Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Cessna 550 Bravo, Farrell 5 LLC, N584PS: Incident occurred March 21, 2017 at Indianapolis Executive Airport (KTYQ), Zionsville, Boone County, Indiana

Farrell 5 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N584PS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana 

Aircraft right brakes locked up and the airplane went off the edge of Runway 36.

Date: 21-MAR-17
Time: 23:40:00Z
Regis#: N584PS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 550
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: INDIANAPOLIS
State: INDIANA

Indianapolis Executive Airport, 11329 E. state Route 32, is operating normally after a scare Tuesday night, March 21, when a plane slid off the runway, according to an IEA press release. The seven passengers and two crew members were not injured.

The plane belonged to Defiance, Ohio-based Farrell 5, LLC. It took off from Groton-New London, Conn., at 5:07 p.m., and was scheduled to land at 7:38 p.m.

The Boone County Communications Center received a 911 call at 7:42 p.m. of a possible plane crash but first responders verified there was no crash. The pilot said the aircraft’s right brake locked up during landing, which forced the plane to the side of the runway.

The Boone County Sheriff’s Office, Zionsville Police and Fire departments, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office and Hamilton County Airport Authority responded to the scene.

Montgomery Aviation moved the plane and reopened the runway at 3:42 a.m. on Wednesday, March 22.

Luscombe 8F, N2007B: Fatal accident occurred March 19, 2017 at Thrall Lake Airport ((7MI3), Vicksburg, Kalamazoo County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2007B

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA135
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 19, 2017 in Vicksburg, MI
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8F, registration: N2007B
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 20, 2017, about 1844 central daylight time (CDT), a Luscombe 8F, N2007B, experienced a propeller blade strike during an attempted hand prop of the engine at Thrall Lake Airport (7MI3), Vicksburg, Michigan. The airplane did not sustain substantial damage. The commercial-rated pilot, and intended sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was privately registered, and was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Michael A. "Mike, Gilligan" Westveer 

Westveer, Michael A. "Mike" "Gilligan" Passed away Monday, March 20, 2017, unexpectedly at the age of 52. Mike was born May 26, 1964 in Kalamazoo to Gerald and Darlene (Hoskins) Westveer. On March 1, 2008 Mike was united in marriage to Denise Richmond, who survives. Mike was a graduate of Portage Central High School and served his country in the United States Navy. He was an avid aviator who loved vintage aircraft and everything aviation related. He proudly earned his pilot's license before his driver's license. He spent many years flying hot air balloons for the Michigan Balloon Corporation. He was a licensed aircraft mechanic and owner of MW Aviation Inc. who specialized in vintage aircraft restoration. He enjoyed ANY time spent in the air. He also loved the Caribbean and he and Denise enjoyed their annual trips there each year. Mike is survived by his wife, Denise Westveer; mother, Darlene Westveer: siblings, Steve (Pam) Westveer and Sally (Gary) Browne; In-laws, Phil and Sherry Richmond and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins as well as his longtime friend and mentor, Ron Centers. Mike was preceded in death by his father; Gerald. A celebration of life gathering for family and friends will take place Tuesday, March 28 from 4-7pm at Barn Brewers Brewery, 114 N. Main Street, Lawton MI 49065. Arrangements by Langeland Family Homes: Westside Chapel. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Mike's name may be directed to a charity of your choice . For obituary and condolences, please see Mike's personalized page at www.langelands.com


- See more at: http://obits.mlive.com

Michael Westveer


VICKSBURG, MI -- The pilot who was tragically killed Monday while trying to start the engine of a small aircraft was known in the local flying community for the work he did on aircraft and as a balloon pilot.

Michael Westveer, 52, of Vicksburg, was killed on March 20, apparently as he tried to hand crank an airplane propeller and was struck on the head by it, Kalamazoo County Sheriff's deputies say.

"He was a hell of a pilot," said Ron Centers, owner of Michigan Balloon Corp., a commercial hot air balloon service. "No matter what he flew, it was like he was born in that aircraft."

Westveer had a commercial balloon pilot's license and had been flying hot air balloons with Centers since Westveer was about 18 years old.

"He was a great guy with a great sense of humor," Centers said. "He would do anything for you and if you needed him, he would be there for you. I can't say enough about him."

Westveer piloted lots of hot air balloon trips as a full-time and then part-time pilot for Michigan Balloon Corp.

More than 10 years ago, he represented the company by flying a balloon for several years in the Battle Creek Field of Flight Air Show & Balloon Festival.

"He was a happy-go-lucky, jovial, joking, laugh-a-lot guy," said Maurice Hovious, owner of Hov-Aire Inc., an aircraft repair and restoration specialist.

For the past 20 years, Westveer worked as a supervisor at Vicksburg-based Hov-Aire, which specializes in the repair of the Piper Malibu, a small airplane that is still in production, and the Ford Tri-motor, the venerable aircraft that are considered the first to be widely used to fly passengers. Henry Ford built only 199 between 1926 and 1933.

Hovious said Westveer was presently the lead on the restoration of a Ford Tri-motor owned by a Florida man. It is a project that Hov-Aire began in 1992 after the plane was damaged by Hurricane Andrew in south Florida. The project is now about 90 percent complete after requiring about 35,000 man hours of labor, he said.

Westveer was a veteran of the U.S. Navy but did not learn how to fly an airplane until after he was discharged, Hovious said. He was also known to have or be working to attain a license to pilot helicopters.

Hovious said Westveer was apparently preparing to fly a small, single-engine Luscombe plane owned by another Hov-Aire worker on Monday when he was killed. Hovious said Westveer had free use of the plane and had flown it for more than 15 years.

Westveer was apparently preparing to take off from a small grass air strip owned by Hovious and two other individuals when the mishap occurred. The air strip is in the 6000 block of East W Avenue in Brady Township, about a mile from Vicksburg.

Hovious said hand-cranking the propeller of the aircraft was the only way to start it.

Kalamazoo County Undersheriff Pali Matyas said investigators believe Westveer's mishap occurred not long after 11 a.m. Monday. That is when he was last in contact via telephone with friends. He was found near the plane at about 6:45 p.m. that day after he failed to meet with a friend earlier in the afternoon. A concerned friend traveled to the air strip and found him.

Westveer was married and had a brother and a sister, all of whom survive him. There was no word on funeral arrangements or memorials.

Hovious and Centers said Westveer will be missed.

Centers said he will miss him "like I would miss my left arm. And I'm left handed. He was a very good friend."

Air Tractor AT-602, Sturdivant Brothers Flying Service Inc., N2049D: Fatal accident occurred March 19, 2017 in Minter City, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi
Air Tractor, Inc.; Olney, Texas
Transportation Safety Board of Canada-Accredited Representative; Ontario

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report / National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Sturdivant Brothers Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2049D

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA131
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, March 19, 2017 in Minter City, MS
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 602, registration: N2049D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to chang
e, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 19, 2017, about 1600 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-602, N2049D, registered to and operated by Sturdivant Brothers Flying Service, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight, collided with trees and terrain near Minter City, Mississippi. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated about 30 minutes earlier from the company airstrip.

The pilot departed the airstrip with 3/4 fuel capacity in each wing fuel tank and the hopper containing 375 gallons of mixed water and chemicals. After takeoff the pilot proceeded towards the intended spray field, and although there were no eyewitnesses to the accident, an individual familiar with aerial application who lived adjacent to the intended field reported hearing an airplane fly over his house. He noted the airplane sounded fine at that time, but about 10 to 15 seconds later, he heard a pop sound followed by an explosion. He went outside, noted the fire, and a friend called 911. He then drove to the site, and after arrival, he noted damage to trees, and parts of the airplane away from the main wreckage. The fire department arrived about 20 minutes later and extinguished the fire, which at that time was mostly confined to the cockpit area.

The accident site was located about 1,000 feet east of the eastern edge of the intended spray field. There was airplane debris on the ground and damage to trees that bordered the southwestern edge of the field. An energy path was oriented on a magnetic heading of 280 degrees, and the distance between the first tree contact and the resting position of the fuselage was about 282 feet. The first identified components among the trees were components of the left wing.

Inspection of the intended spray field several days after the accident revealed damage to weeds consistent with spray application in areas of the field.

A heat-damaged Satloc G4 GPS was retained for attempted read-out by the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Owen Dale Holland 
July 20, 1948 - March 19, 2017


Owen Dale Holland was born July 20, 1948 in Jonesville, Louisiana to the union of Hilton Shaw and Verba Lee Charrier Holland. He passed away March 19, 2017 while flying in Minter, Mississippi.

He grew up farming with his father and two brothers in Parhams, Louisiana. He loved to play football and was an outstanding quarterback at Block High School during his high school years.

His love of flying began in 1974. He flew in the family operation for several years in Jonesville, Louisiana, 9 years for UTAVA, a French company in Cameroon, Africa where he was chief pilot spraying bananas. In 2011 he came back to the United States to work for Sturdivant Brothers Flying Service in Marks, Mississippi. He had flown a total of 29,943 plus hours.

He was baptized as one of Jehovah's Witnesses in 1968 in Vicksburg, Mississippi. He was a third generation witness with his grandfather learning the truth in the early 1930's. He served as an elder in the Jonesville, Louisiana Congregation for about 12 years. He loved and mentioned often the beauty of Jehovah's creation from his view from the sky.

Survivors include his loving wife of 10 years, Terry Efosi Holland. 4 daughters: Tonya La Jean Holland Johnson and husband Jeff Johnson of Collinsville, Texas, Geena Nichole Holland and Myriah La Donna Holland of Grenada, Mississippi, Marisa Nabholtz and husband Jake of Conway, Arkansas. 2 sons, William Donovan Holland of Grenada, Mississippi, Jared Holland and wife Brooke of Natchez, Mississippi. 2 grandsons: Evan Shaw Salter and wife Kelsey and Matthew Tanner Salter of West Monroe, Louisiana 1 granddaughter Trisha Megan Johnson of Whitesboro, Texas Mother Verba Lee Holland, 2 brothers Lloyd Holland and wife Sue, Wayne Holland and wife Delores of Jonesville, Louisiana. 1 sister Jan Forman and husband Mike of Jonesville, Louisiana. Nieces: Charla Mophett and Sonja Spann Nephews: Wayne Holland Jr, Jason Holland, Chris Forman, Bryan Forman and Jon Brandon Holland.

Memorial services for Mr. Owen Dale Holland, 68, of Grenada, MS. be 2 PM Saturday at Young's Funeral Home -Ferriday, LA with Bro. Victor Cheeks officiating. Visitation will be from 11 AM until 2 PM Saturday at the funeral home. Under the direction of Young's Funeral Home-Ferriday, LA

Read more here:  http://www.youngsfh.com

Fairchild SA-227AC Metro III, Gas/Wilson Inc., N26959: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 - San Clemente Island, California

GAS/WILSON INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N26959

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California 

After engine shutdown,  excessive smoke was coming from #1 engine nacelle.  Engine was removed for testing due to an inflight fire.

Date: 20-MAR-17
Time: 10:04:00Z
Regis#: N26959
Aircraft Make: SWEARINGEN
Aircraft Model: SA227-AC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 135
City: SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND
State: CALIFORNIA

Aeronca 7AC Champion, First Flight Corp, N2778E: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 in San Diego, California

First Flight Corp: http://registry.faa.gov/N2778E

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California 

Aircraft departed the left side of the runway 1000' from the threshold and struck a runway light.

Date: 20-MAR-17
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N2778E
Aircraft Make: AERONCA
Aircraft Model: 7AC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Swearingen SA226TC, Western Airlines, N158WA: Accident occurred March 20, 2017 at Boise Airport (KBOI), Idaho

The NTSB did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report / National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Western Airlines: http://registry.faa.gov/N158WA

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA078
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, March 20, 2017 in Boise, ID
Aircraft: SWEARINGEN SA226, registration: N158WA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 20, 2017, about 0400 mountain daylight time, a Swearingen SA226TC, N158WA, was substantially damaged due to foreign object damage to the airplane's propeller and fuselage during initial takeoff/climb from Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field (BOI), Boise, Idaho. The airline transport pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Western Airlines LC of Boise. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed, but not activated. The charter cargo flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135, with a destination of Centinnial Airport (APA), Denver, Colorado.

According to Federal Aviation Administration personnel, about the time the airplane was rotating from Runway 10L, the pilot experienced a light vibration; he subsequently returned to BOI and landed uneventfully. During a post-landing examination of the airplane, it was revealed that a portion of the outboard section of a left propeller blade, which had fragmented into 2 pieces, was missing. Additionally, about a 4 inch by 4 inch puncture hole was observed to have gone through the left forward side of the fuselage just aft of the main air stair door; a piece of the propeller blade was found in the cabin. It was further noted during a runway sweep for foreign objects shortly after the occurrence, that a screw driver which had been used during maintenance on the airplane earlier, and the second piece of the propeller blade tip, were both recovered from the departure runway in the same approximate location from where the airplane would have rotated.

Cessna 340A, SP Aircraft LLC, N114BH: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 in Prairie, Idaho

SP Aircraft LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N114BH

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aircraft reported a lost prop while climbing through 14,800'.

Date: 20-MAR-17
Time: 13:23:00Z
Regis#: N114BH
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 340
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
City: PRAIRIE
State: IDAHO

Bombardier CRJ200, Endeavor Air: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 at Westchester County Airport (KHPN), White Plains, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;Farmingdale, New York 

Aircraft got stuck in a snowbank exiting Runway 34.

Date: 20-MAR-17
Time: 03:38:00Z
Regis#:
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ2
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ENDEAVOR
Flight Number: 3703
City: WESTCHESTER
State: NEW YORK

American Champion 8KCAB Decathlon, FlyDallasBay LLC, N400AB: Incident occurred March 20, 2017 in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee

FLYDALLASBAY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N400AB

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee 

Aircraft had a prop strike on landing. 

Date: 20-MAR-17
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N400AB
Aircraft Make: AMERICAN CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 8KCAB
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHATTANOOGA
State: TENNESSEE

Even Elite Frequent Fliers Find Fewer Airline Perks: Flying 100,000 miles a year won’t guarantee regular upgrades to business or first class anymore



The decline in airline amenities that has vexed consumers in the back of the plane is now hitting elite frequent fliers, too.

Some of the big carriers’ best customers complain that perks have been whittled away. Delta used to give its top-tier frequent fliers free club membership, but now offers that as a choice in a bundle of options. United paid Global Entry fees for top customers three years, but stopped in 2015. And the most important loyalty benefit—an upgrade—has gotten much rarer because airlines are selling more first- and business-class seats, auctioning them off, and in some cases shrinking those cabins and reducing legroom there as well.

“The loyalty is gone,” says Peter Boer, a consultant to technology companies who is based in Florida and Virginia. He now buys business-class and first-class tickets on different airlines for his travelers, since he can’t get an upgrade from American, where he’s a lifetime platinum member.

Even “systemwide upgrades,” the golden ticket for travelers that used to let you instantly upgrade any flight, are becoming harder to use, elite-level frequent fliers say. Systemwide upgrades are earned by travelers who spend heavily with airlines and fly more than 100,000 miles a year, or hit a milestone like 2 million lifetime miles. They used to get you confirmed upgrades when you bought your ticket.

With United, you can’t buy the cheapest ticket for international trips and use systemwide upgrade certificates. You must spend more for a coach ticket and then wait, not knowing if the upgrade will clear. If it doesn’t come through, you paid more for your coach seat than necessary.

On American, the available inventory of seats for systemwide upgrades has shrunk. That means waiting until departure on many flights to see if you’ll get a cushier seat.

Mark Kovac, a Dallas-based business consultant who is a member of American’s highest loyalty tier, invitation-only Concierge Key, bought coach tickets last fall for a family summer trip to London. He was told seats weren’t available then to use his systemwide upgrades—the first time that had happened to him.

When he complained, American told him the airline’s predictive models are blocking upgrades more often so premium seats are available to sell close to departure. “It is true that until a few years back, systemwide upgrades would, more often than not, get cleared at the time of booking. However, that is not the case now,” a customer service representative at American’s AAdvantage program wrote.

To Mr. Kovac, that erases a big benefit. “This is probably the biggest, most noticeable thing they’ve changed,” he says. “I used to want to save these for something special. Now I just use them whenever I can.”

Mr. Kovac and his family did get upgraded shortly before the overnight flight to London on Friday, but his children, ages 10, 8 and 6, were spread around the cabin, he says.

American says it has improved its international premium cabins and seen an increase in paid demand. “We continue to refine our systems to reflect the demand for the product while still providing as much availability as possible to our elite members,” a spokeswoman says.

Frequent fliers say they understand airlines’ desire to sell premium seats rather than give them away, but upgrades used to be considered a necessary investment in loyalty. Frequent travelers essentially paid for those seats in advance by buying expensive tickets trip after trip.

In January, American also chopped how many systemwide upgrades it gave out to 100,000-mile-a-year executive platinum members. Each year executive platinum members used to get eight SWUs. This year that was cut to four, with the opportunity to earn two for reaching 150,000 miles and two more at 200,000 miles.

Gary Leff, co-founder of the frequent-flier community InsideFlyer, says top travelers are complaining a lot about American lately because the airline is making changes after its merger with US Airways. American was considered the most generous for top customers, because Delta and United had already weakened some perks, he says. Now there are few major differences between the three big airlines, Mr. Leff says.

Delta says the percentage of passengers in first class who paid to sit there used to be around 10%, but by next year will hit 70%. Airlines offer more first-class sales and discounted seats and push affordable upgrades by email and kiosk.

To placate their best customers stuck in coach, American and United now give them the small consolation of a free cocktail and food item for sale onboard.

A bigger upgrade issue looms for top-tier travelers: How “premium economy” cabins will impact upgrades on international flights. Premium economy—usually a separate cabin with more legroom, wider seats and upgraded food compared with coach—has been a big hit on international airlines, priced several hundred dollars above coach tickets but several thousand below business class.

American is rolling out its version now. Delta says its premium economy will launch in the fall. United says it is taking steps toward premium economy, too.

The catch: On many international airlines, upgrades move you up one cabin. So instead of jumping from coach to business, an upgrade from economy moves you to premium economy. To get to business class you have to buy a premium economy ticket. “It reduces the value of the upgrade,” Mr. Leff says.

U.S. airlines have yet to say what their upgrade policy will be on flights with premium economy.

Airline mergers swelled membership in the top tiers of loyalty status, so airlines have made it harder to qualify for elite status by adding annual spending requirements.

In January, American created a new elite tier called platinum pro. It’s halfway between its platinum, which requires 50,000 miles of travel a year, and 100,000-mile executive platinum. On May 20, the airline started ranking elite-level members on upgrade lists in part by how much they’ve spent on American tickets the previous year.

An American spokeswoman says changes were made so the best customers have the best access to perks.

Mr. Boer, the consultant, says he understands airlines’ desire to generate revenue and isn’t angry. But he questions whether they will regret weakening loyalty for so many. “American is now just another airline in the mix,” he says. “I’m kind of wondering if our friends at American are shooting themselves in the foot.”

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Grega GN-1 Aircamper, N23RT: Accident occurred March 21, 2017 in Oronogo, Jasper County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N23RT

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA171
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 21, 2017 in Oronogo, MO
Aircraft: John Goodman Air Camper, registration: N23RT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 21, 2017, about 1700 central daylight time, an experimental amateur built Goodman Air Camper, N23RT, registered to the pilot/owner, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the ground following a partial loss of engine power near Oronogo, Missouri. The private pilot, who the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plane was not filed. The flight originated at 1659 from a private airstrip near Oronogo, Missouri.


This airplane was taking off to the north from a private grass runway located on the property of the aircraft owner. The pilot stated that after takeoff, he noticed that he was losing power from the engine and made a turn to the south in an attempt to make it back to the airport. The engine continued to lose power and as the pilot attempted to make a turn to line up for landing. The aircraft lost airspeed and stalled. The aircraft contacted low trees approximately 330 feet from the end of the runway, then continued in a northwest direction before colliding with small trees. The right wing contacted the ground in a nose down attitude about 240 feet from the end of the runway.







ORONOGO, Mo. — An Oronogo man underwent surgery Tuesday after suffering facial and arm fractures late Monday afternoon when his home-built airplane crashed on his property.  

While 72-year-old John Goodman's recovery will be long, his older sister, Marje Taylor, of Carl Junction, said his injuries were not life-threatening. 

Taylor said Goodman, who was alert before surgery, told her that the engine of his plane failed midflight. She said he was cruising at a low altitude above the private airstrip behind his house at 20262 County Road 220 when the aircraft clipped a tree and crashed. Taylor said neighbors saw the crash and told Goodman's wife, who called 911. Goodman was pulled from the wreckage, she said.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol characterized Goodman's injuries as serious, and he was flown by medical helicopter to the hospital. 

"He was alert but pretty banged up," said Detective Tim Williams, the Jasper County Sheriff 's Department's public information officer.

The Federal Aviation Administration was on the scene Tuesday morning to investigate the crash. An FAA preliminary data report said that Goodman's GN-1 Air Camper "crashed under unknown circumstances" and sustained "substantial" damage. The aircraft was certified in November.

Taylor said that Goodman had been piloting planes since his late teens or early 20s. The plane he crashed was the second one he had built. It was named "Wendy Gayle," after his daughter who died of cancer two years ago last December.

Taylor said it was "pretty neat" her brother built and flew his own planes. 

"I suppose you think of (possible accidents), but you don't dwell on it," Taylor added.

She said it was the first time he had ever been in an accident while flying.

Family businesses 

John Goodman's father founded Goodman Church Builders, a 45-year area business that closed in 2009. The business later became Goodman Architectural Services Inc., and John Goodman served as its president.

Source:   http://www.joplinglobe.com

A Grega GN-1 Aircamper plane came down in a rural area near County Road 220 and Thorn Road west of Jasper, according to Sheriff's Capt. Derek Walrod.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Spokesman John Lueckenhoff said the pilot, John W. Goodman, 72, Oronogo, was taken by helicopter to Freeman West Hospital in Joplin for treatment of his injuries.

"The guy walked out of it," Walrod said. "I think he had relatively minor injuries considering what could have happened."

Lueckenhoff said the Grega GN-1 Aircamper experimental aircraft that Goodman built himself. He said the plane came down on private property near Goodman's personal airstrip.

Walrod said the FAA would be down on Tuesday to investigate the crash and deputies were guarding the site in the meantime.

Lueckenhoff said the FAA would be handling the investigation.

JASPER COUNTY, Mo. - The Missouri Highway Patrol says 72-year-old John Goodman of Oronogo was flying an open, single cockpit experimental aircraft on his property, located at 20262 County Road 220. 

They say the plane, built by Goodman, was at a low altitude before the plane's wing hit a tree, and then crashed to the ground. Officers say witnesses in the area helped remove Goodman from the plane as they waited for an ambulance to arrive.  

Highway patrol troopers say the man was lucky witnesses were able to help. 

"Between the technology they have and the people that are always our looking around and reporting things like they should, we typically don't have a real hard time finding these calls," explained Missouri State Highway Patrol Trooper Sam Carpenter. "So, it works out in the benefit of everybody."  

The cause of the crash has yet to be determined by the Federal Aviation Administration. No information about the pilot is being released at this time.

Source:  http://www.fourstateshomepage.com

Attorney Jason Webster Representing Clients Involved in Fatal Plane Crash: Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, XA-ULU, accident occurred April 01, 2016 near San Ignacio, Mexico

Personal injury attorney Jason Webster, founder of The Webster Law Firm, files complaint on behalf of clients involved in a plane crash that resulted in severe injuries and two deaths. 

HOUSTON, TX (PRWEB) MARCH 21, 2017


Jason Webster, principal attorney of The Webster Law Firm, recently filed a complaint (Case No. DC-16-15341 filed in the District Court of Dallas County, Texas) on behalf of clients (plaintiffs) whose aircraft, a Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, according to court documents, experienced an alleged in-flight shutdown resulting in the plane crashing. As a result of the crash, two of the plaintiffs, including the co-pilot, were severely injured, three people died, five were injured, one woman lost her husband and grandson and another lost her husband.

Court documents further state that, upon information and belief, the airplane, engine and/or its component parts were allegedly defective and unreasonably dangerous, which allegedly caused the airplane to crash, and Pratt & Whitney Canada Corporation (defendant) failed to use reasonable care and skill in the design, manufacture, marketing and distribution of the engine and failed to warn of defects inherent in the design or resulting from the manufacture of the engine including its component and replacement parts. The plaintiffs in the case are requesting a jury trial to recover damages from defendants Pratt & Whitney Canada Corporation, Cessna Aircraft Company, Kansas Aviation of Independence, LLC, Woodward Inc. and Prime Turbines LLC. Additionally, Webster recently filed an amended petition naming Southwest Turbine, Inc. as a new defendant.

As a result of the crash, the plaintiffs, according to court documents, are seeking recovery for alleged significant injuries and damages, including, but not limited to, physical pain and mental anguish sustained from the date of injury to the time of trial; future physical pain and mental anguish reasonably anticipated to be sustained in the future; loss of earnings sustained from the date of injury to the time of trial; loss of earnings and earning capacity reasonably anticipated to be suffered in the future; and reasonable and necessary medical expenses incurred in the treatment of their injuries from the date of injury to the time of trial.

The plaintiffs representing the estates of the deceased, according to court documents, are seeking recovery for alleged past mental anguish in the form of emotional pain, torment and suffering experienced only by one who has suffered the loss of their spouse or child; future mental anguish in the form of emotional pain, torment and suffering experienced only by one who has suffered the loss of their spouse or child; past physical pain; future physical pain; past medical expenses; future medical expenses; funeral and burial expenses; loss of household services; and loss of inheritance and pecuniary loss.

Plaintiffs in the case include Edgar Alan Chaidez Arrieta; Guillermo Javier Adrian Talavera; Barbara Sanchez Adrian; Migdaglis Talavera, as next friend of J.A.A.T, a minor; and Angelina Maria Grieco Arevalo, individually and as representative of the estate of Guillermo Jose Adrian Vallenilla, deceased.

About The Webster Law Firm 

The Webster Law Firm handles a wide range of cases and has obtained many successful results. It focuses on representing individuals injured by another party’s negligence. Personal injury lawyer Jason Webster is a licensed legal representative in Texas, New York, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. He is a member of the American Bar Association, State Bar of Texas, Houston Young Lawyers Association, Association of Trial Lawyers of America, Texas Trial Lawyers Association and Houston Trial Lawyers Association. For more information, please call (713) 396-5197, visit http://www.thewebsterlawfirm.com, or follow Jason on his Facebook and Google+ pages. The law office is located at 6200 Savoy Drive, Suite 150, Houston, TX 77036.

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Source: http://www.prweb.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16WA144
Accident occurred Friday, April 01, 2016 in Tayoltita, Dgo, Mexico, Mexico
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 7 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On April 1, 2016, about 0900 local time, a Cessna 208B single engine airplane, serial number 208B2104, registry XA-ULU, was substantially damaged during an off-airport forced landing near Tayoltita, San Dimas, Durango, Mexico. There were ten persons on-board and three of those persons were fatally injured. The airplane had departed from Tayoltita (TAY), and was enroute to Durango (DGO).

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of Mexico. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the government of Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

SCT – DGAC
Boulevard Adolfo López Mateos N° 1990,
Los Alpes Tlacopac,
Delegación Álvaro Obregón
México, D.F. C.P.01010