Saturday, August 13, 2016

Cripple Creek, Wythe County, Virginia: Man has copter land in yard

Donald Anderson Sr. routinely sees deer and other wildlife visiting the hayfield behind his Cripple Creek farmhouse, but it’s not very often he finds that a helicopter has decided to visit that same patch of grass.

Anderson, who is hard of hearing, said he didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary Aug. 3 when a large Bell 412 helicopter landed an estimated 50 yards behind his home. He lives in a secluded area in the Cripple Creek community, so he was surprised to find a stranger knocking on his front door.

“I didn’t hear anything,” Anderson said. “I was in the house watching the news. I didn’t hear anyone come up the drive, but there was a knock on the door and there was a man standing on the edge of the porch. He said he had to land his helicopter in the back of my house, that he didn’t hurt anything, it just wasn’t safe to fly and he had to land.”

Virginia State Police Trooper Brandon Frye said the police didn’t catch wind of the incident until the following day when a concerned resident from the area called to report suspicious activity.

Frye said the two men who occupied the helicopter were with the U.S. military. He said the pair was travelling in a leased helicopter used to track weather patterns across the country from New Mexico. Frye explained that they had just taken off from Mountain Empire Airport in nearby Smyth County when a warning light came on and they were forced to land.

Smyth-Wythe Airport Commission Chairman Curtis Pennington, who also owns Hangar 7 at the airport, said the stranded pilots had initially intended to bring the helicopter to his hangar for repair, but were unable to make the short trip to the next county.

Pennington explained that the pilots landed the helicopter as a precaution when the fire warning light came on in the cockpit.

“Anything with a jet engine has censors all over it,” Pennington said. “If the temperature goes up those censors tell you you’ve got a fire.”

Pennington said the warning light was believed to have come on as a result of an exhaust leak near a temperature probe.

“When the light goes on that tells you you’ve got a fire, you land,” he said.

Without being able to get the helicopter to the hangar for repair, Anderson said his visitors were forced to leave the rotorcraft behind while he took them into town to find lodging and transportation.

It would be four days between the time of their arrival and the time of their departure late Sunday evening. It took that long for an aircraft mechanic from Roanoke to make it out to the sequestered farmland to repair the out-of-commission helicopter.

“It was a pretty high-priced machine, so they didn’t want to leave it there long,” Anderson said.

This is not Wythe County’s first unexpected landing from a military helicopter, however.

In September 2009, a pilot with the Virginia Army National Guard was forced to make what the military calls a “hard landing” in an alfalfa patch on Huffard Farm between Wytheville and Rural Retreat.

During that incident the pilot was tasked with searching out marijuana plants that may have been in the area when the emergency landing was made. Unlike the more recent incident, that helicopter sustained heavy damage, but the pilot was uninjured.

Source:  http://www.swvatoday.com

Champion 7ECA Citabria, N9541S: Fatal accident occurred August 13, 2016 at Birchwood Airport (PABV), Chugiak, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16FA057
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Chugiak, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CHAMPION 7ECA, registration: N9541S
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to multiple witnesses at the airport, they observed the airplane perform several touch-and-go landings throughout the late morning and early afternoon on the day of the accident. They added that the pilot then landed and taxied to a local fuel vendor's facility and refueled. The pilot then departed. Two witnesses who were near the departure runway reported that, after the airplane departed, they heard the engine making a "pop pop" sound and that it then appeared to lose power. Another witness near the runway reported hearing the engine "sputtering" and added that the airplane appeared to stall. All the witnesses reported that they observed the airplane turn right steeply, that its right wing and nose dropped abruptly, and that it then descended in a steep, nose-down attitude, consistent with an aerodynamic stall. A postimpact fire immediately ensued, which destroyed the airplane.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The witnesses reported hearing noises consistent with an engine misfiring and it was likely losing power; however, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined based on the postaccident examination. After the loss of engine power, the pilot attempted a steep turn at low altitude, during which he failed to maintain proper airspeed and exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and a loss of control at too low of an altitude to recover.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain proper airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during a steep low-altitude turn following a loss of engine power, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of control at too low of an altitude to recover. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined because postaccident examination revealed no mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9541S 

NTSB Identification: ANC16FA057
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Chugiak, AK
Aircraft: CHAMPION 7ECA, registration: N9541S
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1330 Alaska daylight time, a Champion 7ECA (Citabria) airplane, N9541S, impacted terrain following a loss of engine power just after takeoff from Birchwood Airport, Chugiak, Alaska. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to the pilot and a co-owner and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the intended local flight.

According to multiple witnesses at Birchwood Airport, they observed the airplane perform several touch-and-go landings throughout the late morning and early afternoon on the day of the accident. They said that, just after 1300, the pilot made a full-stop landing and then taxied to a local fuel vendor's facility. 

During a postaccident interview, one of the witnesses stated that the accident airplane had been for sale and that the accident pilot had met him and a friend at Birchwood Airport about 1315 to show the potential buyer the airplane. The potential buyer reported that he "walked around the airplane" and noticed no mechanical problems and that the pilot told him that there were no mechanical problems with the airframe and engine. The pilot asked the potential buyer if he would like to go for a ride in the airplane, and the potential buyer declined and said he would only go for a ride if he offered to purchase the airplane. The pilot then started the airplane and departed from runway 2R, which was 2,200 ft long and 50 ft wide. The potential buyer said he watched the airplane as it departed and that, as it neared the departure end of the runway, it turned "steeply to the right about 90 degrees," followed by a nose-and-right-wing-low descent. The airplane subsequently descended behind a stand of trees and hangars and out of view. 

Two other witnesses, who were located near the departure end of runway 2R, reported that, after the airplane departed, they heard the engine making a "pop pop" sound and that it then appeared to lose power. Another witness reported hearing the engine "sputtering" and stated that the airplane appeared to stall. All the witnesses reported that they saw the airplane turn steeply to the right, the airplane's right wing and nose drop abruptly, and the airplane continue to descend nose down behind several hangars and impact terrain. A postimpact fire ensued, and the airplane was destroyed. 

A witness who was flying a helicopter about 1/2 mile east of Birchwood Airport before the accident reported hearing a male voice on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) stating that he was taking off from runway 2R and would make a right turnout. The helicopter pilot reported that he saw the accident airplane and that it appeared "lower than what I would expect." The airplane began an early right crosswind turn near the airport. The helicopter pilot noticed that the bank of the right turn appeared steep considering the low altitude of the airplane. The helicopter pilot reported that, about 90° into the right turn, he heard a male voice transmit on the CTAF, "oh [expletive]." Immediately after the radio transmission, the airplane "appeared to stall and enter a very nose down attitude." The helicopter pilot saw the airplane descend until it disappeared below the tree line. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on June 1, 2015, and contained no limitations. On the medical certificate application, the pilot reported a total time of 206 hours, with 0 hours in the last 6 months.

A review of the pilot's personal logbook revealed that he had a total of 194.2 flight hours, all of which were in single-engine airplanes. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 

The two-seat, tailwheel-equipped airplane was equipped with a 115-horsepower Lycoming O-235-C2C engine. The engine was equipped with a two-bladed McCauley metal propeller.

According to the airplane's maintenance logbook, the engine was installed on June 14, 1974. The last annual inspection of the airframe and engine was performed on April 2, 2016, at which time the engine total time was 1,313.02 hours, including 383.8 hours since its last major overhaul, and the airframe total time was 1,913.8 flight hours, including 383.8 hours since the last major overhaul. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The official weather observation station located at the Birchwood Airport was not reporting full METAR data at the time of the accident. The closest official weather observation station was located at the Wasilla Airport, Wasilla, Alaska, about 9 miles north of the accident site. At 1336, a METAR reported, in part, wind 090° at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 8,000 ft; temperature 64°F; dew point 48°F; altimeter setting 29.56 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was about 1,725 ft northeast of the departure end of runway 2R on the north side of a "t" intersection of Birchwood Spur Road and Stoltze Drive (A terrain image of the accident site location in relation to the departure runway is available in the public docket for this accident). The accident site was bordered on the north side by a wooded area and was about 260 ft east of airport hangars. The initial impact point was on about a 351° heading, and the airplane was resting upright on sloping terrain (about 45°), with the left wing closest to Birchwood Spur Road, and the right wing closest to the bottom of the sloping terrain at the "t" intersection. No wreckage path was present at the accident site. Ground scarring was limited to the planform area of the airplane. The wreckage was recovered and transported to a secure facility for examination.

The airplane exhibited about a 45°-nose-down crushing of its firewall with the vertical stabilizer displaced left about 10°. The airplane was destroyed by postimpact fire. The responding firefighting personnel reported that foam was used to extinguish the fire. All of the major airplane components were found at the accident site. 

The fuselage was twisted, and the empennage was displaced forward and to the left near the left wing. Various tube attachment points were separated due to impact forces. The majority of the airplane's fabric was melted by the postimpact fire except for several feet on the left wing's outboard section.

All the windscreens were missing. The cockpit and instrument gauges were consumed by the postimpact fire, and no readings/positions could be determined. The cockpit structure was crushed from downward impact forces. Flight control continuity was established from the control surfaces to the cockpit.

The propeller was separated from the crankshaft flange at the mechanical attachment point on the hub. All the propeller bolts were in place within the propeller hub. Neither of the propeller exhibited S-shaped bending and/or chordwise gouging/scratching. 

The engine's top spark plugs were removed, and the engine was rotated by hand. During the rotation, air was drawn in and expelled through each top spark plug hole. Engine and valve train continuity was confirmed. Borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed no mechanical anomalies. 

No liquid was found in the fuel system due to impact damage and the postimpact fire. The fuel selector was in the "on" position, and the selector manifold and selector valve did not contain debris upon disassembly. The carburetor heat was found in the "off" position. The throttle was found in the "full forward" position. 

The carburetor was found displaced from the engine, and the throttle/mixture controls were attached to their respective control arms of the carburetor. The fuel inlet screen did not contain debris. The carburetor fuel hose was consumed by the postimpact fire. The carburetor was opened, and the fuel bowl had no visible contaminants. The float assembly hinge remained secure at the mounting and was not damaged. The float pontoon and float arm were consumed by postimpact fire. 

During the engine examination, no evidence of anomalies, contamination, or malfunctions were found in any of the engine accessories, including the magnetos, ignition harness, induction system, spark plugs, oil pump, oil cooler, and oil filter. The cylinders, pistons, valve train, crankshaft, and other internal components showed no evidence of anomalies or malfunctions. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The Alaska State Medical Examiner, Anchorage, Alaska, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The autopsy report attributed the pilot's cause of death to multiple blunt force injuries with a contributing cause of thermal injuries. 

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the pilot's specimens. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, and drugs. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Fuel Testing 


The pilot purchased 10.45 gallons of 100 low-lead fuel at 1316. A fuel sample from the fuel facility was tested by the owner with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge present, and no fuel contamination was found. There were no reports of fuel contamination or operating anomalies from pilots of other airplanes that were fueled before or after the accident from the fuel pump at the airport.

NTSB Identification: ANC16FA057
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Chugiak, AK
Aircraft: CHAMPION 7ECA, registration: N9541S
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016 about 1330 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Champion 7ECA (Citabria) airplane, N9541S, was destroyed following a loss of engine power and subsequent loss of control just after takeoff from the Birchwood Airport, Chugiak, Alaska. The sole occupant, the private pilot, sustained fatal injuries. The flight was operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Birchwood Airport, about 1330.

According to various witnesses at the Birchwood Airport, they observed the accident airplane perform a series of touch-and-go landings throughout late morning and early afternoon on the day of the accident. They said that just after 1300, the airplane did a full stop landing, and it taxied to a local fuel vendor's facility. 

During an on-scene interview with the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on August 13, a witness to the accident explained that the accident airplane had been for sale and the accident pilot met him at the Birchwood Airport to show him the airplane. The potential buyer/witness reported that he and a friend met the pilot about 1315 to look at the airplane. The potential buyer looked the airplane over and noticed no mechanical problems with the airplane, and reported that the pilot said there with no mechanical problems with the airframe and engine. The pilot asked the potential buyer if he would like to go for a ride in the airplane, and the potential buyer declined citing he would only go for a ride if he made an offer for purchasing the airplane. After the pilot and potential buyer parted ways, the pilot started the airplane and departed from runway 2R. The potential buyer said he watched the airplane as it departed, and as it neared the departure end of runway 2R, it turned steeply to the right (90 degrees), followed by a nose and right wing low descent. The airplane subsequently descended behind a large stand of trees and hangars, and out of view.

During additional on-scene interviews with the NTSB IIC on August 13, witnesses situated closer to the departure end of runway 2R consistently reported that after the airplane departed, they heard the engine "sputtering and popping" and then it appeared to either lose partial or all power. The witnesses reported after the loss of engine power, they saw the airplane turn steeply to the right and then it appeared to stall. The airplane's right wing and nose dropped abruptly, and continued to descend, nose down. The airplane then descended behind several hangars, and impacted terrain. The witness reported that a postimpact fire ensued immediately after impact. 

The airplane's wreckage was subsequently incinerated by a postimpact fire. 

A witness who was flying a helicopter about 1/2 mile east of the Birchwood Airport prior to the accident, reported hearing a male voice on the Birchwood Airport common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) of 123.00 stating that he was taking off from runway 2R and would make a right turnout. The helicopter pilot reported that he obtained visual contact of the accident airplane and it appeared lower than he expected. The airplane began an early right crosswind turn in close proximity to the airport. The helicopter pilot noticed that the bank of the right turn appeared steep considering the low altitude of the airplane. At about 90 degrees into the right turn, the helicopter pilot reported hearing a male voice transmit on the CTAF frequency, "oh [expletive]." Immediately after the radio transmission, the airplane appeared to stall and enter a nose down attitude. The helicopter pilot observed the descent until the airplane disappeared below the tree line. 

The NTSB IIC and three air safety investigators from the NTSB traveled to the accident scene. The wreckage was recovered and transported to a secure facility for future examination of the airframe and engine.


The closest official weather observation station is located at the Wasilla Airport, about 9 miles to the north of the accident site. At 1336, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting, and stated in part: Wind 090 degrees (true) at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, few clouds at 8,000 feet; temperature 64 degrees F; dew point 48 degrees F; altimeter 29.56 inHg. The official weather observation station located at the Birchwood Airport was not reporting full METAR data at the time of the accident.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




Champion 7ECA, N9541S: Aircraft on landing, nosed over - Anchorage, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N9541S


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 9541S        Make/Model: 7ECA      Description: CHAMPION 7ECA
  Date: 10/20/2012     Time: 0126

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: ANCHORAGE   State: AK   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSED OVER, ANCHORAGE, AK

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0        
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0         
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0      


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ANCHORAGE, AK  (AL03)                 Entry date: 10/22/2012 

ANCHORAGE – Last updated at 11:40 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 13

A small, single-engine plane crashed near the Birchwood Airport Saturday afternoon, resulting in one fatality. The pilot has been identified as 43-year-old Christopher Lampshire. He was the only person onboard.

Chugiak Fire and Rescue Chief Clifton Dalton told KTVA the plane crash was reported at 1:32 p.m. on the north side of the airport. Eight units were initially dispatched and found the plane, a Champion Citabria, fully engulfed in flames. Anchorage Assistant Fire Chief Erich Scheunemann said the fire has since been put out.

The Anchorage Police Department also responded, including Chief Chris Tolley. He said witnesses reported seeing the plane taking off just before the crash.

“[The plane] crashed and immediately burst into flames, according to witnesses,” he said in an interview with KTVA. “We have some leads as to who it could be, as well as the registered owner. We don’t know for sure, so we want to confirm all those things.”

Scheunemann said two people were initially reported to be on the plane when it crashed but Tolley said only one death had been confirmed as of Saturday evening.

“We believe it’s just one at this time, but again, these things, you have to check with sources and things like that. What we can tell right now is one and we’re hoping that all it is is one, not that that’s any less traumatic,” Tolley explained.

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Mike Hodges later confirmed only one person had died in the crash — the pilot, Lampshire. Hodges also stated witnesses heard two popping noises before the crash. He said it was unclear where Lampshire was headed.

NTSB spokesman Clint Johnson said the wreckage was moved to a facility in Wasilla for further examination. He said investigators are not ruling anything out in terms of cause, but are looking into a possible “engine anomaly” based on the popping noises heard by witnesses.

Johnson also said the plane is a Champion, but the engine is made by Lycoming. A representative from that manufacturer is flying up from the Lower 48 to help with the investigation.

Lampshire’s family has been notified of his death.

No other injuries were reported as a result of the crash.

This is the second fatal plane crash at the Birchwood Airport this year. In April, another plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing four people onboard. The plane hit a young bald eagle, according to NTSB officials.


Source:   http://www.ktva.com



A Saturday afternoon air crash killed one person as a American Champion 7ECA Citabria, fully engulfed in flames upon impact near the intersection of the Birchwood Spur Road and Stoltze Road.

“The victim in today’s plane crash was not immediately identifiable,” Anita Shell, Anchorage Police Department spokesperson said via email to The Star Saturday night. “The body was taken to the medical examiner’s office. They will use dental records to confirm identification.”

Shell said police believe they know the victim’s identity, but will not release the name until they are 100 percent sure. She believes final identification will be made on Monday.

Initial reports of a second victim proved false.

“At this point, we don't have any indications of a second victim. Only one was found in the wreckage,” Shell said, adding that the victim’s age is older than 18.

The Facebook page Chugiak Neighborhood Watch posted around 2 p.m. with a photo and a video by a witness to the fire upon impact. The crash was reported at 1:32 p.m., according to Chugiak Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department Chief Clifton Dalton who said eight units were initially sent to the crash site on the northern side of the Birchwood Airport.

Mike Skupniewitz, a Chugiak resident, posted a photo of the fire and a video of the area where the plane crashed, labeled his post with the following, “Plane crash & burn. Birchwood engine quit on takeoff. Tried to turn back.”

APD Chief Chris Tolley was on site shortly after the crash report. He told KTVA television that, “(The plane) crashed and immediately burst into flames, according to witnesses.”

National Transportation Safety Board officials were still conducting their investigation in to the air crash as of Saturday night. Mike Hodges, an NTSB spokesperson, said the plane crashed shortly after taking off from runway 2 right. He said witnesses report hearing two popping noises before the crash.

Due to the air crash site’s close proximity to the road, the Birchwood Spur Road was closed for several hours denying direct access to the Birchwood Recreation and Shooting Park facility and the northern side of the airport. APD sent out a Nixle alert to notify drivers of the closure.

Airport hangar and land owner Lee Wareham opened the gate near his hangar at APD request allowing APD to use a pilot car to escort commuters past the Birchwood Hangar Association’s 24 condo-style hangars to and from the southern and northern sides of the airport while investigation of the crash continued.

The Champion Citabria is a single-engine, two-seat aircraft manufactured by the Champion Aircraft Corporation in Osceola, Wis. Its fuselage and tail surfaces are made of welded metal tubing. Its outer shape of the fuselage is created with a combination of wooden formers and longerons – the longitudinal structural component of an aircraft's fuselage often referred to as the stringer – that are covered with fabric.


Source:  http://www.alaskastar.com




ANCHORAGE (KTUU) A plane crash Saturday right outside of the Birchwood Airport kills one according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

“Witnesses report hearing two loud pops prior to impact,” said Mike Hodges NTSB Aviation Accident investigator. “There was one occupant on board who sustained fatal injuries.”

Scotty Smith was at his family's hangar at the Birchwood airport just before the plane took off. Smith a photojournalist at Channel 2 just happened to be in the area on his day off.

“I actually heard the plane taking off, and the engine was sounding pretty rough it was sputtering,” says Smith. “Then all of sudden there was a pop, and the plane went silent.”

Immediately Smith says he saw a pillar of smoke and ran over to the plane.

“It took me about thirty seconds to get over to it, and it was already completely engulfed in flames," said Smith

When Smith got to the plane he says three other people were already calling 911, and grabbing a fire extinguisher.

“I wish I could have done more, and I know everyone out there feels the same,” said Smith.

NTSB investigators say not much of the plane was left due to the fire, and plan to have preliminary reports out in 5 to 10 days.


Source:   http://www.ktuu.com




One person was killed Saturday when a small plane crashed on takeoff at the Birchwood Airport in Chugiak, about 25 miles northeast of Anchorage, authorities said.

The small plane completely burned "within a matter of minutes," making a rescue impossible for responding members of the Chugiak Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department, Chief Clifton Dalton said in a phone interview.


Officials initially said two people were in the two-seat Champion 7ECA plane, but that was not true. The extent of the fire damage made it difficult at first to determine the number of occupants.


The pilot's identity is being withheld until it can be confirmed by dental records, which may not happen until Monday, said Anchorage Police Department spokeswoman Anita Shell.


The National Transportation Safety Board's Alaska chief, Clint Johnson, said the plane's tail number would not be released until the pilot could be identified.


The Chugiak fire department responded to the crash around 1:30 p.m., Dalton said.


Firefighters arrived within five minutes of being dispatched, he said. By then, he added, the plane, laden with fuel, was "fully engulfed."


"We were able to get the aircraft put out pretty quick," Dalton said. But, he added: "There wasn't any opportunity to affect any rescue."


Later in the afternoon, the plane's frame was resting in a ditch next to the road that runs past the Birchwood airstrip's northeast end.


Witnesses said they saw the plane take off, then heard "a couple of pops," Johnson said in phone interview, before landing upside-down.


The engine was being removed from the plane and taken to Wasilla; it will be examined next week "with a fine-toothed comb" by a representative of the engine's manufacturer, Lycoming, Johnson said.


"Nothing is off the table for us," Johnson said. "But right now, our emphasis is on that engine."


Source:  http://www.adn.com


ANCHORAGE – Last updated at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 13

A small, single-engine plane crashed near the Birchwood Airport Saturday afternoon, resulting in one fatality.


Chugiak Fire and Rescue Chief Clifton Dalton told KTVA the plane crash was reported at 1:32 p.m. on the north side of the airport. Eight units were initially dispatched and found the plane, a Champion Citabria, fully engulfed in flames. Anchorage Assistant Fire Chief Erich Scheunemann said the fire has since been put out.


The Anchorage Police Department also responded, including Chief Chris Tolley. He said witnesses reported seeing the plane taking off just before the crash.


“[The plane] crashed and immediately burst into flames, according to witnesses,” he said in an interview with KTVA. “We have some leads as to who it could be, as well as the registered owner. We don’t know for sure, so we want to confirm all those things.”


Scheunemann said two people were initially reported to be on the plane when it crashed but Tolley said only one death had been confirmed.


“We believe it’s just one at this time, but again, these things, you have to check with sources and things like that. What we can tell right now is one and we’re hoping that all it is is one, not that that’s any less traumatic,” Tolley explained.


National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Mike Hodges later confirmed only one person had died in the crash. Hodges also stated witnesses heard two popping noises before the crash. He said it was unclear where the pilot, who has yet to be identified, was headed.


Tolley said the Federal Aviation Administration and the State Medical Examiner’s Office were notified.


Birchwood Spur Road was closed west of the railroad tracks, according to a Nixle released by APD. The Birchwood Airport is still open and vehicles are allowed to exit, police wrote.


No other injuries were reported as a result of the crash.


This is the second fatal plane crash at the Birchwood Airport this year. In April, another plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing four people onboard. The plane hit a young bald eagle, according to NTSB officials.

Cessna TU206C Turbo Skywagon, N29225: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 near Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6), Oklahoma









AIRCRAFT: 1968 Cessna TU-206 N29225 SN# U206-1177

ENGINE:       Continental TSIO-520C2B  SN# 178450-R

PROPELLER: McCauley D3A32C90N 

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:          3687.9 TT   848.9 SMOH (factory rebuilt 12/3/1994)     

PROPELLER:        TT unknown  -  340.7 SMOH on 9/25/2007 by Santa Monica Propeller     

AIRFRAME:     3,687.9 TTAF                      

OTHER EQUIPMENT:  KMA-20, KNS80, KY197, KX170B, AT-150  

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 8/13/2016 during skydiving operations engine lost power at approximately 900 feet with a hard forced landing that caused extensive damage to the aircraft.    

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:     Propeller bent, engine separated from firewall, nose gear sheared, cowling buckled, aft fuselage buckled and twisted, main gear stressed, damage to various flight controls including but not limited to rudder, elevators, ailerons, flaps.  Aircraft dismantled for transport to storage.    
                 
LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   Dawson Aircraft – Clinton, AR     

Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com/N29225.htm

http://registry.faa.gov/N29225

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA323
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Skiatook, OK
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206C, registration: N29225
Injuries: 7 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1100 central standard time, a Cessna TU206B airdrop configured airplane, N29225, registered to the pilot and operated by Gypsy Moth Skydive LLC of Benton, Kansas, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power while maneuvering in the vicinity of Skiatook, Oklahoma. All seven occupants, the private pilot and six passengers (parachutists), sustained minor injuries. The local flight was being operated under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91 and the intent was to climb to altitude and dispatch the 6 parachutists. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Skiatook Municipal Airport (2F6), Skiatook, Oklahoma, about 1030. 

According to the FAA, the airplane had departed 2F6 and was climbing through about 1,000 feet AGL when the engine lost power. The pilot maneuvered the airplane toward an open grassy field and avoided several rural buildings just prior to landing. The airplane landed hard in the field, resulting in structural buckling to the fuselage and empennage, and separation of the nose gear assembly. All of the occupants exited the airplane and several were treated at a local hospital. 

The accident site was located about 1 mile from 2F6. The airplane wreckage and engine will be examined on August 18, 2016, at a local secure facility.







SKIATOOK, Okla. (AP) -- The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says four people suffered non-life threatening injuries when a small airplane carrying skydivers made a forced landing in a field near Skiatook.

OHP Trooper Dwight Durant said the plane had seven people on board when it made a hard landing shortly after 11 a.m. in a field north of Highway 20 in Osage County and that none of the injuries appear serious.

Durant said the pilot told troopers that the plane lost engine power at about 1,000 feet after taking off from the Skiatook airport. Images show the aircraft with the tail crumpled sitting in a grassy field near a barn.

The plane is registered to a company out of Wichita, Kansas.

Source:  http://www.kjrh.com

Cessna 150M, N7649U: Incident occurred August 13, 2016 at Smith Point County Park, Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N7649U

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Farmingdale FSDO-11

Date: 13-AUG-16
Time: 15:27:00Z
Regis#: N7649U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SHIRLEY
State: New York

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON THE BEACH, NEAR SHIRLEY, NEW YORK





SHIRLEY, N.Y. (AP) — A small plane has made an emergency landing on a Long Island beach as beachgoers watched it glide down smoothly onto soft sand.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Arlene Salac says the two-seater's reported an engine problem before touching down around 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Smith Point County Park.

No injuries were reported.

Witness Frank Esposito tells Newsday the aircraft "came down nice and level," with its engine off, a few hundred yards from beachgoers. Onlooker Brie Claire Drost tells the newspaper the plane circled over the water and a parking lot before the pilot "did a great job landing."

FAA records show the single-engine Cessna 150 is registered to Adrien Bazelais of New York. A possible phone number for him was not accepting messages Saturday, and email messages weren't immediately returned.

Source:  http://www.sfgate.com

Cirrus SR20, Alidade Partners LLC, N314BF: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 near Des Moines International Airport (DSM), Iowa

ALIDADE PARTNERS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N314BF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Des Moines FSDO-61

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA320
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Des Moines, IA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N314BF
Injuries: 3 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1001 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation model SR20 single-engine airplane, N314BF, experienced a partial loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from Des Moines International Airport (DSM), Des Moines, Iowa. The pilot deployed the cirrus airframe parachute system (CAPS) and descended into powerlines and terrain. The airplane was subsequently destroyed by a postimpact fire. The pilot and 2 passengers sustained minor injuries. An additional passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to Alidade Partners, LLC, and was operated by the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area of the accident for the cross-country flight that was enroute to Warren County Airport (I68), Lebanon, Ohio.

The pilot reported that there were no airframe or engine anomalies identified during his preflight inspection. Additionally, the pilot reported that the fuel tanks were completely full and that there was no water or particulate contamination observed in the fuel samples he obtained during the preflight inspection. The pilot reported that the engine started without hesitation and idled normally. The engine also operated without any anomalies during a pretakeoff run-up. A normal takeoff was made on runway 31 from the taxiway Romeo intersection with the wing flaps set at 50-percent, electric fuel pump selected to boost, and the mixture-control selected to full rich. The pilot reported that the engine instrumentation indicated normal readings during the takeoff run and liftoff was achieved at 70 knots indicated airspeed. After liftoff, the pilot reduced airplane pitch and accelerated to 90-95 knots before retracting the wing flaps. The pilot reported that during initial climb, about 500 feet agl, he heard and felt a sudden reduction in engine power. He told the tower controller that he had engine trouble and requested an immediate landing. The tower controller cleared the pilot to enter a right downwind for landing on runway 31. The pilot reported that the he was unable to maintain altitude and, as a result, he deployed the cirrus airframe parachute system (CAPS). After a successful CAPS deployment, the airplane descended under the canopy and contacted powerlines shortly before impacting at the intersection of Park Avenue and SW 56th Street. The pilot remarked that the airplane had landed "remarkably soft" in a nose level attitude. After landing, a fire erupted from under the left wing and the pilot ordered his passengers to evacuate from the right cabin entry door. The airplane was subsequently destroyed by the postimpact fire.

The accident airplane, serial number 1055, registration number N314BF, was a four-place single engine low-wing airplane of primarily composite construction. The airplane was powered by a six-cylinder, 200 horsepower, Continental Motors model IO-360-ES16B engine, serial number 1000059, which drove a two-blade Hartzell model BHC-J2YF-1BF/F7694 constant speed propeller. According to airplane logbook entries, the most recent annual inspection was completed on May 19, 2016, at 1,565.6 hours total airframe time. As of the annual inspection, the engine had accumulated 555.2 hours since being rebuilt at the factory on March 20, 2009. According to the pilot, the airplane had accumulated about 66.5 hours since the annual inspection. The airplane was equipped with a cirrus airframe parachute system (CAPS) that was designed to recover the airplane and its occupants to the ground in the event of an inflight emergency.

The 42-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument ratings. He also held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on February, 8, 2016, with no limitations or restrictions. The pilot reported having accumulated 252 hours of total flight time, of which 211 hours were as pilot-in-command, and 66 hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The engine and propeller were not damaged by the postimpact fire. The engine remained attached to the firewall and the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange. The propeller exhibited torsional twisting, S-shaped spanwise bends, leading edge damage, and burnishing of the blade face and back. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation and both magnetos provided spark at all leads. The sparkplugs for cylinder Nos. 4 and 5 exhibited excessive black soot, consistent with an over-rich fuel/air mixture. The remaining sparkplugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies. Additionally, no anomalies were observed with the fuel servo, mechanical fuel pump, fuel flow divider, or fuel injectors. A disassembly of the oil filter did not reveal any metal debris. The intake coupler closest to the No. 1 cylinder, part number 654439-16, was observed partially disconnected from its associated intake tube. Although both coupler clamps were tight, the clamp, part number AN737TW74, closest to the No. 1 cylinder did not overlap its associated intake tube. Additionally, the cylinder No. 3 intake tube, part number 655224-1, was completely fractured at the cylinder mounting flange. The fractured No. 3 intake tube was retained for additional laboratory examination.



A small plane crashed at the intersection of Southwest 56th Street and Park Avenue on Saturday in Des Moines.

Authorities said the pilot and three passengers, all of whom were family, survived the crash, which happened shortly after 10 a.m.

The pilot had just taken off in a prop plane from the Des Moines International Airport, according to officials. He experienced some type of mechanical malfunction and realized he didn't have enough time to make it back to the airport. The pilot deployed a parachute which helped slow the plane down.

A fire ensued after the crash, leaving only the nose and one wing of the charred plane remaining. The pilot declined an interview with the Register.

"It looks a lot worse than it was," Des Moines Fire Department Captain Amy Montgomery said.

Des Moines Police Sgt. Paul Parizek said Park Avenue will be closed until Sunday as emergency crews investigate the crash. The area remains without power.

Source:   http://www.desmoinesregister.com




DES MOINES, Iowa —A pilot and his family are OK after their plane crashed in southwest Des Moines on Saturday morning. 

Officials said the crash happened around 10 a.m. near Southwest 56th Street and Park Avenue, where a parachute entangled around a stoplight, and caused damage to electric lines and poles.

Des Moines fire officials said the family of four was taking off from the Des Moines International Airport in their private aircraft and heading home to Virginia.

Audio from the Des Moines AirPort Air Traffic Control indicates the plane, from Duluth, Minnesota-based aircraft company Cirrus, experienced engine trouble about 800-900 feet in the air before the pilot deployed the parachute, which helped safely float the plane to the ground. The plane was consumed by fire after it landed.

All survived the crash and walked away without injury.

MidAmerican Energy crews worked to switch circuits after the crash left approximately 720 customers without service.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash. 

Source:   http://www.kcci.com














DES MOINES, Iowa — A family of four survived a small plane crash in Des Moines on Saturday morning.

It happened shortly after 10 a.m. along Park Avenue.

The plane was occupied by a husband, wife, and two kids. The husband, who was the pilot, realized shortly after takeoff that the plane wasn’t performing correctly.

At which point, according to fire crews, the safety parachute was pulled on the plane and started its descent slowly to the ground. As the plane was floating down, a gust of wind pushed it into power lines before it hit the ground.

The family was able to exit the plane safely after it touched down before fire crews arrived to put the fire out.

Due to the plane hitting power lines, the surrounding area is without power.

Source:  http://whotv.com

Luscombe 8A, N71497: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 in Marlboro Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N71497

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Teterboro FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA291
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Marlboro, NJ
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8, registration: N71497
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2016, about 1203 eastern daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N71497, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in an open field near Marlboro, New Jersey. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated about 1 hour 30 minutes earlier from Old Bridge Airport (3N6), Old Bridge, New Jersey.

The pilot stated to Federal Aviation Administration personnel that the flight departed 3N6 with 12 gallons of fuel and flew around the local area. While in cruise flight at 1,200 ft mean sea level, he reported the engine suddenly ceased producing power, and his attempts to restore engine power were unsuccessful. He maneuvered for a forced landing to a nearby racetrack but realized the airplane was too high. He then maneuvered for a forced landing in a field, and while in a left bank, the airplane impacted the ground. He further stated that the engine did not sputter, and he did apply carburetor heat, but that did not restore engine power.




MARLBORO - A small single-engine plane crashed Saturday in a field near School Road and Oak Lane, according to police. 

The pilot was taken to Jersey Shore University Medical Center in Neptune after suffering a leg injury, said Marlboro Township Police Capt. Frederick J. Reck in a prepared statement.

The incident occurred about 1 p.m. Saturday, Reck said.

The pilot apparently was the only person in the plane, a Luscombe 8A aircraft. The pilot’s name and further details on their injuries were not immediately disclosed.

Reck said he was withholding the name of the male pilot until authorities could verify his information.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Marlboro police, the Colts Neck Township Police Department, Marlboro Fire Department, Marlboro First Aid Squad and a MONOC paramedic unit, all responded to the scene of the crash. The pilot was transported to the regional trauma center by the Marlboro First Aid Squad.

Source:   http://www.app.com

MARLBORO — A small single-engine plane crashed Saturday afternoon in a residential neighborhood near Route 18, injuring its pilot.

The Luscombe 8A aircraft went down about 1 p.m. in a field near School Road and Oak Lane. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

The male pilot, who authorities did not name, was hospitalized. 

There were no passengers on board, township police said.

The field where the plane landed is surrounded by trees, police said.