Saturday, April 6, 2019

Navion Navion G Rangemaster, registered to Kalea Company LLC and operated by SkyWalker Flying, N249KC: Accident occurred August 11, 2017 near Lenawee County Airport (KADG), Adrian, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Belleville, Michigan
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms     


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf   

Location: Adrian, MI
Accident Number: CEN17LA316
Date & Time: 08/11/2017, 1200 EDT
Registration: N249KC
Aircraft: NAVION NAVION G
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

The flight instructor and private pilot had completed training maneuvers and were returning to the airport when the engine experienced a partial loss of power about 1,000 to 1,500 ft above ground level. They were unable to glide the airplane to an open field and descended into a wooded area. The airplane impacted trees and became wedged between trees, suspended above the ground. The engine and empennage separated from the rest of the airplane and came to rest on the ground nearby. The fuel tanks were damaged and most of the remaining fuel spilled onto the ground.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed no pre-impact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation or production of rated horsepower; however, an examination of the gascolator showed that it had been leaking fuel from three locations and contained a significant amount of debris. In a postaccident examination, the gascolator was subjected to the relevant service bulletin testing and did not pass the test due to the leaking seals and drain valve. Since the gascolator was unable to seal properly, it would have allowed air into the fuel system, which would have resulted in a loss of engine power. A review of the airplane maintenance records revealed no record of compliance with the service bulletin, nor was compliance mandatory.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A leak in the gascolator, which allowed air to enter the fuel system and resulted in a partial loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel distribution - Damaged/degraded (Cause)
Fuel distribution - Not serviced/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Scheduled/routine inspection - Maintenance personnel
Scheduled/routine maintenance - Maintenance personnel

Factual Information

On August 11, 2017, about 1200 eastern daylight time, a Navion G airplane, N249KC, impacted trees after a loss of engine power near Adrian, Michigan. The flight instructor and private pilot were seriously injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to Kalea Co. LLC and operated by Sky Walker Flying under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight departed Lenawee County Airport (ADG), Adrian, Michigan, about 1000.

According to the flight instructor, the engine experienced a loss of power about 1,000 ft above ground level (agl) while over a wooded area and she was unable to glide the airplane to a nearby field. She stated to the sheriff's office that after the accident she walked to a nearby road and waited for a car to pass by for help.

The private pilot stated to the sheriff's office that he was flying the airplane and they were returning to the airport after completing training maneuvers. He stated that the engine experienced a partial loss of power about 1,500 ft agl. He added that the engine still had a little power available during the event.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane was found wedged between trees with the empennage separated from the rear fuselage and engine separated from the firewall (figure 1). There was a smell of aviation fuel at the accident site.


Figure 1 – The airplane suspended above the ground and wedged between trees

A postaccident examination of the airplane was conducted by the FAA inspector and a technical representative from Continental Motors. The examination revealed that more than 4 gallons of fuel was drained from left wing tip tank, which remained intact. The right wing tip tank was found breached and had separated from the wing; there was no fuel present in the tank. The fuel gascolator, which is the low point of the center main fuel tanks, did not contain any fuel. There were fuel stain marks underneath the gascolator as it was installed on the airplane. The gascolator was removed for further testing.

An examination of the engine revealed the engine sustained impact damage concentrated mostly to the left rear side and the crankcase remained intact. All six cylinders remained attached to the engine and displayed impact damage signatures with the left side cylinders sustaining more damage than the right. The induction and exhaust systems both displayed impact damage signatures, but there were no signs of exhaust or induction leaks noted. The fuel pump was impact damaged as were several of the fuel line fittings. The throttle and metering assembly remained attached to the engine and displayed impact damage signatures; both the throttle and mixture arms were broken. The fuel manifold valve remained attached to its installation point and displayed impact damage signatures at the rear fitting. All of the fuel nozzles remained installed in their cylinders and there were no signs of fuel leaks near the nozzles. The 2 magnetos were undamaged and produced a spark at each ignition lead when manually rotated. The ignition harness displayed impact damage signatures to several of the left side cylinder ignition leads. All of the spark plugs remained installed in their cylinders and the top left spark plugs displayed impact damage signatures. The three-blade, constant speed propeller remained attached to the crankshaft and one of the blades was impact damaged. There were no pre-impact anomalies with the engine that would have precluded normal operation or production of rated horsepower.

The gascolator top and bottom seals were comprised of rubber gaskets which were meshed to a wire screen by a glass cylinder. As assembled the glass cylinder was tightened between two caps which each contained the rubber gaskets and wire mesh. The gascolator was examined by an FAA inspector who reported that there were fuel stains on the top seal and the drain valve, indicative of a fuel leak at some point during the life of the unit (figure 2).


Figure 2 – Gascolator installed on the airplane 

Sierra Hotel Aero, Inc. (SHA) holds the type certificate for the Navion. In May of 2007, SHA issued Navion Service Bulletin (SB) 106A - Fuel System - Inspection of the fuel system continued safe operation. The purpose of the SB was to require accomplishment of one time inspection of entire fuel system. This included from firewall aft for condition of all fuel lines installed including tip tanks, metal lines, fittings, hoses, vent system, vapor return, boost pump, and fuel strainer. The SB further states, inspect fuel strainer for evidence of fuel staining and leaking. Disassemble strainer and clean fuel screen. Inspect for damage and reassemble. Perform vacuum test of gascolator to include: connect hand operated vacuum pump and apply 24" of vacuum, verify bleed down does not exceed 4" over one minute, replace gaskets, fuel drain and/or gascolator as needed to ensure proper operation.

The gascolator was subjected to postaccident testing as prescribed in the Navion SB No. 106 A. The outlet port was plugged using an appropriate AN plug fitting. The gascolator was filled with clean 100LL fuel. After the fuel was added, a significant amount of foreign debris was observed floating in the gascolator. A 7-inch aluminum line with AN fittings was attached to the inlet port and the other end to the gascolator. This line was previously leak checked with no anomalies found. The inspector applied 24 inches of vacuum pressure using a hand vacuum pump; the gascolator was tested and failed to hold the required 24 inches of vacuum pressure for any amount of time. During the test the gascolator was leaking from the top seal, bottom seal, and the drain valve.

A review of the airplane maintenance logbooks revealed no record of compliance with the Navion SB No. 106 A, and there was no mention of gascolator maintenance from December 2006 to July 2017. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 52, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/23/2016
Flight Time:  1700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 32 hours (Total, this make and model), 1500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 80 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/23/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/13/2015
Flight Time: (Estimated) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: NAVION
Registration: N249KC
Model/Series: NAVION G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: NAV-4-2499
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/05/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 
Time Since Last Inspection: 5 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2089.06 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520BA
Registered Owner: KALEA CO LLC
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: Skywalker Flight School, LLC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: SkyWalker Flying
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KADG, 796 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 355°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 220°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ADRIAN, MI (ADG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: ADRIAN, MI (ADG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: LENAWEE COUNTY (ADG)
Runway Surface Type: 
Airport Elevation: 798 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 41.829167, -84.074444 (est)

Piper PA-28-180, registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N8397W: Accident occurred March 29, 2019 at Monroe County Airport (M40), Aberdeen/Amory, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N8397W

Location: Aberdeen, MS
Accident Number: CEN19TA112
Date & Time: 03/29/2019, 1745 CDT
Registration: N8397W
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 29, 2019, at 1745 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N8397W, collided with an airport perimeter fence and a ditch after an aborted landing at Monroe County Airport, (M40), Aberdeen/Amory, Mississippi. The private pilot and passenger received minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Marion County-Rankin Fite Airport (HAB), Hamilton, Alabama about 1715.

The passenger, who held a student pilot certificate with about 40 hours of flight time, stated that he had recently purchased the airplane and planned to take lessons from a flight instructor at M40 on April 1, 2019. He and the private pilot intended to reposition the airplane to M40 where it was to be refueled for the upcoming flight instruction. He stated the private pilot was acting as the pilot in command and was manipulating the flight controls. He added that the flight was uneventful until the landing at M40. During the landing flare, the airplane was slightly left of the runway centerline when it suddenly veered left. As the airplane continued off the left side of the runway, the private pilot applied full power and attempted to abort the landing. During the aborted landing the airplane collided with the north-south airport perimeter fence then continued into a ditch (figure 1).

Figure 1 – Accident airplane in a ditch 

After the airplane impacted the ditch, the private pilot was unconscious for a few minutes until first responders arrived. The pilot was taken to a local hospital and treated for a concussion. He reported that he has no memory of the accident flight.

A review of the airport surveillance video revealed the wind was from the south about 10 knots.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector completed a postaccident examination of the airplane on April 1, 2019. The flaps were found fully extended and the flight control cables were continuous. The nose landing gear was impact damaged; the corresponding rudder cable was off of the pulley and the cable's attachment point to the rudder pedal was broken. The examination did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The FAA inspector's photos revealed tire tracks in the grass where the airplane exited the runway. The tire tracks continued left across the taxiway and led to a knocked over fence post and metal fence laid on the ground toward the airplane. The airplane came to rest facing northwest toward the runway 18 threshold (figure 2).

Figure 2 – Airplane in a ditch facing toward the runway 18 threshold

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/10/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 40 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/19/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/24/2018
Flight Time:  819.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.9 hours (Total, this make and model), 664 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8397W
Model/Series: PA28 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-2607
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/16/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5687.78 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A3A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KM40, 227 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1755 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 205°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hamilton, AL (HAB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Aberdeen, MS (M40)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1715 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Monroe County (M40)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 225 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4999 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor

Latitude, Longitude:  33.877778, -88.487500 (est)

Location: Aberdeen, MS
Accident Number: CEN19LA112
Date & Time: 03/29/2019, 1750 CDT
Registration: N8397W
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 29, 2019, at 1750 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N8397W, collided with an airport perimeter fence and a ditch after a runway excursion at Monroe County Airport, (M40), Aberdeen/Amory, Mississippi. The private pilot and passenger received minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Marion County-Rankin Fite Airport (HAB), Hamilton, Alabama about 1715.

The passenger, who is also student pilot, stated that he had recently purchased the airplane and planned to take lessons from a flight instructor at M40 on April 1, 2019. He and the private pilot intended to reposition the airplane to M40 where it was to be refueled for the upcoming flight instruction. The private pilot was acting as the pilot in command and was manipulating the flight controls. He added that the flight was uneventful until the landing at M40. During landing, the airplane was slightly left of the runway centerline when it suddenly veered left. As the airplane continued off the left side of the runway, the private pilot attempted to go around. During the go-around the airplane collided with the north-south airport perimeter fence then continued into a ditch (figure 1).


Figure 1 – Accident airplane 

A review of the airport surveillance video revealed the wind was from the south about 5 knots.

The airplane has been retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8397W
Model/Series: PA28 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KM40, 227 ft msl
Observation Time: 1755 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hamilton, AL (HAB)
Destination: Aberdeen, MS (M40)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  33.877778, -88.487500 (est)

Robinson R44 Raven II, N4046J: Fatal accident occurred April 04, 2019 in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Atlanta, Georgia
Robinson Helicopters; Los Angeles, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N4046J

Location: Tampa, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA142
Date & Time: 04/04/2019, 1416 EDT
Registration: N4046J
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44 II
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On April 4, 2019, about 1416 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44, N4046J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a roadway near Tampa, Florida. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The passenger in a vehicle was fatally injured and the driver incurred minor injuries from flying debris. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the positioning flight, which was destined for Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the owner of the helicopter, he was flying on March 31, 2019 from Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida, to Cross-City Airport (CTY), Cross City, Florida. He stated that he had flown for about one hour at an altitude of 1,000 ft when the helicopter's engine completely lost power. He located a field to land in and performed an autorotation to the ground. The helicopter was not damaged during the landing. He further stated that he restarted the engine and it ran at idle for several minutes before he pulled on the collective and the engine lost power again. He restarted the engine for a second time and kept the main rotor disengaged while he ran the engine up to 100% power without a load; the engine ran well. Then he engaged the main rotor, and when he started to pull on the collective, the engine lost power again. He shut the engine down, contacted the helicopter manufacturer, and asked them to repair the helicopter. A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector contacted the pilot on the morning of April 4 to tell him the helicopter was being worked on by two mechanics from Florida Suncoast Helicopters.

According to the FAA inspector, he traveled to the field where the helicopter had landed on the morning of April 4. There he observed Florida Suncoast Helicopters mechanics as they performed maintenance on the helicopter. The mechanics told the inspector that they had cleaned the fuel screen and looked for contamination. Then, a company pilot employed by Suncoast Helicopters started the engine and let it warm up. He pulled on the collective and the engine lost total power. After further discussion with the helicopter manufacturer, the mechanics decided to replace the fuel servo unit with a new one. The FAA inspector then departed, and asked the mechanics to call after the repairs were complete, and to tell him what was repaired.

According to the mechanics and pilot employed by Suncoast Helicopters, after the fuel servo unit was changed, the pilot test ran the engine and hovered the helicopter for several minutes. No problems were noted. The pilot and one of the mechanics boarded the helicopter and departed the field at 1401, with the intent of moving the helicopter to SRQ. At 1416, the engine lost total power and the pilot performed an autorotation to a roadway.

After touchdown on the roadway, the helicopter slid on the pavement due to its forward momentum. The helicopter slid sideways, and the main rotor blades contacted a telephone pole. An approximately 2 ½-foot-long piece of the main rotor blade fractured off and flew into a truck driving down the street. The blade went through the windshield and fatally injured the passenger of the truck, while the driver sustained minor injuries.

The helicopter came to rest on South 50th Street about 100 ft from the intersection of Palm River Rd. The helicopter was oriented on a heading of 180°. The helicopter was next to a telephone pole and the main rotor cut the telephone pole in half. Both main rotor blades were fractured at the tips and had telephone cable cuts down the blades. The skids on the helicopter were damaged consistent with a hard landing, and the skids' main brace was fractured. The tail cone was buckled on the top located at the second bay. One pitch link for the rotor blade was fractured off. The vertical firewall was wrinkled at the lower right corner.

Examination of the engine revealed that the induction air inlet duct was partially collapsed. The inner rubberized fabric liner of the duct had partially delaminated and separated from the outer rubberized fabric, obstructing the interior volume of the duct. The wire stiffener between the two layers of fabric was displaced in two locations near the center of the duct length, at the 90° bend. No other discrepancies of the airframe or engine were noted.

The duct was retained for further examination.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter. He held an FAA-issued second-class medical certificate, dated March 20, 2019. According to the pilot's logbook, he had a total of 657.9 hours of flight experience.

The four-seat helicopter was manufactured in 2019. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-540-AE1A5, 260-horsepower engine. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine total time was 81.34 hours.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Registration: N4046J
Model/Series: R44 II No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: BC Dental Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTPF, 8 ft msl
Observation Time: 1815 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 80°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 9500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Tampa, FL
Destination: Sarasota, FL (SRQ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.943333, -82.401944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Deodat Hilton Gangapersaud
October 14th, 1946 - April 4th, 2019

On Thursday, April 4, 2019, Deodat Hilton Gangapersaud was taken from his family in a horrific helicopter accident in Tampa, Florida. He was the son of the late Ganga and Tulia Persaud of Whim, Guyana. 

Hilton was born on October 14, 1946 in Whim, Guyana. He migrated to the United States in 1979 and resided with his wife and children in Maryland until 2005. 

Hilton worked at the World Bank in Washington, D.C for over 20 years. There, he was a special police officer known as Sergeant Ganga.

In 2005, Hilton relocated to Tampa, Florida with his loving wife and four of his children. He came to Florida to retire early and do the things he loved: gardening, working on cars, raising livestock and being able to enjoy his family and dogs. 

Hilton was a busy body, he could never sit still and let time pass. This resulted in him going back into the workforce for an additional five years until he retired again at the age of 65. Even after he retired from the workforce for the second time, he ended up building his own mechanic shop from the ground up with the help of his sons. This mechanic shop was his hobby that he took great pride in.

Hilton brought life and laughter into the lives of anyone he touched. He was a family man who many gravitated towards. There was never a dull moment with him. If he wasn’t telling you a joke, then he was dancing or singing with you. He didn’t have any friends because he considered everyone family. He was not only a provider, but also a giver. He would never let you leave his home without a gift.

Hilton is survived by his devoted wife, Grace, of 38 years; along with their five children: two sons: Milton and Ryan; three daughters: Jasmine and her husband Richard, Neelomie and her husband William, and the youngest, Sharita; eight grandchildren: Camisha, Nicholas, Alexia, Joshua, Mariah, William III, Yolanda, and Zion Hilton; one great-grandson: Jaden; three brothers: Balchand, Baljiet, and Moti; five sisters: Lynette, Zeena, Liloutie, Calo, and Nadira; several cousins, nieces, nephews, and a host of relatives and friends.  Hilton was preceded in death by his parents: Ganga and Tulia Persaud and brother Charlie Persaud. 

“Death leaves a heartache,
no one can heal
Love leaves a memory,
No one can steal”
-Anonymous

So with you: Now is your time of grief,
but I will see you again and you will rejoice,
and no one will take away your joy
John 16:22




PALM RIVER, Florida — One person is dead following a helicopter crash in Palm River Thursday afternoon.

According to the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office, a helicopter suffered a catastrophic engine failure and made a hard landing on 50th Street at Palm River Road a little before 2:30 p.m.

Bryan Messick, 39, was piloting the helicopter while Joshua Wells, 21, was co-piloting.

After the hard landing, one of the rotor blades came off, hitting a Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck that was carrying 72-year-old Deodat Gangapersaud and his son, 35-year-old Ryan Persaud. The rotor blade hit Deodat, who was a passenger in the the truck. He suffered fatal injuries.

Deputies said Ryan, who was driving the truck, was transported to Tampa General Hospital. Officials said he suffered minor cuts.

"You could start hearing the blades. I turn around and see the helicopter about like 20 feet above the air," witness Alejandor Bou-Colon said. "It tries to crash land in that patch of grass. But, then it kept on sliding and sliding until it hit that pole right about there and cut it in half. It was very scary. It was really close. It could’ve been us."

Witnesses couldn't believe the father in the truck was killed so far away from the crash site.

According to deputies, the two people in the helicopter were highly trained pilots and had recently been in for service. The chopper was on its way to Sarasota before pieces of blades fell off.

Dan Boggs with the National Transportation Safety Board told ABC Action News reporter Michael Paluska the helicopter is brand new.

"It’s only a couple of months old. We will be doing a complete and full investigation," Boggs said.

The pilot told investigators he had a catastrophic engine failure.

"The pilot did a great job he came in he was auto rotating which means he was using gravity to make sure the rotor blades were spinning fast enough," Boggs said. "I looked at the surveillance video there was a truck underneath him. He made sure he did not land on the truck; he was floating it as hard as he could til the truck passed by if this had been on grass he’d of probably stopped right where he landed. He really did about the best job you can do in that situation."

The helicopter is a Robinson R44 Raven II with tail number N4046J.

FlightAware tracking shows the path the helicopter took and where it crashed.

The National Transportation Safety Board expects to release a preliminary report of their findings in a couple of weeks. It will take at least 18 months for their final report.

Story and video ➤ https://www.abcactionnews.com


















TAMPA, Florida  — A helicopter attempting to make an emergency landing crashed onto a busy street on Thursday, sending one of its rotors flying into a passing vehicle, killing a passenger, authorities said.

The crash took place at about 2:21 p.m. near the intersection of S 50th Street and Palm River Road. The blue Robinson R44 helicopter suffered catastrophic engine failure, said Hillsborough Sheriff Chad Chronister at a news conference held at the crash scene.

The helicopter was attempting to make a “hard landing,” the sheriff said, when it struck a telephone pole. That caused one of the rotor blades to break off, fly across the street and strike a Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck that was traveling north on S 50th Street.

The severed rotor killed a passenger, the father of the driver.

Alejandro Bou-Colon said he saw the helicopter fall from the sky. He works at Top Choice Automobile Sales at 506 S 50th St., which is right next to the crash site.

He said it looked like the helicopter was trying to land on a patch of grass. Instead, it came down fast, hit the ground and started skidding across the roadway before hitting a pole. He said debris went flying everywhere.

The Sheriff's Office did not release the names of those involved in the deadly crash.

The pickup driver was also injured and taken to Tampa General Hospital for treatment. The sheriff did not say how seriously injured he was.

The helicopter pilot was taken to a local hospital to be treated for heat exhaustion and dehydration and may also have injured in the crash.

The unidentified pilot was “highly trained,” the sheriff said. Chronister said the helicopter had just been serviced, passed several tests and was deemed to be functioning properly.

The sheriff said the helicopter was on its way to Sarasota when the pilot experienced engine failure.

When asked if the pilot handled the emergency landing the best possible way, Chronister said “depends who you ask.”

“I’m sure the passenger of that truck probably doesn’t feel that way right now ...,” the sheriff said, but noted it could have been worse: “We have one death when it could’ve been more.”

The National Transportation Safety Board will send investigators to the site to start examining the helicopter crash, Chronister said. The Florida Highway Patrol will investigate the death of the truck passenger.

“I'm not a flight investigator by any means,” the sheriff said, “but I can say thank God nobody else was injured.”

Story and video ➤  https://www.tampabay.com

Piaggio P.180: Incident occurred March 31, 2019 at Vero Beach Regional Airport (KVRB), Indian River County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Bird strike, landed without incident.

Date: 31-MAR-19
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: PIAGGIO
Aircraft Model: P180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: VERO BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N2465Q: Incident occurred April 03, 2019 at Kissimmee Gateway Airport (KISM), Orlando, Orange County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Veered off the runway and struck a taxiway light.

Christiansen Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N2465Q

Date: 03-APR-19
Time: 16:55:00Z
Regis#: N2465Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ORLANDO
State: FLORIDA

De Havilland Canada DHC-6-100 Twin Otter, N24HV: Incident occurred April 04, 2019 at DeLand Municipal Airport (KDED), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Hard landing.

Vertical Air Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N24HV

Date: 04-APR-19
Time: 17:15:00Z
Regis#: N24HV
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC 6 TWIN OTTER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: SKYDIVING
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DELAND
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 175 Skylark, owned by Kingdom Air Corps Inc and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N7622M: Accident occurred April 04, 2019 in Edgefield, South Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; West Columbia, South Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7622M

Location: Edgefield, SC
Accident Number: ERA19LA143
Date & Time: 04/04/2019, 1215 EDT
Registration: N7622M
Aircraft: Cessna 175
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 4, 2019, about 1215 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 175, N7622M, owned by Kingdom Air Corps, Inc., impacted a powerpole adjacent to a field during a forced landing near Edgefield, South Carolina. The commercial pilot and pilot-rated passenger were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight destined for Boone Inc Airport, Boone, North Carolina. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated about 15 minutes earlier from Daniel Field Airport, Augusta, Georgia.

The pilot stated that no discrepancies were noted during the engine run-up before departure, and after departure with an adequate supply of fuel for the intended flight, climbed to 2,000 feet mean sea level, where he switched the fuel selector to the left tank. About 5 minutes later the engine began to run "a little shaky" which he attributed to be a stuck valve. He turned to fly toward a nearby airport but realized he was unable to reach it. The engine began to run rougher then lost power completely. Attempts to restore engine power by switching the fuel selector, checking the magnetos, and application of carburetor heat were unsuccessful. He spotted a field and set up for a landing by lowering flaps. During the landing roll he maneuvered the airplane to avoid cows, and the left wing collided with a power pole.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7622M
Model/Series: 175 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DNL, 422 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.39 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Augusta, GA (DNL)
Destination: Boone, NC (NC14)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.768889, -81.986667