air Field Thursday.

Crews hoisted the wreckage from the small plane—backwards from its final crash landing spot in a backyard.

The airplane’s tail battered, its wings sawed off, its propellers bent

The FAA reports the plane was bound for San Carlos from Auburn when investigators believe the pilot attempted an emergency landing at McClellan Airfield.

Air traffic recordings describe the initial crash aftermath.

“We got a downed aircraft out here.”

“Can you let us know if you can see anything? They’re a mile out from the runway right on the approach in.”

The pilot, oral surgeon Marshall Michaelian is shown in photos on his dental practice website with his Lancair plane that he was flying when he crashed.

Michaelian was a volunteer for “Angel Flight” and had flown 28 missions, flying children with burn scars and hearing impairments to special needs camps in his plane.

“It’s sad, it’s very sad,” Auburn pilot Kenton Kiaser said.

Kiaser had recently befriended Michaelian.

He says Michaelian’s Lancair, a high-performance plane, was the envy of the airport.

“He had quite a bit of experience with the hours he had, and he had built the airplane that he was flying,” Kiaser said.

NTSB crews removed the plane from the crash site and will deconstruct it at a wreckage warehouse.

“I’ll do a teardown examination, where I’ll thoroughly look at the engine,” NTSB investigator Zoe Keliher said.

An NTSB preliminary investigation report is expected to be released next week. A full crash report will take a year.







The National Transportation Safety Board says Marshall Michaelian was flying from Auburn Municipal Airport with a destination of San Carlos south of San Francisco.

Witnesses told the Sacramento Sheriffs Department they saw his single-engine plane hit a power pole and trees before crashing into the yard of a home at the corner of 28th and U Streets in Rio Linda. Michaelian was pronounced dead at the scene.

The  Sacramento County Coroner has not released a cause of death.

Michaelian was flying a Lancair IV P. Lancair sells planes in kits to be assembled by people at their homes.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 28 Lancair planes have crashed since 1989, 11 of the crashes resulted in a fatality.

Six of the 28 crashes involved an IV P model.

The NTSB says failure to maintain sufficient speed was the cause of half of the IV P crashes.

The Federal Aviation Administration requires home-built aircraft be certified and pass annual airworthiness inspections.

The Federal Aviation Administration says a homebuilt aircraft must first receive an airworthiness certificate which can be obtained after 40 hours of flight time that prove it is "controllable."

Even with a certificate, pilots may not fly over populated areas unless they are in the process of landing at or taking off from airports.

Homebuilt aircraft must undergo the same annual or 100 flight-hour, whichever comes first, inspections as aircraft with standard airworthiness certificates.

FAA and NTSB inspectors are reviewing the crash.


http://www.capradio.org

The pilot of a small home-built airplane died when when the aircraft crashed into the yard of a Rio Linda home Thursday afternoon.

Sgt. Tony Turnbull, Sacramento County sheriff’s spokesman, said deputies responded to a report of a plane crash about 3 p.m. on property at 28th and U streets.

The pilot, the only person on board, was unresponsive. Sacramento Metropolitan Fire Department personnel provided medical aid, but the man was pronounced dead at the scene.

Turnbull said the plane did not damage any structures and no one else was injured.

The plane was a single-engine, home-built Lancair IV-P, according to Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

Tunbull said no information was available on where the flight originated or where the plane was headed. Witnesses reported that the plane was southbound at a low altitude, and it clipped power lines and trees as it came down on the property, he said.

The name of the pilot has not been released.

An investigation will be conducted by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Turnbull said 28th Street is closed between Elverta Road and Elkhorn Boulevard, and U Street is closed between 26th and 30th streets.

http://www.sacbee.com




RIO LINDA, Calif. (KCRA) — A pilot died Thursday afternoon after his small plane crashed into a Sacramento County neighborhood, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department said.

The pilot was the only person on board the plane at the time.

The plane crashed into the backyard of a Rio Linda home near 28th and U streets, the Sacramento Metro Fire Department said. The scene is just north of McClellan Airfield.

The FAA said the plane -- a single-engine, home-built Lancair IV-P aircraft -- crashed for unknown reasons.

The incident will be investigated by the FAA and the NTSB.

A small power outage was reported in the area due to the plane crash. Aerial video from LiveCopter 3 shows downed power lines and trees at the crash scene.

Story and video ► http://www.kcra.com

Three Sacramento-bound passengers sue JetBlue over turbulence: Jetblue Airbus A320-200, N632JB, incident occurred August 11, 2016 in Rapid City, South Dakota

It sounds like a flight from hell.

JetBlue Airways Flight 429 from Boston to Sacramento last Aug. 11 took off at 6 p.m. on a Thursday for what should have been a six-and-a-half hour trip. Instead, the plane hit violent turbulence that forced an emergency landing in Rapid City, S.D., and sent 24 passengers and three crew members to a local hospital for treatment.

“All of a sudden, the plane just dropped,” passenger Christopher De Vries told The Bee at the time. “It dropped fast enough so that things just flew up in the air.

“I just saw laptops, candy and soda splashing onto the ceiling.”

Now, the incident is the subject of two lawsuits in federal court in Sacramento, the most recent filed Wednesday on behalf of two passengers who say they suffered neck and other injuries that require medical treatment to this day.

The latest lawsuit, filed by Michelle Hill, a Sacramento County resident, and Ariel Epstein Pollack, a Yolo County woman, alleges that the JetBlue crew “disregarded the threat of a major thunderstorm over South Dakota.”

“JetBlue then flew Flight 429 directly into that thunderstorm,” the lawsuit claims. “During this time, JetBlue chose not to advise its Flight 429 passengers to stay seated with seatbelts fastened.

“As a consequence, the thunderstorm’s sudden and severe turbulence threw passengers repeatedly about the cabin and into the ceiling. Many passengers and crew were unrestrained.”

Michelle Hill was one of those, the lawsuit says. Hill was returning from the restroom and had sat down but not yet strapped on her seatbelt when the plane hit turbulence and “she flew up and hit her head on the ceiling,” the lawsuit says.

Ariel Pollack had her seatbelt on and was sleeping at the time, but when the turbulence hit “she flew out of her seat and slammed back down with a great force.”

“Only after the aircraft had flown into the severe weather did flight attendants announce to the passengers to be seated and fasten seatbelts,” the lawsuit says.

Lawyers for Hill and Pollack did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday, but the lawsuit describes both passengers as suffering severe injuries.

Hill “could not move her neck and was in shock from the trauma,” the suit says, and continues to suffer from head and neck pain, mental stress and nightmares and has been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder.

Pollack had undergone spinal fusion surgery six months prior to the flight and, after hitting the turbulence, had such pain that “her lower and mid back felt like it was on fire,” the lawsuit says.

JetBlue declined to comment, saying in an email that “we do not comment on pending litigation.”

But the airline has disputed similar claims in a suit filed a month after the incident. In that suit, JetBlue says in court papers that it adheres to Federal Aviation Administration safety guidelines and that the airline will argue at trial that the “alleged injuries” were not caused by the airline “but were caused by the comparative fault of the plaintiff(s).”

The first lawsuit was filed on behalf of passenger Xuan Thi Phan, a Sacramento County woman who was injured when she got up to go to the restroom, according to that lawsuit.

Phan’s lawsuit says the seatbelt sign was not on when she stood up and that when the plane hit the turbulence she fell, then was tossed up into the air and slammed into the ceiling, then fell again.

“As she was thrown downward, she again struck her head and shoulder,” her lawsuit says. “A door of the overhead bin broke ... loose and hit (Phan) on the head.”

Phan’s injuries continue to cause her pain, dizziness, memory problems and difficulty concentrating, her suit says.

Both lawsuits were filed by Elk Grove attorney Glenn Guenard. The Phan lawsuit also lists the Seattle law firm of Friedman Rubin, which advertises on its website that its efforts “representing plane crash victims, commercial airline passengers, pilots, flight attendants and helicopter crash victims has been nationally recognized.”

“It has resulted in obtaining millions of dollars in compensation for injured clients,” the site says.

The firm’s website apparently got under JetBlue’s corporate skin in the Phan lawsuit, with the company’s attorneys complaining that Friedman Rubin is using the lawsuit “as a marketing tool” to attract more clients.

JetBlue complained in court papers that “the day after filing the lawsuit,” Friedman Rubin posted a notice saying it was leading the litigation against JetBlue and “if you were injured on a flight, anywhere in the United States, contact Friedman Rubin and tell us your story.”

“This is an abuse of litigation and discovery and it should not be tolerated by the court,” JetBlue’s attorneys argued in court papers objecting to efforts to add Hill and Pollack to the Phan suit.

Friedman Rubin answered by noting JetBlue’s “vehement opposition” and wrote that Hill and Pollack would later file their own lawsuit.

That came Wednesday, with the two passengers saying in their suit that JetBlue did not provide up-to-date weather information to the crew, did not warn passengers of the massive thunderstorm ahead and flew “the aircraft straight into it.”

A preliminary report on the incident filed by the National Transportation Safety Board on Dec. 8 found that the flight “encountered turbulence in cruise flight...while maneuvering to avoid convective weather.”

“As a result of the turbulence, three flight attendants and 24 passengers received minor injuries,” the NTSB reported. “The remaining 124 passengers and crew were not injured.

“The airplane received minor damage.”

http://www.sacbee.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident. 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N632JB

NTSB Identification: DCA16IA215
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of JetBlue Airways
Incident occurred Thursday, August 11, 2016 in Wood, SD
Aircraft: AIRBUS A320 232, registration: N632JB
Injuries: 27 Minor, 124 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On August 11, 2016, about 2009 central daylight time, JetBlue Airways flight 429, an Airbus A320, N632JB, encountered turbulence in cruise flight at FL320 while maneuvering to avoid convective weather. As a result of the turbulence, three flight attendants and 24 passengers received minor injuries. The remaining 124 passengers and crew were not injured. The airplane received minor damage. The flight crew declared an emergency and diverted to Rapid City Regional Airport (RAP), Rapid City, South Dakota. The regularly scheduled passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 from Logan International Airport (BOS), Boston, Massachusetts, to Sacramento International Airport (SMF), Sacramento, California.