Saturday, February 18, 2017

Cessna 182A Skylane, HBC Aero LLC, N9909B: Accident occurred April 18, 2016 in Selma, Fresno County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office  
FSDO-17 Fresno, California 
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 
Cessna Aircraft; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

HBC Aero LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9909B

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA094
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 18, 2016 in Selma, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182A, registration: N9909B
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 18, 2016, about 1805 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182A, N9909B, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Selma, California. The airplane was registered to HBC Aero LLC, Rancho, Murieta, California, and operated by the student pilot. The student pilot and the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The cross-country flight originated from Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport, Carlsbad, California, about 1600, with an intended destination of Madera, California.

In a written statement to and a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the flight instructor (FI) reported that following an uneventful flight from Rancho Murieta to Hesperia, California, they flew to Apple Valley, California, to refuel. The FI stated that they topped the airplane off with 56.08 gallons of fuel, and flew to Carlsbad, which was about a 1-hour flight, where they dropped two people off prior to departing to return to Rancho Murieta.

During the flight, the FI and student pilot decided instead of their original intended fuel stop at Fresno, California, they would refuel in Madera. The FI further stated that during a descent from 6,500 feet to 4,500 feet mean sea level (msl), the engine lost power. The FI and student pilot received vectors from air traffic control to the nearest airport. Despite multiple attempts, the FI was unable to restart the engine, and realized they would not be able to make it to the Selma Airport, Selma, California. Subsequently, the FI initiated a forced landing to an open field, and during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over. The FI reported that during the descent, carburetor heat was not used.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest in a field, which contained a mix of sand and dirt. The right wing and fuselage were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered airframe and engine was conducted on June 15, 2016, at the facilities of Plain Parts, Pleasant Grove, California, by representatives of Cessna Aircraft and Continental Motors Inc. under the supervision of the NTSB IIC.

Both wings and the empennage were separated from the airplane to facilitate recovery of the wreckage. Personnel from the recovery company reported that there was less than 2 quarts of fuel in either fuel tank. Both the left and right fuel caps remained attached and secure. The airframe was intact and undamaged. The nose wheel landing gear was separated. Impact damage to the airframe air filter and air box was observed. When an alternate fuel sources was plumed to the right wing fuel inlet port, fuel was observed leaking out of the airframe fuel strainer. The fuel strainer valve was found stuck in the open position along with an abundance of sand like debris. The debris was cleaned away, and the fuel strainer valve closed normally.

All accessories remained attached, the ignition harness was intact, and the right side engine mounts were fractured. The left side exhaust was damaged. The crankshaft was rotated by hand, and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. In addition, when the crankshaft was rotated, spark was observed on all ignition leads. Due to propeller damage, a test club propeller was installed on the engine in order to facilitate an engine run.





An external power supply was connected to the airplane's electrical system, and the engine was started. Initially, the engine ran for about 80 seconds before losing power. Multiple attempts were made to start the engine again, however, the engine would only start when primed, and would not continue running once the initial primer fuel was exhausted. The carburetor was then removed from the engine and disassembled. A small amount of sand like debris was cleared from the Mixture Metering Sleeve using light air pressure. No other anomalies were noted with the carburetor. The carburetor was reassembled and reinstalled on the engine. The engine started, and ran continuously at various power settings until the mixture control was moved to the idle cutoff position. The sources of the debris located within the carburetor mixture metering sleeve was undetermined.

Review of the Cessna 182 Pilots Operating Handbook (POH), 182 Cruise and Range Performance Chart, depending on rpm, manifold pressure, and mixture settings, fuel burn rates vary between 9.7 and 14.5 gallons per hour. The airplane was equipped with two wing fuel tanks, which have a capacity of 32.5 gallons of fuel per tank. The POH states that the left and right fuel tank have a usable fuel of 27.5 gallons per tank in all flight conditions along with an additional 3.5 gallons of fuel useable in level flight only. Each fuel tank has an unusable fuel level of 1.5 gallons.

The NTSB IIC calculated an estimated fuel burn using a fuel consumption rate of 14.5 gallons per hour, and the result was 3 hours of flight time. It was determined that the flight would have used about 43.5 gallons of fuel since the airplane was topped off with fuel.


At 1953, weather conditions recorded at the Fresno-Yosemite International Airport, located about 14 miles north of the accident site, were temperature 81 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 43 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, entitled Carburetor Icing Prevention, the temperature and dew point were conducive to the formation of icing at glide or cruise power.




NTSB Identification: WPR16LA094 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 18, 2016 in Selma, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182A, registration: N9909B
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 18, 2016, about 1805 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182A, N9909B, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Selma, California. The airplane was registered to HBC Aero LLC, Rancho, Murieta, California, and operated by the student pilot. The student pilot and the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The cross-country flight originated from Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport, Carlsbad, California, about 1615, with an intended destination of Madera, California.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the CFI reported that following an uneventful flight from Rancho Murieta to Hesperia, California, they flew to Apple Valley, California, to refuel. The CFI stated that they topped the airplane off with fuel and flew to Carlsbad, where they dropped two people off prior to departing to Rancho Murieta. During the flight, the CFI decided to refuel in Madera. The CFI further stated that during a descent from 6,500 feet to 4,500 feet mean sea level (msl), the engine lost power. The CFI received vectors from air traffic control to the nearest airport. Despite multiple attempts, the CFI was unable to restart the engine and realized they would not be able to make it to the Selma Airport. Subsequently, the CFI initiated a forced landing to an open field and during the landing roll, the airplane nosed over. 


Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the right wing and fuselage were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

When flying small, it pays to be a member: MemberJets makes private aviation more available

Ty Carter is a pilot with over 8,000 hours in the sky. He recently saw a gap in the market and created a software that connects individuals with seats on a private aircraft, only costing about as much as a first-class plane ticket.


After 25 years of flying and 8,000 hours in the sky, pilot Ty Carter saw a gap in the aviation industry: the expense of private flight.

Three years ago in Overland Park, Kansas, Carter launched MemberJets, proprietary software that connects single seats on a private aircraft to individuals at a lower cost and with greater efficiency.

“Typically, private aviation is extremely expensive and aimed toward the uber-wealthy,” Carter said. “We are reimagining traveling for people.”

The MemberJets software links Part 135 aircraft operators — on-demand carriers — to individuals seeking private aviation services. The system uses akind of liscensing that allows the aircraft operator to sell individual seats, something that a Part 135 operator had not been able to do.

As members interact about desired destinations and are able to share the private aircraft, the trip becomes more affordable.



According to privatefly.com, using a private jet typically costs between $5,600 and $160,000. A round-trip flight using MemberJets costs the same as a first-class commercial ticket plus 15 percent, Carter said.

In mid-January, MemberJets took Colorado under its wing by teaming with two new operators: International Jet, based at Centennial Airport and Mountain Aviation, headquartered at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Broomfield and operating in Fort Collins, Centennial, Vail, Eagle and Telluride.

Carter said a trip will not be booked unless it is profitable for the flight company.

Sam Gilliss, vice president and general manager of International Jet, said their planes typically have six to eight seats on them. Almost all the seats need to be filled in order for the trip to be profitable.

“On hearing about their program, I think they have a great concept that could serve a segment of a marketplace that has not been served yet,” Gilliss said. “We are excited to help them get this new program off the ground. It becomes a win-win for everybody if everyone can understand and see the benefits of flying in a private jet.”

Members pay for their seats on each flight in addition to an annual fee. As of Jan. 25, MemberJets’ annual membership prices dropped from $1,500 to $250. Only members can use the service.

Carter said that the lower price will attract more members, increasing success for plane operators and making it easier to fill a member’s desired flight.

“The more people who are accessing the system and the more people who are working together, the better the system will be,” Carter said.

The flights offered, called shuttle flights, are typically day trips to a specific destination. After choosing a destination, a member can reach out to family, co-workers and MemberJets members to attract interested parties.

MemberJets offers “journeys” to their members. Depending on the operator, a journey, for example, could be a day-long trip to an out-of-state basketball game in which tickets are included in the MemberJets aviation price.

Carter said that MemberJets is member-driven, meaning if a member requests a specific trip or location of frequent travel, the company will work to make it possible.

Carter said that because members have already undergone a background check, there is no security. Members park next to the aircraft and are in the air within minutes. Minors do not have to purchase a membership, but their seats still need to be purchased.

The private flights travel to 5,000 airports that commercial aviation cannot reach, taking them closer to their destination, Carter said. There are no additional fees for parking or checking luggage and members can park feet from their airplane.

“At the end of the day, what we are trying to do is open up private aviation to a new demographic,” Carter said. “Between commercial and private today, there is nothing that bridges that financial gap. What we are trying to do is bridge that gap so individuals can have the benefits of private aviation.”

Source:  http://centennialcitizen.net

Grumman AA-1B Trainer, N8883L: Accident occurred March 26, 2016 near Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (KSEP), Stephenville, Erath County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration; Irving, Texas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

True Flight Aerospace, LLC; Valdosta, Georgia 

http://registry.faa.gov/N8883L

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA134 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Stephenville, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1B, registration: N8883L
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before departing for a personal cross-country flight, he conducted a full preflight inspection, including a fuel check. As the airplane was approaching the destination airport, the engine lost power. The pilot’s attempts to regain power were unsuccessful. The pilot conducted a forced landing, during which the airplane impacted ground obstacles. 

After the airplane was recovered, fuel was found in a fuel gauge; however, no fuel was found in the fuel tanks. An examination of the airplane revealed no preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A review of data from a video camera mounted in the cockpit revealed that the pilot said that the airplane was new to him and that he "just” ran out of fuel.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of engine power during cruise flight due to fuel exhaustion, which resulted from the pilot's inadequate preflight fuel planning and in-flight fuel management.




On March 26, 2016, about 1115 central daylight time, a Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B airplane, N8883L, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Stephenville, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The pilot and his passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Dallas Executive Airport (RBD), near Dallas, Texas, about 0958 and was destined for the Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (SEP), near Stephenville, Texas.

According to the pilot's accident report, a full preflight, to include a fuel check, was completed. He indicated that the flight departed from RBD and when the flight was about 20 miles east of SEP, he cancelled flight following when he had the destination airfield in sight. Approximately 18 miles out, the engine lost power while the airplane was at 4,500 feet above mean sea level while the left wing fuel tank was selected. After going through emergency procedures and turning the auxiliary fuel pump on, the pilot selected the right fuel tank and a restart was successful. The pilot indicated that he was not sure why the engine lost power. He pitched down and did a 300-foot descent at full power to regain airspeed in order to get to the airfield faster. Approximately four miles east of airport, the engine lost power again. He again went through emergency procedures, attempted a restart several times, but he could not get a restart. The pilot prepared the plane for an off-field landing on Highway 377 but saw oncoming traffic. He saw an open field and began to guide the plane to the open field. He leveled the wings and maintained airspeed to get to the open field. The airplane impacted the top of a horse trailer and the pilot was ejected from the airplane. The pilot and passenger were subsequently transported to a hospital.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. The pilot held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued in January of 2016. He reported that he had accumulated 131.9 hours of total flight time and 14.1 hours of total time in the accident airplane model.

N8883L was a 1974 model Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B, low-wing, fixed-tricycle landing gear, two-place monoplane with serial number AA1B-0383. The airplane was powered by a 108-horsepower Lycoming O-235-C2C engine with serial number L-11776-15. The airplane's fuel system utilized a tubular main wing spar comprised of a two-cell fuel tank (one cell in each wing). Each fuel cell held 12 gallons of fuel, of which, 11 gallons were considered usable. Fuel quantity was indicated by vertical sight gauges on the left and right cabin walls, each sight gauge corresponded to the respective side fuel cell. According to fueling records, the airplane was serviced with 4.02 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline (avgas) on March 24, 2016.

At 1115, the recorded weather at SEP was: Wind from 190 degrees at 8 knots: visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury.

The airplane wreckage and accident site was examined and documented by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector. Review of the inspector's photograph did not reveal any leaks or discoloration consistent with a fuel leak. The airplane had a nose down left wing low attitude. The fuel tank selector was found positioned near the right tank position. A liquid was observed in the right fuel gauge. However, no fuel was recovered when the airplane was disassembled by a recovery company for relocation.

In the pilot's accident report, he indicated that a mechanical malfunction occurred which caused the engine to stop producing power and that he could not get the engine restarted.



The airplane was relocated to a recovery yard where it was examined by an inspector from the FAA, an air safety investigator from the engine manufacturer, and by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator in charge. The engine's spark plugs were removed and the top plugs revealed a normal color when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. The carburetor was found separated from its intake mounting flange. Disassembly of the carburetor revealed its bowl contained a liquid that was subsequently collected. The liquid contained debris. The liquid did not contain water when tested with a water disclosing paste. An examination of the carburetor's fuel screen did not reveal any debris. The electric fuel pump screen contained debris. The electric fuel pump cap had debris adhering to its internal surface. Disassembly of the engine driven fuel pump did not reveal any anomalies. The tachometer indicated 4,338.53 hours. The engine produced a thumb compression when the propeller was rotated by hand. Spark was observed at the end of ignition leads when the propeller was turned by hand. Pressurized air was applied to each fuel line going the fuel tank selector and air exited the fuel line going to the carburetor when the respective side was selected. Each fuel tank was pressurized and no leaks were observed. The electric fuel pump screen, electric fuel pump cap, and collected liquid from the carburetor bowl were retained for examination. No anomalies were detected that would have precluded normal engine operations.

The liquid sample was sent to Core Laboratories/Saybolt for analysis. The liquid was found to be consistent with avgas.

The fuel screen, fuel pump cap, and particles found in the avgas in the carburetor bowl were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory. These samples were examined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a diamond attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory in accordance to ASTM E1252-98 and ASTM E334-01 (American Society for Testing Materials E1252-98: Standard Practice for General Techniques for Obtaining Infrared Spectra for Qualitative Analysis and American Society for Testing Materials). The spectrometer was used to collect and process infrared wavelength absorbance spectra of the unknown material.

A comparison search was performed using a spectral library database for the spectra from each sample. The search did not find a strong spectral match for either a single material or a mixture; however, there were similarities to the spectra of several surfactants, which is a byproduct of the fuel refining processes as well as a common additive in aviation fuel.

The particulate material was then analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to determine the elemental composition of the particulate material. The composition of the material consisted mainly of aluminum, iron, lead, zinc, copper, and chromium. These metals are commonly found in aircraft fuel systems and fuel.

A GoPro Hero HD camera was found in the area of the wreckage and was shipped, along with a Magellan GPS 315 device, to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for downloading and decoding. The GPS unit does not appear to have the capability to store tracks in non-volatile memory. However, video data from the camera revealed that it was mounted in the airplane between the pilot and passenger. The GoPro captured the front seat occupants, a portion of the instrument panel, engine controls, and a view outside of the windscreen. The study, in part, indicated that during the accident flight, the video showed the pilot's fuel management included switching fuel tanks and using fuel pumps. About 1104, the fuel pressure gauge indication dropped to near zero from about five psi. The engine exhibited sounds consistent with losing power. The pilot switched the fuel tank selector from the right tank to the left tank and turned the fuel pump on. The fuel pressure gauge returned to about five psi. About 1111, the fuel pressure gauge indication dropped to near zero again. The engine exhibited reduced RPMs consistent with a power loss. The engine surged during the descent and the vertical speed indicator showed a value near 800 feet per minute. The airspeed indicator showed a value near 80 mph. The stall warning horn was heard intermittently while the airplane was maneuvered toward a landing area during the descent. Trailers and vehicles can be seen while the airplane pitched up. The video showed the airplane impacted a trailer and the airplane then rolled to the right. The camera became liberated from its mount and it came to rest in nearby grass. The camera subsequently recorded the pilot walking in front of the camera. The recording, in part, contained the pilot's conversation when he stated that the "airplane's new to me" and that he "just run it out of fuel." The NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory onboard image recorder study is appended to the docket associated with this investigation.










NTSB Identification: CEN16LA134
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Stephenville, TX
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1B, registration: N8883L
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 26, 2016, about 1115 central daylight time, a Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B airplane, N8883L, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Stephenville, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The pilot and his passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Dallas Executive Airport, near Dallas, Texas, about 0958 and was destined for the Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (SEP), near Stephenville, Texas.

According to initial information, the pilot reported an engine power loss occurred before the forced landing. The pilot and passenger were subsequently transported to a hospital.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. The pilot held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued in January of 2016.

N8883L was a 1974 model Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B, low-wing, fixed-tricycle landing gear, two-place monoplane with serial number AA1B-0383. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming engine. The airplane's fuel system utilized a tubular main wing spar comprised of a two-cell fuel tank (one cell in each wing). Each fuel cell held 12 gallons of fuel, of which, 11 gallons were considered usable. Fuel quantity was indicated by vertical sight gauges on the left and right cabin walls, each sight gauge corresponded to the respective side fuel cell.

At 1115, the recorded weather at SEP was: Wind from 190 degrees at 8 knots: visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury.


















AIRCRAFT:   1975 American General AA1B N8883L   SN# AA1B-0383

ENGINE:  Lycoming O-235-C2C     SN# L11776-15            

PROPELLER:  Unknown fixed pitch – No propeller log

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:  TTSN – Unknown        2510 SMOH    1176.5 STOH            

PROPELLER: Unknown               

AIRFRAME:   4338.5 TTSN                      

OTHER EQUIPMENT: KMA20, KX170B (2), KT78, KR85      

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 3/26/2016 engine lost power and during the subsequent forced landing the aircraft impacted several parked horse trailers  

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Propeller bent, firewall crushed, engine cowlings crushed, landing gear shattered and distorted, L & R wings buckled and crushed, all flight controls damaged, canopy destroyed, fuselage twisted, buckled and deformed.                             

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Air Salvage of Dallas – Lancaster, TX             

REMARKS: Substantial damage with inspection recommended.


Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com/N8883L.htm

Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow, N2702R: Accident occurred February 18, 2017 near Centennial Airport (KAPA), Englewood, Arapahoe County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Denver, Colorado 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N2702R

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA122
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 18, 2017 in Centennial, CO
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200, registration: N2702R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 18, 2017, about1529 mountain standard time, a Piper PA28R-200 single engine airplane, N2702R, registered to a private individual and operated by Centennial Flyers of Englewood, Colorado, sustained substantial damage after it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Centennial Airport (APA), Centennial, Colorado. The airline transport rated instructor pilot (IP) sustained minor injuries, and the private pilot rated student under instruction sustained serious injuries. The instructional flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed.

According to the student pilot, the IP tried to prime the engine several times while pushing the mixture back and forth several times. After the third try, the engine started, and the student pilot proceeded to prepare for takeoff on runway 17L. He stated that the airplane had difficulty obtained lift during takeoff roll. After liftoff, about 75 knots, the engine RPMs remained high and power seemed sufficient, but the airplane was not gaining altitude. Toward the end of the runway, the IP took over the controls and flew the aircraft past the departure end of the 10,000-foot runway, crossed over highway E-470, banked left, and then touched down in grassy area. The student pilot recalled that the airspeed was about 55 knots prior to bracing for impact with trees. The student stated that the instructor passed out upon impact with a tree and recalled feeling that the left wing sheared off. He recalled pulling himself out of the aircraft and being transported to the hospital. 

In an interview after the accident, the student stated that a Falcon Jet took off on runway 17L, approximately 2 minutes prior to departure, and he was concerned about wake turbulence.

According to the IP, the engine was run up to 2000 RPMs, with positive magneto and flight control checks prior to departure. The fuel pump was ON and the mixture was leaned for takeoff. Rotation was about 65 knots within about a 1,000-foot ground roll. The airplane gained airspeed to about 75-80 knots and had a slow climb. The IP verified that the flap handle was down and the flaps were visually up. Upon reaching about 150 feet altitude, the IP felt like something was pushing the airplane down. He stated that the engine seemed to have full RPMs and the throttle and mixture were full forward. He stated that he recalled seeing the airspeed at 65 knots and a stall warning horn when the airplane contacted the ground.

The accident site revealed that aircraft landed in grassy area heading approximately 120 degrees, about 1 mile west of APA. Landing gear track marks showed all three landing gear on the ground with a straight track until impact with a tree. Skid marks prior to tree impact showed an indication of braking. After impact with the tree, the airplane crossed a parking lot driveway, skidded 100 feet, and came to rest inverted. Propeller marks in the driveway pavement showed evidence of rotation and the propeller blade tips were curled. The right wing was found detached from the fuselage and there was a light smell of fuel in the vicinity. Upon recovery, about 15 gallons of fuel was drained from each wing tank.

The weather at APA at the time of the accident was reported as - Winds 170 degrees at 15 knots, gusting to 23 knots. Clear skies. Altimeter 29.64 inches of mercury.

The IP (right seat) reported over 7,000 hours of total flight time with 17 hours in the PA28R-200. The student pilot (left seat) reported 220 hours of total flight time and this was his first flight in a PA28R-200.


The airplane wreckage was transported to a salvage facility located in Greeley, Colorado to be examined. During the examination, the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls functioned normally. The engine rotated freely and all cylinders produced compression. The magnetos produced spark at all spark plug terminals. The engine oil screen was found clean. The elevator and rudder cables were found intact and functional except for impact related damage.



CENTENNIAL, Colo. -- A small plane has crashed south of Centennial airport Saturday afternoon, according to South Metro Fire Rescue officials. Two people are currently being evaluated. 

The plane went down in the area of Belford Avenue and Peoria Street at around 3:45 p.m. 

The condition of the two patients is unknown at this time.

Source:  http://www.thedenverchannel.com


South Metro Fire Rescue responded to a small plane crash south of Centennial airport Saturday afternoon.

The crash happened at Belford Ave and Peoria St. The cause of the crash is unknown at this time.

One person was transported to the hospital and one person was treated on scene.

Source:  http://www.koaa.com









A small plane crashed late Saturday afternoon south of Centennial Airport.

South Metro Fire Rescue said one person was taken to the hospital and one person was treated on the scene.

The plane hit some trees and crashed into a parking lot outside the offices of Western Union. No vehicles or pedestrians were involved.

Source:  http://kdvr.com

Beech 99A, Wiggins Airways Inc., N198WA: Accident occurred March 02, 2016 near Knox County Regional Airport (KRKD), Rockland, Maine

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office FSDO-65 Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Wiggins Airways Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N198WA

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA137
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 02, 2016 in Rockland, ME
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: BEECH 99, registration: N198WA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a nonscheduled cargo flight. The pilot reported that, as the airplane was descending on an instrument approach, it encountered continuous light-to-moderate turbulence. As the airplane descended through about 2,000 ft mean sea level at an airspeed of 130 knots, it encountered severe turbulence, and the pilot subsequently executed a missed approach and chose to divert to an alternate airport. The airplane continued to encounter light-to-moderate turbulence en route to the alternate airport, and the pilot landed the airplane uneventfully. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the airframe had sustained substantial damage during the flight. Although there were multiple AIRMETs for widespread moderate turbulence and low-level windshear, there were no pilot reports of, nor SIGMETs forecasting, severe turbulence at the time the pilot received her preflight weather briefing. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The airplane’s encounter with isolated severe turbulence, which resulted in substantial airframe damage.

On March 2, 2016, about 0800 eastern standard time, a Beech 99A, N198WA, operated by Wiggins Airways Inc., was substantially damaged during approach to Knox County Regional Airport (RKD), Rockland, Maine, following an encounter with severe turbulence. The commercial pilot was not injured. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The non-scheduled cargo flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135, and originated from Manchester Airport (MHT), Manchester, New Hampshire, around 0730.

The pilot stated that the flight was in IMC on descent for the instrument landing system approach to RKD when the airplane encountered an area of continuous light to moderate turbulence. About 2,000 feet mean sea level (msl), and an airspeed about 130 knots, the airplane encountered severe turbulence, and the pilot initiated a missed approach. She decided not to attempt another approach to RKD, and instead diverted to Bangor International Airport (BGR), Bangor, Maine. She stated that the airplane continued to experience light to moderate turbulence enroute to BGR. After landing and securing the airplane, she entered the severe turbulence encounter in the aircraft log book.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that both wings exhibited skin deformation, and the fuselage side skins were wrinkled. Further examination by a local repair station revealed substantial damage to the right wing root between the fuselage and nacelle, just aft of main spar. The right wing root-to-fuselage fillet fairing was also damaged just aft of the main spar. There were several other areas noted with wrinkled skin on both wings.

The pilot held an airline transport certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. She also held a first class medical certificate, issued on March 15, 2016. Her last flight review was completed on November 24, 2015. At the time of the accident the pilot reported 3,600 total hours of flight experience, with 2,784 hours in the accident airplane make and model airplane. She had had accumulated 480 hours of flight experience in IMC, of which 295 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

The RKD weather observation at 0756 included wind from 150 degrees at 20 knots, gusting to 30 knots, visibility 4 statute miles in mist, ceiling overcast at 700 feet above ground level, temperature 8 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 7degrees C, and altimeter setting of 29.43 inches of mercury. Peak wind from 150 degrees at 34 knots was recorded at 0716, with pressure falling rapidly.

The Terminal Aerodrome Forecast for RKD, valid at the time of the accident, predicted wind from the southeast at 22 knots with gusts to 37 knots, and the potential for low-level wind shear at 2,000 feet, with wind from 180 degrees at 45 knots.

The National Weather Service issued multiple AIRMETs for the region, which advised of widespread IMC, moderate turbulence, and low-level wind shear. There were no pilot reports (PIREPs) or SIGMETs for severe turbulence in the area.

The operator's policy and procedures manual stated that it was a general policy of the company to suspend operations over a route that subjected equipment to unacceptable turbulence.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA137 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 02, 2016 in Rockland, ME
Aircraft: BEECH 99, registration: N198WA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On March 2, 2016, about 0800 eastern standard time, a Beech 99A, N198WA, operated by Wiggins Airways Inc., was substantially damaged during approach to Knox County Regional Airport (RKD), Rockland, Maine, following an encounter with severe turbulence. The commercial pilot was not injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The non-scheduled cargo flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 and originated from Manchester Airport (MHT), Manchester, New Hampshire, around 0730. 


According to the pilot, she was in instrument conditions on descent for the instrument landing system (ILS) approach to RKD and she was encountering continuous light to moderate turbulence. When the airplane was slightly below 2,000 feet mean sea level, the airspeed was 130 knots, she experienced severe turbulence. She executed a missed approach while still encountering moderate turbulence. She decided not to attempt another approach to RKD and diverted to Bangor International Airport (BGR) Bangor, Maine. She stated that the airplane continued to experienced light to moderate turbulence enroute to BGR. She landed at BGR and after shutting down the airplane, she entered the severe turbulence encounter in the aircraft log book.


Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that both wings had skin deformation on top of the wings and the fuselage side skins were wrinkled.


Further examination by a local repair station revealed that there was substantial damage to the airplane on the top wing skin, right wing root between fuselage and nacelle just aft of main spar. The right wing root to fuselage fillet fairing was also damaged just aft of main spar. There were several other areas noted with wrinkled skin on the left and right wings.

Passengers moved to tears as fallen North Carolina soldier removed from plane



RALEIGH, N.C. - Airline passengers in Raleigh were asked to wait while fallen soldier, Officer Shawn Thomas, was carried off of a plane in a flag-draped coffin.

Lisa West Williams posted the video on her Facebook page. In it you can see the soldier's widow place her hand on the coffin before bowing her head.

Thomas was stationed at Fort Bragg but died in a non-combat accident in Niger on Feb. 2.

He is survived by his wife and their four children.

"It was an honor to fly home with this PATRIOT! God bless his wife and family. There was not a dry eye around me," Williams said in her Facebook video caption.

Story and video:  http://www.wsoctv.com

Piper PA-31 Navajo, N997DN: Accident occurred January 22, 2016 near Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas AFW FSDO-19

Piper Aircraft; Florida 

http://registry.faa.gov/N997DN



NTSB Identification: CEN16LA102
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 22, 2016 in Denton, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA31, registration: N997DN
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot reported that, during the postmaintenance test flight, the right engine surged and then behaved consistent with a fuel flow issue. The right engine subsequently lost power, and the pilot prepared to return to the airport. However, before the pilot could secure the right engine, the left engine started to surge and then lost power. The pilot conducted a forced landing to a field, during which both wings and the engine nacelles sustained substantial damage. 

Although a fuel smell was present on scene, there was no visual evidence of fuel in the fuel tanks or in the field. Only a quart of fuel was recovered from the left fuel tank. Further examination of the airframe and fuel system revealed that the fuel tanks were not compromised, and no mechanical anomalies with the airframe, engine, or the fuel system were found that would have precluded normal operation. 

The pilot reported that there should have been about 120 gallons of fuel on board at the time of departure. Additionally, a fuel receipt confirmed that 99.36 gallons of fuel had been added to the fuel tanks before a 36-minute maintenance engine test run conducted 3 days before the accident flight. No other flights were conducted between the test run and the accident flight, which the engine data monitor indicated was about 30 minutes long. 

Based upon calibrations set by the operator, the engine data showed that the engines consumed about 5.6 gallons of fuel during the test run and 19.2 gallons of fuel during the accident flight. Performance information from the manufacturer indicated that the engines should have burned between 10 and 18 gallons of fuel during the test run and between 27 and 50 gallons of fuel during the accident flight. Although it is possible the discrepancy between the recorded fuel consumption and the fuel consumption calculations was due to the operator setting the engine data monitor’s calibrations incorrectly, it could not be determined when or by whom the calibrations were set. The absence of fuel on-scene and the loss of engine power are consistent with fuel exhaustion; however, the investigation was unable to determine why there was no fuel on board at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.




On January 22, 2016, about 1530 central standard time, a Piper PA-31 airplane, N997DN, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Denton, Texas. The commercial rated pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight departed Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton, Texas, about 1500.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was a routine maintenance flight following maintenance and a 2-year period where the airplane had not flown regularly.

Several days prior to the accident flight, the pilot conducted an extensive preflight of the airplane and supervised the fueling of the airplane. He stated that the inboard tanks were filled to 56 gallons and the outboard tanks had 10 gallons of fuel added . The nacelle tanks were empty. 

Before conducting a flight in the airplane, the pilot performed a maintenance test run of the engines. He stated that he started and shut down the engines on the inboard tanks and conducted the taxi and engine run-ups on the outboard tanks. He estimated that he ran the engines for about 30 minutes. Aside from issues with the fuel boost pumps and the left and right fuel flow indicators, he noted no anomalies with the airframe, engines, or related systems during the taxi and engine run-up.



The airplane sat for three days between the maintenance test run and the accident flight. During the preflight inspection he noted a fuel spot on the floor under the right main fuel tank sump. Further examination revealed that the plug was not seated correctly. He estimated that less than a cup of fuel was lost during that time. For the accident flight the pilot estimated the fuel on board at takeoff was 120 gallons – no additional fuel was added prior to the flight, nor did he visually verify the fuel quantity as no one had flown the airplane or ran the engines since his last engine run three days prior.

The run-up of both engines prior to the flight revealed no anomalies. The pilot departed with the fuel selected to the inboard tanks and then once at altitude switched to the outboard tanks. The fuel flow meters were now working and when he noted the right engine flow start to drop he switched back to the inboard tanks. He climbed to 1,000 feet, checked multiple systems and then conducted a low approach to Bishop Field. He climbed back up to 2,000 feet and was conducting the cruise checklist when the right engine surged. The pilot noted the sound and behavior consistent with no fuel/fuel flow. The pilot checked the fuel selector valves and trouble shot the engine surge without resolve.

The pilot obtained clearance to enter a downwind for runway 36 at DTO at which time the right engine lost power. Before the pilot could declare an emergency and secure the right engine the left engine surged and lost power. During the forced landing to the field both wings and engine nacelles were substantially damaged.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors who responded to the scene, they could smell fuel on scene but found no evidence of fuel. There was no fuel in the fuel tanks and there was no pooling of fuel outside of the airplane in the debris field or where the airplane came to rest. Only a quart of fuel was recovered from the left fuel tank by the airplane recovery team.

An examination of the airframe, wings, and fuel system was conducted under the auspices of the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, inspectors from the FAA, and an investigator from Piper Aircraft. The examination revealed that the fuel tanks and fuel system had not been compromised during the accident. No mechanical anomalies were noted with the engine, airframe, or airframe fuel system that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane was equipped with a J.P. Instruments EDM-790 that had the capability to monitor and record exhaust gas temperature, cylinder head temperature, oil pressure and temperature, manifold pressure, outside air temperature, turbine inlet temperature, engine rpm, compressor discharge temperature, fuel flow, and battery voltage. The unit contained non-volatile memory for data storage of the recorded parameters.

The recorder was in good condition and data were extracted normally. The EDM contained 2.7 hours of data and 15 power cycles. Both the engine run and the accident flight were captured on the EDM. The engine run captured 36 minutes of engine data. The accident flight captured 30 minutes of data. Based upon the calibrations set by the operator, in the EDM, total fuel consumption for the engine run was 5.6 gallons and total fuel consumption for the accident flight was 19.2 gallons.

Performance data from the airplane flight manual indicate that fuel consumption (at high cruise) to be 54 gallons per hour (gph) for both engines, and 28 gph at maximum endurance. Using data from the pilot's operating manual and airplane flight manual, investigators estimated the fuel burn for the maintenance test run, 3 days prior to the accident flight, to be between 10 and 18 gallons. Further, investigators estimated fuel burn for the accident flight to be between 27 and 50 gallons. Fuel receipts confirmed the addition of 99.36 gallons of fuel, prior to the engine maintenance test run, on January 18, 2016.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA102 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 22, 2016 in Denton, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA31, registration: N997DN
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 22, 2016, about 1530 central standard time, a Piper PA-31 airplane, N997DN, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Denton, Texas. The pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight departed Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton, Texas, about 1500.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspectors who responded to the scene, the airplane had not flown for some time and the pilot was taking it on a routine flight following maintenance. During the flight the right engine surged several times before losing power. Shortly after the right engine lost power, the left engine surged and lost power. The wings, engine nacelles, and landing gear were substantially damaged during the forced landing to a field.