Sunday, August 09, 2020

Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, N761RG: Accident occurred August 07, 2020 in Hanna, Duchesne County, Utah

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

https://registry.faa.gov/N761RG


Location: Hanna, UT
Accident Number: WPR20LA258
Date & Time: 08/07/2020, 1145 MDT
Registration: N761RG
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Injuries: 2 Serious, 4 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 7, 2020, about 1145 mountain daylight time, a Cessna T210M airplane, N761RG, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hanna, Utah. The private pilot and one passenger were seriously injured and 4 other passengers had minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that the engine experienced a loss of power during a turn over mountainous terrain. The pilot decided to fly down a canyon as the propeller continued to windmill. He initiated a forced landing in an open field where the airplane experienced a hard landing. The open field is on the banks of Moon Lake at an elevation of 8,100 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane's forward fuselage and cabin area were crushed upwards and the engine was partially separated from the airplane. Both wings were buckled near the tips.

Preliminary flight track data shows the airplane as it departed Roosevelt Municipal Airport (74V), Roosevelt, UT, and climbed northwest over mountainous terrain. The track turns to the west and continues to climb to an altitude of 12,927 ft msl. The track then decreases in altitude as it turns southwest approaching a large canyon. Shortly after the flight track data stops at 11,575 ft msl. The accident site was about 7 1/2 miles south of the last flight track.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N761RG
Model/Series: T210 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: U67, 5105 ft msl
Observation Time: 1100 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 29 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 4 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 4 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.566944, -110.500278 (est)






MOUNTAIN HOME, Utah — A small plane carrying six people crashed near Moon Lake in Duchesne County, and miraculously, everyone survived. The plane’s pilot spoke to KSL from his hospital room about the crash and what happened for all six people to survive.

Shadrach Feild shared that he trained a lot for a worst case scenario, and while that training kicked in, he felt divine intervention’s hand.

“I absolutely know that God had his hand in this,” Shadrach Feild said. “It’s a miracle.”

When you see what’s left of the Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, it’s hard to believe that everyone on board survived.

“For the terrain that we were in and how it all unfolded, it takes more than a good pilot to get through this,” he said.

Six people were onboard the plane including Feild, his wife Jazlyn, their family friends Betsey and Gentry Mikesell, and their 16-year-old teenage twin sons, Brock and Boston Mikesell.

The group said they were out flying near Moon Lake on Friday morning.

“When I came over the corner over the lake, there was a lot of wind coming at me, which isn’t normally a big deal,” Feild said. “My plane — a Turbo Charged 210 — has plenty of horsepower.

That’s when Feild said the engine gave out.

“I pushed the throttle in and there was no power,” he said. “It kept running, but there was just no power.”

“It took about 12 seconds from that point to the time we touched down,” said Betsey Mikesell, explaining that they only had moments to brace for impact.

Meanwhile, Shad prepared the plane and crew for an emergency landing.

“I remember telling them I would take care of them,” Feild said, holding back emotions. “We made it across the lake.”

“Because Shad was so calm, I just thought he was landing it. He never said, ‘we’re going to crash,’” Mikesell said.

As Shad looked for a landing spot, he spotted two possible locations. The first, he said, was a beach, but there were people on it and he feared his tires wouldn’t handle the sand well. The second option was an open field.

“I thought it would be better to try and land in the sagebrush flat,” Feild said. “I didn’t want to flip over and hurt the people in the back.”

“For some reason in my mind, I was just so calm,” Mikesell said. “I just remember bracing and holding onto the seat in front of me.”

Mikesell said she was the first one out of the plane as nearby campers ran to their rescue.

“Someone said that you could feel angels everywhere, and I feel like that is what we experienced, “ Mikesell said. “Someone else said that it looked like we were just being carried down to the ground, and I swear that is literally what happened.”

“I lost my dad about four years ago, and I know that he helped,” Feild said. “I could feel him the whole time.”

Brock managed to walk away from the crash.

Gentry and Shad, who were at the front of the plane, suffered back and spinal injuries and remain hospitalized. Gentry also has a broken femur, tibia, and shattered ankle. Betsey said he broke his nose and face in 3 places.

Shad’s wife Jazyln broke her arm and wrist.

Boston, the other twin, fractured a hip.

And Betsey said she has four broken ribs on each side, a neck injury and bruised lungs.

Despite their injuries, they said they’re grateful to be alive and for the help of first responders and the campers who ran to their aid.

“Not only where we landed but that the plane died where it did — had it have been 45 seconds earlier, we all would’ve died,” Feild said. “There was nowhere to land 45 seconds earlier. It was God’s hand.”

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

CubCrafters CC11-160 Carbon Cub SS, N321C: Accident occurred August 09, 2020 at Rostraver Airport (KFWQ), Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

https://registry.faa.gov/N321C


NTSB Identification: ERA20CA280
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 9, 2020 in Rostraver, PA
Aircraft: CUBCRAFTERS INC CC11-160, registration: N321C


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft veered off runway during landing.

Date: 09-AUG-20
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N321C
Aircraft Make: CUBCRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: CC11
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MONONGAHELA
State: PENNSYLVANIA







A pilot suffered minor injuries after his CubCrafters CC11-160 Carbon Cub SS plane ran off a runway and flipped onto its roof at the Rostraver Airport on Sunday, officials said.

The call came in shortly after 2:45 p.m. as an “aircraft down” at the airport.

According to a Westmoreland County 911 dispatcher, the plane landed and was taxiing the runway, when it went off the runaway and into the grass, where it flipped over.

“The pilot was coming in to land, and he ended up (in) the grass off to the right side of the runway,” said Maurice Haas, the airport’s director of public safety.

Haas said the pilot wasn’t seriously injured, and managed to get himself out of the plane by the time firefighters and airport personnel arrived at the scene.

“He had a couple scrapes here and there,” Haas said. “He was checked out by local EMS.”

Haas said the pilot had been alone in the high-wing plane when the incident occurred. The plane is based at the Rostraver Airport.

Haas couldn’t provide the pilot’s identity, say where the pilot had been flying, or what may have caused the incident. It will be investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration, Haas said.

“I don’t know what the issue was,” Haas said. “As far as we know, it wasn’t an emergency landing.”

https://triblive.com

Bell 206B JetRanger III, N284S: Fatal accident occurred August 08, 2020 in Marathon, Brewster County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas
Rolls-Royce Engines; Indianapolis, Indiana
Bell Helicopters; Hurst, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N284S


Location: Marathon, TX
Accident Number: CEN20LA328
Date & Time: 08/08/2020, CDT
Registration: N284S
Aircraft: Bell 206
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation

On August 8, 2020, at an unknown time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N284S, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Marathon, Texas. The pilot was seriously injured, and the three passengers were fatally injured. The flight was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 aerial survey flight.

The flight's mission was to conduct aerial survey of desert bighorn sheep in the Texas Black Gap Wildlife Management Area. When the helicopter did not return for refueling at the expected time, a search was initiated. The wreckage was located about 1200, by Texas Parks & Wildlife Department personnel who notified authorities.

The pilot reported to the first responders that about 5 minutes before refueling; the helicopter was about 800 ft above ground level when he felt a slight vibration. He informed the passengers he would be conducting an emergency landing. The vibration intensified and he was losing maneuverability, the vibration got worst. The helicopter lost lift and impacted terrain short of the intended landing area. The pilot stated that the engine never stopped producing power.

The helicopter pilot was not in contact with air traffic control.

The wreckage will be recovered to a secure location for a detailed examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N284S
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Southwest Heliservices Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KE38
Observation Time: 1135 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 72 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious

Latitude, Longitude: 30.191667, -103.210278 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




Brewster County Sheriff's Office


Saturday morning, Brewster County Deputies responded to a remote location, in Southeastern Brewster County, to investigate a helicopter crash. The pilot was flown to Alpine, by DPS aircraft, and treated for injuries. The three passengers were deceased. The Brewster County Sheriff’s Office, Texas DPS Aircraft Operations, Texas Parks and Wildlife, US Border Patrol, Marathon Volunteer Fire Department, and civilian volunteers assisted with the incident. The FAA and the Sheriff’s Office are investigating this incident. Our condolences and prayers are with the families of the individuals onboard.

Texas Buck Registry


Both Dewey Stockbridge and Dr. Bob Dittmar were personal friends of ours, and they will be greatly missed, not only because of the top notch work they did in service of Texas wildlife, but also because of the men they were and the integrity they carried. God speed to both of these men, and the others involved in the crash.

Three employees of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department were killed in a helicopter crash Saturday while conducting aerial surveys for desert bighorn sheep, according to officials.

The three people killed were identified as biologist Dewey Stockbridge, wildlife technician Brandon White and veterinarian Bob Dittmar, according to a Sunday press release from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

"No words can begin to express the depth of sadness we feel for the loss of our colleagues in this tragic accident," Carter Smith, executive director of TPWD, said in the statement.

"These men were consummate professionals, deeply liked and highly regarded by their peers and partners alike for the immense passion, dedication, and expertise they brought to their important work in wildlife management and veterinary medicine," he said.

The helicopter pilot, a private contractor, survived the crash and was transported to a hospital in El Paso, according to the statement. TPWD did not release any information on the cause of the crash.

The group was flying over TPWD's Black Gap Wildlife Management Area in Brewster County to conduct research on the desert bighorn sheep. The area borders Big Bend National Park and spans over 100,000 acres, according to TPWD.

Texas wildlife officials have been instrumental in restoring numbers of desert bighorn sheep after the population decreased due to disease and unregulated hunting, according to TPWD, which estimated the bighorn's population in Texas at 1,500 in 2018.

Stockbridge worked on conservation of the species for several years. In 2016, during an interview with Outside Magazine, he spoke on the importance of managing the herds.

"When you reintroduce desert bighorn in a landscape such as Elephant Mountain here, it's really a trickle down effect," he said. "There are numerous other species that benefit from them being reintroduced to certain mountain ranges."

Officials conduct aerial surveys throughout the year to monitor population size and observe the animal's behavior.

Dittmar joined the TPWD as the agency's first-ever staff veterinarian in 2014, according to the agency. Previously, he assisted in various projects with the agency and was in private practice in Kerrville, northwest of San Antonio.

"My wife's telling everybody that I'm going to be making sure that my grandkids and great grandkids have wildlife to enjoy in the future," Dittmar said in an interview with TPWD in 2014. "I'm going to be a part helping to ensure that our wildlife populations are healthy, and looking at it more from a veterinary medical standpoint than strictly a management and biological standpoint."

The Texas Department of Public Safety, Federal Aviation Administration and Texas Game Wardens are investigating the crash.

"Our hearts ache today for those who died in this tragic accident," Texas Governor Greg Abbott said.

https://www.cnn.com

Accident occurred August 09, 2020 in Meredith Bay on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEREDITH, NEW HAMPSHIRE — Chief James McIntyre reports that a veteran Stoneham Police officer helped rescue a pilot from the water after the man’s ultralight glider plane crash landed into Lake Winnipesaukee Sunday afternoon.

WHEN:

At 8 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 9 Stoneham Police Officer Joe Ponzo will be available for interview via Zoom. To RSVP email ben@jgpr.net.

WHAT:

At approximately 3 p.m. Sunday, Stoneham Police Officer Joe Ponzo was off-duty with his family on vacation on a boat in Lake Winnipesaukee, when he observed an ultralight glider plane crash land into the lake.

Officer Ponzo called the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol Unit and notified them of the incident and then rushed his boat over to the scene of the crash and he and other boaters worked to pull the male pilot out of the water onto his boat. The man was conscious and alert.

Officer Ponzo was met on shore by members of the Marine Patrol Unit, the Laconia Fire Department, the Meredith Fire Department and Meredith Police Department. The man was then transported by ambulance to a local hospital.

“Thankfully we were in the right place at the right time,” Officer Ponzo said. “The plane sank into the water right after the crash and the man was able to get himself out before we got there. He was in the water and a few other boaters came to help me get him into my boat.”

Chief McIntyre credited Officer Ponzo with saving the man’s life.

“Even off-duty on vacation with our families we are never truly off the job when duty calls,” Chief McIntyre said. “Officer Ponzo is a 23-year veteran of the Stoneham Police Department and he was the right person to be there when this man needed help. We credit Joe with helping to save this man’s life and springing into action when he saw someone in need.”

Any further inquiries about the incident should be referred to the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol Unit.

https://jgpr.net



MEREDITH - A Center Harbor man was injured Sunday when the small plane he was piloting crashed and sank in Meredith Bay on Lake Winnipesaukee.

According to state police, around 3 p.m. Marine Patrol Officer Zachary Cobis was on patrol on the lake when he was flagged down by a passing boater reporting a plane crash.

Cobis located the pilot, who had been pulled from the water by other boaters across from Grouse Point in Meredith Bay. He was identified as David Grapes, 78.

Stoneham Police Officer Joe Ponzo was off-duty with his family on vacation on a boat in Lake Winnipesaukee, when he saw the ultralight glider plane crash-land.

Ponzo called Marine Patrol and notified them of the crash, then steered his boat over to the area where the plane went down. He and other boaters worked to pull Grapes out of the water and onto his boat. Grapes was conscious and alert.

Ponzo was met on shore by members of the Marine Patrol Unit, the Laconia Fire Department, the Meredith Fire Department and Meredith Police Department. Grapes, who was the plane’s sole occupant, suffered non-life-threatening injuries and was taken to Lakes Region General Hospital in Laconia.

“Thankfully we were in the right place at the right time,” Ponzo said in a statement. “The plane sank into the water right after the crash and the man was able to get himself out before we got there. He was in the water and a few other boaters came to help me get him into my boat.”

Stoneham, Mass., Police Chief James McIntyre credited Off. Ponzo with saving the man’s life.

“Even off-duty on vacation with our families we are never truly off the job when duty calls,” Chief McIntyre said in a statement. “Officer Ponzo is a 23-year veteran of the Stoneham Police Department and he was the right person to be there when this man needed help. We credit Joe with helping to save this man’s life and springing into action when he saw someone in need.”

The ultralight plane sank in approximately 65 feet of water, Cobis reported.

According to state police, the ultralight was approximately 1,000 feet above the bay when the engine stopped.

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the incident.

The crash remains under investigation.

https://www.unionleader.com

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six, N4079R: Accident occurred July 05, 2020 near Eveleth-Virginia Municipal Airport (KEVM), Minnesota

St. Louis County Rescue Squad

Prior to clearing the scene and moments before the heavens opened in a tempest of rain and thunder, Rick (center) leads the group in a quick debrief following the July 5th aircraft crash near Eveleth, Minnesota. In a magnificent piece of dead-stick flying, the pilot brought his aircraft down slowly and (relatively) softly into a spruce bog, enabling him and his wife to walk away with minor injuries. The aircraft, unfortunately, was consumed in a post-crash fire. Twenty-two (22) squad-members and nearly a score of other agencies participated in the July 5th operation.

St. Louis County Rescue Squad

South Marsh Master arrives with one of two survivors of a plane crash on July 5th deep in a spruce bog in Fayal Township southeast of Eveleth, Minnesota. A lot of agencies put forth herculean effort to make this operation a tremendous success. At the risk of missing someone, props, kudos, and many, many thanks to: Central Lakes, Fayal, Gilbert, and Lakeland Fire-Rescue, Hibbing, Eveleth, and Virginia Ambulance, Eveleth PD, Sheriff's Deputies, County Emergency Management, the Minnesota DNR, 911-Dispatchers, County Public Works, St. Louis County Surveyors, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC), the Federal Aviation Administration, and Duluth Air Traffic Control. This was a very good day!




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N4079R

Location: Eveleth, MN
Accident Number: CEN20LA263
Date & Time: 07/05/2020, 1200 CDT
Registration: N4079R
Aircraft: Piper PA32
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 5, 2020, about 1100 central daylight time, a Piper PA-32-300, N4079R, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Eveleth, Minnesota. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that the airplane had about 55 gallons of fuel on-board before the flight began including 14 gallons in the left tip tank. He reported that he started the engine on a main tank and then switched to the left tip tank for takeoff. He did not recall switching tanks after that. After takeoff the airplane climbed to 7,500 ft. above mean sea level (msl) and leveled off. Shortly after establishing his cruise parameters, the engine lost all power. Attempts to restart the engine were not successful and the pilot attempted to glide to the nearest airport. When he realized that he had insufficient altitude to reach the target airport, he executed a forced landing to a wooded area. The pilot and his passenger were able to exit the airplane with minor injuries, but the airplane sustained substantial damage. Both wings were separated from the airplane, the fuselage and tail surfaces had impact damage, and various parts of the airplane, including the cabin section of the fuselage received post-impact fire damage.

The airplane and engine were recovered and will be examined.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make:Piper
Registration:N4079R
Model/Series: PA32 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No
Operator: Zahasky Richard
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: HIB, 1353 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Tower, MN (12D)
Destination: Menomonie, WI (LUM)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:

Van's RV-8, N508CM: Accident occurred July 17, 2020 in Grimes, Colusa County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N508CM

Location: Grimes, CA
Accident Number: WPR20LA225
Date & Time: 07/17/2020, 1430 PDT
Registration: N508CM
Aircraft: Vans RV 8
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 17, 2020, about 1430 Pacific daylight time, an experimental RV-8 airplane, N508CM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Grimes, California. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated he was conducting pattern work at a private field in preparation for a mountain flying school, when he experienced a partial loss of engine power. He landed the airplane in the field which was then examined by a certified Airframe and Powerplant mechanic. The engine was run at 2,000 rpm with no misfire, the manifold pressure indicated 29-30 inches of mercury and the fuel flow indicated 20 gallons per hour flow (with or without fuel pump). After the mechanic cleared the airplane for flight, the pilot took off, but at 100-150 ft above ground level, he again experienced a partial loss of engine power. The pilot initiated another emergency landing but the airplane impacted the ground resulting in a substantial damage to the fuselage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N508CM
Model/Series: RV 8 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Loss of Lift: Van's RV-6, N327WB; accident occurred July 25, 2020 in Imperial, Chase County, Nebraska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N327WB


Location: Imperial, NE

Accident Number: CEN20CA307
Date & Time: 07/25/2020, 1249 MDT
Registration: N327WB
Aircraft: Vans VANS RV 6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot stated that this was his third passenger carrying flight of the day and he determined his takeoff weight was about 146 lbs below max gross weight. For the takeoff from the grass strip, he elected not to utilize flaps or the full length of the runway, leaving about 100-200 ft behind him. During the takeoff roll, he began to be concerned about powerlines at the end of the runway and when about 10-25 ft above the ground, he began a shallow bank turn to the right. Immediately after starting the turn, he flew over a corn field and he "was almost instantaneously no longer flying." The airplane then impacted the corn, resulting in substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage.


The pilot noted that he listened to the density altitude reported on the Automated Weather Observing System for a nearby airport but did not process the effects it would have on the accident flight. The density altitude was about 6,184ft.


Pilot Information


Certificate: Private

Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/20/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/22/2019
Flight Time: 247 hours (Total, all aircraft), 58 hours (Total, this make and model), 247 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Vans

Registration: N327WB
Model/Series: VANS RV 6 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1996
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 24169
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/07/2020, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 20 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 754 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-H2AD
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIML, 3273 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 359°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Imperial, NE (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Imperial, NE (IML)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1145 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: PRIVATE (PRIV)

Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 3460 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach:None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Minor

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.406944, -101.617500

Plane crashes in both Chase and Perkins County, happening about the same time Saturday morning, called emergency personnel to the two scenes.

In Chase County, a private plane went down in a cornfield near the intersection of 333 Avenue and 730 Road.

In Perkins County, the pilot of a crop plane died after his aircraft went down in a cornfield seven miles south and a half mile east of Grant, or about three miles north of the Chase/Perkins county line.

A release issued by Chase County Sheriff Kevin Mueller’s office said an emergency 911 call regarding a possible airplane crash in rural Chase County was received about 11:49 a.m. Saturday.

The 333/730 location is a few miles southwest of Enders Lake.

The Van's RV-6 aircraft, with two male passengers, had reportedly gone down in cornfield shortly after takeoff.

It landed not far from the grass airstrip on the property.

Brothers Steve and Tim Leibbrandt were in the plane, according to reports from the scene. Both were transported to Chase County Community Hospital.

Steve Leibbrandt, the pilot, was treated for minor injuries and released later Saturday from Chase County Hospital.

Passenger Tim Leibbrandt sustained more serious, non-life threatening injuries. He was eventually transported to another medical facility in Colorado.

Efforts for an update on Tim Leibbrandt’s recovery were unsuccessful.

The Chase County Sheriff’s Office, Imperial EMS and Imperial Volunteer Fire Department were called to the scene.

Fire Chief Doug Mitchell said the IVFD took three units to the scene, where they were charged with making sure the scene was safe. There was no fire, Mitchell said.

Sheriff Mueller said the cause of the accident remains undetermined.

Mueller said the investigation has been turned over to investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Transportation Safety Bureau (NTSB).

Perkins County crash

A 31-year-old Tennessee man perished Saturday when the aerial spray plane he was piloting went down in a cornfield south of Grant.

Perkins County Sheriff Jim Brueggeman identified the victim as Alex Tuttle of College Grove, Tennessee.

Brueggeman said Tuttle was a contract pilot flying for Aurora Cooperative when the accident occurred. The plane was owned by Aurora Co-op.

The call came in at 12:05 p.m. His office, along with the Grant and Madrid fire departments, were dispatched to scene.

Brueggeman said another pilot spraying nearby lost sight of the plane and efforts to contact Tuttle were unsuccessful.

After finishing the load, the pilot flew over the field and spotted the downed plane.

Brueggeman said they believe the plane went down somewhere between 11:40 and 11:50 a.m.

Perkins County Coroner Rick Roberts pronounced Tuttle dead at the scene. An autopsy was ordered since it was an unattended death.

Investigators with the NTSB and FAA were on the scene Sunday, according to the sheriff.

https://www.imperialrepublican.com

Piper PA-28R-201T Cherokee Arrow III, N31720: Accident occurred July 25, 2020 at Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (KFHB), Nassau County, Florida

https://registry.faa.gov/N31720

NTSB Identification: ERA20CA265
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 25, 2020 in Fernandina Beach, FL
Aircraft: Piper PA28R, registration: N31720

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Van's RV-7, N514BS: Accident occurred July 26, 2020 in Henefer, Summit County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N514BS

Location: Henefer, UT
Accident Number: WPR20LA239
Date & Time: 07/26/2020, 1110 MDT
Registration: N514BS
Aircraft: Vans RV7
Injuries:1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 26, 2020, about 1110 mountain daylight time, a Vans RV7, N514BS, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Henefer, Utah. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that during an uneventful flight, at an altitude of about 10,000 ft mean sea level, he switched fuel tanks and shortly after, the engine began to sputter. The pilot turned on the electric fuel boost pump and switched the fuel selector valve to the original position, and the engine began to operate normally. However, a short time later, the engine began to sputter a second time, and despite his attempts, he was unable to restore engine power, and initiated a forced landing to a nearby road. During landing, the left wing struck the ground, and the airplane veered to the left off the surface of the road and impacted rising terrain.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by local law enforcement revealed that both wings and fuselage were structurally damaged. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N514BS
Model/Series: RV7
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOGD, 4439 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 20°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ogden, UT (KOGD)
Destination: Heber City, UT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.986667, -111.529722 (est)








MORGAN COUNTY, Utah — A plane crashed in Morgan county Sunday morning.  The pilot was transported to the University of Utah with non-life-threatening injuries after crashing the small airplane near 6455 South Highway 66. The male pilot sustained some injuries, including a head laceration. 

The Morgan Fire emergency responders were dispatched to the scene around 11:05 a.m. Fire crews initially sent one engine, two brush trucks and an ambulance to the scene. 

While on route, a bystander reported the pilot had a “severe head injury,” causing crews to call in a medical helicopter to the scene. However, upon arriving to the crash, emergency medical responders reported he did not have life-threatening injuries and cancelled the helicopter. 

The pilot reports his plane lost power while en route, so he circled East Canyon Reservoir several times before attempting an emergency crash landing on State Route 66. The right wing of his plane hit the side of the road, sending the pilot into the roadside bank right next to the highway. 

Deputies discovered a small fuel leak when they arrived on scene, which was quickly mitigated — avoiding a fire. The Utah Highway Patrol dispatched a tow truck to retrieve the small aircraft. 

Meanwhile, the male pilot was sent by ground to the University of Utah Hospital. The pilot’s identifying information was not immediately released. 

Highway traffic was slightly impacted, with clearings on the road by about 4 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified of the crash and will conduct an investigation. 

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