Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Airtime Aircraft Cygnet, operated by the pilot/owner, N186AT: Fatal accident occurred August 27, 2018 in Pensacola, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama 
Airtime Aircraft; Navarre, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N186AT

Location: Pensacola, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA235
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1215 CDT
Registration: N186AT
Aircraft: AIRTIME CYGNET
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 27, 2018, about 1215 central daylight time, an amphibious Airtime Aircraft Inc. Cygnet, N186AT, operated by the pilot/owner, collided with the water near Pensacola, Florida. The student pilot was fatally injured. The weight-shift control aircraft was substantially damaged. The solo-instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed the southern coast of Santa Rosa Sound, near Pensacola Beach, about 1200.

The flight instructor witnessed the accident and reported that he was giving the pilot instruction in preparation for his first solo flight. During their dual instruction, they performed about 25 touch-and-go landings in the water of Santa Rosa Sound, an inland waterway north of Pensacola Beach. According to the instructor, the pilot was flying "perfectly" and was ready for his first solo flight. They landed near the shore, and he got out of the aircraft and reviewed some final items with the pilot before he took off; his flight was to consist of several left rectangular patterns and subsequent water landings and takeoffs. The instructor watched as the pilot departed westbound, perpendicular to the shore, and stated the takeoff and climb appeared normal. The engine power settings appeared normal, but as the aircraft reached about 400 ft, he noticed the left wing drop about 35 degrees followed by a quick right wing drop to about 60 degrees before tuning back left and "spiraling steeply down." As the aircraft approached the water, it started to level off immediately before impact.

Another witness, who watched the instructional flight from his boat, stated the aircraft made repeated ovals over the water. A short time later, he anchored his boat close to shore, got out and was walking along the shoreline when he noticed the same aircraft was flying perpendicular to the shore several hundred feet up. He stated it appeared to be flying straight and level when he saw the left and right-wings drop, followed by a left turn and descent straight down; it made 3 revolutions, then briefly looked like it was leveling off before impacting the water.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the left-wing strut and left leading edge tube was fractured and bent in several locations, the fuselage was deformed and the left float was split open. The engine remained attached to the fuselage and all three propeller blades were broken off near the propeller hub. All structural components and control cables were accounted for during the examination. The haul back cable remained attached and all tension wires and control wires were mounted in their respective locations. The control bar remained intact and connected to the keel post.

The aircraft was recovered from the accident site and retained for additional examination.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, a 53-year-old male, held a student pilot certificate and a valid drivers license. No pilot logbooks were recovered.

According to FAA records, the airplane was issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light sport category on June 1, 2016. It was a two-place, weight-shift control aircraft equipped with a Rotax 912-ULS, 100 horsepower engine driving a three-bladed propeller in a pusher configuration. It had two floats for water operations and retractable tricycle landing gear for land operations. The tachometer time indicated the aircraft had accumulated 174.4 total hours of operation. No airplane logbooks were recovered.

The weather conditions reported at Pensacola Naval Air Station/Forrest Sherman Field (NPA) Pensacola, Florida, 10-miles west of the of the accident site, at 1219, included wind from 140° at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 3,200 ft and 4,800 ft, broken clouds at 25,000 ft, temperature 32° C, dew point 22° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.11 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AIRTIME
Registration: N186AT
Model/Series: CYGNET
Aircraft Category: Weight-Shift
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NPA
Observation Time: 1219 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3200 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Pensacola, FL (NONE)
Destination: Pensacola, FL (NONE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  30.363056, -87.058611 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



A man died Monday after his ultralight craft crashed into Santa Rosa Sound east of Portofino at 11:59 a.m.

Witnesses saw the crash and a good samaritan dived into the water to release the pilot from his harness. The man was performing his first solo flight after taking ultralight flight instruction.

The man is identified as a 54-year old Mississippi man, and additional information is withheld pending notification of next of kin.

Midway Fire Department and Pensacola Fire Departments responded to the scene.


A man was killed Monday when his ultralight aircraft crashed in the Santa Rosa Sound.

Midway Fire District Chief Jonathan Kanzigg said his department responded to a call for a plane down in Santa Rosa Sound on Monday morning. First responders staged operations from the Oriole Beach Boat Ramp at 3165 Linden Ave., in Gulf Breeze.

Kanzigg said by the time the department responded, some Good Samaritans had retrieved the pilot’s body, and the man was then transferred to the fire district boat.

The deceased's identity was not available as of Monday evening. Kanzigg described the individual as a male who appeared to be in his late 50s. No one else on the ground or in the water was injured, Kanzigg said.

Numerous state and local agencies responded to the incident, including the Midway Fire District, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Santa Rosa County Sheriff's Office and the Escambia County Sheriff's Office.

The National Transportation Safety Board will take the lead in investigating the circumstances of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.pnj.com

Glasair Super 2SRG, registered to Rich Airplanes LLC and operated by the pilot, N8162H: Accident occurred August 27, 2018 near Yuma Marine Corps Air Station/Yuma International Airport (KNYL), Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Superior Air Parts; Coppell, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N8162H


Photo 1 – Throttle Linkage

Location: Yuma, AZ
Accident Number: WPR18LA250
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1036 MST
Registration: N8162H
Aircraft:
Stoddard Hamilton GLASAIR SUPER IIS
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 27, 2018, at 1036 mountain standard time, an experimental amateur-built Stoddard Hamilton Glasair Super IIS RG airplane, N8162H, lost engine power and landed in a parking lot just short of Yuma Marine Corps Air Station/Yuma International Airport (NYL), Yuma, Arizona. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to Rich Airplanes LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The cross-country flight originated from Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport, San Diego, California, at 0942 Pacific daylight time and destined for Marana Regional Airport, Marana, Arizona.

The pilot stated that he completed a preflight inspection prior to departure, and the airplane performed appropriately during the runup. The departure and climb were uneventful, and after reaching 9,500 ft mean sea level, he configured the airplane for cruise. About 35 minutes later the airplane's multifunction display indicated an "electrical problem, check voltage" alert. He noticed that the airplane's main battery was not charging, and that the alternator field toggle switch/circuit breaker had tripped off, but the alternator circuit breaker was still in. He reset the toggle switch, and the battery began to charge again, and all systems appeared normal. About 5 minutes later, the display indicated the same warning, and the toggle switch again tripped. He cycled the switch and the battery started to charge again.

About 2 minutes later he noticed that the engine manifold pressure was beginning to drop along with the airplane's airspeed. He stated that the fuel flow, fuel pressure, and oil pressure appeared normal, and he could not discern an appreciable reduction in cylinder head or exhaust gas temperatures (CHT, EGT). He selected an alternate fuel tank, turned on the auxiliary electrical fuel pump, and adjusted the throttle, with no change, and by now the multifunction displayed indicated the engine was producing 30% of its rated power.

The pilot declared an emergency with Yuma Radar Approach Control and was provided a local control frequency for NYL. He stated that the engine was still producing partial power when the local tower controller cleared him for an emergency landing on runway 17, and then changed the clearance to runway 21L, which was longer. The pilot stated that he was too high to land, so performed a 360° turn at the north end of the runway, but during the turn the engine lost all power, and the airplane landed short.

The airplane's multifunction display system was a Dynon SkyView Touch, which was configured to record an array of airframe and engine parameters, including main bus voltage. Examination of the recorded data revealed a voltage drop from 14.3 to 12.9 volts at 1017 and 1021, consistent with the pilot's recollection. The drops lasted 20 and 30 seconds respectively, after which normal voltage and current draw was restored. All other engine parameters remained unchanged during the excursions.

Forty seconds after the last voltage drop was restored, the manifold pressure decreased from 21 to 10 inches of mercury and the fuel flow from 10 to 4 gallons per hour (gph). A few seconds later the EGT and CHT's began to decrease. The manifold pressure and fuel flow remained steady for the next 9 minutes, following which they dropped to 7 inches of mercury and 0.7 gph respectively. The data ended about 3 minutes later.

The airplane was equipped with a fuel-injected XP series IO-361-J1HD2 engine, manufactured by Superior Air Parts. The engine was installed new on April 1, 2018, and a condition inspection was completed on April 24, 2018 before the first flight with the engine. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated about 91 hours of flight time since installation. Maintenance records indicated that during the period between the engine installation and accident, maintenance events were limited to routine oil changes, magneto timing adjustments, replacement of EGT and CHT probes, and the installation of a replacement alternator.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the throttle linkage had detached from the throttle arm of the fuel injection servo. The rod end bearing (Heim joint) for the linkage, and the throttle arm were intact and undamaged, but the connecting bolt and its associated washers, castellated nut and cotter pin were not present (Photo 1). The butterfly valve within the throttle body was in the closed position, and the throttle lever in the cabin was in the full forward, "open" position.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/05/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/02/2017
Flight Time:  1598.4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 298.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 1598.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 74.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stoddard Hamilton
Registration: N8162H
Model/Series: GLASAIR SUPER IIS RG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1995
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 2224
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/24/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 91 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2020.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Superior Air Parts
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-361-J1HD2
Registered Owner: Rich Airplanes Llc
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNYL, 213 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1757 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 225°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 20000 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: San Diego, CA (MYF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Marana, AZ (AVQ)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 0942 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: YUMA MCAS/YUMA INTL (NYL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Concrete
Airport Elevation: 213 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 21L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 9240 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.670000, -114.593333

YUMA, Ariz. - The Yuma Police Department and the Yuma Fire Department are at the scene of an emergency plane landing at the Yuma County Fairgrounds Monday morning. 

The pilot made the emergency landing due to engine failure, according to YFD. Personnel said they are inspecting the aircraft for further details. 

Fire officials said personnel remained at the scene as the aircraft's fuel was removed before it was transported from the fairgrounds' parking lot. 

No injuries were reported. 

This incident is under investigation. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kyma.com

American Airlines, Boeing 737-800 Max, N304RB: Incident occurred August 27, 2018 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Flight Number 2793: Ingested a bird into the engine on landing.

American Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N304RB

Date: 28-AUG-18
Time: 12:33:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B738
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: 2793
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172G Skyhawk, N4379L: Accident occurred August 27, 2018 in Rushville, Rush County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis - Plainfield, Indiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N4379L


Location: Rushville, IN
Accident Number: CEN18LA352
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1350 EDT
Registration: N4379L
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 27, 2018, about 1350 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172G (Skyhawk) airplane, N4379L, lost engine power and impacted a remote soybean field about 8 miles northeast of Rushville, Indiana. The left seat private pilot and the right seat passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Greater Portsmouth Regional Airport (PMH), Portsmouth, Ohio, about 1220.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to fly cross-country to visit family members. The pilot landed at PMH and topped off both fuel tanks. She reported that after refueling, she attempted to start the engine, and noted that the primer "didn't have much resistance." The airplane sat for about 10 minutes, the pilot started the airplane without further incident, and departed for the flight. During the second engine start sequence, she reported no abnormalities with the primer. The next planned stop after PMH was for Crawfordsville Municipal Airport (CFJ), Crawfordsville, Indiana.

After the departure climb from PMH, the engine temporarily "sputtered" and then operated normally. While in cruise flight about 2,900 ft above mean sea level (msl) and traveling about 85 knots with a heading of 300°, the engine "sputtered" and ceased producing power. The pilot stated the outside air temperature gauge indicated about 80° Fahrenheit and she did not believe the engine was experiencing carburetor icing conditions. The pilot did not remember what temperature the carburetor temperate gauge was displaying at the time. The engine speed decreased to 1,500 to 1,000 rpm. The pilot advanced the mixture to the full rich position and the engine "smoothed out a little." The airplane descended to about 2,000 ft msl and the engine began "sputtering" again and the engine speed decreased to about 1,000 rpm and ceased producing power. The pilot attempted to troubleshoot the engine power loss without applying carburetor heat but was not successful in regaining engine power.

The pilot reported that her aeronautical navigational chart displayed a private airstrip close to her current location for executing a forced landing. The pilot elected to not land at the private airstrip due to her airspeed and altitude, and instead choose to land to an open soybean field. During the forced landing sequence, she attempted to maneuver the airplane between a power line pole and several trees. The airplane impacted the powerlines and came to rest slightly nose down in the field. The pilot and passenger were able to egress from the airplane without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage from the impact sequence. On August 27, two aviation safety inspectors (ASI) from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Indianapolis Flight Standards District Office traveled to the accident site to document the wreckage and interview the two occupants. The ASIs noted that the both the left and right wing fuel tanks had an adequate amount of usable fuel for the flight to CFJ with no breaching of either fuel tank occurring. The wreckage was recovered from the accident site and transported to a secure location for a future examination of the airframe and engine.

On August 30, an airframe and engine examination were performed by an airframe and powerplant mechanic under the supervision of the FAA. During the examination, no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures were noted with the airframe and engine. An examination of the airplane's maintenance records revealed no evidence of uncorrected mechanical discrepancies with the airframe and engine.

The airplane was equipped with an analog carburetor temperature gauge. The gauge was located on the right side of the cockpit, about 6 inches to the right and level with the control yoke base. The gauge displayed a temperature range of -20° Celsius (C) to 20° C, with the displayed placard, "keep needle out of yellow arc during possible carburetor icing conditions." The yellow arc extends from -15° C to 5° C, and the green arc extends from 5° C to 20° C. Between the control yoke base and the carburetor temperature gauge was an engine cylinder temperature gauge, which was the same dimensions as the carburetor temperature gauge.

The four-seat capacity airplane, serial number 17254458, was manufactured in 1966. The airplane was equipped with a 145 horsepower Continental O-300 series carbureted engine. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4379L
Model/Series: 172 G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGEZ, 804 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4100 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 20 knots, 210°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Portsmouth, OH (PMH)
Destination: Crawfordsville, IN (CFJ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.675000, -85.322222 (est)



The report of a plane that had gone down in rural Rush County was received at the Rush County Sheriff’s Department dispatch center shortly before 2 p.m. Monday.

The call resulted in multiple emergency departments respond to a bean field on CR 700E near CR 450S.

Once on the scene, responders found that a small, two-seat plane had crashed and both the pilot, Angela Winslow, 40, of Virginia, and her passenger, Eric Winslow, also of Virginia, were outside their plane.

According to Deputy Terry Drake of the Rush County Sheriff’s Department, the plane had left Fort Smith, Ohio, and was en route to Crawfordsville when Winslow stated she began having engine problems.

“She said she was losing power and altitude,” Drake said.

In her attempt to find a place to land, she was circling the area when the plane clipped a power line on the east side of CR 450E and then struck a glancing blow to the rural road before entering a bean field.

The crash extensively damaged the aircraft.

Following treatment at the scene by medical personnel from the Rushville Fire Department, the pilot was transported to Rush Memorial Hospital for a head laceration and other non-life threatening injuries. The full extent of her injuries was unknown at press time Monday. Her passenger was uninjured and after being treated at the scene, released at the scene.

Assisting at the scene were units from the Glenwood Volunteer Fire Department, RCSD, Indiana State Police, RFD EMS, Davis Towing, and Rush Shelby Energy. The crash will be investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article ➤ http://www.rushvillerepublican.com

Runway Excursion: Cessna 182L Skylane, N3115R, accident occurred August 27, 2018 at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Plymouth County, Massachusetts

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N3115R

Location: Hanson, MA
Accident Number: ERA18TA236
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1250 EDT
Registration: N3115R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On August 27, 2018, about 1250 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3115R, nosed over following a landing overrun at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight, which originated at 28M and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported completing a thorough preflight inspection and runup prior to the accident flight, noting that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane prior to the flight that would have precluded normal operation, and no abnormal indications or battery discharge indications during the runup preceding takeoff. A witness stated that the airplane was jump-started by a vehicle just prior to the accident flight.

About 2,000 ft during the initial climb, the airplane experienced a radio failure and the pilot noted a slight change in engine sound. He consulted with the jumpmaster and continued to climb to 7,500 ft to allow the two pairs of skydivers to jump. He reported engine roughness after the jumpers departed the airplane. He considered going to a nearby airport about 8 miles southeast that offered longer runways but did not want to go to an airport that was unfamiliar to him. Instead, he circled down over the airport, keeping his approach "a little faster and higher than normal" so that if the engine lost total power he could still reach the runway. After extending full flaps, he tried to "bleed off speed" and lose altitude as quickly as possible. He landed longer than usual but preferred to not execute a go-around due to the rough-running engine. Despite maximum braking, the airplane overran the departure end of runway 18, encountered a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

According to the jumpmaster, he noted no engine problems or other anomalies besides the radio failure prior to jumping. Once on the ground, he observed the landing and left main tire smoking from the pilot "locking up the brakes." According to the second jumpmaster, once back on the ground he saw the airplane "arriving fast" and heard the airplane braking before it overran the runway.

A review of the airport video revealed that the airplane touched down near the midpoint of the 1,760-ft-long runway. Additionally, a Federal Aviation Administration who responded to 28M shortly after the accident noted a quartering tailwind for the airplane's direction of landing. The recorded wind at an airport located 8 miles southeast of the accident site, about the time of the accident, was variable at 5 knots.

The airplane came to rest inverted 183 ft beyond the departure end of runway 18. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the airframe sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, rudder, and vertical stabilizer. The flaps were in the extended position. The main landing gear tires both displayed significant tread wear on one side with visible holes in the tread area. The runway displayed tire skid marks with geometry consistent to the accident airplane for537 ft. Additionally, rim marks were evident 158 ft after the first contiguous skid marks.

Examination of the airplane revealed that the alternator belt was located off the pulleys and on the lower right side of the engine firewall. It was examined, and no anomalies were noted. The battery was disconnected during the accident sequence, with the left post separated at impact. For examination, a replacement battery was wired to the airplane and the flaps operated normally. A multimeter was applied to the accident battery and it indicated 12.3 volts. Except for the alternator belt located off the pully, the engine was examined and no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions were observed. Testing of the brakes showed that they were operational and did not reveal evidence any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/07/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/01/2017
Flight Time:  703.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 392.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 572.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 242.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3115R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18258515
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/12/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3525 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 69 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6167.51 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-U-50
Registered Owner: 516 Skydive Inc
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: Go Skydive Boston
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PYM, 148 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1252 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 146°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hanson, MA (28M)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hanson, MA (28M)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1236 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Cranland (28M)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1760 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.022222, -70.837222 (est)

Location: Hanson, MA
Accident Number: ERA18TA236
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1256 EDT
Registration: N3115R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On August 27, 2018, about 1256 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3115R, nosed over following a landing overrun at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight, which originated at Cranland Airport and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he started carrying skydivers several days before the accident after familiarizing himself with the airport and airplane. The accident occurred on the fourth flight of the day. Around 2,000 ft during the initial climb, the airplane experienced a radio failure and the pilot noted a slight change in engine sound. He consulted with one of the tandem skydivers and continued to climb to 7,500 ft to allow the two pairs of skydivers to jump, which he felt was the safest course of action. He reported that the engine roughness increased after the jumpers departed the airplane, so he spiraled down over the airport and kept his approach "a little faster and higher than normal" so that if the engine failed he could still reach the runway. He considered going to a nearby, longer runway, but did not want to go to an airport that was unfamiliar to him given the roughness of the engine. He extended the flaps when the landing was assured and noted that the flaps were moving slowly. After setting full flaps, he tried to "bleed off speed" and lose altitude as quickly as possible. He realized he landed longer than usual but preferred that to going around because of the rough running engine. Despite maximum braking, the airplane overran the departure end of runway 18, encountered a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

One of the skydivers, who had accumulated over 10,000 jumps, reported that the "flight felt good at all times" and that about 4,000 ft he heard from the other skydiver that they would be doing a "low jump." Once back on the ground, he saw the airplane "arriving fast" and heard the airplane braking before it overran the runway.

A second skydiver reported that the radios began to "flicker" climbing through 1,200 ft. The pilot attempted to correct the problem and cycled the master switch, but the radios did not come back on when the electrical power was turned back on. He discussed the situation with the pilot and they decided it would be safer to climb to the minimum jump altitude of 7,500 ft rather than attempt a landing with the skydivers on the airplane. He reported some sputtering from the airplane just before they jumped and noted that the airplane "wasn't sounding great." Once on the ground, he remembered seeing the left main tire smoking from the pilot "locking up the brakes," and he started running toward the airplane when he realized that it was not going to stop on the runway.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. The pilot was issued a first-class medical certificate on April 7, 2018, with the limitation, "must wear corrective lenses." Review of flight experience documents revealed that the pilot reported 656 hours of flight experience on the day of the accident.

The airplane came to rest inverted 183 feet beyond the departure end of runway 18, which was 1,760 ft long. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the airframe sustained substantial damage. The aft portion of the fuselage was buckled and crushed downward, and the upper portion of the vertical stabilizer was buckled. In addition, the nose landing gear was impact separated.

At 1152, the weather reported at Plymouth Municipal Airport (PYM), about 8 miles southeast of the accident site, included wind from 300° at 9 knots, visibility of 10 miles, few clouds at 3,600 feet, temperature 30° C, dew point 19° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury. At 1252, the weather included variable winds at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 4,400 feet, temperature 31° C, dew point 19° C; and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3115R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Go Skydive Boston
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PYM, 148 ft msl
Observation Time: 1252 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hanson, MA (28M)
Destination:  Hanson, MA (28M) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.022222, -70.837222 (est)








A 22-year-old pilot was taken to a hospital with minor injuries after his plane rolled over on the runway Monday afternoon at Cranland Airport in Hanson, Massachusetts.

Authorities said the incident happened at about 1 p.m. at the small public airport.

The pilot, Jacob Haselden, told NBC10 Boston, he was able to get out of the Cessna 182 Skylane on his own. He was taken to South Shore Hospital by a Hanson Fire Department ambulance.

Police said they believe Haselden overshot the runway while landing, went off the runway and hit a dirt road, causing it to flip onto its roof.

Haselton, who has 6 years of flying experience, said he was with two tandem skydivers before the accident.

"We flew up and I had difficulties with the engine, and I managed to get everyone out and came back in for a landing, couldn't make it," Haselton said.

The crash will be investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.

"We documented the tracks and so once we take a good look at the photographs, we'll be able to find that information and it will be in our factual report," said Heidi Kemner with the NTSB.

The plane, which belongs to Go Skydive Boston, has been taken to a hangar at the airport where the NTSB is conducting their investigation.

The airport's manager said the pilot is a Go Skydive Boston employee.

"The flipping was me running out of runway because I was coming in too fast due to difficulties with my engine and the flaps and various plane issues," Haselden said.

He went on to say that he feels fortunate that the crash did not end worse.

"I just tried to do the safest option and do what I thought was best," Haselden said. 

Cranland Airport had a fatal crash following a take-off from its runway on Friday. Scott Landis, the pilot, was killed in the small aircraft crash while his brother, Patrick Landis, was critically injured.

The brothers had taken to the skies to spread their father's ashes, a family spokesperson said.

Hanson Town Manager Mike McCue said despite the recent incidents, there haven't been any issues at the airport.

"The town speaks on a regular basis with the airport and with the manager and again, as I've said, we've really never had any problems," said McCue. "The airport is run very well and these instances, thank God, are few and far between."

Story and video ➤ https://www.necn.com

Cessna 150K, N6332G: Incident occurred August 27, 2018 near Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Landed on an interstate road.

Flyboys Nevada LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N6332G

Date: 27-AUG-18
Time: 12:58:00Z
Regis#: N6332G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150K
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA



LAS VEGAS (FOX5) - A small plane landed on the highway south of Las Vegas Monday morning. 

Nevada Department of Transportation public information officer Tony Illia said the small plane landed in the southbound lanes of the I-15 near Sloan Road. 

The cause of the emergency landing was not available at this time. No injuries were reported. 

The plane, a Cessna 150K, was operated by a student and flight instructor and ran out of fuel, according to officials

Several agencies responded, including the FAA and the Nevada Highway Patrol. NHP troopers said the landing was risky, but successful, considering no one was injured.

“That’s always been our mission,” said NHP Trooper Travis Smaka. “Zero fatalities and luckily today, that mission was fulfilled and everyone was able to walk away unscathed.”

According to Smaka, the student was on his second or third lesson with an instructor from Desert Flying Club.

“It has been in the air for 1.3 hours,” said Smaka. “A typical duration for one of these training flights is 1.5 to 1.6 hours.”

The plane was taken back to Henderson Executive Airport, where it took off, for further examination.

Officials also said the investigation will determine if any charges or fines will be brought upon the pilot or school for landing on the highway.

“It turned out okay,” said Smaka. “But as far as determining if they took the right course of action or not, I’ve never flown a plane so it’s hard to say that, but the outcome was satisfactory.”

The investigation is being handled as a partnership between the FAA and NHP.

Desert Flying Club released this statement  about the emergency landing, referring to it as an engine failure:

Desert Flying Club is working directly with the FAA to determine the root cause of the engine failure that necessitated an emergency landing on the I15 freeway. No further details can be released until the investigation has been completed. Gratefully there were no injuries or property damage during the incident.  We appreciate the rapid and professional response by the Nevada highway patrol and other responders.  

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox5vegas.com





LAS VEGAS (KSNV) — A single-engine plane made an emergency landing on Interstate 15 Monday morning, causing a small traffic backup south of Las Vegas, according to a federal official.

Preliminary reports indicate a Cessna 150 was having engine problems, according to Ian Gregor with the FAA.

The pilot made the landing around 9:25 a.m. on southbound I-15, about four miles south of Henderson Executive Airport.

Two people were on board, and neither reported any injuries, Gregor said in an email.

Troopers with Nevada Highway Patrol said the plane ran out of fuel, with a student flying the plane with an instructor on board.

According to public records, the plane is registered to Flyboys Nevada LLC, which is based in Henderson.

Nevada Highway Patrol says all travel lanes are open, though cars are moving slowly on the southbound side.

Story and video ➤ https://news3lv.com