Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Cessna A188B AGtruck, N78417: Accident occurred August 22, 2018 at Amelia Earhart Airport (K59), Atchison County, Kansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N78417

Location: Atchison, KS
Accident Number: CEN18LA350
Date & Time: 08/22/2018, 1800 CDT
Registration: N78417
Aircraft: Cessna A188
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On August 22, 2018, about 1300 central daylight time, a Cessna 188 airplane, N78417, impacted terrain after a loss of engine power departing the Amelia Earhart Airport (K59), Atchison, Kansas. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 agricultural flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that he topped off with fuel in the morning and had flown two previous loads. Then during takeoff on the third flight, the engine lost power. He added that the engine continued to rotate, but there wasn't any power. He had too much speed to stop on the runway and continued about a quarter mile into a pasture, before coming to a stop. The inspector noted substantial damage to the fuselage and no obvious problems with the engine.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N78417
Model/Series: A188 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Mcelwain Russell D
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: K59
Observation Time: 2253 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:  24°C / 15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  8 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Atchison, KS (K59)
Destination:  Atchison, KS (K59)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.575833, -95.181111





ATCHISON, Kansas — A man escaped injury when he crashed his plane outside Atchison, Kansas, on Wednesday afternoon.

The Cessna single-seat aircraft has been left in a ruin, but authorities said he managed to get out of it immediately. Atchison County Sheriff Jack Laurie said the man had intended to take off at about 5:15 p.m. Wednesday from Amelia Earhart Memorial Airport but failed to get enough lift off of the runway.

"At a certain point, he was ... forced into some type of landing maneuver," Laurie said. "It landed right into the embankment, where it did a lot of the damage up here. "... So with the speed, he was going at, he didn't think he could stop on the runway without running off the edge anyway, so he was gonna attempt to try to go back up."

A large force of first responders turned around en route after airport authorities determined the crash posed no health or fire hazard. Sheriff's deputies interviewed the pilot at the scene. An airport employee said the pilot left soon afterward and isn't suspected of any wrongdoing.

No one else is believed to have been affected by the incident. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.newspressnow.com

Bell 206B, registered to and operated by West Valley Aviation Inc, N211CS: Accident occurred March 01, 2017 in Firebaugh, Fresno County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Fresno, California
Bell; Euless, Texas
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N211CS



Location: Firebaugh, CA
Accident Number: WPR17LA071
Date & Time: 03/01/2017, 1030 PST
Registration: N211CS
Aircraft: BELL 206B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On March 1, 2017, about 1030 Pacific standard time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N211CS, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Firebaugh, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by West Valley Aviation Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local aerial application flight, which originated from a nearby staging area about 1 minute prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that during an agricultural aerial application flight, he was flying about 5 ft over the crop at an airspeed of 70 mph, when he heard a loud bang followed by a loss of engine power. The helicopter shook violently as he rolled down the throttle twist-grip to the detent stop. As he reached over with his right hand to press the throttle detent switch, he inadvertently rolled on the throttle slightly and heard the engine begin to spool up in RPM, at which time he was able to reach the throttle detent switch to close the throttle. An autorotation was executed and upon touchdown in a freshly plowed soft field, the main rotor blade struck the tailboom and the helicopter came to rest upright.

The pilot stated that he had refueled the helicopter about 20 minutes prior to the accident with 20 to 25 gallons of fuel. He estimated that at the time of the accident, he had about 10 gallons of fuel on board.

Postaccident examination of the helicopter by the pilot revealed that the tailboom was separated forward of the tail rotor gearbox. The helicopter was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the helicopter by representatives of Bell Helicopter and Rolls Royce under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that when power was applied to the helicopter, the fuel quantity gauge indicated about 15 gallons of fuel. The fuel tank was drained and contained about 6.5 gallons of fuel. When the fuel was poured into the fuel tank, the fuel quantity gauge displayed about 6 gallons. The forward boost pump was found operational; however, the aft boost pump was inoperative. No preimpact anomalies were observed with the main rotor assembly, main rotor drive system, or flight controls.

The engine was removed and subsequently sent to Keystone Aviation for further examination. The engine was installed on a test stand and subsequently run. Throughout 6 test runs, the engine appeared to run normally with the exception of various chip detector lights throughout about 33 minutes of total run time. The engine was disassembled to gain access to the gearbox. Damage was noted to the forward face of the separator on the #3 bearing, which could have been sustained during replacement of the double lip seal with a single lip seal to accommodate the engine test run. No additional anomalies were noted with the engine.

Examination of the fuel pump revealed that the thermal fuse was open consistent with over-heating. Representatives from Parker Hannifin stated that the fuel pump thermal fuse is designed to shut power off to the fuel pump when the fuel pump casing builds excess heat due to being run without fluid (fuel).

The Bell Helicopter Flight Manual, section 3, page 3-8, states "Due to possible fuel sloshing in unusual attitudes or out of trim conditions, and one or both fuel pumps inoperative, the unusable fuel is ten gallons.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/19/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  4599 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4200 hours (Total, this make and model), 4559 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 160 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 100 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELL
Registration: N211CS
Model/Series: 206B B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted; Normal
Serial Number: 2775
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/22/2017, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3201 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 20 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: ROLLS-ROYCE
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20B
Registered Owner: WEST VALLEY AVIATION INC
Rated Power: 420 hp
Operator: WEST VALLEY AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMAE, 253 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 69°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.42 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Firebaugh, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Firebaugh, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1029 PST
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.881389, -120.466389 (est)



NTSB Identification: WPR17LA071
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 01, 2017 in Firebaugh, CA
Aircraft: BELL 206B, registration: N211CS
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 1, 2017, about 1030 Pacific standard time, a Bell 206B, N211CS, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Firebaugh, California. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the helicopter, was not injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by West Valley Aviation Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local aerial application flight, which originated from a nearby staging area about 1 minute prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that during an agricultural aerial application flight, he was flying about 5 feet over the crop at an airspeed of 70 mph, when he heard a loud bang followed by a loss of engine power. He executed an autorotation and upon touchdown in a freshly plowed soft field, the main rotor blade struck the tailboom and the helicopter came to rest upright.  Postaccident examination of the helicopter by the pilot revealed that the tailboom was separated forward of the tailrotor gearbox. The helicopter was recovered to a secure location for further examination.















Cirrus SR20, N255JB: Accident February 24, 2017 near Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus; Duluth, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N255JB




Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA113
Date & Time: 02/24/2017, 0639 EST
Registration: N225JB
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 24, 2017, about 0639 eastern standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N255JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The personal flight, destined for Lumberton Regional Airport (LBT) Lumberton, North Carolina, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Track data obtained from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar sensors depicted the airplane climbing out on runway heading to about 300 feet mean sea level, before beginning a descending right turn to the north. About two minutes later, radar contact was lost at an altitude of 50 feet on a northerly ground track.

The pilot stated during the preflight he did not see any low clouds and was able to see stars above him. The pilot intended to depart under visual flight rules (VFR) and open his IFR flight plan after he had reached 1,000 ft. At sunrise, he departed under VFR, while retracting the flaps on initial climbout he encountered instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). He stated, "I was not able to see the low fog until I encountered it." He turned right to avoid any traffic that may have been on final approach to the opposite runway then suddenly he saw a tree. He maneuvered the airplane in an attempt to avoid the tree, then recalled being on the ground, upside down in the airplane. He stated he had not yet begun to transition to instrument flying when he encountered IMC.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site. According to the inspector, the engine was separated from the airframe. The wings, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage all sustained extensive impact damage.
A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation of the airplane.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane was manufactured in 2000, and was equipped with a Continental IO-360. Its most recent inspection was completed in March 2017, at that time the airplane had 1,985 flight hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on July 31, 2017. The pilot reported 790 total hours of flight experience at the time of the accident, and about 80 hours of actual instrument time.

The weather conditions reported at Dayton Beach Regional Airport, Daytona Beach, Florida, located about 7 nautical miles north of the accident site, at 0627, included scattered clouds at 500 feet, wind from 340 at 7 knots, visibility 6 statute miles, mist, temperature 19° C, dew point 19° C, and an altimeter setting 29.79 inches of mercury.

Spatial Disorientation

According to FAA Advisory Circular AC 60-4A, "Pilot's Spatial Disorientation," tests conducted with qualified instrument pilots indicated that it can take as long as 35 seconds to establish full control by instruments after a loss of visual reference of the earth's surface. AC 60-4A further states that surface references and the natural horizon may become obscured even though visibility may be above VFR minimums, and that an inability to perceive the natural horizon or surface references is common during flights over water, at night, in sparsely-populated areas, and in low-visibility conditions. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/31/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  790 hours (Total, all aircraft), 710 hours (Total, this make and model), 700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Registration: N225JB
Model/Series: SR20
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1059
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/31/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1985 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Dawn
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAB, 41 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1127 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 10°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 500 ft agl
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Daytona Beach, FL (7FL6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: LUMBERTON, NC (LBT)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0637 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: SPRUCE CREEK (7FL6)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 23 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 176 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  29.070833, -81.070833 (est)



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA113
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 24, 2017 in Daytona Beach, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20, registration: N225JB
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 24, 2017, about 0639 eastern standard time, a Cirrus SR-20, N255JB, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The personal flight, destined for Lumberton Regional Airport (LBT) Lumberton, North Carolina, was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane climbing out on runway heading to about 300 feet mean sea level, before beginning a descending right turn to the north. About two minutes later, radar contact was lost at an altitude of 50 feet on a northerly ground track.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the accident site. According to the inspector, the engine was separated from the airframe. The wings, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage all sustained extensive impact damage.

The weather conditions reported at Dayton Beach Regional Airport, Florida, located about 7 nautical miles north of the accident site, at 0627, included scattered clouds at 500 feet, wind from 340 at 7 knots, visibility 6 statute miles, mist, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and an altimeter setting 29.79 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Dassault Falcon 2000EX, N975MT: Incident occurred August 21, 2018 at Dothan Regional Airport (KDHN), Dale County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama

Bird strike on landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N975MT

Date: 21-AUG-18
Time: 12:00:00Z
Regis#: N975MT
Aircraft Make: DASSAULT
Aircraft Model: FALCON 2000EX
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DOTHAN
State: ALABAMA

Evolution Revo, N145PT: Accident occurred August 21, 2018 at Hawthorne Municipal Airport (KHHR), Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N145PT



NTSB Identification: GAA18CA499
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 21, 2018 in Hawthorne, CA
Aircraft: EVOLUTION TRIKES REVO, registration: N145PT

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Crashed on landing.

Date: 21-AUG-18
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N145PT
Aircraft Make: EVOLUTION TRIKES
Aircraft Model: REVO
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HAWTHORNE
State: CALIFORNIA




A light sport aircraft crash-landed Tuesday at Hawthorne Municipal Airport, but the two occupants escaped largely unscathed, county fire officials said.

Firefighters and paramedics were dispatched to the airport at 12101 S. Crenshaw Blvd. at 12:32 p.m., a dispatcher said.

The Evolution Revo impacted terrain. 

The pilot and passenger were taken from the scene by paramedics to another part of the airport to be checked out. Both refused medical treatment, according to county fire officials.

Story and video ➤ https://www.nbclosangeles.com




A light sport aircraft crashed near a runway at Hawthorne Municipal Airport Tuesday afternoon, but its pilot and one passenger were not seriously injured, officials said.

The crash occurred at 12:30 p.m. at the airport, said Gustavo Medina, an inspector with the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Paramedics evaluated the two people who were on board, but they declined transport to a hospital, he said.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the agency will investigate what caused the Revolution Revo to crash as it landed.

The Revolution Revo crashed just north of the runway in a “safety area,” and the passengers walked away, said Airport Supervisor Guido Fernandez.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailybreeze.com

Cessna 152, N4962L: Accident occurred August 21, 2018 at McClellan Airfield (KMCC), Sacramento, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Hard landing with loss of control.

http://registry.faa.gov/N4962L

Date: 21-AUG-18
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N4962L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Gulfstream IV, N101CV: Incident occurred August 21, 2018 at Stewart International Airport (KSWF), Orange County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York, New York

Declared emergency due to two (2) blown tires on departure, diverted and landed without incident.

SMB Aircraft LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N101CV

Date: 21-AUG-18
Time: 14:52:00Z
Regis#: N101CV
Aircraft Make: GULFSTREAM
Aircraft Model: G IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK






New York Stewart International Airport Air Traffic Control coordinates an emergency landing with the pilot of a Gulfstream who reported that the two left main landing gear tires of the jet were flat.

Ground control at the airport can also be heard coordinating the ground efforts.

Story and video ➤ https://www.northjersey.com

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N2491M: Incident occurred August 21, 2018 in Hertford County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aircraft landed in river and flipped over.

Tri Air Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N2491M

Date: 21-AUG-18
Time: 17:40:00Z
Regis#: N2491M
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HERTFORD COUNTY
State: NORTH CAROLINA

HERTFORD, Co., N.C. – A plane capsized in the Chowan River Tuesday afternoon.

The plane was reported down near Holiday Island and officials said the plane had the ability to land on water.

While making a landing the pilot touched down in the water and one of the supports to the wing of the plane malfunctioned, the official said.

The plane then capsized with two people on board, the pilot and a passenger learning to fly.

Both of the passengers survived the landing with no injuries, the official said.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wtkr.com

Air Tractor AT-400, N7300M: Accident occurred August 21, 2018 in Grand Forks, North Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota

Crashed due to unknown circumstances.


Ross Seed Company doing business as AgriMax


http://registry.faa.gov/N7300M


Date: 21-AUG-18

Time: 09:00:00Z
Regis#: N7300M
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT 400
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 137
City: GRAND FORKS
State: NORTH DAKOTA



GRAND FORKS - A small plane fell from the sky just north of Grand Forks on Tuesday.  

Forum News Service reporter, Kenneth Chase, was on scene moments after the crash.

He spoke with the man who found the wreckage and what he said the pilot was doing as he waited for help.

Around 8:30 on Tuesday morning, William Klava went to get his mail.

"Just a little ways down the road I could see something unusual in the field,” said William Klava, who lives nearby.

He had heard crop dusters earlier but feared the worst.

That's when he saw it: A downed plane in a nearby field.

"I called 911 and they said please stay there till someone shows up,” said Klava.

While he waited for emergency responders, he saw signs of life.

"I saw somebody's hand in the plane move. So I knew there was someone still in there,” said Klava.

Once emergency responders were on-scene, he says it took them 20 minutes to get the pilot out of the plane.

He was screaming in pain from his injuries.

"He was pretty badly banged up,” said Klava.

Ross Seed Company owns the plane.

They told WDAY News the pilot is at Altru with non-life threatening injuries.

They're not sure what caused the plane to crash and the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

"To be crashed the way that plane was, I'd say he's lucky to be alive,” said Klava.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wdaz.com


Grand Forks, N.D. (Valley News Live) The Federal Aviation Administration confirms a plane went down early Tuesday near the intersection of Columbia Road and 70th Avenue North near Grand Forks.


Officials confirmed with Valley News Live that the plane crashed into a bean field around 9:00 a.m.


Authorities say the pilot was extricated from the plane and taken to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks.


No further information was given about his health.


The plane is an AT 400 owned by Ross Seed Company.


This incident is still an ongoing investigation that's being done by the FAA.


Story and video ➤ http://www.valleynewslive.com


A pilot suffered non-life-threatening injuries after a small aircraft he was flying crashed into a field Tuesday morning near Grand Forks.

The Grand Forks County Sheriff’s Office and other agencies responded to a downed small aircraft near Columbia Road and 70th Avenue North, about 3 miles north of Grand Forks.

The aircraft, which appeared to be an aerial applicator, crashed into a field along North Columbia Road, east of the interchange at Interstate 29 and North Washington Street around 8:45 a.m. Tuesday.

The blue and yellow plane, which landed near a ditch along the side of the field, sustained damage mostly to the front of the aircraft.

The pilot was taken to Altru Hospital via ambulance.

AgriMax owns the plane, AgriMax partner Steve Ross confirmed to the Herald Tuesday. He also confirmed the pilot suffered non-life-threatening injuries as a result of the crash.

Ross said the cause of the crash is not known at this time.

AgriMax has offices in North Dakota and Minnesota, including Fisher, Minn., and Grafton, N.D.

Further details about the plane and the crash were not available. The name of the pilot was also not available Tuesday evening.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash, according to FAA spokeswoman Elizabeth Cory. Cory said crash investigations can take several weeks or more than a month to complete and could not comment further on the crash.

The North Dakota Highway Patrol and emergency agencies from Manvel, N.D., also responded to the incident. The NDHP referred all comments about the crash to the FAA as it was an aviation crash. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.grandforksherald.com