Monday, November 19, 2018

Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, N4817M: Fatal accident occurred November 17, 2018 near Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport (KLBL), Kansas

Dick and Kris James, who in 1994 founded Dick James & Associates Inc., one of Sacramento's leading property management firms for multifamily, died in a plane crash on November 17th.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N4817M

Location: Liberal, KS
Accident Number: CEN19FA029
Date & Time: 11/17/2018, 1657 CST
Registration: N4817M
Aircraft: Beech 55
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 17, 2018, about 1657 central standard time, a Beech BE-95-B55, N4817M, impacted a field during a visual localizer approach to runway 35 at Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport (LBL), Liberal, Kansas. The airplane impacted powerlines and terrain about 3 nautical miles south of runway 35. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Montrose Regional Airport (MTJ), Montrose, Colorado and was destined to Dodge City Regional Airport (DDC), Dodge City, Kansas, but diverted to LBL due to weather at DDC.

The pilot reported to air traffic control (ATC) that that airplane picked up moderate rime ice descending to 5,100 feet, en route to DDC. The pilot reported that the airplane was picking up too much ice, and he would like to climb to 8,000 feet mean sea level (msl). ATC cleared the airplane to 8,000 feet msl. The pilot then reported moderate/severe icing. The airplane was about 12 miles south of LBL when the pilot told ATC that the airplane was unable to climb and was now at 3,500 feet msl. The pilot told ATC that he regained control of the airplane, and he was in visual flight rules conditions. ATC cleared the airplane direct LBL at 3,500 ft msl. The LBL Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) reported ceilings of 600 foot above ground level and a visibility of 7 statute miles. The pilot requested radar vectors to the instrument landing system (ILS) approach at LBL, and ATC stated they were unable to provide radar vectors because the airplane was below the minimum IFR attitude. The pilot said that he had the approach chart for the ILS. The pilot reported established on the localizer, which was confirmed by ATC. ATC then cancelled the flight's IFR clearance and terminated radar service. ATC asked the pilot to confirm the airport in sight, and the pilot said that he could not see out of the windshield and would have to get closer. The pilot was told to contact ATC after landing. There were no further recorded ATC communications from the flight.

The airplane was located about 3 miles south of runway 35 in a relatively flat field and about 325 feet north of unlighted/unmarked powerlines, which had the its top wire separated. The top wire was estimated to be about 50 feet in height. The airplane nose landing gear and one of the propellers displayed features consistent with a wire strike. The landing gear was in the extended position, and the flaps were in the 0-degree position. Both propellers were broken off at their hubs and exhibited a 45-degree fracture face consistent with torsional overload. Flight control continuity from the control surfaces to the cabin was confirmed. The airplane windshields were covered in ice when the airplane was located by law enforcement about 1920. On the following day of the accident, there was about ½ inch of ice on the leading edges of the horizontal stabilizers. The airplane was not certificated for flight into icing conditions, and it was not equipped with a wing anti-ice/de-ice system. The airplane was equipped with an alcohol deice system for the propeller and windshield. The reservoir tank for the alcohol deice system and its fluid lines were dry and exhibited features consistent with long-term non-use.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N4817M
Model/Series: 55 95B55
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LBL, 2886 ft msl
Observation Time: 1656 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -2°C / -4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / , 30°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility: 7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Montrose, CO (MTJ)
Destination: Liberal, KS (LBL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.985000, -100.955278

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dick James and his beloved wife Kris.


A celebration of life will be held on Jan. 13 for Dick and Kris James, who founded one of the Sacramento region’s largest property management firms and died in a plane crash on Nov. 17.

According to employees with Dick James & Associates Inc., the couple died after the plane Dick James was flying clipped a power line and crashed as they were landing in rough weather at an airport in Oklahoma.

“It’s so sudden that it’s still hard to think about,” said Michele Amaral, the couple’s daughter and the president and chief financial officer of the company. “They always had an attitude of treating everyone like family.”

Dick James, who grew up on a farm in Isleton, came to Sacramento as a young man and answered a newspaper ad in 1964 promising a real estate license in exchange for working for a firm selling properties, said Jack Anderson, who works in strategic operations for Dick James & Associates.

James spent decades as a leading broker, primarily for apartment properties, before he ended up owning one himself, Anderson said. After he realized the manager manager of the property was doing a lousy job, he began to move into that side of business and within about eight months, the property was profitable, Anderson said. That led to founding Dick James & Associates in 1994. The firm ranked second this year on the Business Journal’s list of largest local multifamily property management companies.

“What the company grew into is a one-stop shop,” Anderson said, describing how the firm handles accounting, marketing, maintenance and landlord responsibilities on behalf of multifamily owners. Dick James & Associates now manages 90 properties and 8,000 units in three states including California, he said. “One of the things we love to do is taking a property that’s underperforming and turn it profitable."

Dick James received quite a bit of help in growing his company from his wife. Anderson and Amaral said Kris James’ experience in executive administrative work lent itself to formalizing the new company around her husband’s philosophies.

“They learned by trial and error at the beginning,” Amaral said, describing her father as a lone wolf-type broker who had to adjust to working in a company with others.

As the company grew, Dick and Kris James told employees they felt lucky to have been able to provide so many people with jobs and homes, Anderson said.

Amaral and Anderson said they’d describe the couple as strong individuals. “I wouldn’t call them sweet,” Amaral said, but her mom was a generous donor to charities, and her father enjoyed bringing people up. Anderson said the couple often hired recent immigrants to the U.S. and helped them establish lives here.

The couple also enjoyed aviation and became pilots, a hobby that their children also picked up. The Jameses were on their way to the entertainment hub of Branson, Missouri, when they crashed.

Kris James had retired from the company last year, while Dick James was in the early stages of forming a succession plan for his children to keep the company going, Amaral said. Her brother Todd Stevenot, an experienced professional with an MBA, has joined the company as CEO in the unexpected transition, she said.

Next month’s celebration of life will be at 11 a.m. at the Hilton Arden West in Sacramento. Those wanting to make a donation in their memory are encouraged to donate to Happy Tails Pet Sanctuary. 


https://www.bizjournals.com

A California man and a woman are dead this week following a aircraft fatality accident as reported by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol.

According to the report, the crash occurred five miles east of Tyrone at about 6 p.m. on November 17th with a Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, piloted by 79-year-old Richard C. James. He was pronounced dead at the scene due to massive injuries.

The name of the woman in the crash is being withheld pending positive identification. She was also pronounced dead at the scene due to massive injuries.

Weather conditions were cloudy at the time of the crash. Both victims were found pinned inside the plane. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been advised.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Original article ➤ https://www.guymondailyherald.com

Lancair Legacy RG, N8448J: Fatal accident occurred November 17, 2018 at Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (KGVL), Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N8448J 

Location: Gainesville, GA
Accident Number: ERA19FA049
Date & Time: 11/17/2018, 1835 EST
Registration: N8448J
Aircraft: Lancair LEGACY RG
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 17, 2016, about 1835 eastern standard time, a Lancair Legacy RG, N8448J, was substantially damaged after striking trees and impacting terrain at the Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (GVL) Gainesville, Georgia. The private pilot was fatally injured, the pilot-rated passenger was seriously injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Charleston Executive Airport (JZI), Charleston, South Carolina at 1728, destined for GVL.

The accident occurred during the third flight of the day. The first flight was local and flown by the pilot-rated passenger, during which he performed three takeoffs and landings at GVL. Both pilots flew the airplane on the second flight from GVL to JZI, and the accident occurred on the third flight returning to GVL.

Upon arrival in Gainesville, the pilot requested clearance from air traffic control to practice a GPS approach to runway 23, which the controller approved. Runway 23 was equipped with a two-light precision approach path indicator, located on the left side.

A witness in an airplane waiting to takeoff from runway 23 saw the accident airplane approach the runway. He indicated that he saw the landing lights, which "became dim and they appeared to roll 180 degrees" before the accident.

The pilot-rated passenger recalled that the pilot was flying the airplane on the approach when the airplane suddenly became inverted. He did not recall any further details.

According to flight data recorded by the airplane's primary flight display, while at an altitude of 3,500 ft mean sea level (msl) with the autopilot engaged, the airplane arrived at the initial approach fix from the southeast and turned left onto the inbound course. Just after passing the final approach fix, the flaps were extended to about 17 degrees. About 2.6 nautical miles from the runway at an altitude of 2,200 ft msl and an airspeed of 139 knots, the landing gear was lowered. The engine power parameter was 42%, where it remained for most of the approach. About 1.6 miles from the runway, at an altitude of 1,900 ft msl and an airspeed of 129 knots, the autopilot was disengaged. About 15 seconds later, the flaps were extended to 40 degrees, remained there for about 5 seconds, and were then fully retracted. As the flaps retracted, the vertical speed increased from about 600 feet per minute (fpm) to about 1,200 fpm, the pitch attitude began to slowly increase from about -2° to +2° and the airplane gradually descended below the glidepath. The engine power was reduced to 32% about 4 seconds before the recorded data ended. The last recorded data point was captured when the airplane was about 0.3 mile from the runway, on the extended runway centerline at an altitude of 1,323 ft msl and an airspeed of 110 knots with a descent rate 1,029 fpm.

About 0.1 mile from the runway, while on the extended runway centerline, the airplane struck tree tops that were about the same elevation as the runway (the trees were about 50 ft tall and located in a valley), at the edge of a 4-lane divided highway. The airplane descended and impacted terrain and the left lower edge of a 100 ft wide by 20 ft tall wooden platform, located in a ravine below and about 500 feet away from the runway end. The platform held the localizer antenna for runway 05 at GVL.

A debris path extended from the localizer platform along a heading of 215° magnetic, about 175 feet long, to the main wreckage which came to rest upright, on a heading of about 225°.

Additional debris were found near the struck trees on the approach path. Paint chips and small carbon fiber pieces were found at the base of the tree line. The left-wing tip and one of the landing gear doors were found in the highway median. Tree branches and limbs were strewn from the tree line across the highway along the runway heading.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that all major components of the airplane were present at the accident site. The left wing was fractured and partially separated about 2 feet from the root and the flap was completely separated from the wing. The right wing was fractured and partially separated at the root and the right aileron and about 4 feet of the outboard section of the right wing were separated from the wing. The vertical stabilizer was fractured in several locations. An outboard section of the left elevator about 1-foot-long was separated from the remainder of the elevator.

The rudder controls were intact and continuous from the pedals to the rudder. The aileron controls were continuous from the control stick through several bending overload breaks in the push-pull tubes, to the aileron control horns. The elevator controls were continuous from the control stick through an overload fracture in the aft push-pull tube rod end.

The engine remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft propeller flange. Chordwise scratches were present on all 3 propeller blades. There were leading edge gouges and aft bending with slight twisting on two blades. The top spark plugs were removed and exhibited light colored combustion deposits. The spark plug electrodes exhibited normal – worn out signatures when compared to the Champion Check A Plug chart. The fuel pump remained attached to the engine, the drive coupling was intact, and the fuel pump discharged a small amount of fuel when turned by hand. The fuel nozzles were removed and found to be free of obstruction. The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand using the propeller. The magnetos produced spark on all six top ignition leads. Thumb compression and suction was noted on all six cylinders with proper valve movement established. Continuity throughout the engine and accessory section was established.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on December 5, 2017. According to his logbook and airplane usage records, he had accumulated 289 hours of total flight experience, of which 96 hours were in the accident airplane.

The pilot-rated passenger held an airline transport pilot certificate, and a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent 3rd class medical certificate was issued on July 7, 2017 at which time he reported 7,500 hours of total flight experience. According to airplane usage records, he had accumulated 52 hours in the accident airplane.

According to U.S. Naval Observatory records, the sun had set at 1730, civil twilight ended at 1757, and the moon was in the waxing gibbous phase with 70% of the moons disk illuminated. The weather conditions reported at GVL at 1853 included clear skies, visibility 10 miles, and wind from 130° at 3 knots.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Lancair
Registration: N8448J
Model/Series: LEGACY RG No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGVL, 1275 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Charleston, SC (JZI)
Destination: Gainesville, GA (GVL) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 34.278889, -83.825000

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Robert Carlisle Alberhasky 

Robert Carlisle Alberhasky, M.D., age 68, passed away in Gainesville, Georgia during an aviation accident on November 17th, 2018.

Robert was born to Robert and Hilda Alberhasky March 27, 1950 in Louisville, KY. He was the first of three brothers. He grew up in Louisville, attending Bashford Manor Elementary and eventually Atherton High School. An Indiana University graduate in Bloomington, he attended medical school at the University of Louisville, where he also completed his Pathology residency and fellowship in Surgical pathology. He was a diplomat of the American Board of Pathology and fellow of the College of American Pathologists, with subspecialty certification in Cytology.

Bob, to his many friends, practiced medicine for nearly 40 years as a community pathologist, primarily in Cleveland, OH and later in Atlanta, GA, where he was a partner in the specialty pathology practice Bako Dx. He was a published medical author and frequent speaker. Beyond the demands of medicine, Bob was a passionate fisherman, pilot, sailor, international traveler and tournament dart player. His love for darts and the accompanying rich social experience inspired him to open a sports bar, Riggy’s Grill, in Gainesville, GA, creating a venue for good food and friendships, both central themes of Bob’s life. His generosity toward others was unfailing and he would without hesitation take leave from his medical practice, traveling to counsel friends and family members as they struggled with the medical intricacies of healthcare.

Robert is survived by his wife Teresa Alberhasky, brother Dr. Mark Alberhasky, brother Phillip Alberhasky, nephews Brandon Alberhasky and wife Sarah, Evan Alberhasky and wife Marina, and grandniece Katherine Alberhasky.

A memorial service will be held at Riggy’s Grill, 2415 Browns Bridge Rd, Gainesville, GA 30504 on Sunday, December 2 at 5pm.

Donations of sympathy may be made to www.abovethecloudskids.org, an organization which provides underprivileged or medically challenged children with the opportunity to experience small plane flight.

https://www.bgdailynews.com




Federal investigators were sifting through evidence Sunday at the scene of a fatal plane crash at Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport in Gainesville.

A preliminary report could be issued in about 10 days, said Keith Holloway, spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board.

A more complete report — one that gives possible causes of the crash — could be released in 12-18 months, he said.

“It’s more about fact-gathering and collecting all the perishable evidence at this point,” Holloway said. “The aircraft will be moved to (another) facility for further examination if necessary.”

Robert Carlisle Alberhasky, 68, of Cumming died after his 2015 Lancair International Legacy RG crashed Saturday, Nov. 17.

Alberhasky is believed to have been the pilot, Gainesville police spokesman Sgt. Kevin Holbrook said.

Mark Lewis, 69, of Flowery Branch was also in the plane and critically injured. He was taken by ambulance to Northeast Georgia Medical Center, where he was in fair condition Sunday afternoon.

Police and both the Gainesville and Hall County fire departments arrived on the scene shortly after receiving a 911 call close to 7 p.m. Nov. 17. The Federal Aviation Administration arrived at about 10 p.m.

“It appears that the plane was about to land when at some point it possibly struck some trees across Queen City Parkway and then struck a tower here at the airport,” Holbrook said Saturday.

Emergency personnel discovered the single-engine plane had fallen down an embankment along Queen City Parkway.

Holbrook said Sunday the tower, believed to be used for lighting, didn’t have major damage.

“It should not interfere with operations of the airport,” he said.

Holbrook did say the airport was “closed for air traffic (Sunday) for investigative and recovery purposes. Once that is complete, things should return to normal operations.”

Original article ➤ https://www.gainesvilletimes.com

Cessna 441 Conquest II, registered to and operated by Bismarck Air Medical, N441CX: Fatal accident occurred November 18, 2018 in Harmon, Morton County, North Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Office of Accident Investigation and Prevention AVP-100; Washington, District of Columbia
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Honeywell Aerospace; Phoenix, Arizona
Bismarck Air Medical; Bismarck, North Dakota 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N441CX

Location: Harmon, ND
Accident Number: CEN19FA030
Date & Time: 11/18/2018, 1040 CST
Registration: N441CX
Aircraft: Cessna 441
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

On November 18, 2018, at 2240 central standard time, a Cessna 441, N441CX, was destroyed when it broke up in-flight and impacted an open field near Harmon, North Dakota. The airline transport certificated pilot, flight nurse, and paramedic were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bismarck Air Medical under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed for the air medical cross-country flight. The flight originated from Bismarck Municipal Airport (BIS), Bismarck, North Dakota, at 2230, and was en route to Sloulin Field International Airport (ISN), Williston, North Dakota.

Preliminary information indicated the crew was en route to ISN to pick up a neonatal infant for transport back to BIS. Radar data indicated the airplane climbed on a direct course until reaching 14,000 feet above sea level. Ground speed was at 240 knots. The airplane then entered a steep right bank and radar contact was lost. No distress calls were received.

Wreckage was scattered for about 1 mile long and 600 feet wide on snow-covered terrain. The cockpit area, cabin area, empennage, both engines and propellers, and both wings were identified and recovered. Flight control continuity was established.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N441CX
Model/Series: 441 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Bismarck Air Medical LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: R6DA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBIS, 1661 ft msl
Observation Time: 2252 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -4°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Bismarck, ND (BIS)
Destination: Williston, ND (ISN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Todd James Lasky, 48, passed away November 18, 2018, as the result of an air ambulance crash. 

A joint celebration honoring all who perished will be held at 10:00 am Monday, November 26, 2018 at the Bismarck Event Center 315 S 5th St, Bismarck.  

Family will greet visitors from 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm on Sunday, November 25, 2018 at Eastgate Funeral Service, 2302 East Divide Avenue, Bismarck.

Todd was born March 31, 1970 and raised in Virginia, Minnesota with his parents Diane and James Lasky and “Sis” Tammy Lasky-Barboni.  His passion for service and community started at a young age, joining the Police Academy after graduation from high school in 1988.  An incident affecting his “trigger finger” forcing him to choose another career path, Todd finished his Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics from the University of North Dakota in two years.  Todd experienced a diverse background from Flight Instructor at UND, Chief Pilot for several private companies, corporate pilot for a major airline and then ending up in Bismarck as a pilot for Bismarck Air Ambulance. 

Todd loved to fly and was an excellent and meticulous pilot.  Passengers, patients, families and colleagues could count on him to sign, seal and deliver.  He was dependable, honest, intelligent, patient, humble, quick witted and had a huge heart.  He would always “do the right thing” and was quick to offer assistance to alleviate any un do stress and worry to another and take it on himself.  A natural born “giver” he emulated that characteristic in his personal life, as well. 

Todd’s talents and natural God-given gifts were a huge part of his life.  His passion for motorcycles, snow cats, water craft, ATV’s….you name it, he could RIDE IT (and) FIX IT!!!  His “need for speed” was apparent to all that knew him. 

One of his fondest memories and experiences was the snowmobile he built with his father.  This would become the fastest world record for speed in the NSSR 600cc class.

He lit up with pride and teared up with love in his eyes when he would talk about his dad and all of the time they spent together.  Family was of the utmost importance to him and was also very close to his mama and big Sis.  A day or two didn’t go by without a phone call or a text to check on how they were doing.  Nephews and relatives alike were all impacted by his charm and giving spirit.

Todd was the proud owner of his “hobby job” and business, Year-Round Recreation.  If he wasn’t flying or on an adventure with a motorized vehicle, he could be found inside his shop diagnosing the next piece of equipment or building a motorcycle from scratch! 

Talent, drive, work ethic, and a Jack of All Trades, Todd was blessed to have had the opportunity to express his passions on a daily basis and share his excitement with everyone whom he came into contact with.  The next “snowfall” when he could get his rig out into the white stuff was all he could talk about since the leaves were changing colors!  His excitement was contagious and he could usually talk someone into getting just as excited as he was about it!   Many of his friends and acquaintances from the shop claimed to have become a little more serious about riding after working with him on something he had fixed for them.  He was charismatic and fun, a story teller and a prankster.  His smart wit and humor was appreciated by everyone that came into contact with him.

A man of deep faith, inventor, teacher, business owner, father, friend, brother, significant other…Todd will forever hold sacred places in our hearts.  From the twinkle in his puppy dog eyes, his out of this world amazing smile, his HUGE tight hugs and his gentle patient spirit, we will FOREVER miss and honor him. 

Blessed to have shared his life was his mother, Diane Lasky and the late James Lasky; his sister, Tammy Lasky-Barboni, her husband Peter and nephews, Michael and Nicholas; his son Austin Lasky; his true love, Bonny Wesolowski-Senger and her family Jami (James) Summers, Jorden and Jace Senger and his fur babies, Lucy and Louie. 

Fly high Todd….you are our hero!

Tailwinds to eternity…until we meet again, God bless your beautiful heart and soul. We love you always and forever.

https://www.eastgatefuneral.com

Chris Iverson, 47, Bismarck, died November 19, 2018 in Bismarck, ND.

A memorial service will be held at 10:00 am on Monday, November 26, 2018 at Bismarck Event Center, 315 S 5th Street, Bismarck.

Family will greet visitors from 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm Sunday, November 25, at Parkway Funeral Service, 2330 Tyler Parkway, Bismarck, with a prayer service at 7:00 pm.  

Once in a lifetime you meet someone who changes your whole world, for me that was my husband. Chris Alan Iverson was born May 7, 1971, in Tacoma, Washington to Donna Jean (Kjos) and Clayton Jacob Iverson, the 4th of 5 children. He was raised in Tacoma and attended Franklin Pierce High School, where he excelled in FFA and football. He spent his free time with friends camping, hunting,s and fishing in the Puget sound. His love of the outdoors stayed with him throughout his life.

Not long out of school Chris met his first love, his daughter Breyana Lynn, on September 29, 1992. He began working for Takasaki Construction on Fort Lewis Air Fort Base and continued there for almost 10 years. During this time, he met and married his lifetime love, Jennifer Darlene McKenzie. They were married September 13, 1997, in Tacoma, Washington. They resided in Tenino, Washington for 2 years where they welcomed their daughter, Emma Louise, on March 27, 1998 and mourned the loss of their son Christian Jacob on October 8, 1999.  In 2000, they moved to The Tri-Cities and Chris began work at Boise Cascade Paper Mill. On November 15, 2002 they completed their family by welcoming their son, Seth Elias Iverson. In the search to find better hunting grounds and a good place to raise a family, the Iverson family moved to Cathay, North Dakota in 2003.  Chris began work at Canadian Pacific Railroad as a conductor and joined the Cathay Volunteer Fire Department. Eventually, the family moved from the farmstead into Fessenden. Chris continued as a CP conductor for over 10 years and volunteered for 11 years as a fireman on the Cathay and Fessenden Fire Departments. In 2008, Chris and Jenny were introduced to the world of EMS. Chris quickly realized that this was the perfect job for him. It allowed him to take care of people, give to the community, and have work that pushed him both physically and intellectually. He excelled in EMS as a provider, an instructor, and a mentor. Everyone who worked with him and received care from him experienced his compassion and knowledgeable care.

Chris was taken too soon from this life. He is sadly survived in this world by his wife of 21 years, Jenny, his daughters, Breyana, Portland, OR and Emma, his son, Seth, his mother, Donna, Tacoma, WA;  his sisters Melodee (Martin) Gaertner, Georgia; Mary Jamison (John) Olalla, WA , his brothers Jay Iverson and Curtis Iverson, Tacoma, WA, and a multitude of friends.

Chris was preceded in death by his father, Clayton Iverson.

http://www.parkwayfuneral.com

Bonnie Kay Cook, 63, died Nov. 18, 2018, as the result of Air Ambulance crash. A joint celebration honoring all who perished will be held 10 am Monday, November 26 at the Bismarck Event Center.

Bonnie was born May 25, 1955, in Richardton, ND.  She grew up on a rural farm by Killdeer. The oldest of 15 brother and sisters, she quickly became a second mom to her brothers and sisters, showing love and dedication for her family and her work.

Bonnie met and eventually married the love of her life, Perry, August of 1979.  They resided in Killdeer until they moved to Bismarck so she could pursue a career in Nursing at the University of Mary. 

In 1992, she became a registered nurse and worked at St. Alexius in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) where she excelled in serving the babies who needed a higher level of care. She joined the NICU transport team, began instructing S.T.A.B.L.E. class onsite and via telemedicine to local and rural nurses.  She also was an active member of the Nursing Communications Ambassadors, serving on the shared governance committee.

Bonnie’s dedication at work was only elapsed by her love and devotion to her family.  She enjoyed spending weekends and vacations visiting and playing with her eight grandchildren to cherishing every moment of life.  Bonnie loved to do crafts and share recipes with all her friends and family.  Her strength and determination were infectious, and she volunteered throughout the Bismarck area in numerous capacities.

The family asks that in lieu of flowers or gifts that donations be made for the future purchase of Neonatal Transport Isolette.  Bonnie’s passion and goal to equip nurses with the best equipment to increase the survival rate of neonates.   Donations should be made out to the CHI foundation; mailed to C/O Perry Cook, 7009 Golden Crest Rd, Bismarck, ND 58503.

https://bismarckfuneralhome.com




Chris Iverson, paramedic, age 47 of Mandan

Bonnie Cook, NICU nurse, age 63 of Bismarck

Todd Lasky, pilot, age 48 of Bismarck



MANDAN, N.D. — The Morton County Sheriff's Office here has released the names of three people who died Sunday night, Nov. 18, when a Bismarck Air Medical plane crashed northwest of Mandan.

The three victims are Todd Lasky, 48, of Bismarck, the pilot of the plane; Bonnie Cook, 63, of Bismarck, a nurse; and Chris Iverson, 47, of Mandan, a paramedic.

According to a release from CHI St. Alexius Health, the plane, which was flying to Williston to assist in a patient transport, went down prior to arrival.

The three victims were the only people aboard the plane when it crashed.

Around 11 p.m. Sunday, the Bismarck Airport tower reported the aircraft was missing about a half-hour after taking flight.

Searchers with the Morton County Sheriff's Office, Mandan Rural Fire Department, Civil Air Patrol and an Air Force Rescue Team located the crash site around 2 a.m. Monday, Nov. 19.

Cellphone forensics and radar analysis helped track the plane's last location, according to a Morton County press release.

Morton County spokeswoman Maxine Herr said the crash site is about 15 to 20 miles northwest of Mandan. The fuselage and other debris are spread over "a large area" in a "remote pasture" about 3 miles west of state Highway 25 northwest of Mandan, according to the press release.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

The plane was a Cessna 441 turboprop that was built in 1982, according to FAA records.

Original article ➤ http://www.grandforksherald.com



BISMARCK, N.D. — An air ambulance on its way to pick up a patient crashed shortly after taking off in North Dakota, killing all three people on board, and military officials involved in the response said the plane may have broken up in midair.

The Cessna 441 Conquest II Bismarck Air Medical airplane took off at about 10:30 p.m. Sunday and crashed shortly after in a field about 20 miles northwest of Bismarck. Air traffic control officials lost contact with the plane about 11 p.m., county spokeswoman Maxine Herr said.

CHI St. Alexius Health and Bismarck Air Medical said in a joint statement that the pilot, a paramedic and a registered nurse had been heading to Williston to pick up a patient. The statement did not provide their names.

"It is a sad day here for both of our organizations," Kurt Schley, president of CHI St. Alexius Health Bismarck, and Dan Schaefer, operations chief for Bismarck Air Medical and Metro Area Ambulance Operations, said. "We are grieving for the family members of those who were on board."

The Morton County Sheriff's Office, Civil Air Patrol and Air Force Rescue Coordination Center based at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida located the crash scene around early Monday using radar and cellphone technology, Herr said.

An analysis by the Air Force team indicated the plane might have broken up at about 14,000 feet, and "that corresponded with what they found on the ground," said Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Sean Johnson.

He said he didn't want to speculate on the cause. The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were investigating. FAA records show that the Cessna 441 turboprop was built in 1982. Bismarck Air Medical is listed as the registered owner.

Dan Schaefer, Bismarck Air Medical and Metro Area Ambulance operations chief, said the crash leaves Bismarck Air Medical with two aircraft, with which "we'll be fine."

Schaefer also said Sunday's crash is "extremely rare."

"Never had it happen," he said.

The weather from 11 p.m. Sunday to midnight Monday, as observed at the Bismarck Airport, had low hanging clouds and light snow showers moving in, said Nathan Heinert, meteorologist with the Bismarck National Weather Service. He also said visibility had dropped to 5 miles.

Gov. Doug Burgum issued a statement Monday expressing condolences to the families, friends and colleagues of the victims.

"We are deeply saddened by the news of last night's airplane crash that claimed the lives of the pilot, a paramedic and a registered nurse — individuals who dedicated their lives to saving the lives of others," he said. "We are forever grateful for their service."

Original article can be found here ➤ https://missoulian.com

Pilot Todd Lasky

BISMARCK, N.D. — Three people died Sunday night when a Metro Area Ambulance plane crashed northwest of Mandan.

According to a release from CHI St. Alexius Health, the plane, which was flying to Williston to assist in a patient transport, went down prior to arrival. A Bismarck Air Medical pilot and paramedic, along with a CHI St. Alexius Health registered nurse, were on board. There were no survivors.

Around 11 p.m. Sunday, the Bismarck Airport tower reported the aircraft as missing about a half-hour after taking flight.

Search efforts by the Morton County Sheriff's Office, Mandan Rural Fire Department, Civil Air Patrol and an Air Force Rescue Team located the crash site around 2 a.m. Monday.

Cell phone forensics and radar analysis helped track the plane's last location, according to a Morton County press release.

Morton County spokeswoman Maxine Herr said the crash site is about 15 to 20 miles northwest of Mandan. The fuselage and other debris are spread over "a large area" in a "remote pasture" about 3 miles west of North Dakota Highway 25 northwest of Mandan, according to the press release.

The National Transport Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Chelsey Kralicek, marketing specialist for CHI St. Alexius Health in Bismarck, said the hospital is offering employee assistance program services through its professional counselors to employees and their families.

In a joint statement, Kurt Schley, CHI St. Alexius Health Bismarck president, and Dan Schaefer, Bismarck Air Medical and Metro Area Ambulance operations chief, stated: “It is a sad day here for both of our organizations. We are grieving for the family members of those who were on board.”

"The names of the individuals are not being released until families are notified. We are focused on supporting the families and associates from both organizations. We ask for your prayers and support at this very difficult time for all."

Bismarck Mayor Steve Bakken offered a statement on behalf of the Bismarck City Commission following news of the crash:

“We are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of life of these individuals who selflessly dedicate themselves to saving the lives of others, and provide this vital service to our communities. We send our heartfelt sympathies and prayers to the families, friends and colleagues in the medical and first responder communities.”

Gov. Doug Burgum also offered words in the wake of the crash. 

"We are deeply saddened by the news of last night’s airplane crash that claimed the lives of the pilot, a paramedic and a registered nurse – individuals who dedicated their lives to saving the lives of others. We are forever grateful for their service," the governor said in a statement. "Kathryn and I extend our deepest condolences and heartfelt prayers to their families, friends and colleagues in the medical and first responder communities.”

Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., also issued a statement. 

“Mikey and I are deeply saddened to hear of the air ambulance crash last night near Mandan," Hoeven said. "Those on board were committed to serving others and providing life-saving medical care. We extend our condolences to their families and loved ones.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://missoulian.com

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — An air ambulance on its way to pick up a patient crashed shortly after taking off in North Dakota, killing all three people on board, and military officials involved in the response said the plane may have broken up in midair.

The twin-engine Bismarck Air Medical airplane took off about 10:30 p.m. Sunday and crashed shortly after in a field about 20 miles (32 kilometers) northwest of Bismarck. Air traffic control officials lost contact with the plane about 11 p.m., county spokeswoman Maxine Herr said.

CHI St. Alexius Health and Bismarck Air Medical said in a joint statement that the pilot, a paramedic and a registered nurse had been heading to Williston to pick up a patient. The statement did not provide their names.

"It is a sad day here for both of our organizations," Kurt Schley, president of CHI St. Alexius Health Bismarck, and Dan Schaefer, operations chief for Bismarck Air Medical and Metro Area Ambulance Operations, said. "We are grieving for the family members of those who were on board."

The Morton County Sheriff's Office, Civil Air Patrol and Air Force Rescue Coordination Center based at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida located the crash scene around early Monday using radar and cellphone technology, Herr said.

An analysis by the Air Force team indicated the plane might have broken up at about 14,000 feet (4,300 meters), and "that corresponded with what they found on the ground," said Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Sean Johnson.

He said he didn't want to speculate on the cause. The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were investigating. FAA records show that the Cessna 441 turboprop was built in 1982. Bismarck Air Medical is listed as the registered owner.

National Weather Service meteorologist Jeff Schild said there was light snow in the area at the time but no hazardous weather. Johnson said there was the potential for fog or haze.

Gov. Doug Burgum issued a statement Monday expressing condolences to the families, friends and colleagues of the victims.

"We are deeply saddened by the news of last night's airplane crash that claimed the lives of the pilot, a paramedic and a registered nurse — individuals who dedicated their lives to saving the lives of others," he said. "We are forever grateful for their service."

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tribdem.com

Mooney M20F Executive, N3535X: Accident occurred April 19, 2018 at Bulverde Airpark (1T8), San Antonio, Texas


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3535X

Location: Bulverde, TX
Accident Number: GAA18CA233
Date & Time: 04/19/2018, 1655 CDT
Registration: N3535X
Aircraft: MOONEY M20F
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

According to the pilot who occupied the right front seat, during the flight the engine started to run rough.

During landing, the airplane was fast and high, and touched down about 1,200ft past the approach end of the 2,890ft runway. A pilot rated passenger occupied the left front seat which was the only position configured with brakes.

The pilot-rated passenger applied the brakes during the landing roll and the pilot maneuvered the airplane to exit the left side of the runway to avoid a runway overrun and impact with a fence. The airplane exited the left side of the runway and the right main landing gear collapsed, and subsequently skidded to a stop in the grass safety area.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft section of the fuselage.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-in-charge, a flight instructor, who was seated in the rear of the airplane during the flight, reported that the airplane touched down about 100 knots, with between 40-60 percent of the runway remaining.

According to the manufacturer's airplane operator manual, the minimum runway landing roll distance at sea level is 785ft when the ground speed is 70 knots.

The METAR at the airport reported that about the time of the accident, the wind was from 07° at 12 knots and gusting to 17 knots. The airport field elevation was 789ft and the pilot landed to runway 34. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/12/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1228.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 308 hours (Total, this make and model), 1114 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 17, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/05/2018
Flight Time: 70 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Registration: N3535X
Model/Series: M20F NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 670072
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/31/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2740 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4475 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-A1A
Registered Owner: Zulu Aviation Corp.
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: Zulu Aviation Corp.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSAT, 789 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2151 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 188°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 25000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots / 17 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 70°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fort Worth, TX (FTW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Bulverde, TX (1T8)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1515 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: BULVERDE AIRPARK (1T8)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1080 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2890 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.739167, -98.451111 (est)