Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Incident occurred July 01, 2015 at Midway International Airport (KMDW), Chicago, Illinois



A military jet experiencing problems with one of its engines landed safely at Midway Airport on Wednesday afternoon, officials said.

The F-18 landed on Runway 4R around 12:35 p.m. after the pilot radioed air traffic controllers about the engine problem, according to Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro.

The aircraft landed “without incident,’’ Molinaro said in an email.

Two people were aboard the jet, and neither was injured, according to Chicago Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford, who said a still and box alarm and an EMS Plan I were called as a precaution.

The alarm and ambulance plan were called off at 12:36 p.m. after the F-18 made an emergency landing, said Chicago Fire Department spokesman Chief Juan Hernandez.

“They’re designed to run on one engine if it has to,’’ Langford said.

Story and video:  http://www.chicagotribune.com

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6168P: Fatal accident occurred July 01, 2015 in Quinlan, Texas

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Dallas FSDO-05

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA287
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 01, 2015 in Quinlan, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/17/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-250, registration: N6168P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane, which was owned and operated by the private pilot, experienced a total loss of engine power shortly after takeoff, descended, and impacted a field. A fire erupted that consumed the majority of the airplane's cabin and the inboard sections of both wings. The wreckage distribution, ground scars, and crushing of the wing leading edges were indicative of a low-speed nose-down impact and consistent with an aerodynamic stall. Examination of the fuel system revealed the presence of rust and water in both electric fuel pumps and water in the engine carburetor bowl. The examination revealed no other engine or airframe anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The rust found in the fuel pumps indicated that the fuel system had been contaminated with water for a long period of time. The airplane owner's handbook provided clear and explicit instructions on how to check before flight for fuel system contamination.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane following a loss of engine power during initial climb after takeoff, which resulted in the wing's critical angle-of-attack being exceeded and a subsequent aerodynamic stall. Also causal was the pilot's inadequate preflight inspection of the airplane's fuel system, which resulted in the loss of engine power due to water contamination.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 1, 2015, about 1354 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250 (Piper Comanche), N6168P, experienced a loss of engine power after takeoff from runway 18 (3,120 feet by 60 feet, turf) at Rockin M Airport (T14), Quinlan, Texas and impacted a field. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. Both private-rated pilots were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

A witness stated that runway 18 at T14 was located about 250-300 yards from the back porch of his house, located west of the airport and slightly north of the runway 18. He said that he could not see the runway 18 due to trees and brush which blocked his view. He stated that he was working on his truck when he heard the airplane engine start and run for several minutes and then heard the airplane taxi to runway 18. The engine speed was run up and he heard the engine speed drop slightly as the magnetos were tested. The propeller was cycled three "distinct times" with the engine speed lowered and the propeller blades making a cutting sound as the propeller was cycled. The engine power was reduced and the engine was at idle. About 45 seconds later, he heard the airplane engine accelerate and about 2 seconds later he heard the engine go to what appeared to be full power. He stated that he could tell that the airplane was now moving away from him and the engine sound "sounded very strong." He heard that the airplane was climbing out and heard the engine power reduce and for about 2 seconds he heard what sounded like a cruise climb power setting. The engine sound then went away and he did not hear the engine speed drop off "slowly," he just did not hear anything at all. About 35-45 seconds later, he heard a "thud." He said that he was "impressed at the power" that the airplane was making.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The left seat pilot/airplane owner held a private pilot certificate with airplane multiengine land and airplane single-engine land ratings. This pilot reported flight experience that included 4,005 total and 55 hours in last six months as of his last airman medical exam, which was a third class medical certificate and was dated March 7, 2015. The airman medical certificate had the following limitation(s): Must wear corrective lenses.

The witness stated that he had flown with the pilot/owner on numerous occasions and was impressed with the knowledge he had of the airplane and the ability to fly it. 

The right seat pilot-rated passenger held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating and a mechanic certificate with an airframe and powerplant rating. He reported accumulating a total flight time of 250 hours and 10 hours in last six months as of his last airman medical, exam dated October 2, 2013, and was issued third class medical certificate with the following limitation(s): None.



AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The 1959 Piper PA-24-250, serial number 24-1269, airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-540-A1A5, serial number L-1112-40 engine, and was registered to the left seat pilot on July 26, 2002. 

Logbook entries show that the airplane and engine received their last inspection, dated August 1, 2014, at a tachometer time of 4,048.83 hours and a total time since major overhaul of engine, which was dated December 17, 2007, of 849.33 hours. 

METEROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Majors Airport (GVT) Greenville, Texas automated weather observing system located about 7 nautical miles of T14, recorded at 1355 the following: wind – 190 degrees at 12 knots, visibility – 10 statute miles, sky conditions – clear, temperature – 32 degrees Celsius, dew point – 30 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 30.01 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was about 0.32 nautical miles southeast of the runway center and oriented on a west-southwest airplane tail to nose heading and ground scarring that was approximately contained to approximately the planform of the airplane. The airplane was upright and exhibited crushing along the wing leading edges; the right wing was at about a 45-degree pitch downward angle. The empennage was inverted and along the left side of the fuselage. The landing gear jack screw extension equated to a fully extended landing gear, and the cockpit flap control handle was in the flaps fully extended position. The cockpit fuel selector was positioned to the right fuel tank. Engine control continuity to the cockpit controls was confirmed. The propeller blades did not exhibit S-shaped bending or chordwise gouges/scratches consistent with torsion.

On-scene examination of the engine revealed that air was expelled and drawn in through the top spark plug holes with rotation of the propeller with the top spark plugs removed. Engine drive and valve train continuity was confirmed when the propeller was rotated by hand. 

Rotation of the left magneto produced sparking and the right magneto was unable to be rotated due to thermal damage from the accident.

Post-accident examination of the engine revealed a liquid consistent with water within the carburetor bowl, which when tested with Kolor Kut indicated the presence of water. Both fuel pumps exhibited internal brown discoloration and brown material consistent with in color and quantity with long-term corrosion and a liquid consistent with water, which when tested with Kolor Kut indicated the presence of water.

The instrument panel was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. The tachometer was destroyed.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Autopsies for both pilots were performed by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas Office of the Medical Examiner on July 2, 2015 and stated that cause of death for each pilot was blunt force injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report for the left seat pilot stated: no carbon monoxide was detected in blood, cyanide testing was not performed, no ethanol detected in urine, and no listed drugs detected in urine.

The FAA Final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report for the right seat pilot stated: carbon monoxide testing was not performed due to insufficient sample for analysis, cyanide testing was not performed, 42 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol detected in urine, 19 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol detected in vitreous, and no ethanol detected in blood. Putrefaction was present.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The Piper Commanche Service Manual, Section 2-50, Draining Fuel Valve and Strainers, states in part:

"a …The fuel strainer should be drained regularly to check for water or dirt accumulations. 

"b. The procedure for draining the right and left tanks and lines is to open the easy drain valve for a few seconds with the fuel tank selector valve on one tank. Then change the fuel selector to the opposite tank and repeat the process, allowing enough fuel to flow out to clear water from the fuel line as well as the fuel strainer. The same procedure will apply when auxiliary fuel cells are installed by simply selecting the right and left auxiliary fuel tank."

Section 2-51a, Fuel System Draining Procedures - Water Contamination. (PA-24-400)

a. Fuel cells should be kept full of fuel during storage and the aircraft refueled as soon as possible after each flight to prevent accumulation of moisture and deterioration of the cells.

b. When the aircraft has been exposed to below freezing temperatures or it is suspected that waster may have entered the tanks, fuel should be drained using the following procedure:

To drain main and auxiliary cells open the strainer quick drain for ten (10) to twelve (12) seconds with the fuel cell selector on the main cell, then change the selector to the auxiliary cell and repeat the process. Draining each cell for the recommended time should produce a half (1/2) pint or more of fuel per cell.

c. All fuel cells are equipped with fuel caps that periodically need to be inspected for proper sealing. In addition, each cell has a filler neck scupper drain tube for water that may collect around the filler neck. These drains should be free flowing with no restrictions. The fuel cell filler cover plate gaskets must also be in good condition and show no evidence of aging, hardening or deterioration. By assuring that the fuel caps are sealing properly, there are no restrictions in the drains and if the cover plate gaskets are in good condition, water contamination of the fuel can be kept to a minimum.

d. In order to minimize water contamination of the fuel during cleaning operations avoid directing water into the vents, drain tubes, around sealed cover plates and filler cap access opening."

The Piper Comanche Service Manual, Section VIII, further discusses maintenance and cleaning of the fuel system.

The PA-24-250 Airplane Owner's Handbook, VI. Fuel System, states in part, "The fuel strainer, equipped with a quick drain, is mounted under the right forward section of the fuselage. The strainer should be drained regularly to check for water or dirt accumulations. The procedure for draining the right and left tanks and lines is to open the gascolator quick drain for a few seconds with the fuel selector on one tank. Then change the fuel selector to the opposite tank and repeat the process, allowing enough fuel to flow out to clear the line as well as the gascolator." 

Section II, Operating Instructions, I. Preflight, state in part: 

"Before each flight, visually inspect the airplane, and/or determine that: 

(13) The fuel strainer and fuel lines are free of water and sediment by draining all fuel strainers once as day. 

(14) The fuel tanks and carburetor bowls are free of water and sediment by draining sumps once a week."


Walter S. Meziere:  http://registry.faa.gov/N6168P

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA287 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 01, 2015 in Quinlan, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-250, registration: N6168P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On July 1, 2015, about 1354 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250, N6168P, experienced a loss of engine power after takeoff from runway 18 at (3,120 feet by 60 feet, turf) at Rockin M Airport (T14), Quinlan, Texas and impacted a field. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. Both private-rated pilots were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.


The airplane wreckage was about 0.32 nautical miles southeast of the runway center and oriented on a west-southwest airplane tail to nose heading. The airplane was upright and exhibited crushing along the wing leading edges and airplane nose. The landing gear jack screw extension equated to a fully extended landing gear, and the cockpit flap control handle was in the flaps fully extended position.


Walter Meziere Jr.
~


QUINLAN — Walter Stewart Meziere Jr., 54, of Quinlan, joined our Lord and Saviour on Wednesday July 1, 2015.

Walt is survived by his bride, Chellie Feathers-Meziere; daughter Sheena Meziere James, son-in-law Zachary James, granddaughters Kendall, Madison and Ava; daughter Lisa Meziere; stepson Skylar Sheff, stepdaughter Courtnie Sheff; father Walter Stewart Meziere Sr.; mother Allie Wright Metoyer; stepfather Donald Metoyer; mother-in-law Roberta Feathers; brothers Rodney and Jonathan Meziere; sisters Claudine Meziere-Metoyer, Judi Meziere, and Penny Meziere-Clayton and numerous cousins, uncles, aunts, nieces and nephews.

Walt was born in Pineville and grew up in Natchitoches, La.. Walt’s biggest passion in life was aviation.

He could be found working on his private airport visiting with the many aviators who would fly in to say hello or lend a helping hand.

One of his favorite things to do was to ferry youngsters in his plane as part of the Young Eagle’s, an EAA program established to develop a passion for aviation in youth.

Walt was a very prolific businessman, having built his successful company, Golden Eagle Law Enforcement Systems, which is active in five states throughout the Southwest. “We were blessed and privileged to experience his overwhelmingly generous spirit. We mourn his passing but celebrate his life and his trust in God in calling him Home.”

A memorial service celebrating Walt’s life will be Saturday, July 11, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Rockin’ M Airport located at 360 Stinson Lane in Quinlan.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Walt’s name would be gratefully accepted by his and Chellie’s favorite charity, Arms Of Hope Boles Children’s Home in Quinlan: www.ArmsofHope.org

Joe Daniel Livingston 
September 24, 1965 - July 1, 2015 
Services are pending with Downs Funeral Home: http://www.downsfuneralhome.com








Walt Meziere
~


McKINNEY (CBSDFW.COM) – Loved ones are remembering two men killed in a plane crash in Hunt County. The Piper PA-24-250 Comanche crashed shortly after takeoff from a private airstrip near Quinlan Wednesday afternoon. 

Friends and relatives are now paying tribute to Walt Meziere and Joe Livingston, who were both newly married to their wives.

Rick Richards knew Meziere and said, “I don’t think that Walt would have done anything if it wasn’t fun.”

Friends like Richards say that’s why Meziere chose to have a medieval-themed wedding when he got married just two weeks ago.

Loved ones say both men were experienced pilots. They say Meziere was such an aviation buff that he even owned his own airstrip. It was there where he launched the fatal flight.

“Every time he started talking about flying and planes his face would just light up,” Richards remembered.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation. Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration say Meziere’s plane left his airstrip near Quinlan early Wednesday afternoon. It was just moments after takeoff that the plane went down in a field not far from the runway.

Friends like Richards say they can’t understand what went wrong. Now those who loved the men can only treasure the good times they had together.

“You just could not get enough of him. You didn’t want to leave,” Richards said thinking of Meziere. “Once you were there… you wanted to get there early, and you wanted to leave late ’cause I mean he was just that kind of a guy. The kind of friend that everybody wished they had.”

Source:  http://dfw.cbslocal.com




























Two people were killed Wednesday when a plane crashed and burst into flames shortly after takeoff from an East Texas airstrip, sources tell NBC 5.

First responders were seen placing two tarps over what remained of the burned out aircraft, indicating there were two victims in the crash.

The airstrip's owner, Walter S. Meziere, Jr. of Quinlan, was the pilot of the aircraft. Trooper Kyle Bradford of the Texas Department of Public Safety says Meziere, who was 54, and his 49-year-old passenger, Joe Daniel Livingston of McKinney, were both killed in the crash.

According to Lynn Lunsford with the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, which can seat four occupants, had departed the private Rockin' M Airport northeast of Quinlan early Wednesday afternoon.

Only a few moments later, the plane crashed into a field about 1,000 feet east of the north-south grass runway. The plane came to rest a few yards from a residence in rural Hunt County.

At this time, the cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Source:  http://www.nbcdfw.com








Search Called Off for Possible Downed Aircraft in Braxton County, West Virginia

WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather


UPDATE 7/1/15 @ 8:55 a.m.

BRAXTON COUNTY, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- The search has been officially called off for a possible downed aircraft in Braxton County.

The call of a possible downed aircraft came in just before 7 p.m. Tuesday from people who live Millrun area. Crews searched several hours Tuesday night, but never found anything.

According to the Braxton County Emergency Management Facebook post, the search was called off early Wednesday after a C-130 from the West Virginia Air National Guard flew a search grid in the area and did not see or pick up a distress signal.

West Virginia State Police, with support from WV National Air Guard and emergency responders from Braxton and Nicholas Counties helped in the search.

UPDATE 7/1/15 @ 12:10 a.m.

BRAXTON COUNTY, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- A search for a possible downed aircraft in the Frametown area was called off just before midnight Tuesday.

Crews searched by air and foot and found nothing. They say the terrain is so rugged it's difficult to even access it with four-wheelers. High water in a nearby creek also presented challenges.

The call of a possible downed aircraft came in just before 7 p.m. Tuesday from people who live in the area.

ORIGINAL STORY 6/30/15 @ 10:05 p.m.

BRAXTON COUNTY, W.Va. (WSAZ)  -- A report of a possible aircraft down in the Frametown area of Braxton County has emergency crews out Tuesday night searching for wreckage. 

The call came in just before 7 p.m. Tuesday from people who live in the area.  

However, Mike Baker, the director of Emergency Management and 911 in Braxton County, says nothing has been found and there is no confirmation of the report at this time.

Crews are searching in wooded areas near Frametown along Mill Creek Road.

No other information is available at this time.

Source:  http://www.wsaz.com

UPDATE (7/1: 7 a.m.):

Braxton County emergency crews ended a search for a possible downed aircraft Tuesday night.

Dispatchers tell 12 News they received several calls from residents in the Strange Ridge area about a possible aircraft wreck. Residents said they saw helicopters trimming trees in the area earlier in the day.

"You could see the helicopter burning, you could smell it. You could smell the paint burning on it. Me and my wife went home, which is right down the road the other way because they had people here," said Eugene Fisher, a Strange Creek resident.

Search crews ended their search around 11:30 p.m. and found no wreckage. 

"I mean, you're out there, looking for something trying to save a life or whatever and you're in the woods and you can't find anything. Yeah, it's very frustrating," said Roger Hall, assistant chief of the Servia Volunteer Fire Department.

Officials said search crews may begin another search Wednesday morning. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board said they have no knowledge of any downed or missing aircraft.

UPDATE (6/30: 11:45 p.m.):

The search for a potentially downed aircraft has been called off Tuesday night, according to Braxton County officials.

ORIGINAL:

Braxton County officials tell 12 News a search is underway for an unknown aircraft that has possibly gone down. The search is in the Frametown, Mill Run or Servia areas of Braxton County. 

The FAA or NTSB tell 12 News they have no knowledge of any down aircraft in the area.

Source:   http://www.wboy.com