Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Airbus A330-202: Incident occurred April 14, 2018 in Brisbane, QLD, Australia

NTSB Identification: ENG18WA025
14 CFR Unknown
Incident occurred Saturday, April 14, 2018 in Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Aircraft: AIRBUS A330, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Australian Government has notified the NTSB of an incident involving an Airbus A330-202 that occurred April 14, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer and Design of the engine.

All investigative information will be released by the ATSB.

Piper PA-22-160, N9819D: Accident occurred June 19, 2018 at Yakutat Airport (PAYA), Alaska

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9819D

Location: Yakutat, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA363
Date & Time: 06/19/2018, 1400 AKD
Registration: N9819D
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, after touchdown, oscillations began and the airplane exited the runway to the right. The airplane ground looped to the right, the left main landing gear collapsed, and the left wing impacted the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/17/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/19/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6575.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 101.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 5145.5 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 103.2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 44.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N9819D
Model/Series: PA22 160
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1959
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-6706
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:  4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/14/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3604.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAYA, 31 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 312°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Yakutat, AK (A68)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Yakutat, AK (YAK)
Type of Clearance: Special VFR
Departure Time: 1345 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: YAKUTAT (YAK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 32 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 11
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7732 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  59.508889, -139.664167 (est)

Compass Airlines, Embraer ERJ-175, N637CZ: Accident occurred June 17, 2018 in Calgary, Canada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena

Flight 5774: Encountered mountain turbulence resulting in a flight attendant sustaining a back injury.

Delta Air Lines Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N637CZ

Date: 17-JUN-18
Time: 04:02:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: E75S
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: COMPASS AIR
Flight Number: 5774
City: CALGARY
State: CANADA

Cubcrafters CC11-160, N331TR: Incident occurred June 20, 2018 in Port Mayaca, Martin County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

During takeoff ran into a bank of rocks.

Westgate and Beyond #15 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N331TR

Date: 20-JUN-18
Time: 00:26:00Z
Regis#: N331TR
Aircraft Make: CUB CRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: CC11 160
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PORT MAYACA
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 525C Citation CJ4, N614SB, registered to Maverick Air LLC and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2016 near Cleveland Burke Lakefront Airport (KBKL), Cleveland, Ohio

John Fleming, his wife, Suzanne; their 2 sons, 15-year-old John Robert Fleming, and 14-year-old Andrew Fleming, a neighbor Brian Casey; and Casey's teenage daughter, Megan Casey, were on the Cessna 525C Citation CJ4 plane.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Olmsted, Ohio
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Williams International; Walled Lake, Michigan
Rockwell Collins; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Cleveland, OH

Accident Number: CEN17FA072
Date & Time: 12/29/2016, 2257 EST
Registration: N614SB
Aircraft: CESSNA 525
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 6 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 29, 2016, at 2257 eastern standard time, a Cessna 525C (Citation CJ4) airplane, N614SB, was destroyed during an in-flight collision with Lake Erie shortly after takeoff from runway 24R (6,604 feet by 150 feet, asphalt) at the Burke Lakefront Airport (BKL), Cleveland, Ohio. The pilot and five passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Maverick Air LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The intended destination was the Ohio State University Airport (OSU), Columbus, Ohio.


The pilot and passengers departed OSU about 1730 and arrived at BKL about 1800. The pilot checked in at the fixed base operator (FBO) at 1812. The pilot and passengers attended a local sporting event before returning to the airport about 2230.


A review of the air traffic control (ATC) communications transcript, the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) transcript, automated dependent surveillance – broadcast (ADS-B) data, and full authority digital engine control (FADEC) unit data revealed the following:


At 2255, the pilot was cleared for takeoff. He was instructed to turn right to a heading of 330° and maintain 2,000 feet mean sea level (msl) after departure. The pilot acknowledged the clearance. At 2256:33, the engine power increased for takeoff, and 15 seconds later the airplane became airborne. At 2257:09, an automated voice annunciated "altitude." A second "altitude" annunciation followed 14 seconds later. At 2257:25, a sound similar to a decrease in engine power was recorded. Two seconds later, the enhanced ground proximity warning system (EGPWS) provided an excessive bank angle warning. At 2257:29, about 2 seconds after the bank angle warning, the tower controller instructed the pilot to contact departure control. The pilot replied, "to departure six one four sierra bravo;" however, that communication was not received by the tower controller suggesting that the pilot did not have the microphone push-to-talk button depressed.


At 2257:37, the controller again attempted to contact the pilot. Two seconds after the controller's transmission, the EGPWS provided a "sink rate" warning to the pilot. The pilot again responded, "six one four sierra bravo," but this was not received by the tower controller. Beginning at 2257:43, the EGPWS provided 7 "pull up" warnings at 1.6-second intervals until the end of the CVR recording. During that time, a sound similar to the overspeed warning began, which continued until the end of the recording. The CVR recording ended at 2257:58.


The tower controller's continued attempts to contact the pilot were unsuccessful, and he subsequently initiated search and rescue procedures.


A summary of the operational factors associated with the accident, including a detailed history of flight, is included in the docket associated with the investigation.


Pilot Information


Certificate: Private

Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/15/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/08/2016
Flight Time: 1205 hours (Total, all aircraft), 56 hours (Total, this make and model), 919 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 56 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 22 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The pilot's Cessna 525 single-pilot type rating was added December 8, 2016, after he successfully completed the prescribed Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) practical test (checkride). His initial Cessna 525 training was completed in the accident airplane. The pilot subsequently completed a simulator-based recurrent training course at FlightSafety International on December 17, 2016.


The pilot had accumulated a total of 56.5 hours in Cessna 525 airplanes. Of that time, 8.7 hours were as pilot-in-command which included the practical test. His most recent logged flight was on December 17 from Orlando International (MCO) to OSU. The pilot owned a Cessna 510 (Mustang) for about 2 years before purchasing the accident airplane. He had logged 372.9 hours total time in Cessna 510 airplanes. Interviews with the pilot's instructor confirmed that the pilot was trained to consistently use the autopilot after takeoff.


Available information indicated that the pilot had been awake for nearly 17 hours at the time of the accident. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA

Registration: N614SB
Model/Series: 525
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Commuter
Serial Number: 525C0072
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 11
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/17/2016, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 17110 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 1 Hours
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time: 861.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Williams International
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: FJ44-4A
Registered Owner: Maverick Air LLC
Rated Power: 3621 lbs 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

FAA records revealed that the airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate in January 2012 and was subsequently exported to Brazil. The airplane was imported to the United States and purchased by the owner in October 2016. An FAA standard airworthiness certificate was issued at that time.


According to the airplane maintenance records, the most recent inspection was completed on October 3, 2016, at 812.7 hours airframe total time. Compliance with all current airworthiness directives and mandatory service bulletins was confirmed at that time. Additional maintenance work was completed on October 14, 2016, at 814.1 hours total airframe time. The most recent maintenance work occurred on December 17, 2016, at 860.7 hours total airframe time. 


Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: BKL, 584 ft msl
Observation Time: 2300 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 135°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2300 ft agl
Visibility: 9 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 31 knots, 260°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.74 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Cleveland, OH (BKL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Columbus, OH (OSU)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 2256 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

The observations from BKL and Cleveland Hopkins International (CLE) indicated that marginal visual conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. Precipitation was reported in the one-minute observations at BKL until 2251, with no precipitation reported at the surface until 2342. While the surface temperature remained above freezing after the airplane landed at BKL and about the accident time, the dew point temperature remained below freezing the entire time with precipitation occurring on and off in the snow shower activity.


Airport Information


Airport: Burke Lakefront (BKL)

Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 584 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 24R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6604 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.554722, -81.703333

The accident site was located in Lake Erie about 2 miles northwest of BKL. The depth of the lake at that location was about 40 feet. Search and recovery efforts were hampered by weather and lake conditions. Airplane debris, including the cockpit voice recorder, was located beginning on January 5. The recovery operations were conducted over the following 2 weeks as lake conditions permitted.


A postaccident examination of the recovered wreckage did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. 


Medical And Pathological Information


An autopsy and toxicology testing were not performed due to the limited remains recovered. 


Additional Information


Flight Guidance Panel


The flight guidance panel (FGP), located on the glareshield, allows the pilot to select manual or autopilot guidance for airplane control. The autopilot button is located on the upper row of button controls near the right side of the panel. Autopilot engagement is indicated in the flight control system display area along the upper portion of the primary flight display (PFD). There is no indication of the autopilot status on or near the autopilot button on the flight guidance panel.


A comparison of the Cessna 525 systems and those of the airplane previously flown by the pilot, a Cessna 510, revealed that the autopilot engagement button on the Cessna 510 is located in a slightly different location on the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) panel. In the Cessna 510, autopilot engagement is indicated along the upper portion of the PFD similar to the accident airplane. In addition, an indicator light adjacent to the autopilot button on the AFCS panel is illuminated when the autopilot is engaged.


Primary Flight Display


The attitude indicator presented by the PFD on the Cessna 525 was an ego-centric ("inside out") type display. An "inside out" perspective involves a fixed aircraft symbol and moving horizon similar to what a pilot sees when looking outside of the aircraft. On the other hand, the Cessna 510 utilizes an exo-centric ("outside in") display. An "outside in" perspective involves a fixed horizon and a moving aircraft symbol.


Spatial Disorientation


The FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute's publication, "Introduction to Aviation Physiology," defines spatial disorientation as a loss of proper bearings or a state of mental confusion as to position, location, or movement relative to the position of the earth. Factors contributing to spatial disorientation include changes in acceleration, flight in IMC, frequent transfer between visual meteorological conditions (VMC) and IMC, and unperceived changes in aircraft attitude.



The FAA's Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3A) describes some hazards associated with flying when the ground or horizon are obscured. The handbook states, in part: "The vestibular sense (motion sensing by the inner ear) in particular tends to confuse the pilot. Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated; leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

Location: Cleveland, OH

Accident Number: CEN17FA072
Date & Time: 12/29/2016, 2257 EST
Registration: N614SB
Aircraft: CESSNA 525
Injuries: 6 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 29, 2016, at 2257 eastern standard time, a Cessna model 525C (Citation CJ4) airplane, N614SB, was destroyed during an in-flight collision with Lake Erie shortly after takeoff from runway 24R (6,604 feet by 15o feet, asphalt) at the Burke Lakefront Airport (BKL), Cleveland, Ohio. The pilot and five passengers are missing and presumed fatal. The airplane was registered to Maverick Air LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The intended destination was the Ohio State University Airport (OSU), Columbus, Ohio.


The pilot and passengers initially departed OSU about 1730 and arrived at BKL about 1800. The pilot checked in at the fixed base operator (FBO) at 1812. The pilot and passengers reportedly attended a local sporting event before returning to the airport about 2230.


An initial review of Air Traffic Control (ATC) transmissions between the pilot and the Midwest ATC Federal Contract Tower at BKL revealed that the pilot requested the IFR clearance at 2247, followed by the taxi clearance at 2251. At 2256, the pilot informed the BKL tower controller that he was holding short of the runway and ready for takeoff. The controller subsequently cleared the pilot for takeoff and instructed him to turn right to a heading of 330 degrees and maintain 2,000 feet msl after departure. The pilot acknowledged the clearance. After takeoff, the controller instructed the pilot to contact departure control; however, no further communications were received from the pilot. After multiple attempts to contact the pilot were unsuccessful, the controller initiated search and rescue procedures.


Automated Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) position data indicated that the takeoff began about 2256:47 (hhmm:ss). The data depicted the airplane entering a right turn shortly after crossing the runway departure threshold. The airplane became established on a magnetic course of 310 degrees at about 2257:28. During this time, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 2,925 feet msl. About 5 seconds later, the airplane entered a descending right turn that continued until the final data point. The final data point was recorded at 2257:52 and was located 1.83 miles northwest of BKL. The associated altitude was 775 feet msl.


The resulting search and recovery effort was hampered by weather and lake conditions. Airplane debris, including the cockpit voice recorder, was ultimately located about 0.10 mile northeast of the final data point. The cockpit voice recorder was transferred to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for readout. A detailed wreckage examination will be conducted once recovery operations have concluded.


The Cessna 525C Citation CJ4 airplane has a low-wing, T-tail airframe arrangement, with a retractable tricycle landing gear configuration. The cabin is pressurized and the airplane is capable of operating at a maximum pressure altitude of 45,000 feet. It is configured for up to 10 occupants including the pilot(s). The airplane is approved for single pilot operations provided the pilot-in-command holds a CE525S (single pilot) type rating, the airplane is configured for single pilot operations in accordance with the operating limitations, and the pilot occupies the left pilot seat.


Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the accident airplane was a 2012 model year Cessna 525C, serial number 525C-0072. It was powered by two Williams International FJ44-4A turbofan engines, serial numbers 211155 and 211156. The airplane was initially issued a commuter category standard airworthiness certificate in January 2012. It was subsequently exported to Brazil. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 10 hours total time when exported. The airplane was imported to the United States and purchased by the accident owner in October 2016. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 812 hours total time when the airplane was returned to the United States. Available records indicated that the most recent maintenance activity occurred on December 17, 2016. At that time the airplane had accumulated 860 hours total time.


FAA records revealed that the accident pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, and instrument airplane category/class ratings. In addition, the pilot held CE-510S and CE-525S type ratings. He was issued a third class airman medical certificate without limitations on October 15, 2015. The pilot's CE-525S type rating was added December 8, 2016, after he successfully completed the prescribed FAA practical test (checkride). His initial Cessna 525 training was completed in the accident airplane. The pilot subsequently completed a simulator-based recurrent training course at FlightSafety International on December 17, 2016. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA

Registration: N614SB
Model/Series: 525
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: BKL, 584 ft msl
Observation Time: 2300 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 31 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2300 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.74 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Cleveland, OH (BKL)
Destination: Columbus, OH (OSU)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  41.517778, -81.682778 (est)








Location: Cleveland, OH
Accident Number: CEN17FA072
Date & Time: 12/29/2016, 2257 EST
Registration: N614SB
Aircraft: CESSNA 525
Injuries: 6 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 29, 2016, at 2257 eastern standard time, a Cessna model 525C (Citation CJ4) airplane, N614SB, was destroyed during an in-flight collision with Lake Erie shortly after takeoff from runway 24R (6,604 feet by 15o feet, asphalt) at the Burke Lakefront Airport (BKL), Cleveland, Ohio. The pilot and five passengers are missing and presumed fatal. The airplane was registered to Maverick Air LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The intended destination was the Ohio State University Airport (OSU), Columbus, Ohio.

The pilot and passengers initially departed OSU about 1730 and arrived at BKL about 1800. The pilot checked in at the fixed base operator (FBO) at 1812. The pilot and passengers reportedly attended a local sporting event before returning to the airport about 2230.

An initial review of Air Traffic Control (ATC) transmissions between the pilot and the Midwest ATC Federal Contract Tower at BKL revealed that the pilot requested the IFR clearance at 2247, followed by the taxi clearance at 2251. At 2256, the pilot informed the BKL tower controller that he was holding short of the runway and ready for takeoff. The controller subsequently cleared the pilot for takeoff and instructed him to turn right to a heading of 330 degrees and maintain 2,000 feet msl after departure. The pilot acknowledged the clearance. After takeoff, the controller instructed the pilot to contact departure control; however, no further communications were received from the pilot. After multiple attempts to contact the pilot were unsuccessful, the controller initiated search and rescue procedures.

Automated Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) position data indicated that the takeoff began about 2256:47 (hhmm:ss). The data depicted the airplane entering a right turn shortly after crossing the runway departure threshold. The airplane became established on a magnetic course of 310 degrees at about 2257:28. During this time, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 2,925 feet msl. About 5 seconds later, the airplane entered a descending right turn that continued until the final data point. The final data point was recorded at 2257:52 and was located 1.83 miles northwest of BKL. The associated altitude was 775 feet msl.

The resulting search and recovery effort was hampered by weather and lake conditions. Airplane debris, including the cockpit voice recorder, was ultimately located about 0.10 mile northeast of the final data point. The cockpit voice recorder was transferred to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for readout. A detailed wreckage examination will be conducted once recovery operations have concluded.

The Cessna 525C Citation CJ4 airplane has a low-wing, T-tail airframe arrangement, with a retractable tricycle landing gear configuration. The cabin is pressurized and the airplane is capable of operating at a maximum pressure altitude of 45,000 feet. It is configured for up to 10 occupants including the pilot(s). The airplane is approved for single pilot operations provided the pilot-in-command holds a CE525S (single pilot) type rating, the airplane is configured for single pilot operations in accordance with the operating limitations, and the pilot occupies the left pilot seat.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the accident airplane was a 2012 model year Cessna 525C, serial number 525C-0072. It was powered by two Williams International FJ44-4A turbofan engines, serial numbers 211155 and 211156. The airplane was initially issued a commuter category standard airworthiness certificate in January 2012. It was subsequently exported to Brazil. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 10 hours total time when exported. The airplane was imported to the United States and purchased by the accident owner in October 2016. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 812 hours total time when the airplane was returned to the United States. Available records indicated that the most recent maintenance activity occurred on December 17, 2016. At that time the airplane had accumulated 860 hours total time.

FAA records revealed that the accident pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, and instrument airplane category/class ratings. In addition, the pilot held CE-510S and CE-525S type ratings. He was issued a third class airman medical certificate without limitations on October 15, 2015. The pilot's CE-525S type rating was added December 8, 2016, after he successfully completed the prescribed FAA practical test (checkride). His initial Cessna 525 training was completed in the accident airplane. The pilot subsequently completed a simulator-based recurrent training course at FlightSafety International on December 17, 2016. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N614SB
Model/Series: 525
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: BKL, 584 ft msl
Observation Time: 2300 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 31 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2300 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.74 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Cleveland, OH (BKL)
Destination: Columbus, OH (OSU)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  41.517778, -81.682778 (est)

Bell OH-58A Kiowa, operated by the North Carolina State Highway Patrol, N303HP: Accident occurred June 19, 2018 at Garner Road Heliport (3NC2), Raleigh, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N303HP




Location: Raleigh, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA170
Date & Time: 06/19/2018, 1406 EDT
Registration: N303HP
Aircraft: BELL OH 58A
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

On June 19, 2018, about 1406 eastern daylight time, a Bell OH-58A, N303HP, operated by the North Carolina State Highway Patrol, was substantially damaged during takeoff at the Garner Road Heliport (3NC2), Raleigh, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the local, public use, photography flight. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a written statement, the pilot stated the purpose of the flight was to take photographs near the Raleigh-Durham Airport. He moved the helicopter from the hangar to the helipad using an electric/hydraulic transporter attached to the helicopter skids. During his preflight preparation as he unhooked the transporter clamp from the left skid, the passenger, seated in the left front co-pilot seat, inquired about removing the controls from co-pilot's side of the helicopter. The pilot had not intended to remove them, though he decided to do so after the passenger's inquiry. After removing the controls, he continued with the preflight inspection; however, he forgot to unhook the transporter from the right skid. Subsequently during the takeoff, the helicopter began to roll uncontrollably to the right until the main rotor blades struck the ground.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. He held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane-single engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued March 26, 2018, at which time he reported 882 total hours of flight experience.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site by an FAA inspector and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The helicopter came to rest mostly on its left side, and partially inverted. Examination also revealed substantial damage to the fuselage, separation of the tail boom and main rotor system with the transmission, from the fuselage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELL
Registration: N303HP
Model/Series: OH 58A NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: NORTH CAROLINA STATE HIGHWAY PATROL
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RDU, 416 ft msl
Observation Time: 1351 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Raleigh, NC (3NC2)
Destination: Raleigh, NC (3NC2) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  35.731944, -78.628611 (est)

RALEIGH, NC (WITN) - Federal investigators say a Highway Patrol pilot said he forgot to unhook a transport clamp from one of the helicopter skids, causing it to crash last month.

The Bell OH-58A helicopter crashed on June 19th at a state-owned landing pad in Raleigh.

The pilot, Trooper R.M. Collie, and passenger, Clint Stone, received minor injuries in the crash that destroyed the state-owned helicopter.

A preliminary report from National Transportation Safety Board says Collie moved the chopper from the hangar to the helipad with an electric/hydraulic transporter that was attached to its skids.

During preflight operations, the NTSB says Collie removed the clamp from the left skid but was interrupted by Stone who asked about the removal of co-pilot controls in front of his seat.

"After removing the controls, he continued with the preflight inspection; however, he forgot to unhook the transporter from the right skid," the NTSB report said. When it took off, the helicopter began to roll "uncontrollably to the right until the main rotor blades struck the ground".

The helicopter was military surplus that was bought by the Highway Patrol for training.


http://www.witn.com




RALEIGH, N.C. — Authorities are investigating after a helicopter crashed at the Highway Patrol training facility on Tuesday afternoon in Raleigh.

Sgt. Michael Baker with the Highway Patrol said the helicopter was attempting to take off from the facility at Garner Road at about 2 p.m, but the pilot began having difficulty controlling the aircraft when it was about five feet in the air.

The helicopter tilted to its side and the rotor struck the ground, causing the helicopter to fall on its side. The tail portion of the helicopter broke off on impact, Baker said.

The pilot is identified as Trooper R. M. Collie, assigned to Troop I, District 4 in Wake County. The passenger is identified as Clint Stone, the assistant federal security director with TSA and the Federal Air Marshal Service. 

Baker said Collie, who was assigned to the Highway Patrols' Aviation Unit, and Stone were on board the helicopter at the time of the crash. Collie was taken to the Highway Patrol Medical Facility and Stone was taken to WakeMed, both with minor injuries.

"It's a very sinking feeling when you see one of your helicopters lying on its side in the condition it's in," Baker said. "Were very fortunate the injuries were not worse in this crash."

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration will join the Highway Patrol Construction Unit to investigate the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wral.com




RALEIGH -- The pilot and the passenger involved in a helicopter crash at the State Highway Patrol training facility have been identified.

The pilot has been identified as Trooper R. M. Collie with District 4 in Wake County and the passenger has been identified as Clint Stone, Assistant Federal Security Director with TSA/Federal Air Marshal Service.

The helicopter went down around 2 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon.

The incident happened on the landing pad off Garner Road at E. Tryon Road.

The helicopter took off, went about five to six feet above the ground when the pilot lost control and started to fall back down to the ground, Sgt. Michael Baker with the Highway Patrol said.

As the rotorcraft started to fall, the rotor hit the ground, the helicopter fell to its side and the tail broke off.

Collie was treated nearby at the SHP medical facility and Stone was transported to WakeMed with minor injuries.

The helicopter is a military surplus chopper that was purchased by the highway patrol for training.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have been notified and will investigate.

Story and video ➤ http://abc11.com

Mooney M20J 201, N201FD: Accident occurred June 19, 2018 at Charlotte-Monroe Executive Airport (EQY), Monroe, Union County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Battenti Ingegnere LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N201FD

Location: Monroe, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA172
Date & Time: 06/19/2018, 1350 EDT
Registration: N201FD
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 19, 2018, at 1350 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M201FD, N201FD, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a missed approach to runway 5 at Charlotte-Monroe Executive Airport (EQY), Monroe, North Carolina. The private pilot was not injured and the pilot-rated passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which departed Jim Hamilton L. B. Owens Airport (CUB), Columbia, South Carolina about 1245, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a written statement, the pilot said the purpose of the flight was to practice instrument approaches at three different airports, and then return to CUB; his home airport. The pilot-rated passenger, who was not instrument rated, accompanied him as a "safety pilot."

According to the pilot, he had completed the ILS RWY 5 instrument approach procedure at EQY to near decision altitude and initiated the missed approach with a climbing right turn, when about 600 feet above ground level (agl), "the engine suddenly started to falter."

The pilot visually checked the mixture, throttle, propeller, and fuel pump settings and turned left for a forced landing on runway 23. The pilot maneuvered the airplane over trees and buildings on the airport perimeter towards the runway "just above" stall speed. As the airplane neared the landing surface heading about 270 degrees and about 8 feet agl, the airplane stalled, landed hard on the paved surface, and continued into the grass between the runway and parallel taxiway.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 3rd class medical was issued March 20, 2017. The pilot reported 772 total hours of flight experience, of which 137 were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1977. Its most recent annual inspection was completed April 4, 2018 at 5,391 total aircraft hours.

At 1353, the weather recorded at EQY included scattered clouds at 7,000 feet and variable winds at 4 knots. The temperature was 36°C, and the dew point was 19°C. The altimeter setting was 29.96 inches of mercury.

Examination of photographs revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

Under the supervision of an FAA aviation safety inspector, electrical power was applied and an engine start was attempted at EQY. The engine rotated when the starter was actuated, but the start attempt was unsuccessful. While troubleshooting, compression was confirmed on each cylinder using the thumb method, fuel delivery was confirmed, and spark was confirmed at the top spark plugs for cylinders 1 and 3, and the bottom spark plugs for cylinders 2 and 4. Subsequent start attempts were also unsuccessful. The engine exam was suspended and the airplane was scheduled for recovery from the site and further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Registration: N201FD
Model/Series: M20J NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEQY, 679 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: COLUMBIA, SC (CUB)
Destination:  Monroe, NC (EQY)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.017500, -80.621944