Friday, August 23, 2019

American Airlines, Airbus A321: Incident occurred August 22, 2019 at Jacksonville International Airport (KJAX), Duval County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft struck a bird on landing.

Date: 22-AUG-19
Time: 21:00:00Z
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: AAL2023
City: JACKSONVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Pipistrel Sinus 912 LSA, N331AV: Accident occurred August 22, 2019 in Oxford, Sumter County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

San Antonio Light Sport Aircraft Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N331AV

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA505
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 22, 2019 in Oxford, FL
Aircraft: Pipistrel SINUS 912, registration: N331AV

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed in a field and flipped over.

Date: 22-AUG-19
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N331AV
Aircraft Make: PIPISTREL
Aircraft Model: SINUS 912
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: OXFORD
State: FLORIDA

Hawaiian Airlines, Airbus A330-200, N218HA: Incident occurred August 22, 2019 at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (PHNL), Honolulu, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu

Aircraft declared an emergency due to fire in cargo hold and smoke in cockpit.

Hawaiian Airlines Inc


https://registry.faa.gov/N218HA

Date: 22-AUG-19
Time: 21:22:00Z
Regis#: N218HA
Flight#: HAL47
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
City: HONOLULU
State: HAWAII



Hawaiian Airlines said in a statement tonight it was determined that “a seal failed in the aircraft’s left engine, causing oil to leak onto hot parts of the plane’s engine and air conditioning pressurization system, resulting in smoke in the cabin.” The airline said performance of the engine was not affected.

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Passengers on a Hawaiian Airlines flight had to evacuate the plane from emergency slides this morning after it landed in Honolulu due to reports of smoke in the cargo hold and cabin.

All passengers and crew evacuated the aircraft and seven passengers were taken to hospitals with smoke inhalation symptoms, according to an airline official.

First responders met flight Hawaiian Airlines Flight 47, which had concluded a flight from Oakland, Calif., to Honolulu, on the runway at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

Hawaiian Airlines said there were 184 passengers and seven crew aboard the plane, which landed at 11:36 a.m. shortly after an in-flight emergency was declared due to reports of smoke in the cargo hold and cabin.

“At this time, we are aware of seven passengers who were transported to local hospitals due to smoke-related symptoms,” Hawaiian Airlines said in a statement. “All other passengers and crew have deplaned and have been transported via bus to a terminal. We sincerely apologize to our passengers for this incident and thank them for their cooperation in the evacuation. We are working with airport officials and first responders to support our passengers and respond to this event.”

State Department of Transportation spokesman Tim Sakahara said no smoke or fire was visible from the outside when the plane landed.

The Airbus 321 plane landed safely on Runway 4R at Honolulu, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, and passengers deplaned on the runway.

The FAA said it will investigate the incident.

Story and video ➤ https://www.staradvertiser.com




Hawaiian Airlines flight HA 47 carrying 184 passengers landed safely at Daniel K. Inouye international airport after the crew declared an in-flight emergency due to reports of smoke in the cargo hold and cabin.

The smoke began to fill the cabin about 30 minutes prior to landing. The plane was flying from Oakland to Honolulu.

Passengers evacuated the plane via emergency slides on the tarmac.

At this time, we are aware of seven passengers who were transported to local hospitals due to smoke-related symptoms.

Story and video ➤ https://www.khon2.com

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N1920Q: Accident occurred August 22, 2019 in Rangeley, Franklin County, Maine


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Acadian Seaplanes

https://registry.faa.gov/N1920Q

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA513
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 22, 2019 in Rangeley Lake, ME
Aircraft: Cessna A185, registration: N1920Q

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed into a lake on takeoff. 

Date: 22-AUG-19
Time: 19:39:00Z
Regis#: N1920Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: A185
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: RANGELEY
State: MAINE





RANGELEY — Two men reportedly escaped with minor injuries Thursday afternoon after their floatplane went down on Rangeley Lake near Russell Cove.

Two men received minor injuries when a floatplane crashed on Rangeley Lake on Thursday afternoon. Photo courtesy of Rangeley Rescue Capt. Tiger Sikes

Pilot David Taisey, 69, of Pownal and passenger Mike Koob, 53, of Oquossoc were flying to Bangor, Stephen McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety, said.

Both men were treated at a local hospital and released.

An official from the Maine Warden Service said the plane went down about 3:30 p.m. at the northeast point of the lake.

Officials said it crashed during takeoff and landed upside down on the water. A video taken by a man boating on the lake shows the plane was only about 50 feet above the lake when it overturned and crashed.

“I couldn’t hear a thing,” witness Derek Hoyt told WGME. “I just noticed it had gone up into the air. From the distance I was at, it didn’t look like it went more than 30 feet in the air, and then it just plummeted downward and crashed.”

When fire crews first arrived, they found the men swimming back to shore, according to witnesses.

Among the rescuers who responded were Franklin County Sheriff’s deputies and crews from the Rangeley Fire and Rescue Department.

The Federal Aviation Administration was expected to be called to investigate the cause.

The plane was being towed 6 miles to Oquossoc, McCausland said, and is owned by Acadian Seaplanes of Rangeley.

Story and video ➤ https://www.sunjournal.com














AIRCRAFT:   1977 CESSNA A185F N1920Q, s/n: 18503502 

Last 100 hour inspection on 07/24/19 at TT 2582                                                 

ENGINE:       TCM IO-520-D, s/n: 566463

Last 100 hour inspection on 07/24/19 at TT 2582; TSMOH 781.2                                                                                                                                

PROPELLER:    MTV-9-D, s/n: 150180

Last 100 hour inspection on 07/24/19 at TSN 781.2

EQUIPMENT:    

Garmin GTX 345

Garmin GTR 225

Garmin GMA 340

Garmin GTN 650

Garmin G5 attitude

Garmin G5 HSI

Garmin GA 35

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT: Upon take-off the pilot indicated he thought the right float hit something in the water. The aircraft veered right after liftoff and flipped in the water. 

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT: Rangeley, Maine

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com

Honda HA-420 HondaJet, N49HJ: Incident occurred August 22, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas

Aircraft heating element in pilot's side of windshield caught fire.

VLJ HA-420 LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N49HJ

Date: 22-AUG-19
Time: 18:26:00Z
Regis#: N49HJ
Aircraft Make: HONDA
Aircraft Model: HA420
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 135
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Cirrus SR22 GTS TC, N404PE: Accident occurred August 22, 2019 in Burnsville, Yancey County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N404PE

Location: Burnsville, NC
Accident Number: ERA19LA257
Date & Time: 08/22/2019, 1654 UTC
Registration: N404PE
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 22, 2019, about 1254 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N404PE, was substantially damaged following an encounter with weather and deployment of the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) near Burnsville, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and the student pilot-rated passenger were not injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airplane departed Donaldson Field Airport (GYH), Greenville, South Carolina at 1216, with an intended destination of Medina Municipal Airport (1G5), Medina, Ohio.

In a written statement, the pilot reported that he completed a flight from 1G5 to GYH earlier in the day. He serviced the airplane with fuel, reviewed the weather, and "confirmed there were no changes from the morning briefing" that he had obtained from Leidos flight service prior to departure from 1G5.

The airplane was initially cleared to 10,000 ft and later the Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) controller cleared the airplane to 15,000 ft and ultimately to 17,000 ft at the pilot's request. The pilot noted both visually and on his NEXRAD radar display that "thunderstorms were building with cumulonimbus clouds along the route of flight." The controller advised a 30°e left turn when the clearance to 17,000 ft was issued, and the pilot "believed" the new course and altitude would place the airplane "on top of the build-up" and "between the two cells."

As the airplane approached the "developing weather system" the NEXRAD display showed the airplane's path "between" the two cells and that the airplane would penetrate clouds that "did not appear dangerous." Upon entry into the clouds, the airplane encountered "very strong" turbulence. At that time, the pilot disabled the autopilot and took control of the airplane and leveled the wings "with a climbing attitude." The airplane was below the clouds, and the pilot could see the airplane was "heading for a mountain (Mount Mitchell, North Carolina, 6,684 ft elevation)."

The pilot initiated a climb to "avoid the mountain" when the engine stopped producing power. The pilot then decided there was not sufficient time to attempt remedial actions and chose instead to deploy the CAPS system.

Preliminary radar and voice communication data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after the airplane levelled at 17,000 ft, the controller asked, "What would you like to do for the weather?" The controller informed the pilot that the 30° left turn directed earlier had been for traffic conflict resolution. The pilot replied, "Looks like this heading will work for a while."

About 7 minutes later, the pilot announced, "four papa echo has pulled the chute." The controller replied, "you have lost your engine?" and the airplane responded, "engine is lost, had a situation through the weather there, lost control, engine is gone." There were no further communications with the airplane.

In a telephone interview with an FAA aviation safety inspector, the student pilot-rated passenger, who was seated in the left seat, stated he and the pilot had been "making that trip for 4.5 years." He said that when the airplane penetrated the clouds the flight became "rough" and the airplane "stalled because of the weather." The passenger stated that the airplane was in a spin when it descended below the base of the clouds, and the pilot then deployed the CAPS.

The airplane came to rest in trees on Mount Mitchell.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single engine and instrument airplane. He was issued a second-class medical certificate on March 13, 2019. The pilot reported 5,343 total hours of flight experience, of which 1,907 were in the accident airplane make and model.

The student pilot-rated passenger was issued his student pilot and third-class medical certificate on November 5, 2004. He reported 15 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane was manufactured in 2007, and equipped with a Continental IO-550-N1B, 315-horsepower reciprocating engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 28, 2019, at 3,187 total aircraft hours.

At 1642, the weather reported at Asheville Regional Airport (AVL), Asheville, North Carolina, located 28 miles south of the accident site, included a broken ceiling at 6,000 ft, wind from 340° at 9 knots, and 10 miles visibility. The temperature was 28 degrees C, the dew point was 18 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.13 inches of mercury.

Review of weather data revealed that Convective SIGMET 46E with thunderstorms, AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions, and AIRMET Zulu for icing above 12,000 – 14,000 ft were in effect along the airplane's route of flight.

The pilot reported that "Convective SIGMETs were received for route of flight."

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site by helicopter and retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N404PE
Model/Series: SR22 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAVL, 2165 ft msl
Observation Time: 1642 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 28 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Greenville, SC (GYH)
Destination: Medina, OH (1G5)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.745278, -82.288333




BURNSVILLE, North Carolina -  Federal officials have located a crashed plane in the mountains of Western North Carolina on Thursday, according to Federal Aviation Administration officials.

According to an Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson, the Cirrus SR22t was found on a ridge on Mount Mitchell and its parachute helped it crash-land.

The two people on board were shaken but walking around after the crash and one of them was taken to the hospital to be checked out, according to Yancey County emergency officials.

The crash site was about half a mile off Mount Mitchell State Park property on the west side of the Black Mountain Range, emergency officials said. Had the plane come down just a foot or two over from where it landed, the situation could have had a very different ending, officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice about the aircraft after a pilot reported weather-related problems. Air traffic controllers lost contact with the flight shortly before 1 p.m., the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane departed from the Donaldson Center Airport in Greenville, South Carolina, and it was headed to the Medina Municipal Airport in Ohio.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, local officials will release the names of the people on board.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wyff4.com





YANCEY COUNTY, N.C. (WLOS) - Two men are recovering after surviving a plane crash Thursday afternoon near Mount Mitchell State Park.

Authorities say the Cirrus SR22 went down less than a mile away from the ranger station.

News 13 was on the scene as the pilot and passenger arrived back at the Mount Mitchell Ranger Station, where they were treated for minor injuries. One of the men was taken to the hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the pilot reported weather-related problems and air traffic controllers lost contact with the flight shortly before 1 p.m.

Officials say park rangers heard an explosion and watched the plane parachute to the ground.

The Yancey County sheriff says the plane was found around 2:30 p.m. and the two passengers were helped away from the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the plane took off from Donaldson Center Airport in Greenville, South Carolina, and was heading for Medina Municipal Airport in Ohio.

South Toe Fire, Yancy County Sheriff, Mt. Mitchell State Park, Blue Ridge Parkway, Yancey County Emergency, Garren Creek Fire have all responded to the scene.

The sheriff said there are no reports of a fire, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wlos.com

Grob G103 Twin II, N901BG: Accident occurred August 22, 2019 in San Antonio, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

San Antonio Soaring Society Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N901BG

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA506
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 22, 2019 in San Antonio, TX
Aircraft: Grob G103, registration: N901BG

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft canopy came off after being hit by tow rope.

Date: 21-AUG-19
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N901BG
Aircraft Make: GROB
Aircraft Model: G103
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SAN ANTONIO
State: TEXAS

Van's RV-4, N844: Incident occurred August 22, 2019 in Nine Mile Falls, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Aircraft landed in a field.

https://registry.faa.gov/N844

Date: 23-AUG-19
Time: 03:14:00Z
Regis#: N844
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MILE FALLS
State: WASHINGTON



Spokane County Sheriff's Office

Spokane County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the scene of small aircraft that experienced a mechanical problem forcing the pilot to make an emergency landing in an open field. The pilot and the sole occupant was uninjured.

On August 22, 2019, at approximately 7:30 p.m., Spokane County Sheriff’s Deputies responded a small airplane, Van’s RV-4, that was forced to land in an open field near the 14400 block of N. Dover Road.

The uninjured adult male pilot stated the aircraft experienced a mechanical failure just after takeoff from the Deer Park Airport. Unable to safely keep the small plane in the air, he located an open field and made an emergency landing. The plane was damaged due to the hard landing but intact.





NINE MILE FALLS, Washington  — A pilot is okay after making a hard landing in a field in  Nine Mile Falls Thursday evening.

Spokane County Sheriff’s Deputies responded a Van’s RV-4 plane  that was forced to land in an open field off of N. Dover Road. 

It happened around 7:30 p.m., the sheriff's office said. 

Fire crews on scene said the pilot is okay. No other injuries were reported.

The pilot told deputies the aircraft experienced a mechanical failure just after he took off  from the Deer Park Airport.  The pilot was unable to safely keep the small plane in the air, so he located an open field and made an emergency landing.  The plane was damaged due to the hard landing, but is still intact the sheriff's office said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.krem.com




No one was injured when a small plane carrying two people made an emergency landing in an open field near Nine Mile Falls on Thursday night, according to the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office.

The pilot told sheriff’s deputies the aircraft, a Van’s R-4, experienced a mechanical failure just after takeoff from the Deer Park Airport around 7:30 p.m.

Unable to safely keep the small plane in the air, he located an open field near the 14400 block of North Dover Road and made an emergency landing, the sheriff’s department said in a Facebook post.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.spokesman.com