Saturday, November 2, 2013

Piper Aerostar 602P, Young Living Essential Oils LLC, N35FD: Accident occurred September 23, 2013 in Sandpoint, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA419
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 23, 2013 in Sandpoint, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2014
Aircraft: PIPER PA60 602P, registration: N35FD
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while on a right base leg visual approach, he received the current automated weather report and that he did not think that the 4-knot tailwind was an issue because the runway was 5,500 feet long. The pilot reported that, although the airplane landed long, he thought that he had sufficient runway to stop the airplane with heavy braking. However, as he applied the brakes, he felt the sensation of “no brakes” as the end of the runway quickly approached. The airplane’s owner, who occupied a seat in the rear cabin, reported that the pilot seemed to be having a problem aligning the airplane with the runway during the approach, that the airplane was high and fast and the flaps were full down, and that the pilot was trying to force the airplane down onto the runway. The passenger reported that he observed that the approach speed was 132 knots; per the airplane's flight manual, the calculated approach speed for the landing weight of the airplane was about 90 knots. The airplane subsequently ran off the end of the runway and impacted the localizer structure, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. A postaccident examination of the airplane's braking system revealed that the brakes were likely operating properly before the airplane exited the runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to fly the approach at the appropriate landing speed and attain the correct touchdown point, which resulted in a runway overrun.

On September 23, 2013, about 0815 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA60 602P, N35FD, sustained substantial damage as a result of a runway overrun and subsequent impact with the airport's localizer equipment at the Sandpoint Airport, Sandpoint, Idaho. The airplane was registered to Young Living Essential Oils LC, of Lehi, Utah. The commercial pilot and one passenger were not injured, while the remaining passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the corporate cross-country flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Provo Municipal Airport, Provo, Utah, about 0600 mountain daylight time, with SZT as its destination.

In a statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported while approaching SZT, he requested and was approved for the GPS approach [for Runway 01]. After descending out of the clouds at about 2,500 feet above ground level (agl), the pilot received the local automated weather; the wind was reported to be from 190 degrees at 4 knots. The pilot stated that as he was set up on a right base leg for runway 01, he considered the 4 knot tailwind minimal for the 5,500-foot runway. The pilot further stated that he landed quite a bit long, but thought he had sufficient room to stop with heavy braking, and [during the landing roll] had the sensation of "…no brakes at all." The airplane subsequently ran off the end of the runway, and impacted the localizer before coming to rest upright. The pilot concluded in his report that this accident could have been prevented by landing into the wind and on the numbers. The pilot reported no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

In a telephone interview with the IIC, the owner of the airplane reported that he was seated in the rear cabin at the time of the accident. The owner stated that during the approach he detected that the pilot was having an alignment problem with the approach. He further reported that the pilot was high, the flaps were full down, the airspeed over the threshold was 132 knots, and that there was a tailwind of about 10 knots; the airplane flight manual states that the approach speed for the reported landing weight of 5,156 pounds and full flaps (45 degrees) would have been about 90 knots. The owner stated that over the runway threshold, the airplane dropped down then went back up, and that the pilot tried to force the airplane down. The owner added that after the airplane went off the end of the runway and came to a stop, he exited the aircraft and noticed that while the brakes were not smoking, they were hot.

A postaccident examination of the airplane's braking system was performed by a Federal Aviation Administration airworthiness inspector, on September 25, 2013. The inspector reported that an inspection of the brake reservoir revealed that all of the brake fluid was gone, however, the inside area of the reservoir was observed to be wet and shiny, indicative that there had been brake fluid present recently. Further, inspection of the brake actuators on the pilot's rudder pedals revealed that all components appeared to be working correctly. The inspector concluded that all evidence observed supports the contention that the brakes were most likely operating properly prior to the airplane leaving the runway.



SANDPOINT — A pretrial settlement agreement is being proposed to resolve a misdemeanor criminal charge against a Utah pilot who crashed a plane at Sandpoint Airport last fall.

Donald Moss Muirhead is charged with flying under the influence of prescription medication at the time of the Sept. 23 crash.

The terms of the agreement were not made public following a pretrial hearing in Muirhead’s case on Friday in Bonner County Magistrate Court. The agreement is slated for review by Judge Debra Heise, who is presiding over Muirhead’s trial on Thursday.

Muirhead, 55, of Orem, was at the controls of a Piper Aerostar 620P when he careened 600 feet off the north end of the runway and crashed into an antenna array that helps pilots make instrument landings.

Neither Muirhead nor his 61- and 39-year-old passengers were injured.

Muirhead, according to a Sandpoint Police report, blamed the crash on a mechanical issue. Witnesses, however, told police that believed Muirhead touched down on the runway too late and with too much speed, the report said.

Replacing the antenna array and attendant equipment is expected to cost about $270,000, although the system has been deemed obsolete by airport officials. The county is considering a dual-band system that will improve the localizer’s accuracy, adding about $100,000 to the cost.


http://www.bonnercountydailybee.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N35FD


NTSB Identification: WPR13LA419
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 23, 2013 in Sandpoint, ID
Aircraft: PIPER PA60 602P, registration: N35FD
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 23, 2013, about 0815 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA60 602P, N35FD, sustained substantial damage as a result of a runway overrun and subsequent impact with the airport’s localizer equipment at the Sandpoint Airport, Sandpoint, Idaho. The airplane was registered to Young Living Essential Oils LC, of Lehi, Utah. The certified commercial pilot and one passenger were not injured, while the remaining passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the corporate cross-country flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed the Provo Municipal Airport, Provo, Utah, about 0600 mountain daylight time, with SZT as its destination.

In a post-accident interview with a Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector, the pilot reported that on landing rollout he experienced a braking anomaly, which resulted in a runway overrun. During the overrun the airplane impacted the runway localizer array and a perimeter fence, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane’s left wing.

The airplane was recoverd to a secured hangar for further investigation of the reported brake anomaly.




SANDPOINT — Bonner County commissioners are scheduled to take up on Tuesday the matter of replacing navigation equipment that was damaged when a Utah pilot recently crashed at Sandpoint Airport.

An antenna array which served the airport’s distance-measuring equipment was destroyed when the plane crashed off the north end of the runway on Sept. 23.

Airport Manager Dave Schuck said installing a replacement system would cost about $267,000, but that system has grown obsolete. Moreover, the positioning of hangars at the airport interferes with its accuracy.

“We’re looking for an improved system,” Schuck said on Friday.

However, an improved system is expected to increase the replacement cost to about $367,000, according to Schuck.

The pilot who was at the controls during the crash, Donald Moss Muirhead, is charged with flying under the influence of drugs, a misdemeanor. Muirhead, a 55-year-old from Orem, pleaded not guilty, setting the stage for a Dec. 19 jury trial in Bonner County Magistrate Court.

Muirhead denied being under the influence, although he did admit to being prescribed Seroquel and Lexapro, which are antidepressants.

Neither Muirhead nor his two passengers were injured in the 8:30 p.m. crash.

Eyewitness statements given to Sandpoint Police suggested Muirhead approached the landing with too much speed and touched down too late on the runway.

One of the passengers advised police that he said a prayer as they landed because he was concerned they were going to crash, according to court documents.

Both passengers, the police report said, indicated that Muirhead “was not acting his normal self” on the day of the crash. The manager of the airport’s fixed-base operations told Sandpoint Police Muirhead had flown into the on prior occasions without trouble, although his demeanor was “a little bit slower” on the day of the crash.

A Breathalyzer test of Muirhead did not detect the presence of alcohol in his system, court records show. A Bonner County sheriff’s deputy certified as a drug-recognition expert determined Muirhead was under the influence of an intoxicating substance.

In a brief written statement to police, Muirhead said he “landed long” and had no brakes when he went off the runway.

Blue Angels fly over during the National Anthem at Notre Dame Stadium, November 2, 2013

NOTRE DAME --- One of the most elite flight teams in the world is in South Bend this weekend. 

The Blue Angels, the Navy's flight demonstration team, kicked off Saturday's game with a flyover. 

They flew South to North over Notre Dame Stadium.







Beechcraft C90 King Air, N269JG, J & G Aviation LLC, Accident occurred November 01, 2013 in Springdale, Arkansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N269JG

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA035 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 01, 2013 in Springdale, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/09/2014
Aircraft: BEECH C90, registration: N269JG
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

As the airplane was descending toward its destination airport, the pilot reported to an air traffic controller en route that he needed to change his destination to a closer airport because the airplane was low on fuel. The controller advised him to land at an airport that was 4 miles away. Shortly after, the pilot contacted the alternate airport’s air traffic control tower (ATCT) and reported that he was low on fuel. The tower controller cleared the airplane to land, and, about 30 seconds later, the pilot advised that he was not going to make it to the airport. The airplane subsequently impacted a field 3.25 miles southeast of the airport. One witness reported hearing the engine sputter, and another witness reported that the engine “did not sound right.” Forty-foot power lines crossed the field 311 feet from the point of impact. It is likely that the pilot was attempting to avoid the power lines during the forced landing and that the airplane then experienced an inadvertent stall and an uncontrolled collision with terrain.
About 1 quart of fuel was observed in each fuel tank. No evidence of fuel spillage was found on the ground; no fuel stains were observed on the undersides of the wing panels, wing trailing edges, or engine nacelles; and no fuel smell was observed at the accident site. However, the fuel totalizer showed that 123 gallons of fuel was remaining. Magnification of the annunciator panel light bulbs revealed that the left and right low fuel pressure annunciator lights were illuminated at the time of impact. An examination of the airframe and engines revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
About 1 month before the accident, the pilot had instructed the fixed-base operator at Camden, Arkansas, to put 25 gallons of fuel in each wing tank; however, it is unknown how much fuel was already onboard the airplane. Although the fuel totalizer showed that the airplane had 123 gallons of fuel remaining at the time of the crash, information in the fuel totalizer is based on pilot inputs, and it is likely the pilot did not update the fuel totalizer properly before the accident flight. The pilot was likely relying on the fuel totalizer instead of the fuel gauges for fuel information, and he likely reported his low fuel situation to the ATCT after the annunciator lights illuminated.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of power to both engines due to fuel exhaustion. Also causal were the pilot’s reliance on the fuel totalizer rather than the fuel quantity gauges to determine the fuel on board and his improper fuel planning.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 1, 2013, at 1742 central daylight time, a Beech C90, N269JG, impacted terrain 3.25 miles southeast of the Springdale Municipal Airport (ASG), Springdale, Arkansas. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to J&G Aviation, LLC, and operated by the pilot, both of Camden, Arkansas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Pine Bluff (PBF), Arkansas, about 1650, and was destined for Bentonville (VBT), Arkansas, but was diverting to Springdale (ASG), Arkansas.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) documents, the pilot contacted Little Rock, Arkansas, approach control at 1651 and advised that he was en route from PBF to VBT, and requested flight following services. Radar contact was established when the airplane was 10 miles northwest of PBF at 10,000 feet and climbing to 16,500 feet. At 1702, the pilot was handed off to Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC), Hot Springs sector. At 1721, the pilot reported he was descending from 16,500 feet. At 1727, the pilot contacted Fort Smith (FSM) Air Traffic Control Tower, Razorback Approach, and advised he was passing 11,800 feet for 6,500 feet. He was then given traffic advisories. At 1740, the pilot said he wanted to change his destination from VBT to Fayetteville (FYV), Arkansas. When the FSM controller asked the reason for the change, the pilot replied he was low on fuel. He then requested the distance to FYV, and the controller told him it was 9 miles away. At 1741, the pilot said he needed to go to a closer airport. The controller advised that ASG was at his 12 o'clock position and 4 miles away. The pilot said he had ASG in sight and was familiar with the airport. The controller issued the pilot the ASG tower frequency. The pilot contacted ASG tower and reported he was low on fuel. The ASG controller issued the pilot the wind conditions and altimeter setting and cleared him to land on runway 36. Approximately 30 seconds later, the pilot advised ASG that he was not going to make the airport. The ASG controller attempted to get the aircraft's position. No further transmissions were received. At 1743, ASG advised FSM that the airplane was down.

Six written witness statements were collected by the Washington County Sheriff's Office. One witness reported hearing the engine(s) sputtering. Another witness said the engine noise was loud but "did not sound right." He observed one wing turn perpendicular to the ground before the airplane disappeared from sight. Three witnesses reported seeing the airplane pull up abruptly and fall from about 300 feet to the ground in a right wing-low, nose-low attitude. In his report, the sheriff's deputy stated that he interviewed two of five witnesses. They told him that the pilot was "trying to find a clear and empty place to land," and noticed that control was lost at times as the airplane would "tilt" to the right and left. They said the pilot "was trying to land smoothly and was being successful until about 300 feet from the ground when the plane suddenly went straight down."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 72-year-old private pilot held airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument ratings dated March 8, 2010. He also held a third class airman medical certificate, dated June 4, 2013, with the restriction, "Must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision." When the pilot applied for that medical certificate, he estimated his total flight time to be 3,367 hours, of which 53 hours were acquired within the last six months. The pilot's logbook was never located, so it could not be ascertained as to how much flight time he had logged in turboprop airplanes or in the Beech C90 King Air.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

N269JG (serial number LJ-949), a model C90, was manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation in 1981. It had been equipped with two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-35 (upgraded from PT6A-21) turboprop engines, serial numbers PCE-25558 (left), and PCE-25501 (right), each rated at 750 horsepower, driving two Hartzell 4-blade, all-metal, constant speed, full-feathering, reversible propellers. The propeller model numbers were HC-D4N-3C, with D9290K blades. The serial numbers were FY 2319 (left), and FY 2320 (right).

An FAA aviation safety inspector examined the aircraft maintenance records at the pilot's office in Camden, Arkansas, on November 12, 2013. He reported that Airframe and Engine Phase 3 and 4 Inspections were accomplished on March 15, 2013, at a Hobbs meter time of 826.2 hours. At that time, airframe total time was 11,395.9 hours. Airframe Phase 1 and 2 Inspections were accomplished on March 14, 2012, at a Hobbs meter time of 738.9 hours. At that time, airframe total time was 11,308.6 hours. The following times were recorded during the Phase 3 and 4 inspections:

LEFT ENGINE

Time since new, 5,801.3
Time since overhaul, 2,453.6
Time since hot section inspection, 874.5
Total cycles since new, 6,613
Overhaul date, 07/21/2000
Cycles since overhaul, 2,800
Cycles since hot section inspection, 875
Engine time at overhaul, 3,454.5
Cycle time at overhaul, 3,930

RIGHT ENGINE

Time since new, 5,722.9
Time since overhaul, 2,268.4
Time since hot section inspection, 847.5
Total cycles since new, 6,311
Overhaul date, 12/06/03
Cycles since overhaul, 2,381
Cycles since hot section inspection, 875
Engine time at overhaul, 3,347.7
Cycle time at overhaul, 3,812

On October 9, 2013, the pilot flew to PBF where the altimeter, encoding and static systems, and transponder calibration checks were accomplished by Tomlinson Avionics, and the airplane was recertified for IFR (instrument flight rules) flight. A Garmin GNS 430W (WAAS-certified GPS, 2280-channel capacity comm, and 200-channel ILS/VOR with localizer and glideslope), Avidyne TAS610 (traffic advisory system), Bendix DA-144A (weather radar) antenna, and a PC-250 (inverter) were removed and shipped to their respective manufacturers for repairs. The PC-250 inverter was non-repairable, and an overhauled unit was returned. On November 1, 2013, these items were reinstalled and functionally tested satisfactory.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The following weather was recorded by the ASG Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS) at 1748:

Wind, 310 degrees at 7 knots, gusting to 14 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, few clouds at 6,500 feet; temperature, 16 degrees Celsius (C.); dew point, 5 degrees C.; altimeter setting, 29.90 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was located in a large open pasture that sloped downward from west to east. It was aligned on a magnetic heading of 030 degrees. South of the point of impact, power lines crossed the field from west to east. They were about 35 to 40 feet off the ground and 311 feet from the point of impact. The on-scene examination revealed no ground scars, only impact ground gouges, consistent with a right wing-low, nose-low attitude as reported by witnesses. The nose and cockpit area were crushed inward.

There were ground imprints, the same length as the wings. At the end of the left imprint were red lens fragments. At the end of the right imprint were green lens fragments. These ground imprints were immediately forward of both wings, consistent with the airplane rebounding slightly. The right wing was destroyed. The left wing was partially separated at midspan, and the wing tip was separated from the wing. The leading edge was crushed aft to the spar, and the wing was twisted up and aft. The right wing was bent aft and upward along its span, and the leading edge was crushed inward along the lower side. Minimal fuel (approximately one quart) was observed in each nacelle tank. There was no evidence of fuel spillage on the ground, and no fuel stains were observed on the undersides of the wing panels, wing trailing edges, or engine nacelles. There was no smell of fuel at the site.

Both engines and nacelles were partially separated from the wings. Both propeller assemblies remained attached to the engines and were partially buried in the earth. There were no ground scars leading up to the airplane, and there was no evidence of rotation at impact. Control continuity was established from the flight controls to the center of the airplane. Measurements of the elevator and rudder trim were indicative of a neutral position, and aileron trim was in a slight left wing down position. The landing gear and flaps were retracted. Propeller signatures indicate the propellers were not feathered and bore little or no rotational signatures.

The airplane was configured with two cockpit seats and four cabin seats arranged in club seating. The lavatory and baggage compartment were configured for additional seating. The cockpit seats were separated from the floor attachments and the seat bases were buckled. Both cockpit seatbelts and shoulder harnesses bore evidence of being fastened at impact.

Examination of the cockpit revealed both power, condition, and fuel shutoff levers were full forward. There was a witness mark on the airspeed indicator at 78 knots. The airplane's power off stall speed (flaps retracted) was between 78 and 89 knots (minimum weight versus maximum gross weight, respectively).

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Arkansas State Medical Examiners report stated the pilot's cause of death to be "multiple traumatic injuries." FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute toxicology report indicated no carbon monoxide or ethanol were detected. However, verapamil (an antiarrhythmic drug used in the treatment of hypertension, angina, and arrhythmias) and norverapamil (a metabolite of verapamil) were detected.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The annunciator panel and fuel totalizer were removed from the airplane and sent to NTSB's Vehicle Recorder (RE-40) and Materials Laboratory (RE-30) Divisions for examination. According to the Vehicle Recorder Specialist's report, application of electrical power to the fuel totalizer revealed:

FUEL USED: 260 gallons
FUEL REMAINING: 123 gallons.

According to the Materials Laboratory Specialist's report, magnification of the annunciator panel light bulbs revealed that the following annunciator lights were illuminated at impact:

LEFT GENERATOR OUT
LEFT IGNITION ON
LOW FUEL PRESSURE (LEFT)
FUEL CROSSFEED
INVERTER OUT
LOW FUEL PRESSURE (RIGHT)
RIGHT GENERATOR OUT
RIGHT IGNITION ON

The fuel management panel, located on the left sidewall, had been cut away by first responders in order to extricate the pilot. Although intact, the panel had been damaged by impact. Examination of the panel revealed the left and right boost pumps were ON, the left and right fuel transfer switches were OFF, the fuel crossfeed switch was in the AUTO position, and all the fuel system circuit breakers were OPEN. There was a yellow arc on the fuel gauges, denoting minimum fuel that must be in each wing tank before takeoff. The range is from 0 to 265 pounds or 0 to about 41 gallons in each wing (6.7 pounds per gallon).

In retracing the airplane's travels, FlightAware's Activity Log captured its movements from July 26, 2013, to September 28, 2013, when activity ceased. A Faith Aviation spokesman at Camden (CDH) said the pilot topped off the airplane with fuel and flew to Cozumel, Mexico, in early October. On the return flight to CDH, he stopped for fuel in New Orleans. It is unknown how much fuel he purchased in Cozumel or New Orleans.

An effort was made to trace the airplane's movements in an attempt to explain the discrepancy between the fuel gauges and the fuel totalizer. On October 9, 2013, the pilot gave instructions to the Faith Aviation, the fixed base operator (FBO) at CDH, to put 25 gallons of fuel in each wing tank. When asked if he had a receipt for this transaction, the FBO replied that he did not. The pilot then flew from CDH to PBF, a distance of 65 nm. According to Beech Aircraft, the fuel required for this flight (assuming a cruising altitude of 10,000 feet) would be about 210 pounds, or about 30 gallons. Grider Aviation and Pine Bluff Aviation, both FBOs at PBF, were contacted. It was learned that Tomlinson Avionics had replaced the airplane's inverter, and the airplane was placed in Tomlinson's hangar, where it remained until the pilot departed on November 1. Before departure, the pilot purchased a new battery but did not purchase fuel. It was reported that the pilot rarely topped off the airplane with fuel, but would add only enough fuel as necessary to make the trip. The distance between PBF and VBT is about 172 miles. According to Beech Aircraft, the estimated fuel needed for this flight (assuming a cruising altitude of 17,000 feet) would be about 460 pounds, or 70 gallons.


NTSB Identification: CEN14FA035 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 01, 2013 in Springdale, AR
Aircraft: BEECH C90, registration: N269JG
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 1, 2013, at 1742 central daylight time, a Beech C90, N269JG, impacted terrain 4 miles southeast of the Springdale Municipal Airport, Springdale, Arkansas. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to J&G Aviation, LLC, and operated by the pilot, both of Camden, Arkansas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Pine Bluff, Arkansas, about 1700.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot contacted Fort Smith, Arkansas (FSM), and advised he was en route from Pine Bluff (PBF), Arkansas, to Bentonville (VBT), Arkansas. He was given flight following services. Later, the pilot said he wanted to change his destination to Fayetteville (KFYV), Arkansas. When the FSM controller asked the reason for the destination change and if he required any assistance, the pilot stated he was low on fuel. He requested the distance to FYV, and the controller told him it was 9 miles away. The pilot said he needed something closer. The controller advised that Springdale Airport (ASG) was at his 12 o'clock position and 4 miles away. The pilot said he had ASG in sight and was familiar with the airport. The controller issued the pilot a frequency change to ASG tower. The pilot contacted ASG tower and reported he was low on fuel. The ASG controller issued the wind conditions and altimeter setting and cleared the pilot to land on runway 36. Approximately 30 seconds later, the pilot advised ASG that he was not going to make the airport. The ASG controller attempted to get the aircraft's position. No further transmissions were received from the pilot.

A witness saw the airplane descend, pull up abruptly, and impact the ground in a right wing-low, nose-low attitude. There were power lines about 300 feet short of the impact point.

The on-scene examination revealed no ground scars, only impact ground gouges. Control continuity was established from the flight controls to the center of the airplane. The right wing was destroyed. No fuel was observed in the left wing or nacelle tanks. The landing gear and flaps were retracted. Propeller signatures indicate the propellers were not feathered.


==============

Searcy Harrell, 72, and Ruth Ann Hudson, 71, died in a plane crash in Washington County Friday (Nov. 1). Harrell’s youngest son, Ben Harrell, said his dad had his King Air aircraft for about a decade and was an experienced pilot. 

Ben, who owns U.S. Lawns in Lowell, described Searcy Harrell as adventurous and well respected by his family and the Camden community. He said Searcy loved to fly, scuba dive, golf and his family.

The University of Arkansas graduate has a long list of accomplishments. He had been the president of a bank that was started by his grandfather, he was an attorney, and had been appointed by Governor Mike Beebe to be Circuit Judge. Ben said his dad wasn’t sure if to accept the position at the time since his step-mother Peggy Harrell had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

“Me and my brothers were trying to just hype him into doing it, ‘dad you gotta do it,’ he said ‘I guess every lawyer would like to hear judge in front of their name at one time or another,’” Ben said.

Searcy’s late wife Peggy died about a year ago and Ben said his dad began dating Ruth Ann Hudson who had also lost her husband a month before Peggy had died.

“My heart just bleeds for their family,” Ben said. “It’s just terrible and once again the community in South Arkansas and Camden is devastated by both of their losses.”

Searcy was on his way to Northwest Arkansas to watch his grandson, the Rogers High School quarterback play. The plan, according to Ben, was for Searcy to attend the Rogers High game and Ruth Ann Hudson to go to the Fayetteville High School game to watch her granddaughter who is part of one of the spirit squads.

“He was there for the opening game and when they played Springdale we came up and he went to that game and we were of course looking forward to this one,” Ben said.

Max Harrell, who turned 18 on Oct. 29, scored Friday.Max has received an outpour of support on Twitter from his high school and friends.

Rogers High School Principal Charles Lee twitted, “Thoughts and prayers to Max, MacKenzie and the Harrell family. May God sustain you during your loss and grief.”

The family knew something was wrong when they couldn’t reach the couple. Ben said when he heard of a plane crash and the plane model from 5NEWS he knew it was his dad.

“That’s when I scrambled the phone and started heading to Springdale to find out what I could,” Ben said. “I think the way he went last night would have been the way he wanted to go but not this early that’s for sure because he had a lot more on his agenda.”

Searcy Harrell knew he wanted more of a memorial than a funeral when he was gone. He requested four hymns, one of them is “How Great Thou Art.”

“A lot of people knew dad, well respected, I’m proud to be Searcy Harrell’s son, I really am,” Ben said. “I’m proud to have known him.”

Searcy Harrell leaves behind three sons and a step-daughter: Steven, attorney in Springfield, MO; Jon, president of First Bank in Rogers; Ben, owner of U.S. Lawns in Lowell; and Shannon Beard, who lives in Dallas. He also leaves behind his sister Jan Strickland, who lives in Destin, FL, and 10 grandchildren.

Searcy’s memorial will be Tuesday in Camden. Ruth Ann’s visitation will be Tuesday and her funeral will be Wednesday also in Camden.

Here a two pictures the family shared with 5NEWS of Searcy Harrell and his late wife Peggy Harrell.








http://5newsonline.com


Prominent Camden banker and lawyer Searcy W. Harrell Jr., 72, was one of two people killed in an airplane crash near Springdale on Friday afternoon.

Also killed was his passenger, Ruth Ann Hudson, 71, also of Camden.

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office said that the bodies of both victims will be sent to the Arkansas State Crime Lab to determine causes of death.

The twin-engine Beechcraft King Air that crashed was owned by J&G Aviation, 1516 Edgewood, of Camden, according to aircraft records.

Harrell is the registered agent for the corporation that owns the aircraft. Harrell is a certified private pilot with single and multi-engine and instrument ratings.

Harrell, 72, owns Harrell Bancshares, a bank holding company which operates FirstBank locations in Hampton, Camden, Junction City and, most recently, Rogers and Siloam Springs.

Gov. Mike Beebe appointed Harrell to fill a 13-month vacancy in the 13th Judicial District, replacing Judge Susan Hickey, who was appointed to the federal bench. The term expired in December 2013.

News media said that that aircraft’s pilot was in radio contact air traffic controllers before he crashed. He told them that he was low on fuel. The aircraft crashed south of U.S. 412 near Bennington Road east of Springdale at approximately 5:40 p.m.

The Beechcraft King Air is usually configured for nine seats. It has a pressurized cabin and a cruising speed of about 200 mph. It is a favorite turboprop aircraft in general aviation.

Records indicated that the aircraft was built in 1981.


Source:  http://www.magnoliareporter.com


New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame in Teterboro draws fans of all ages to "open-cockpit weekend"

 
DON SMITH / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER 
Six-year-old Michael Mauro trying out the pilot's seat in an AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter from the Vietnam War era on Saturday at the N.J. Aviation Hall of Fame. Michael is wearing his pilot's Halloween costume. 



As Nicolas Inguanzo walked up the stairs to the old airliner, his mother asked if he wanted to be a passenger or a pilot. 

“A pilot! A pilot!” said Inguanzo, age 3, climbing into the cockpit of a Martin 2-0-2 parked behind the Aviation Hall of Fame of New Jersey. “Airplane! Airplane!” he said, taking hold of the yoke and smiling.

Dozens of children made the same choice Saturday during the hall of fame’s first “open-cockpit weekend” event. The museum, located beside the runway at Teterboro Airport, owns a number of historic aircraft including a Cobra gunship helicopter that was damaged during battle in Vietnam, an HH-52A helicopter used by the Coast Guard to rescue people during the Mariel Boat Lift in 1980, and the Martin 2-0-2, one of the first modern airliners.

The Martin’s passenger cabin is open to the public during the hall of fame’s business hours, said Shea Oakley, the museum’s executive director. But like the rest of the aircraft parked on the museum’s grounds, the plane’s cockpit is usually off limits to visitors. The open-cockpit event, which runs Saturday and Sunday, is a rare chance for kids — and the occasional adult — to take the pilot’s seat.

“There’s something about kids of any age, we’re naturally attracted to plans and dials and gadgets,” said Bruce Meyer, a volunteer with the hall of fame and retired Continental Airlines pilot who gave tours of the airliner in his pilot’s uniform. “You just don’t know who’s going to catch the bug.”

Getting such access is harder than ever now, Oakley said. Passengers were banned from airliner cockpits after Sept. 11, ending the decades-old tradition of inviting children up to see all the dials and switches mid-flight.

“That’ll never happen again,” Oakley said. “These days with tight airport security, it’s very difficult for kids to get close to the cockpits.”

Of course, few children have ever got to sit in a Bell AH-1 Cobra Gunship, an attack helicopter used widely by the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Chris Perry lifted his 4-year-old son Alexander into the front seat of the Cobra, which sat on the gravel backyard of the hall of fame with its curved plastic canopy propped open.

Alexander took the yoke in his hand and absentmindedly pressed the red buttons that once operated the helicopter’s nose-mounted cannon. But he was far more interested in figuring out the aircraft’s seatbelt, which he pulled over his shoulders.

“Way cool,” he said to his mother Lourdes Perry, 33, from Montclair.

Kevin Lodewick, age 2, came with his father, also named Kevin, from Bloomfield. When Alexander was lifted out of the cockpit, Kevin took place in the pilot’s seat.

 “Up! Up!” he said, flipping switches and turning knobs in the helicopter’s armrest. “More planes! More planes!”

- See more at: http://www.northjersey.com

Behala gets new pilot school

KOLKATA: Nearly three decades after the last student qualified for a pilot's license from the flight training institute in Behala, a new private institute has taken wings, rekindling hopes of those aspiring to fly.

Sitaram Yechury, chairman of the Parliamentary Committee on Civil Aviation, flagged off the flight training institute by Trans Bharat Aviation Pvt Ltd, a non-scheduled operator that has helicopter operations in north India and fixed wing services in Bhubaneswar. The institute will train around 30 students at a time and charge Rs 25-30 lakh for the 18-month course that includes 350 hours of ground training and 200 hours of flight training.

While the state government-run Flying Training Institute has been non-functional for over two decades, another private player's bid to operate an institute encountered turbulence and was grounded in a couple of years. Camellia Aviation was undone by a revised regulation by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation that made training in twin engine aircraft mandatory for commercial pilot's license. Camellia tried to pull a fast one by purchasing a scrap. It had hoped to meet the DGCA norm in letter when it purchased the rusting junk that had been a plane a couple of years earlier and used to dump arms in Purulia. But the aviation watchdog acted tough and grounded the institute.

Now, Trans Bharat Aviation Training Institute plans to fill the void, not just in Kolkata but the entire east. "There is no flight training facility in the entire region. That is indeed sad given that the Behala Flying Club has produced so many sterling pilots in the past. MLA group chairman Madan Lal Agarwal approached me nearly four years ago, expressing his intent to start an institute and has been remarkably resilient in the quest. I am glad the institute has finally taken shape," Yechuri said. The institute has received a go-ahead by DGCA.

Apart from three two-seater single-engine Cessna planes, Trans Bharat deputy director wing commander (retired) Subir Sen said the company would fly down a Piper Seneca multi-engine aircraft from Delhi when required. He though, acknowledged that rising fuel costs and hiring and retaining chief pilot instructor, pilot instructor in-charge and quality manager was a challenge.

Yechury endorsed Agarwal's plan to apply for a helicopter pilot training course, pointing out that several accidents involving VIPs had occurred due to lack of proper training. Trans Bharat, which has helicopters operating in north India and the northeast, plans to introduce a helicopter service from Kolkata to Gangasagar during the fair in January.


Source:   http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Emergency responder drill prepares response to plane crash at Watertown International Airport (KART), Watertown, New York

 

DEXTER — Emergency crews were put to the test Saturday morning as they responded to a crash scenario at the Watertown International Airport.

Crews had to “rescue” 25 passengers from a plane, represented during the drill by a school bus, that slid off the runway after landing. After recovering the victims, crews in a real emergency would have to triage the patients and begin their medical care.

Joseph D. Plummer, Jefferson County Director of Fire and Emergency Management, said the drill’s setting at an active airport created a new set of challenges for responders, such as knowing where they could operate safely.

“We’ve had so much growth out here, people don’t know where to go,” he said. Part of mitigating the risk for responders was accounting for where runways are.

“Planes just don’t stop; they don’t just stop on a dime if somebody pulls out in front of them,” Mr. Plummer said.

The script for the scenario included crews springing into action after the initial call to dispatchers by a passenger in the airport’s terminal. Among the responding crews were the Dexter, Brownville, Glen Park and Sackets Harbor fire departments, Guilfoyle Ambulance and Lifenet. The crash victims were portrayed by local Boy Scouts, paramedic class students and other community members.

The Federal Aviation Administration mandates that larger-scale drills like the one on Saturday take place at the airport every three years, Mr. Plummer said.

He said the the skills learned during the drill are applicable to a wide range of circumstances.
“When we do these drills, we’re not drilling just only the situation of this plane crash, but we’re also drilling other things that we can utilize for other events, such as the triage for the EMS folks,” Mr. Plummer said. “There’s a lot of times these drills actually intertwine into everyday events that happen.”

A similar situation happened in February 2010, Mr. Plummer said, when a Cape Air nine-seat Cessna slid off the runway on landing. No injuries were reported among the aircraft’s six passengers.

Saturday’s drill also brought out a number of county legislators and newly hired airport manager Grant W. Sussey, who starts work on Wednesday. The new manager said he liked what he saw from the responders during the drill.

Video from Saturday’s drill can be found at http://wdt.me/crash-drill

Source:  http://www.watertowndailytimes.com


 
JUSTIN SORENSEN
 WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
  Emergency personnel run a drill Saturday at the Watertown International Airport, where a bus represents a plane off the runway.


 
JUSTIN SORENSEN 
WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
 A person representing a victim wears the injuries on his arm.



 
JUSTIN SORENSEN
 WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES 
Airport personnel and local politicians attend a drill Saturday at the Watertown International Airport.

 
JUSTIN SORENSEN 
 WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
 People representing victims are transported to ambulances.


Milford Fire Department receives training to prep for aviation accidents



 
Melanie Folcik, program coordinator for Redline Elements, gives a presentation on the workings of aircraft controls to Milford firefighters recently. 
Peter Casolino — New Haven Register




Milford firefighters listen to a presentation by Redline Elements at the Milford fire headquarters recently. 
Peter Casolino — New Haven Register



MILFORD >> In the wake of a fatal plane crash in East Haven in August, the Milford Fire Department is implementing training on aviation emergencies, impacts and injuries. 

 “The city is in the direct flight path of Sikorsky Airport and Sikorsky Helicopter,” Chief Doug Edo said. “The benefit of this training would be to provide a general understanding of what to and not to do if a plane or helicopter were to crash in our city.”

Edo wants to make sure his department is aware of how to respond to best protect the citizens in Milford should this type of emergency present itself.

Firefighters in Milford were offered six opportunities to receive this training. The first four trainings took place in late October, while the final sessions will be held Tuesday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Edo said all personnel will be involved in the training.

“Training in our department is extremely important and constantly evolving due to new technologies being introduced into the world,” Edo said.

To provide the training, the department brought in Redline Elements, an outside agency which is run by program coordinator Melanie Folcik.

In 2009, Folcik said, she saw a void in emergency responders training for various situations. One aspect of her company provides emergency responders with training for aviation accidents.

“I noticed a niche that there wasn’t any training on how to respond to aviation accidents,” Folcik said. “Responders didn’t know how to shut down an airplane or respond to the injuries sustained during aviation accidents.”

Folcik put together a presentation that includes a range of information that would better prepare emergency responders to deal with an aviation accident.

Folcik said she has done this training primarily in Florida thus far because the program is still new, but she has two other fire departments in Connecticut that have signed up to receive the training.

When attending the training, Milford firefighters learned about different types of aircrafts, the various parts and hazards that could be a part of the different pieces should the aircraft crash, as well as what unique injuries are sustained during an aviation accident.

Lt. Gavin O’Brien, who took the training last month, said it was excellent and very informative for an array of situations.

“It gives us the basic things that we need to know how to do,” O’Brien said. “We have a range of issues we may need to deal with in Milford, whether it is railroads, water-related, roadways or from the two airports we have close by.”

Edo said the sessions are held in addition to all the training already provided to firefighters.

“Our department is very aggressive in all aspects of fire service,” Edo said. “Over the past 20 years, the fire service has changed. Our department is not only performing firefighting duties and is highly trained in firefighting, our personnel respond to a vast amount of different emergency calls.”

Edo said some of these range from basic medial and traumatic emergencies; car, tractor-trailer and bus accidents; trains, passenger and freight emergencies; and as boating and swimming incidents.

The Milford department is not alone in preparing its firefighters for aviation accidents. East Haven Fire Department Chief Doug Jackson said town firefighters are trained every year and receive full-scale training every three years.

“Since we have an airport in our district, we have to do it since anybody with commercial service, to comply with FAA standards, you have to do it every year,” Jackson said.

A table-top exercise where a discussion of these types of incidents is discussed is held every year and every third year; Jackson said they invite all personnel who would be involved in aviation accidents to participate in a full-scale field exercise where they are working on an aircraft.

Jackson said the table-top discussions and full-scale exercises include hospital personnel, the FBI, the police department, TSA, traffic control personnel and FAA inspectors, among other personnel.

Both Jackson and Edo stressed the importance of such trainings for emergency responders.

“What happened in East Haven, we are right in line with Sikorsky, there have been incidents in Long Island Sound in the past,” Milford Fire Department Capt. Kyle Brotherton said. “It is better to be prepared than underprepared, proactive rather than reactive.”


Source:   http://www.nhregister.com

Fate of Airport Manager up in the air: Current contracts in effect while under new review

INDEPENDENCE – After a 45 minute closed session Monday night, the Independence City Council took no action on the Fixed Base Operator and Airport Manager contracts, other than to direct Mayor Carl Scharff to appoint a sub-committee of Council Members not currently serving on the Airport Committee. The new ad hoc committee is to meet with FBO/Manager Jonathan Walter to discuss airport operation issues and develop recommendations for contract changes. The motion to passed 4-3, with Council Members Jeanne Hermsen, Richard Engen and Dennis Vaughn dissenting. Vaughn stated he thought the new committee should be comprised of non-council members, as they would be less biased. Engen voted “Nay” because he objected to the process, saying it would set a bad precedence. Hermsen also thought the potential committee members were set in their opinions, and a new committee was not a good idea. 

After the new sub-committee is selected and meets, their recommendations will be brought before the entire council for further action. 

Source:   http://www.communitynewspapergroup.com

Crop Duster Shooting Case Delayed

 
Christopher Lewis 
 (Courtesy photo)



TWIN FALLS • Christopher V. Lewis’s preliminary hearing on a felony charge of shooting at a crop duster has been delayed until Nov. 22 

Lewis, 42, of Filer, was to have been in Twin Falls County Magistrate Court on Friday. He is charged with one count of discharging a firearm at an aircraft, a felony.

On Aug. 24, Lewis told authorities he was angry about the low-flying aircraft, went outside with his shotgun and “did something bad,” according to a deputy’s report. Lewis changed his story a few times, saying he fired his semi-automatic Remington shotgun twice, then four times, deputies wrote.

Lewis also told deputies his neighbor brought his children to his home, saying the neighbor was frightened by how close the crop duster was flying to the ground.

Lewis was arraigned on the charge in early October. He has not yet entered a plea but could after his preliminary hearing or if he is arraigned sooner in District Court.


Source:  http://magicvalley.com

Benefis upgrades to new Mercy Flight helicopter



Benefis Health System unveiled its new Mercy Flight helicopter Friday, which officials say will not only improve patients’ safety in transport, but also the crew trying to save their lives. 

 “Just as medicine has advanced over the last decade, so has aviation,” said Laura Goldhahn, president of Benefis Hospitals. “Patients need us where they need us. And we need to be able to get to them and get to them quickly and safely.”

The 1,300 horsepower Eurocopter features many advances in terms of power, safety and accessibility, according to Scott Schandelson, chief flight nurse for Mercy Flight. For one thing, the twin-engine Eurocopter replaces the single-engine Eurocopter Benefis has been using since 2003. In May, Benefis upgraded its fixed-wing air ambulance to a Cessna Mustang medical jet.

“The changes that Mercy Flight has gone through this year is amazing,” Schandelson said.

Benefis did not release the cost of the Eurocopter but spokeswoman Karen Ogden said they are leasing it from Metro Aviation. She also said the funding comes from their general operational budget. On Metro Aviaton’s website, it states that Benefis has been a client since 2000.

According to Controller, the aviation trade publication that lists single- and twin-engine piston aircraft for sale online, the model Eurocopter Benefis uses is listed between $2.5 million to $4 million, depending on the year and location of the aircraft.

Some of the other features include second-generation engines that allow for enhanced weight-carrying capacity and offer more torque, making it ideal for the mountainous terrain the flight crew often navigates. There is room for one additional crew member and a rear-loading patient area (instead of along the side) that provides smoother loading for often critical patients, Schandelson said.

Flight nurse Brian Schreuth said he appreciates having more room for him and paramedics on board to work with a patient and is glad to have a separation area between the pilot and paramedics, which will improve the safety of everyone as they try to navigate the skies while attending to patients.

“They can focus on flying with no distractions and we can focus on the patient in the back here,” Schreuth said.

The new helicopter is also equipped with terrain avoidance systems and XM weather radio. Previously, when landing in smaller airfields or in remote locations, crew members had no way of knowing if there was other aircraft in the area, according to flight paramedic Mark Long.

Pilot Tim Swingle said in the previous helicopter if the weather was potentially hazardous, the crew didn’t fly. But with the new satellite weather mapping, the crew can navigate around storm systems, if possible.

“The process we went through to select this aircraft was quite good,” Schandelson said.

Mercy Flight will fly close to 1,000 missions in the next year, having to land in all kinds of different places in different weather conditions. Goldhahn said having the most up-to-date equipment is crucial to being able to respond to and serve patients.

That just provides the safety and the upgrade and the power that our crew really needs,” Goldhahn said. “(Safety) is always on our radar. We consider it at every step and every decision.”


Story,  Photo and Video:   http://www.greatfallstribune.com

Mild and humid as Stuart Air Show opens Saturday

 

The Stuart Air Show is getting off to a warm, sunny start, but if you're staying into the afternoon, keep an umbrella handy.

For the airshow's opening at 9 a.m., it's 73 degrees in Stuart and skies are mostly sunny with just a few light clouds over the airport. Humidity is high at 89 percent and visibility is 6 miles, according to the National Weather Service, so spectators should be able to see all the action clearly.

Temperatures will climb throughout the morning as humidity drops. It should be in the low 80s by 11 a.m., peaking at an unusually warm 87 degrees in the afternoon, according to the Weather Service.
 
Although there's a 30 to 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon, but WPTV reports any showers should move through quickly.

Humidity will be about 70 percent for most of the day and winds will be west-southwest of 5 to 10 mph.

By show's close at 5 p.m., it should be about 82 degrees and rain chances should still be up to 40 percent.

On Sunday, however, the weather will be nearly perfect. Afternoon temperatures will be in the upper 70s after starting off in the 50s and 60s. We'll have lots of sunshine, but we'll have lots of wind, too, WPTV reports.

Winds will pick up to 25 mph, if not higher in some areas.

Source:   http://www.tcpalm.com

 

United Airlines to provide direct flights to Chicago from University Park Airport (KUNV), State College, Pennsylvania

Photo Credit:   Kathryn



“We are always working towards new air service. And we have high hopes that by next fall, United will add a third direct flight to Chicago.” 

  –James Meyer, Director, Centre County Airport Authority

 

STATE COLLEGE, PA – United Airlines has announced that it will begin regularly scheduled flights to Chicago from University Park Airport beginning on January 7, 2014.  The service will be provided by ExpressJet Airlines, and use 50-seat regional jet aircraft.

“We are thrilled with the addition of this new service,” said Bryan Rodgers, director of the University Park Airport. “United is convinced that this new service will work and they want it to last.”

“Airlines have limited resources, and they want to make the most of them,” stated James Meyer, director of the Centre County Airport Authority.  “United initiated the conversation about the new service and we were invited to go to Chicago to discuss it at their (corporate) headquarters. They had already looked us over and had an interest.”

When businesses are asked about locating in an area, one of the top considerations is access to a full service commercial airport.

In an economic impact study conducted by Wilbur Smith Associates,  the University Park Airport has a major economic impact on central Pennsylvania.  It is directly responsible for nearly 3,000 jobs with a payroll in excess of $80 million.

“The University Park Airport has a total estimated annual economic impact of $203.8 million,” said Rodgers. It serves approximately 280,000 total passengers annually with three airlines (Delta, United, and US Airways) who offer daily regularly scheduled flights to and from three major hub cities (Detroit, Washington/Dulles and Philadelphia).”

The airport has approximately 64 based aircraft, including Geisinger Life Flight, corporate and recreational aircraft. The airport regularly handles aircraft ranging in size from small single-engine to Boeing 737/757s as well as military aircraft including Blackhawks, Chinooks and Apaches.

Both Meyer and Rodgers spend considerable time and energy on attracting new airlines and new flights and services to University Park.  “We are always working towards new air service,” said Meyer. “And we have high hopes that by next fall, United will add a third direct flight to Chicago. This is our first new service since the Atlanta service in 2007.” That service lasted less than a year due to challenging economic conditions and the merger of Delta and Northwest.

The new Chicago service fits nicely into United’s current service to Washington, D.C.’s Dulles Airport. It will allow easier access to international travel. Airlines most profitable ticketing comes in international service.

One big plus of the new service is the impact it will have on the business community in the region extending from Williamsport to Altoona and DuBois.

“We reached out to the business community to determine the level of interest in service to Chicago,” said Rodgers. “Many local businesses are supportive of the new service and will use it.” Rogers has also worked with the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre County to bring awareness of the airport’s economic impact on the region.

Penn State’s transportation needs will undoubtedly drive the success of the new service. First, there is the large international student population. In fact, the highest percentage of international students – by far – travel to Shanghai, China. Nearly 40 percent of international students are Chinese.

In addition, Big Ten travel for athletics and academic meetings will be made far more convenient with the addition of the new Chicago service.

According to a report prepared for United, Chicago is already the third most traveled-to domestic market for University Park Airport passengers, behind Orlando, Florida and Los Angeles.

In international travel, the top-ranked market served is Shanghai, China, followed by London, UK, Seoul, South Korea, and Beijing, China.

Flights to Chicago will make connections to Houston easier. That, in turn, will make it more convenient for the Marcellus natural gas industry to conduct business in Pennsylvania. Houston is the location of many shale gas and oil company headquarters.


Source:  http://www.pabusinesscentral.com

Photo Courtesy: Kathryn

Search Resumes for Aircraft Lost in Tirúa

At 7 in the morning they resumed the inquiry in the area where it was found a scrap metal, it could be a part of the Cessna 172. However, the results are still awaited to confirm that this fragment is the plane.


SANTIAGO– On Thursday, during the afternoon, metal debris was found, they would correspond to the fuselage of the Cessna 172 that since last October 6 is missing, while flying between Isla Mocha and Tirúa with five people on board.

The discovery was made about 15 miles south of Tirúa in the Tranicura sector, hours after the relatives of missing persons conducted an ecumenical service to remember those missing in this plane, the Tuesday after the operation finished search by Armed Forces teams. According to the police , the metal piece is inscribed with watermark type the acronym ” CLAD24ST ” , which was subsequently verified by Ruben Luis Paredes Diocares , the strayed aircraft mechanic, who stated that the serial number corresponds to the frame of the plane.

During the search operation deployed by the Air Force tracked an area equivalent to 9,000 square kilometers and only found a backpack belonging to one of the crew of the plane , Jorge Luengo Espinoza.

Without finding reliable information regarding the location of the aircraft , it was decided to end the search and since last Tuesday it had begun the withdrawal of the Armed Forces troops, a situation that eventually have to be reevaluated.

But at 7 am on Friday resumed the search for missing plane in Tirúa , after the discovery of a metal piece that would be part of the fuselage of the aircraft. However, the piece has not yet been officially confirmed as part of the missing Cessna 172, and is undergoing surveys by the PDI. According to informed sources Emol for maritime governance Talcahuano, two vessels roam the area , one of which leads to 8 divers on board, in addition to patrols Lebu harbor master, that run the place by land. The search is performed between 10 and 12 kilometers south of Tirúa, will run throughout the day despite weather conditions that generated rough seas, complicating the work of divers in the sector

The continuation of the investigations will depend on the results at the end of the day and the expertise of the piece found yesterday, which has yet to be confirmed as part of the Cessna 172 , lost on 6 October. The piece found was recognized by the mechanical air terminal as part of the stricken aircraft, however,  still waiting for official confirmation.

Source:    http://www.ilovechile.cl

Holloman's training flight schedule for the next week

LAS CRUCES >> Nighttime training flights will be conducted ntxt week of F-18 Raptors based at Holloman Air Force Base, near Alamogordo.

Training flights are scheduled from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. and from 10 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. Monday through Thursday. On Friday, training flights will be from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m.

No training flights are scheduled on Nov. 9 and Nov. 10. However, schedules could be changed by Holloman officials for a variety of reasons.

The training flights could create possible sonic booms in areas where the planes will fly, including Las Cruces and Doña Ana County. But Holloman officials remind residents that training flights do not necessarily mean sonic booms will occur.

For more information, visit Holloman's website at www.holloman.af.mil, or follow Holloman on Twitter @HollomanAFB.

Source:   http://www.lcsun-news.com