Monday, June 12, 2017

Incident occurred June 12, 2017 at O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Chicago, Illinois

CHICAGO (CBS) — A Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing at O’Hare International Airport, shortly after taking off from Midway on Monday.

The pilot on Flight 1914, en route from Midway to Windsor Locks, (Hartford) Conn., reported a mechanical issue, possibly a problem with an engine.

The plane landed around 2:30 p.m. at O’Hare and there were no reports of any injuries.

Passenger Jasmine Cain said the engine failed about 15 minutes into the flight and praised the pilot for his actions landing the plane safely.

A flight recording indicates that pilot declared an emergency and reported to air traffic control that the plane “lost an engine.’

In a statement, Southwest spokesman, Dan Landson said: “The crew of Southwest Airlines Flight 1914 from Chicago Midway to Hartford safely diverted the aircraft to Chicago O’Hare International Airport shortly after takeoff due to reported issues with one of the aircraft engines.

“We are in the process of sending another aircraft to O’Hare to get our 139 customers to Hartford this evening.

“The original aircraft is being taken out of service for a maintenance review.”

Story and video:  http://chicago.cbslocal.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, C-GBMH: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 in North Vancouver, British Columbia

http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/C-GBMH


Pilot Octavio Hernandez poses with his son.





The pilot of a small Cessna plane that lost power and crashed in an industrial area of North Vancouver Sunday said he feels lucky to be reunited with his wife and young son.

“When I looked at all those kids playing in the parks (below), of course I thought about my son,” Octavio Hernandez told CTV Vancouver on Monday, but added he felt confident in the moments before the crash that the incident wouldn’t be fatal.

“You know you’re going to hit and you’re just hoping it’s not going to be a horrible outcome,” he said. “Something told me it was not going to end up bad.”

But veteran investigators with the Transportation Safety Board say they're amazed the four passengers of the aircraft survived after the plane made a forced landing in an industrial area of the waterfront near McKeen Ave around 4 p.m.

The plane crashed into a guardrail along with other structures near a bridge. The TSB said the small craft simply ran out of fuel: right-wing tank was empty and the left-wing tank only had a small amount of fuel.

The Cessna was on its return trip from Tofino back to Langley when the engine cut out and the aircraft began descending at roughly 100 km/h.

“Immediately, I just started looking at the possible causes of the engine failure,” said Hernandez, who started flying in B.C. as a pastime in 2010. “I just couldn’t find what (the problem was).”

The pilot attempted to restart the engine three times before declaring a state of emergency with the air traffic controller.

Hernandez said he considered a few options including a highway and a park, but decided against landing on either because there were people below. That’s when he noticed an empty parking lot and aimed the plane towards it.

“I already knew it was going to be hard for all of us, but my main goal was not landing on…some people,” he said. “I didn’t want to put other people at risk.”

Hernandez said he followed all the necessary safety procedures before leaving Tofino.

“Everything looked perfect,” during the pre-flight walk around, Hernandez said, including the aircraft’s fuel capacity.

The plane left Tofino with 20 gallons of fuel, which would normally allow it fly for about another 2.5 hours, the pilot said.

The engine failure occurred just over an hour later, leaving Hernandez unsure of what caused the incident.

“There are many different probabilities that could cause an engine failure,” he said “I’m really interested to know what caused the problem.”

Three of the passengers walked away unscathed and a fourth suffered what a broken arm while trying to protect his girlfriend from the impact of the landing.

One of the plane’s wings was resting on telephone cable and guide wires, instead of power lines, which emergency crews were initially concerned about.

“It’s very fortunate, it could’ve been a lot worse,” assistant fire chief Jim Bonneville said.

"There didn't appear to be any fuel leaking. It's resting on what appeared to be power lines at first, but they're just guide wires for the pole and some cable lines as well."

He said the plane appeared to have landed hard on its wheels and then "nosed in" with a propeller into the gravel. One wing rested on wires, another on the ground.

Witness Claire Alter told CTV News what she noticed most is that the plane wasn't making any noise.

"I was just walking my daughter and I looked up at the sky because I saw a plane, a very small plane, and I happened to notice there was no sound from it," she said.

The TSB says its investigation is now complete and no more information will be released.

Meanwhile, Hernandez said the experience won’t keep him from pursuing his ultimate goal of becoming a commercial bush pilot.

“I love flying and that’s always been my dream,” he said. “I see this as a lesson and, hopefully, it’s the first one and the last one.”

Story and video:  http://bc.ctvnews.ca

Clyde Shelton, noted aviator, NASA pioneer, dies


Clyde Harold Shelton passed away Saturday (June 10, 2017) after a brief illness comfortably in the arms of his beloved wife of 62 years, Mrs. Sara West Shelton.

Mr. Shelton was born in Taft on March 7, 1931. He worked hard early, operating a paper route at the age of 12 to support his mother and younger sister. He graduated from Central High School in 1949 and went to work at Kraft Foods until joining the United States Air Force in 1951 where he trained as a crew chief on the T-23 and F86 aircraft. During his service, Mr. Shelton developed an insatiable interest in aviation and vowed to one day buy his own aircraft.

Following his honorable discharge in 1955, Mr. Shelton finished his business degree at Indiana Tech. He soloed and began earning his pilot’s credentials at Wilkes Field in Fayetteville where he did buy that aircraft and began flight instructing both in Fayetteville and Huntsville, Ala., in 1963.

Mr. Shelton, still actively flying until Nov. 30, 2016, ended his aviation career having given well over 20,000 hours of flight instruction. He graduated over 1,000 students, and as an FAA flight examiner and beginning in 1987, he administered a United States’ record 10,379 checkride flights.

His personal logbook documents 38,971 actual flight hours with ratings as an airline transport pilot, single and multi-engine instrument instructor and Cessna Citation jet.

Mr. Shelton actually had two careers. A charter member of NASA, the Marshall Space Flight Center, he and his colleagues made aerospace history during our nation’s space race. He was there from the beginning working with Dr. Werner Von Braun on all the launch vehicles from the Redstone Rocket to the Saturn V Moon Rocket, finishing after 38 years with the Shuttle program in 1993.

The patriarch of three generations of pilots, Clyde instructed his wife, Sara, in 1966; his son, Scott, now a Boeing 747 captain for Delta Airlines on his 16th birthday; and his grandson, Nevada, currently a captain in the United States Army flying the Blackhawk helicopter on his 16th birthday, as well.

Clyde Shelton’s legacy is firmly established in those lives he touched. He was a genuine aviation professional. He was a man whose integrity, character, food nature and sincere interest in his students defined him as a man of competent humility.

For his extraordinary and endearing contributions to aviation, Mr. Shelton was elected into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame in 2010 and the Alabama Aviation Hall of Fame in 2016.

Clyde will be missed by all he touched during his long historical career, but most importantly by his wife, Sara; his sons, Steve and Scott (Gwen); grandchildren, Ashley Davis (Johnny), Chase (Ashley), Nevada, Whitney (Marcus), Richard (Chelsea) and Cooper.

Additionally, he will be missed by his great-grandchildren, Emma Grace, Anna Elizabeth, Abby, Walker, Ryder, Gunner, Ronin, and especially by his sister, Jodeen Steelman, and his brother-in-law, Ron (Dianah) West.

Mr. Shelton was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas Hamilton and Louella Shelton, and his brother, Thomas Owen Shelton.

Visitation with the family will be held Wednesday, June 14, at 1 p.m. until time of service at 4 p.m. at Higgins Funeral Home with Bro. John Hathcock officiating. There will also be a very special funeral send off at the Madison County Executive Airport in Meridianville, Ala. A reception will be held at 11 a.m., followed by services and a fly over honoring Mr. Shelton at 1 p.m.

Higgins Funeral Home is serving the family.

Original article can be found here: http://www.elkvalleytimes.com

Airbus A330-200, China Eastern Airlines, B-6099, flight MU-736: Incident occurred June 11, 2017 in Sydney, Australia




Images of a gaping hole on the engine cowling of a China Eastern Airlines Airbus A330-200 hit Chinese social media on Monday, following the plane’s emergency landing in Australia.

The crew of the flight from Sydney to Shanghai reported problems with the plane’s left engine shortly after takeoff on Sunday night.

The plane returned to Sydney airport and landed safely, with no reported injuries. Pictures posted by passengers on Chinese social media showed that a large section of the cowling on the jet’s Rolls-Royce Trent 772 engine had been either burned or torn away.

China Eastern confirmed the incident on its own social-media account, and praised the crew for acting decisively and ensuring the safety of those on board.

A Rolls-Royce spokesperson said the company was aware of the incident and “working closely with our customer and relevant partners to understand the cause of the issue.”

Airbus didn’t immediately respond to questions.

The Airbus A330-200 typically carries around 250 passengers. China Eastern didn’t say how many people were on Sunday’s flight.

In February, a China Eastern flight from London to Shanghai was forced to divert to an airport in Russia after experiencing engine trouble.

Source:  https://blogs.wsj.com

Investigators examining the cause of a gaping hole in the left engine casing of a China Eastern Airlines flight are yet to recover all the debris from the A330-200.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau yesterday began its formal investigation into Sunday night’s incident on flight MU736 as it took off from Sydney to fly to Shanghai.

Although some debris was retrieved from the runway, more is believed to have been fallen off in the local area as the plane circled Sydney on its return to the airport.

In a notice on the investigation website, the ATSB warned any aircraft debris “was unsafe to handle and should be reported to local police”.

Debris from the plane will play a crucial role in the ATSB investigation centred on “the engine malfunction” of the Airbus aircraft.

The investigation will also look at aircraft maintenance records, engine damage and debris, and data from the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder.

A similar incident occurred just a month ago in Cairo, involving an Egypt Air A330-200.

The aircraft have Rolls Royce Trent 772 engines, which have previously experienced an issue with air intake cowls due to acoustic panel collapse, and cracking due to acoustic vibration.

In Sunday night’s incident, the pilot became aware of a fault with the left engine and radioed Air Traffic Control.

After dumping fuel, flight MU736 returned to land at Sydney Airport without incident.

Aviation expert Byron Bailey said the China Eastern Airlines’ pilot made the right decision.

“The aircraft could not have continued to Shanghai as one engine could only reach 20,000-feet and would therefore burn up fuel quickly,” said Mr Bailey.

Last year China Eastern carried 569,235 passengers to and from Australia, representing 24.3 percent increase on the previous year.

Rolls Royce spokeswoman Erin Atan said they were working closely with China Eastern and “relevant partners to understand the cause of the issue”.

Australian Federation of Air Pilots safety and technical officer Marcus Diamond said it was likely Rolls Royce would need to issue a “fix” for the Trent 772 engine based on Sunday night’s incident, and the one in Cairo last month.

“They definitely will be looking at what they call certification,” said Mr Diamond.

“They’ll have to fix it, to provide assurances for other operators of this aircraft.”

He said to some extent, the aviation industry was still learning how carbon fibre responded to different situations.

“Because they’re making aircraft lighter and lighter, with more and more light materials, they’re not as sturdy,” Mr Diamond said.

“They’re still built to certification standards and are able to lift more payload, but they’re not made of aluminium and rivets and we’re still learning how this sort of stuff responds.”

No-one on board the China Eastern flight was hurt in Sunday night’s incident, and all 221 passengers were rebooked on other flights to reach their destination.


Read more here: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au

A disintegrating fan or a loose engine part are considered the most likely causes of a gaping hole in the left engine covering of a China Eastern Airlines' A330 in Sydney.

The pilot became aware of an engine fault within seconds of takeoff from Sydney at 8.30 Sunday night, and radioed Air Traffic Control.

Passengers on board flight MU736 to Shanghai, reported hearing a loud bang then a burning smell sparking some concern.

The giant tear in the engine cowling that could be seen from the plane only served to heighten the alarm.

Air Traffic Controllers warned other aircraft landing in Sydney of the "engine loss" and raced to get a runway inspection completed.

In just over an hour, the A330 was safely back on the ground, and the 221 passengers deboarded.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau yesterday began an investigation, focusing on the Rolls Royce Trent 772 engine.

Airbus spokesman Ted Porter said they would assist investigators where required.

"We are in contact with the airline and Rolls-Royce and will support the investigation of this engine issue," said Mr Porter.

It was the second incident resulting in damage to an A330's left engine cowling in a month, following on from a strikingly similar occurrence involving an Egypt Air plane in Cairo.

Aviation expert, Byron Bailey, a former Boeing 777 pilot, said it looked to him like "the fan blade detached from the large fan at the front of the engine and caused a penetration of the cowling".

"The interesting common denominator of the China Airlines A330, Egypt Air A330 one month ago in Cairo, and the magnificently handled Qantas A380 engine blow-up in Singapore years ago appears to be the very efficient Trent 700 engine," said Mr. Bailey.

"I guess Rolls Royce, the manufacturer of the Trent series of engines, will be now be rapidly finding out the cause of this engine " blow-up" and issuing instructions to airlines if any action such as immediate inspection is required."

Fellow aviation expert, Trevor Jensen, said if the engine had recently undergone work, a loose part may have caused the damage to the cowling.

"It is very unusual," said Mr. Jensen.

China Eastern Airlines' General Manager for the Oceania region, Kathy Zhang, said the A330 remained under investigation at Sydney Airport.

"All passengers and crew members were landed safely. They were then arranged accommodation by China Eastern Airlines," said Ms. Zhang.

"Today the passengers have been arranged to fly to their destinations on either China Eastern flights or other airlines."

Story and photo gallery:  https://www.northernstar.com.au

Grumman AA-5B Tiger, N74262: Incident occurred June 12, 2017 in Naples, Collier County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N74262

Aircraft force landed on a highway.  

Date: 12-JUN-17
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N74262
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Aircraft Model: AA5B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NAPLES
State: FLORIDA





A single-engine airplane made an emergency landing on the Alligator Alley section of Interstate 75 Monday morning near the Collier-Broward County line after the pilot said he lost power in the plane, a Florida Highway Patrol spokesman said.

The landing happened at about 10 a.m. Ken Watson, a regional recruiter for the FHP, confirmed that the pilot's name is William James McKay, 49, a Maitland resident. McKay declined to be interviewed Monday morning.

McKay had been flying from Key West to Okeechobee Monday morning, with a final destination of Orlando. Maitland is an Orlando suburb.

Story and video: http://www.naplesnews.com










COLLIER COUNTY, Fla. - A small plane made an emergency landing Monday morning on Interstate 75 in Collier County, just west of the Broward County line.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot of the Grumman American AA5B lost power and made an emergency landing on the stretch of I-75 known as Alligator Alley about 10:30 a.m.

A view from Sky 10 showed the plane in the grass median.

No injuries were reported.

A check of the plane's registration shows that it belongs to Seminole County resident William McKay.

The FAA is investigating.

Story and video:  https://www.local10.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N13306, YWP Air Inc: Accident occurred June 12, 2017 in Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

YWP Air Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N13306

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA203 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 12, 2017 in Suffolk, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N13306
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 12, 2017, about 0615 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172M, N13306, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a golf course near Suffolk, New York. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a corporation and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight originated from Brookhaven Airport (HWV), Shirley, New York, and was destined for Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Bayport, New York.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to purchase fuel at HWV and then return to 23N. While en route to 23N, he heard a "loud pop" and the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot checked the fuel selector and mixture, and then searched for a place to perform a forced landing. He declared an emergency, unsuccessfully attempted to restart the engine, and turned toward a golf course. During the landing, the airplane struck a tree, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, no debris or water was noted following an examination of the fuel in the airplane and the fuel tank where the fuel was purchased. An external fuel tank was connected to the engine in an attempt to operate the engine, however, it would not start. The left and right magnetos were removed, and when the propeller was rotated by hand, both magneto drive gears would not rotate.

The engine was retained for further examination.




BELLPORT, Long Island (WABC) -- The pilot of a small plane made an emergency landing on the Bellport Country Club in Bellport, Long Island Monday morning.

Police say the pilot of a 1973 Cessna 172M airplane notified MacArthur Airport Tower that he was experiencing engine failure.

The pilot chose to make an emergency landing near the 12th hole on the golf course of the country club at about 6:15 a.m., according to police.

The plane clipped a tree, causing minor damage to one of the plane's wings and landed safely.

The pilot refused medical attention and no one on the ground was injured. The FAA was notified and responded.


Story and video:  http://abc7ny.com



A single-engine Cessna made an emergency landing on the golf course at the Bellport Country Club after suffering a midair engine failure at about 6:15 a.m. Monday, June 12, 2017, officials said.

A description on the Bellport Country Club golf course website calls it “a hole that nightmares are made of.”

Not so for the pilot who landed his single-engine Cessna in the 12th hole rough Monday morning — managing to miss the green-side bunkers and the left-side water hazard — after suffering what the Federal Aviation Administration described as a in-flight engine failure over Great South Bay.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.newsday.com

Velocity XL-RG-5, N735D, Net Trek Inc: Incident occurred June 11, 2017 at Middle Peninsula Regional Airport (KFYJ), West Point, King William County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond

Net Trek Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N735D

Aircraft on takeoff, went off the end of the runway into a marsh.

Date: 11-JUN-17
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N735D
Aircraft Make: VELOCITY
Aircraft Model: XLRG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: WEST POINT
State: VIRGINIA

Piper PA-25-260, N8578L, Hood River Soaring: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 in Hood River County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Hood River Soaring: http://registry.faa.gov/N8578L

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA331
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Hood River, OR
Aircraft: PIPER PA25, registration: N8578L

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft force landed in an orchard.

Date: 12-JUN-17
Time: 00:20:00Z
Regis#: N8578L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA25
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: HOOD RIVER
State: OREGON

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N33FM, Van Bortel Aircraft Inc: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 at Portage County Airport (KPOV), Ravenna, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland

Van Bortel Aircraft Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N33FM

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA337
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Ravenna, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N33FM

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed short of the runway.

Date: 11-JUN-17
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N33FM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: RAVENNA
State: OHIO

Cessna 180K Skywagon, N71MH, Schultz Engineered Products Inc: Accident occurred June 11, 2017 Belmar, Monmouth County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro

Schultz Engineered Products Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N71MH

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Belmar, NJ
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N71MH

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and gear collapsed.

Date: 11-JUN-17
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N71MH
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BELMAR
State: NEW JERSEY

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N7351P: Incident occurred June 11, 2017 at Albany International Airport (KALB), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N7351P

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed. 

Date: 11-JUN-17
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: N7351P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALBANY
State: NEW YORK

Cirrus SR22, N667SR, Red Raider Aviation LLC: Incident occurred June 10, 2017 at San Angelo Regional Airport (KSJT), Tom Green County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock

Red Raider Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N667SR

Aircraft, while enroute experienced a birdstrike. Landed without incident.

Date: 10-JUN-17
Time: 00:21:00Z
Regis#: N667SR
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
City: SAN ANGELO
State: TEXAS

Cirrus SR22, N424AT, FlyAwayHome LLC: Incident occurred June 10, 2017 at Roche Harbor Airport (WA09), San Juan County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle

FlyAwayHome LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N424AT

Aircraft on landing, struck a deer.

Date: 10-JUN-17
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N424AT
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROCHE HARBOR
State: WASHINGTON

Hughes 269C, N7482F, Wade and Son Inc: Accident occurred June 10, 2017 at Vicksburg Tallulah Regional Airport (KTVR), Madison Parish, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Tallulah, LA
Aircraft: HUGHES 269C, registration: N7482F
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2017, about 1320 central daylight time, a Hughes 269C helicopter, N7482F, was substantially damaged during a ground resonance event at the Vicksburg Tallulah Regional Airport (TVR), Tallulah, Louisiana. The pilot was not injured. The helicopter was registered to Wade and Son, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that the cyclic trim was not re-centered before takeoff as noted on the checklist. Instead, it remained at a nearly full forward position from the previous flight. The engine start and run-up were normal. At full power for takeoff, the helicopter began to vibrate. The pilot "rolled the throttle off" and lowered the collective; however, the vibrations became worse and the helicopter "began to destroy itself." He noted that if the cyclic had been centered, the vibrations would have stopped. However, with the trim full forward, the rotor blades began hitting the stops causing the vibrations. The pilot added that there were no malfunctions or failures with the helicopter before the accident.

The helicopter came to rest upright on the airport ramp. A postaccident examination revealed that the engine had partially separated from the airframe and the main rotor gearbox had separated from the rear bulkhead. The landing skid dampers appeared intact, with no visible damage or fluid leakage.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
  
Wade and Son Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N7482F

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Tallulah, LA
Aircraft: HUGHES 269C, registration: N7482F
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 10, 2017, about 1320 central daylight time, a Hughes 269C helicopter, N7482F, was substantially damaged during a ground resonance event at the Vicksburg Tallulah Regional Airport (TVR), Tallulah, Louisiana. The pilot was not injured. The helicopter was registered to Wade and Son, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that when he increased engine power for liftoff the helicopter entered ground resonance. He reduced engine power and lowered the collective. He subsequently shut the helicopter down.

The helicopter came to rest upright on the airport ramp. An initial postaccident examination revealed that the engine had partially separated from the airframe and the main rotor gearbox had separated from the rear bulkhead during the event.

SkyWest Airlines, Bombardier CRJ700, N715SK: Incident occurred June 10, 2017 at O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Chicago, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Chicago
SkyWest Airlines; St. George, Utah
GE Aviation; Cincinnati, Ohio
Bombardier; Montreal, QC
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Ottawa, ON

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

SkyWest Airlines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N715SK

NTSB Identification: ENG17IA028
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of SKYWEST AIRLINES INC
Incident occurred Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Chicago, IL
Aircraft: BOMBARDIER INC CL 600 2C10, registration: N715SK
Injuries: 64 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On June 10, 2017, at about 1750 central daylight time, a SkyWest Airlines Bombardier CRJ700, N715SK, experienced an uncontained No. 1 engine failure during takeoff from Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD)- Chicago, Illinois. The crew reported hearing a loud bang, followed by a reduction in power, and a No. 1 engine fire warning. The crew declared an emergency and returned to ORD for an uneventful landing. Aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) crews met the airplane on the runway. ARFF did not observe fire or smoke, and the airplane was cleared to taxi to the gate. There were no injuries reported to the passengers or crew. The flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and was a regularly scheduled flight from ORD to Bishop International Airport (FNT)- Flint, Michigan.

A preliminary visual inspection of the No. 1 engine was conducted by maintenance crews at ORD and extensive turbine damage and a large hole in the cowl were reported. Multiple small impact marks were observed on the fuselage, aft of the No. 1 engine.

Piper PA-28-181, N9763K, Bahia Aviation LLC: Accident occurred June 10, 2017 at Hartford-Brainard Airport (KHFD), Hartford, Connecticut

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Bahia Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9763K


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA345
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Hartford, CT
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N9763K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, during the landing, the airplane bounced. She added that she attempted to correct, but the propeller struck the runway. The pilot taxied the airplane to the ramp without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Mooney M20C, N6256U: Incident occurred June 10, 2017 at Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (KFNL), Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N6256U

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 10-JUN-17
Time: 01:50:00Z
Regis#: N6256U
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FORT COLLINS
State: COLORADO















AIRCRAFT:   1962 Mooney M20C, N6256U, S/N 2095

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:  Lycoming, O-360-A1D, L-4559-36

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N: Hartzell, HC-C2YR-1B, CH35182B

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   2473 hours TT Since New

PROPELLER:    MOH on 9/15/2009, TIS NA  

AIRFRAME:     2473 hours                 

OTHER EQUIPMENT:
Garmin GMA340      
Audio Panel

Garmin GNS430W 
GPS/NAV/COM

King KX155   
NAV/COM

Garmin GTX330/ES  
Transponder with ADS-B out

Bendix ADF T12-B  
ADF

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft landed with the landing gear retracted

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  
Propeller-both blades are curled back
Left and right nose gear doors-scraped
Belly skins-severely scraped
Belly antennae-scraped, bent
Belly air vent-scraped, dented
Belly rotating beacon-broken
Tail tie down rng-bent
Left and right inboard flap hinges-scraped, ground down
Exhaust pipe-scraped                                 

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:    Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (FNL), Fort Collins, Colorado   


http://www.avclaims.com/N6256U.htm