Sunday, September 16, 2012

Airport security manager facing indecency charges... Cleveland-Hopkins International (KCLE), Cleveland, Ohio

The manager of airport security at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is facing criminal charges for allegedly masturbating outside a local tanning salon and making obscene phone calls to Tan City and other area tanning salons.

John Dialinos, 45, has been placed on unpaid administrative leave from his $64,000-a-year city job while the case works its way through the court system, airport spokeswoman Jackie Mayo said Friday.

Dialinos, who lives in North Ridgeville, was charged with public indecency and two counts of telephone harassment earlier this week after an investigation by North Ridgeville police that focused on calls to Tan City, Tru-Tan and Xtreme Tan that date as far back as last year.

North Ridgeville police Lt. Greg Petek said officers first learned about the calls in December, when a tanning salon manager complained her staff had received several sexually charged calls.

Petek said the caller would start out the conversation asking legitimate questions.

“Then he would get into making lewd remarks talking about his genitalia,” Petek said.

Tanning salon workers also reported hearing moaning and heavy breathing during the calls, he said.

Police set up a system to track the calls and traced the obscene ones back to a prepaid, disposable cell phone that was in the area of the salons when the lewd calls were made, Petek said.   Full story

JDT Mini-MAX 1500R, N3533D: Accident occurred September 16, 2012 in Cameron, Missouri

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA636
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Cameron, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2014
Aircraft: JDT MINI-MAX LLC 1500R, registration: N3533D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness to the accident reported that he was outside his residence when he heard the accident airplane departing to the south. He initially heard the sound of the airplane's engine before he saw the airplane climbing away from the runway at an estimated 45-degree, nose-up pitch attitude. The witness did not perceive any engine anomalies as the airplane climbed to about 350 feet above the ground, where it suddenly rolled right and entered a near-vertical descent into terrain. The postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The witness's description of the airplane's flightpath was consistent with an aerodynamic stall and spin during initial climb.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during initial climb, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and spin at a low altitude.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 16, 2012, about 1852 central daylight time, an experimental JDT Mini-Max LLC model 1500R light sport airplane, N3533D, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from the Cameron Memorial Airport (EZZ), Cameron, Missouri. The sport pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight. The local area flight was originating at the time of the accident.

A witness to the accident reported that he was outside his residence when he heard the accident airplane departing to the south. He initially heard the sound of the engine before he spotted the airplane climbing away from runway 17 at an estimated 45-degree nose up pitch attitude. The witness reported that he did not perceive any engine anomalies as the airplane climbed to about 350 feet above the ground, where it suddenly rolled to the right and entered a near vertical descent into terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the accident pilot, age 52, held a sport pilot certificate, issued on October 9, 2010, with airplane single engine land rating. The pilot had never applied for an aviation medical certificate; however, the operation of a light-sport aircraft only required a valid driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no accident, incident, enforcement, or disciplinary actions.

The pilot's most recent logbook entry was dated August 12, 2012, at which time he had accumulated 72.8 hours total flight time, of which 38.5 hours were as pilot-in-command. The pilot's first recorded flight in the accident airplane was completed on June 11, 2011. He had accumulated 30 hours in the accident airplane as of the last logbook entry. He had flown 27.5 hours during the past year, 16 hours during the prior 6 months, and 10 hours during previous 90 days. There was no record that the pilot had flown during the 30 day period before the accident flight. All of the flight time accumulated during the previous year had been completed in the accident airplane.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The experimental light sport airplane was a 2002 JDT Mini-Max LLC model 1500R, serial number (s/n) 852. A two-stroke, two-cylinder, air cooled, 40-horsepower, Rotax model 447UL engine, s/n 5504279, powered the airplane. The engine was equipped with a three-blade Ivoprop propeller. The single-seat, tail-wheel equipped airplane was constructed of wood and fabric and had a maximum takeoff weight of 630 pounds.

According to FAA records, the airplane had already accumulated 195 hours when it received its experimental airworthiness certificate on November 23, 2007, by a designated airworthiness representative. A digital hour meter found in the wreckage indicated that the airplane had accumulated 253 hours total time at the time of the accident. The airplane maintenance records were not located during the on-scene investigation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather observing station was located at the Midwest National Air Center Airport (GPH), about 28 miles south of the accident site. At 1855, the GPH automatic weather observing station reported: calm wind conditions, clear sky, surface visibility 10 miles, temperature 22 degrees Celsius, dew point 16 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.

Astronomical data obtained from the United States Naval Observatory indicated that the local sunset was at 1923, about 31 minutes after the accident, and the end of civil twilight was at 1950.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Cameron Memorial Airport (EZZ), a public-use airport, located about 2 miles southwest of Cameron, Missouri, was served by a single runway: 17/35 (4,000 feet by 75 feet, concrete). The airport elevation was 1,040 feet mean sea level (msl). According to airport data, there were trees, measuring 23 feet tall, located 1,200 feet from the departure end of runway 17 and 326 feet west of the extended runway centerline.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident investigation, completed by FAA inspectors, confirmed that all airframe structural components were located at the accident site. The main wreckage was located about 94 feet north of the runway end and about 27 feet east of the runway edge. The entire wreckage was contained within an area comparable to the lateral dimensions of the aircraft. The lack of a wreckage debris path was consistent with a near vertical impact angle. A portion of a wing leading edge rib was found embedded into the ground. The angle between the rib and the surrounding terrain was about 75 degrees. Elevator and rudder flight control continuity was established from the control surfaces to their associated cockpit controls. Aileron flight control continuity could not be established due to damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress failure. Both wing fuel tanks appeared undamaged and were about 1/2 full. The airframe examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The engine remained partially attached to the fuselage; however, the carburetor and fuel pump had separated from the engine. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on both cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. All three composite propeller blades remained attached to the metal hub assembly and exhibited damage consistent with ground impact. The engine examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On September 19, 2012, an autopsy was performed on the pilot at the First Call Morgue, located in Kansas City, Kansas. The cause of death for the pilot was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the pilot's autopsy. Carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol were not detected. Pseudoephedrine was detected in blood and urine samples. Pseudoephedrine, brand name Sudafed, is a non-sedating over-the-counter medication that is used to relieve nasal congestion and pressure caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever.


http://registry.faa.gov/N3533D
  
NTSB Identification: CEN12LA636 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Cameron, MO
Aircraft: JDT Mini-Max LLC 1500R, registration: N3533D
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2012, about 1852 central daylight time, an experimental JDT Mini-Max LLC model 1500R light sport aircraft, N3533D, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Cameron Memorial Airport (KEZZ), Cameron, Missouri. The sport pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight. The local area flight was originating at the time of the accident.

A witness to the accident reported that he was outside his residence when he heard the accident airplane departing to the south. He initially heard the sound of the aircraft’s engine before he spotted the airplane climbing away from runway 17 (4,000 feet by 75 feet, concrete) with an estimated deck angle of approximately 45 degrees. The witness reported that the engine was not sputtering or running rough as the airplane climbed to 300-400 feet above the ground, where it suddenly rolled to the right and entered a near vertical descent into terrain.

A postaccident investigation confirmed that all airframe structural components were located at the accident site. The main wreckage was located about 94 feet north of the runway end and about 27 feet east of the runway edge. The entire wreckage was contained within an area comparable to the lateral dimensions of the aircraft. The lack of a wreckage debris path was consistent with a near vertical impact angle. A portion of a wing leading edge rib was found embedded into the ground. The angle between the rib and the surrounding terrain was about 75 degrees. Elevator and rudder flight control continuity was established from the empennage control surfaces to their associated cockpit controls. Aileron flight control continuity could not be established due to damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with an overstress failure. Both wing fuel tanks appeared undamaged and were about 1/2 full. The postaccident examination revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal airplane operation.

The engine, a Rotax model 447UL, serial number 5504279, remained partially attached to the fuselage. The carburetor and fuel pump had separated from the engine. A postaccident engine examination confirmed internal engine and valve train continuity as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on both cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. All three composite propeller blades remained attached to the metal hub assembly and exhibited damage consistent with ground impact. The postaccident examination revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the accident pilot, age 52, held a sport pilot certificate, issued on October 9, 2010, with airplane single engine land rating. A search of FAA records showed no accident, incident, enforcement, or disciplinary actions. The pilot's most recent logbook entry was dated August 12, 2012, at which time he had accumulated 73 hours total flight time, of which 39 hours were as pilot-in-command. The pilot had accumulated 30 hours in the accident airplane. He had flown 28 hours during the past year, 16 hours during the prior 6 months, 10 hours during previous 90 days. There was no record that the pilot had flown during the 30 day period before the accident flight. All of the flight time accumulated during the previous year had been completed in the accident airplane.

The experimental light sport airplane was constructed of wood and fabric and was equipped with a single-seat. According to FAA records, the airplane already had accumulated 195 hours when it received its airworthiness certificate on November 23, 2007, by a designated airworthiness representative. A digital hour meter found in the wreckage indicated that the airplane had accumulated 253 hours total time at the time of the accident. The airplane maintenance records were not located during the on-scene investigation.

The closest weather observing station was located at the Midwest National Air Center Airport (KGPH), about 27.6 miles south of the accident site. At 1855, the KGPH automatic weather observing station reported the following weather conditions: calm wind, clear sky, visibility 10 miles, temperature 22 degrees Celsius, dew point 16 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury. Review of photographs taken by local law enforcement immediately following the accident revealed no appreciable cloud cover or visibility restrictions at the accident site, consistent with visual meteorological conditions. Astronomical data obtained from the United States Naval Observatory indicated that the local sunset was at 1923, about 31 minutes after the accident, and the end of civil twilight was listed at 1950.



(LAWSON, Mo.) Investigators are still trying to sort out what caused a plane to crash in Cameron, killing the pilot. 

 The pilot was 52-year-old David King of Lawson.

Family members say it wasn't unusual to find King somewhere in the great outdoors.

They say he loved hunting, fishing, and flying his plane.

"He was always working on adjusting the carburetor and different things. He just liked to fly," John Cayton, who lives near the Cameron Airport said.

King's love of flying ended tragically when his aircraft went down at Cameron Memorial Airport Sunday night.

Investigators were at the crash site Monday trying to figure out what happened.

A truck moved what was left of his plane into a hangar so authorities could take a closer look.

"I think he got up probably a couple hundred feet. One of the people there said it looked like he got up a couple hundred feet then the plane quit and he just came down so he didn't have any speed to glide or anything," Cayton said.

Cayton says he heard the noise and knew something was wrong.

"The engine was kind of cutting out so I got up to look to see if I could see where it was. I didn't see it but by then it had gone down on the south end of the runway," Cayton said.

The aircraft, a small one-seat plane with an open cockpit, is similar to the other planes in the Cameron hangars.

The ultralight planes, like the one King had, are often made from a kit.

Family members say King spent a lot of time working on his plane, but he was an experienced pilot.

They say he was always trying to make others happy.

"Just a very cheery, happy person," Tracy Bush, of Lawson said.

The 52-year old was also a pastor at Grace Family Worship Center in Excelsior Springs.

The FAA is still investigating the cause of the crash.


King's family released a statement about his life:

While we mourn the loss of David, we also celebrate the life he had. He was a passionate man--passionate for God and for his church. He had been preaching since he was 14. He was also passionate for his wife Lisa, Sons Skyler and Daniel and Daughter-In-Law Kristin, passionate to be a Grandpa to his Grandson Elijah, that brought him so much joy. He was passionate about being a pilot, a lifelong dream. He was a passionate outdoors-men often hunting with his sons, brothers and close friends. He was a man of many talents, and he used those talents to accomplish many of his dreams by the age of 52. While this is a tragic end to such a beautiful, vibrant life, we know this was not the end for him. He has now reached his ultimate destination in Heaven. We appreciate the respect of our privacy during this difficult time.



 
One person has died following a plane crash at Cameron Memorial Airport Sunday evening. Cameron Police Department Public Information Officer Heath Henry spoke to the media about the crash.


CAMERON, Mo. — Federal officials will begin an investigation in what caused a single-engine airplane to crash early Sunday night at the Cameron Memorial Airport. One person was killed.

Patrolman Heath Henry of the Cameron Police Department said a call was received at 6:53 p.m. of an aircraft crash at the airport. The crash involved a small airplane with only one occupant, whom Mr. Henry said was listed as the lone fatality in the incident. He said the crash occurred in the south area of the airport.


The Federal Aviation Adminstration and the National Transportation Safety Board were being summoned to the crash site to initiate an investigation. Both agencies will assist Cameron police with the probe, with the FAA expected to arrive this morning.

An identity and any other details on the victim were withheld Sunday night, pending notification of next of kin.

“There was a witness that had called it in,” Mr. Henry said.

No airport staff were on duty at the time, he said. The airport was closed for the remainder of Sunday night and will most likely remain closed until the scene can be processed. Law enforcement secured the site.

“Airport officials were contacted and called to come out” to the scene, he added.

It was unknown whether the plane involved was locally based. The airport has a runway and a taxiway that parallel each other and have a north/south orientation, Mr. Henry said.

Cameron police were assisted by the Cameron Fire Department, Missouri State Highway Patrol, Clinton County Sheriff’s Department and Clinton County Coroner’s office.

The airport, whose origins date back to 1969, is located about one mile southwest of the Cameron city limits on Missouri Route A.
One person has died following a plane crash at Cameron Memorial Airport Sunday evening. 

The crash occurred just before 7 p.m. at the south end of the runway at the airport. The airport has been closed to all air and vehicle traffic.

The name of the victim has not been released pending notification of relatives. No information is available at this time as to what type of aircraft was involved in the crash.

The Cameron Police Department, Cameron Fire Department, Cameron Ambulance, and Clinton County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene of the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been called to the scene to investigate.


(CAMERON, Mo.) Authorities have confirmed there was a fatal airplane crash in Cameron.

Cameron Police Chief Corey Sloan confirmed the call came in just before 7 p.m. Sunday evening about a crash at the Cameron Memorial Airport.

Authorities tell KQ2 the pilot of the small aircraft was the only one aboard at the time of the crash.

The victim's name has not been released until the family has been notified.

Specific details are unconfirmed at this time. However, we can confirm the Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted and they will be investigating.

The airport has been closed at this time.

Piper PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV, N2960L: Pilot lands on highway instead of at Grand Canyon Airport




A confused pilot landed his plane Sunday on southbound State Route 64 instead of the Grand Canyon Airport, to where it was later towed, officials said.

"The plane did not crash, simply landed on the highway,' the Arizona Department of Public Safety said in an email. "We now know this was not an emergency landing, simply a confused pilot who thought the highway was part of the airport."

The small plane blocked both lanes of the highway after its 2:40 p.m. landing near mile post 232 until DPS towed it into Grand Canyon Airport.

"There were no injuries or damage done," DPS said.

http://www.azcentral.com

http://hangeraviation.com/page13/photos/index.html

http://registry.faa.gov/N2960L

http://www.abc15.com

http://www.kpho.com

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N2960L


 GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, AZ – Department of Public Safety officials said a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing on a busy Arizona highway Sunday afternoon.

Officials said at approximately 2:40 p.m. crews were notified of a plane down on the southbound SR 64 at milepost 232.

DPS said the plane did not crash, but simply landed on the highway. The plane blocked both lanes of traffic while crews worked to tow it off the highway and take it to the Grand Canyon Airport.

Officials told ABC15, they are still investigating the reason for the landing. There were no injuries or damage reported.

Pilot escapes submerged float plane




A float plane pilot is lucky to be alive after crashing into Okanagan Lake Sunday afternoon.

The plane flipped into the lake near Okanagan Landing.

Lake Country resident Charm Gerace says she had been watching the plane come in from Kelowna just before 4 p.m., and the pilot appeared to be practicing taking off and landing when something went wrong.

“He had practiced landing and taking off from the water about four times, but on the fifth time some how he turned too suddenly and his right wing got caught in the water and it flipped over so fast.”

The pilot was submerged in the upside down plane for approximately two minutes.

Gerace says someone on a jet ski quickly rushed over and picked up the pilot, taking him to a nearby wharf.

The pilot would not give Castanet his name. He did say he was okay and that he was a student at a local Kelowna fight school.

The plane belongs to the school, but it is now the pilot’s responsibility to have it removed from the water as quickly as possible because of environmental reasons.

RCMP say they are not pressing charges in the incident.

http://web1.castanet.net

Neah Neah Neah! Chicago looking for a few good goats — for O’Hare job

 Help wanted: One shepherd with at least 25 sheep. Goatherds also welcome to apply. Must be able to tolerate the roar of jet planes overhead.

It’s certainly not the typical contract the city puts out for bid for O’Hare International Airport.

But the city’s Aviation Department is indeed looking to hire a herder with animals to graze areas at the airport that have become overgrown with grass, weeds and other vegetation, in particular a vacant property on the perimeter of O’Hare just east of Mannheim Road and north of Interstate 190.

Interested herders must have at least 25 animals.

“Sheep, goats — it could be any grazing animal. We don’t discriminate,” said Amy Malick, an Aviation Department official.

But don’t expect to look out your plane window and see some bearded character in flowing robes using a staff to guide the animals. Goat- and sheepherding is a bit more high-tech these days.


http://www.suntimes.com

Airplane engine flaw hurts GEnx

The United States airlines using General Electric Co GEnx jet engines will be required to inspect their planes for signs of the type of flaws that led to a July explosion, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings Inc, the only carrier flying the Boeing Co jets with those engines, found nothing wrong on one of its 747-8 freighters on Friday and was inspecting the other aircraft, the FAA said in an e-mailed statement. A formal directive is being prepared, the FAA said.

The FAA plan heightened the scrutiny on the GEnx since a Boeing 787 Dreamliner spewed hot metal engine parts during a July 28 test in Charleston, South Carolina. There have now been three instances of damage to GEnx engines, which are used only on Boeing's two newest planes, the 787 and the 747-8 jumbo jets.

"This now has entered the phase where it's incumbent on GE and Boeing to come up very quickly with a very clear answer as to what the fix is, or they're going to be hurting very badly," Hans Weber, chief executive officer of aviation consultant Tecop International Inc, said in a telephone interview. "They're now under real pressure."

The FAA's inspection directive followed a recommendation for the check from the US National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates aviation accidents. Regulators worldwide typically follow the FAA's lead in such cases.

"Because of the immediate threat of multiple engine failures on a single aircraft and the availability of an appropriate inspection procedure, there is an urgent need for the FAA to act immediately," the NTSB wrote in a letter to the agency.

Hours later, the FAA said it "will continue to review the recommendations and coordinate closely with the NTSB and GE as part of the investigation".

A similar GEnx engine crack was found last month on a twin-engine Dreamliner that hadn't flown yet, according to the NTSB. A four-engine 747-8 flown by a Russian cargo carrier suffered an engine failure on Sept 11 in China, and preliminary evidence shows it may have failed the same way as in Charleston, according to the NTSB.

(China Daily 09/17/2012 page14)

Lancair LC42-550FG Columbia, Global Governments Inc., N6512Y: Accident occurred September 16, 2012 in Okeechobee, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N6512Y

NTSB Identification: ERA12CA564  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Okeechobee, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/31/2013
Aircraft: LANCAIR COMPANY LC42-550FG, registration: N6512Y
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot/owner stated that he was conducting an experiment to see where on the runway the airplane would touch down using RNAV/GPS guidance. He said he became preoccupied with the instrumentation in the airplane, landed hard, and did not realize that he had done "serious damage" to the airplane. Examination of a video recording submitted by a witness revealed two high-speed, shallow approaches to the runway. On the first approach, the airplane traveled well past the normal touchdown zone at a high rate, touched down briefly, and then climbed back into the traffic pattern. On its second approach, the airplane crossed the runway threshold at a high rate of speed, a low altitude, and at a shallow approach angle. The airplane then struck the ground in a flat attitude, the nose landing gear separated from the airframe, and the propeller struck the runway. The airplane then pitched up, the engine noise increased, the tail struck the runway, and the airplane climbed at a shallow angle. The airplane subsequently collided with containers and vehicles in a commercial lot about one-half mile from the departure end of the runway. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

The pilot/owner stated that he was conducting an experiment to see where on the runway the airplane would touch down using RNAV/GPS guidance. He said he became preoccupied with the instrumentation in the airplane, landed hard, and did not realize that he had done "serious damage" to the airplane. Examination of a video recording submitted by a witness revealed two high-speed, shallow approaches to the runway. On the first approach, the airplane travelled well past the normal touchdown zone at a high rate, touched down briefly, and then climbed back into the traffic pattern. On its second approach, the airplane crossed the runway threshold at a high rate, low altitude, and at a shallow approach angle. The airplane then struck the ground in a flat attitude, the nose landing gear separated from the airframe, and the propeller struck the runway. The airplane then pitched up, the engine noise increased, the tail struck the runway, and the airplane climbed out of sight at a shallow angle. The airplane subsequently collided with containers and vehicles in a commercial lot approximately one-half mile from the departure end of the runway. In a telephone interview, when asked about the performance and handling of the airplane, the pilot said, "I cannot blame the accident on the airplane."


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 6512Y        Make/Model: LC41      Description: COLUMBIA 400
  Date: 09/16/2012     Time: 1504

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: OKEECHOBEE   State: FL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED WHILE DOING TOUCH AND GO'S. OKEECHOBEE, FL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ORLANDO, FL  (SO15)                   Entry date: 09/17/2012 



OKEECHOBEE—Two Jupiter men were sent to area hospitals following the crash of their 2003 single-engine Lancair airplane into a tanker-truck parked at Walpole Feed & Supply, Inc. 

 Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office Detective Marty D. Faulkner said the fixed-wing plane, valued at over $300,000, was registered to Thomas Hewitt. With Mr. Hewitt in the plane was Donald Dowd. The detective said Mr. Hewitt was airlifted to Lawnwood Regional Medical Center for treatment, while Mr. Dowd was taken to Raulerson Hospital.

As of Monday, Sept. 17, both men were doing well, stated the detective.

The Sunday, Sept. 16, crash apparently occurred as a result of the men practicing touch-and-go maneuvers at the Okeechobee County Airport around 10 to 10:30 a.m., stated a witness.

"The came in very hot, about midway on the runway, and they tried to force the plane down," said John Bubel, a local pilot with over 30 years of flying experience. "Out of a dozen times, they had one good landing. I would have quit at that."

 
On what turned out to be their last touch-and-go attempt, the plane hit the runway with such force that the nose wheel was sheared off, said Mr. Bubel, who had been watching the plane from the patio of the airport restaurant. That apparently caused the nose of the plane to dip and the prop to hit the runway.

"They tried to take off again, but once you hit the prop you don't have any power," said Mr. Bubel.

The plane did manage to get airborne again but only flew a short distance before striking a tanker-truck parked at the Walpole Feed & Supply company at N.W. Eighth St. and U.S. 98 N.

"Once it was beyond the tree line we saw a big explosion. When we got there (Walpole's) we realized he hit the top of a tanker-truck," recalled Mr. Bubel. "They (the plane's occupants) were in their late 60s. One of them was sitting up and had a bloody face. The other one had some blood on his chest and he was laying down. They got banged up."

Detective Faulkner said the small plane hit the truck then slid over 150 feet where it struck some lumber material. The plane continued to slide until it finally came to rest in a wooded area along N.W. Eighth St.

A spokeswoman with Walpole said Monday that the tanker carries molasses but she wasn't sure if there was any in the tanker at the time. She said the truck and tanker had a value of around $140,000.

Mr. Bubel said he continued to watch as the pilot of the plane kept coming in "too hot," hitting the runway then taking off. He did say, however, on about the fifth attempt the plane came in very smoothly, touched down gently then became airborne.

"We realized right away someone wasn't very good with that plane," he offered.

Detective Faulkner said Mr. Dowd was the pilot when the nose of the plane stuck the runway. Mr. Hewitt then took control of the plane and tried to fly it until it crashed into the tanker-truck.

As he watched the plane attempt to land then take off again, Mr. Bubel said he just knew something bad was going to happen.

"I've never seen anybody that bad," he added.


Source:  http://florida.newszap.com

OKEECHOBEE, Fla. - Federal Aviation experts are investigating a plane crash in Okeechobee County that sent two men to the hospital. 

 A Columbia high-performance plane touched down at the Okeechobee Airport Sunday morning, but the landing went wrong. The plane gyrated in the air.

"Not even a minute later, two miles southwest of the airport, the airplane went down,” said Alex Mendoza, airport manager.

The plane crashed in the parking lot of Walpole Feed and came to rest in the woods nearby. A black column of smoke shot in the air, as a semi truck caught fire. Pilot Kris Smith witnessed the scene from the sky.

"I orbited around the site of the crash at 2,000 feet, put an emergency call out,” said Smith. "Sadly, there was a lot of smoke and fire."

Mendoza says an emergency medical helicopter carried one of the plane’s occupants to a hospital.

"Just praying for hope … for a good outcome for those involved,” said Smith.

The Federal Aviation Administration arrived on scene hours later to investigate.

A wheel and a wing cover were left on the runway Sunday afternoon.

The National Transportation Safety Board is reviewing the cause of the crash.

Read more: http://www.wptv.com



 OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, Fla - The Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office has confirmed two people were injured in a plane crash in Okeechobee County.

Spokeswoman Michelle Bell said two people were on board the Lancair aircraft that was attempting to make a landing at the Okeechobee County airport, when it crashed off of Highway 98 behind the Walpole Feed & Supply just before 12 p.m., Sunday.

One passenger was airlifted to Lawnwood Regional Medical Center and the other was taken to Raulerson Hospital.

The extent of the victims' injuries have not been released.

Bell added a tractor trailer caught fire nearby, after the plane crashed.

Read more

Pilot dies when ultralight crashes at Hernando County Airport (KBKV), Brooksville, Florida

BROOKSVILLE --   A pilot died Sunday after an ultralight plane crashed in Hernando County, the second such crash to take place in the same day.

Christopher A. Washington, 50, died when the ultalight he was piloting crashed at the Hernando County Airport.

The Hernando County Sheriff's Office received reports of a small plane going down in the area of the Hernando County Airport at about 11:38 a.m., officials said.

When emergency crews responded, they found an ultralight-type aircraft in flames in a field located in the southeast portion of the airport.

Witnesses said the aircraft took off from the north end of the of the airport, but that once it was about 200 feet in the air, the plane appeared to be struggling.

Deputies said the aircraft then appeared to have stalled, then spiraled to the ground, where it burst into flames upon impact.

This is the second fatal crash involving an ultralight aircraft on Sunday.

The pilot of an ultralight died after his ultralight aircraft became entangled in power lines as it was going down in rural Pasco County, authorities said.

http://www.baynews9.com


Party at Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (KFNL) benefits nonprofits

Though Windsor residents Jamison and Tammy Bohl didn't take their suitcases to the Suitcase Party, they should have -- for the free trip they won to Catalina Island.

"We went with the clothes we had on our backs," Jamison Bohl said about the trip they took at the end of August. "We didn't expect to win, so we didn't pack."

The Bohls and two other couples won the annual weekend trip through Northern Colorado Active 20/30, or NOCO 20/30.

The club of men in their 20s and 30s, which formed in 2007, wanted to hold a high-yield fundraiser and came up with the Suitcase Party to raise money for nonprofits in Northern Colorado.

The Suitcase Party takes place each summer in an airplane hangar at the Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport. The hangar is converted from an industrial setting into a decorated event hall with bars and food stations and a live music and auction stage.

The raffle for an unknown destination highlights the party, this year on Aug. 24, with a drawing for a round-trip flight on a private jet. The winners of the trip have to leave 20 minutes after the drawing, hence the need for the suitcase. There were two flights and a third purchased through the silent auction, which the recipient donated back to the club.

More than 1,200 people attended the party, which grossed more than $260,000, compared with $80,000 the first year in 2007.

"It's just a really high-energy event," said Billy Campbell, president of NOC0 20/30. "It really is a party. There's a great band, a lot of beverage flowing and a lot of dancing."

The club holds two other large-scale fundraising and community events -- the Down and Derby Party at the end of April to coincide with the Kentucky Derby, and Christmas for Kids, where club members take 300 needy children and their families shopping for Christmas gifts.

Club members donate what they raise to 20 different Northern Colorado nonprofits.

"We serve as a fundraising conduit to raise money for any organization in Northern Colorado that serves disadvantaged youth," Campbell said.

The club started with five members who wanted to make a bigger impact beyond the nonprofits where they were volunteering, Campbell said. They liked the idea of the Denver 20/30 club and started a local club based on the international organization.

"When a lot of us looked around at the other service organizations, we saw a gap for young professionals to get engaged early on," said Nathan Klein, a member of the club. "It makes it a lot of fun when you can do it with people your own age."

The members are young business leaders and entrepreneurs interested in developing their leadership skills and sense of community, as stated on the organization's website, noco2030.org.

Since its founding, the club has grown to 39 members and has donated $1 million to charity. Last year, the club donated $300,000 and this year wants to raise that amount to $500,000.

"I've been very impressed with the caliber of leadership the members of the group show and have," said Kathi Wright, executive director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Larimer County, one of the funding recipients of NOCO 20/30. "Their fundraisers are awesome. Their connections are a cut above." 

Source:  http://www.reporterherald.com

Wealthy Nigerians spend $6.5bn on 130 private jets

The growing penchant for private jets acquisition has cost wealthy Nigerians a sum of $6.5bn (N1.02tn) in the last five years. Aviation sources reveal that the luxury trend, which rose by 650 per cent between 2007 and 2012, is encouraged among the rich by the need for privacy, fear of insecurity and the urgency required by modern business, TUNJI ABIOYE reports

Private jet ownership in Nigeria has grown by 650 per cent, from 20 jets in 2007 to over 150 jets in 2012.

According to documents sighted in aviation agencies, the development means that wealthy Nigerians acquired, at least, 130 private jets with a sum of N1.02tn ($6.5bn) within the last five years.

This put the private jets aviation market in Nigeria (the monetary value of all private jets in the country) at N1.18tn ($7.5bn), using $50m as the average cost of each brand new private jet.

A private jet goes for between $40m and $65m, according to the websites of major private jets manufacturers, like Bombardier of Canada; GulfStream and Hawker Siddley of United States; and Embraer of Brazil.

According to findings, the common brands of private jets in Nigeria are Gulfstream 450, 550 and 650; Bombardier Challenger 604, 605; Global Express; Embraer Legacy and Falcons; and Hawker Siddley 125-800 and 900XP.

Top aviation officials told our correspondent on Friday that Nigeria currently rivalled China as one of the two fastest growing private jet markets in the world.

An official with in-depth knowledge of the situation, who spoke under condition of anonymity because he was not authorised to comment on the matter, said most of the jets were bought by top politicians, oil magnates and other business moguls in Nigeria.

He explained that the economic downturn in Europe and the United States had made Nigeria and China to become two of the fastest growing private jet markets in the world.

He said, “Two countries buying private jets now are China and Nigeria. Europe and America are going through turmoil; so, their people are no more buying. This accounts for the trend that whenever some of the private jet manufacturers develop any new jet, they take them to Nigeria and China.”

“The private jets in Nigeria are owned by top politicians, oil magnates and business moguls. It is difficult to get the real identities of owners of some of the private jets in Nigeria because they buy them through some foreign companies in North America, especially the US. The foreign company then leases it to another company in Nigeria.”

Investigation by our correspondent also revealed that there were still several private jets on order by wealthy Nigerians. Some of the jets, it was learnt, would be delivered this year, while others would be delivered in 2013 and 2014.

A top official of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority, who asked not to be named, said representatives of the owners of the private jets on order had already notified the agency about the order. This, he said, was necessary for the purpose of registering the aircraft in Nigeria. According to him, some of the private jets also come with foreign registration credentials.

The Managing Director of Aero Airlines, Captain Akin George, had recently commented on the increasing number of private jets being parked at the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja.

He particularly lamented the fact that most of the private jets carried foreign registration credentials. He had subsequently called on the authorities concerned in the country to make registration processes in Nigeria friendly and attractive.

During a recent visit to Abuja, our correspondent observed that over 40 private jets were parked at the terminal.

The CEO of another airline also said that during political meetings or big functions in Abuja, over 50 private jets were usually seen parked at the Abuja airport.

These, he said, were different from the ones parked at the Lagos and other major airports across the country.

“If you go to the old local wing at the Abuja airport, there is virtually no place to park private jets again,” he said

Just on Thursday, a team of officials from the headquarters of Bombardier in Canada arrived at the Executjets Private Hangar at the Murtala Muhammed Airport, Lagos, to showcase one of their latest private jets, Global 6000.

The team was led by the Sales Director, Africa, Bombardier Business Aircraft, Mr. Robert Habjanic, who said that the team was on a tour of 12 cities in Africa, including Lagos. Habjanic, who spoke with a few aviation journalists, told our correspondent that Nigeria was the company’s largest market in Africa, with about 35 Bombardier-made business aircraft currently flying its airspace.

He said the team had also showcased the relatively new business jet in other parts of the world.

He confirmed that “private business in Nigeria has been growing tremendously in the last five years.”

He attributed this to the fact that “Nigeria is an emerging market.”

The growth in the purchase of private jets in Nigeria has also led to the development of multimillion dollars private jets hangars, where repairs and maintenance could be done in the country. Some of these include Execujets Nigeria Hangar, Caverton Hangar and EverGreen Hangar, all located at the Lagos airport.

Speaking on the development, industry expert, Mr. Olumide Ohunayo, said, “The economy is expanding, with increasing investments within the country and the region. This will invariably necessitate instantaneous travel that scheduled airlines cannot provide.

“Also the privacy needed in a country filled with paparazzi can be an issue. Increasing political and religious issues are contributory. By and large, it will continue to increase if the economy continues with a lot of diversification inputs that naturally spread wealth.”

 http://www.punchng.com

NEW JERSEY: Ocean City's Aviation Festival ends with aerobatic airshow

OCEAN CITY -- The Ocean City Tourist Development once again held their annual Aerobatic Airshow today and this year show was a little different as they added some new performers with some hometown connections.

Patrons of the Ocean City beach and boardwalk stared into the sky Sunday afternoon as they watch several different aircrafts soar high above them as they took part in an aerobatic aerial display.

"It's fantastic it's a great day out, a nice sunny day and we can enjoy it as we stroll, said Molly Koniers of Philadelphia, PA.

"It's killer because it's just nice to come out with my friends and check out a bunch of aircrafts, talk about them and that kind of thing show the little guys that's how it is," said Cody Passaro of Williamstown, NJ.
 

People watched in amazement, as they viewed more than a dozen planes flew over them in different formations, looping, swooping and rolling through the sky.

And for the city, the event once again proved to be a great way to end the two day free aviation festival and the summer as well.

The air show was a success as thousands came to the beach and boardwalk to enjoy all the aerobatic performances these pilots had to offer.

"Very impressed it takes a lot of guts to be able to do some stuff like that," said Jim Cray.

"All the acrobatics I think is pretty neat, all the stuff they can do with the planes a lot of stuff I never seen before, explained Samuel Feagratian of Sea Isle City, NJ.

And one thing that made this year's show special was the addition of an F18 super hornet flyby flown by Ocean City's own, Ben Charles a Lt. Commander in the U.S. Navy, who made the trip from California to have the opportunity to fly over his hometown as his parents watched on.

"That was a thrill today to see him fly over his home town, said Jane Charles, mother of Lt. Commander Ben Charles.

Never get tired of seeing it proud of him, expressed Bob Charles, father of Lt. Commander Ben Charles.


Source:  http://www.nbc40.net/news/24056/

Yakovlev YAK 52, N2207X: Accident occurred September 16, 2012 in Brownsboro, Alabama

 http://registry.faa.gov/N2207X 

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA565 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Brownsboro, AL
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK 52, registration: N2207X
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2012, about 1515 central daylight time, an experimental, Yakovlev Yak-52, N2207X, registered to Matrushka LLC and operated by an individual, sustained substantial damaged from ground impact at Moontown Airport (3M5), Brownsboro, Alabama. The pilot and the student pilot rated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91, personal flight. The flight originated from 3M5, about 1450.

The airport was having a fly in event that day. Several witnesses observed three Yak-52 airplanes flying from west to east in a trailing formation, each slightly lower than the one in front. When they were southeast of the airport, the lead airplane performed a barrel row, followed by the second airplane in the formation. When the third airplane performed the barrel row, as the airplane reached the wings level attitude, the nose of the airplane was in a high pitch angle. The airplane began to descend in that nose high attitude. Then the airplane’s nose dropped below the horizon and it was lost from sight behind the trees that separated the open field and the airport’s grass runway. A loud impact noise was heard and smoke was seen immediately rising behind the trees.

The pilot, age 74, held a Federal Aviation Administration private pilot certificate with rating for airplane single engine land and airplane instrument. He was issued a second-class medical certificate on February 29, 2012, with limitations. A review of the pilot’s flight logbooks shows he documented a total time of 6,150 flight hours.

The Yakovlev Yak-52 was manufactured in the Soviet Union in 1982 and was issued a Federal Aviation Administration experimental airworthiness certificate in the exhibition category in November of 1999. The two place, low wing, metal construction airplane was powered by a 360 horsepower, Vedeneyev, M14P, 9-cylinder radial engine, and equipped with a two-bladed counter-clockwise rotating, variable pitch, wood and fiberglass laminated propeller.

The airplane’s energy path at the accident site was on an estimated 90-degree heading. The airplane’s initial collision was with the ground at an elevation of 686 feet mean sea level, which made a three foot in diameter crater that was two feet deep. One of the two wooden propeller blades was embedded into the ground at that location. The engine, along with its cowling, separated from the airframe and came to rest about 50 feet along the energy path from the crater. The propeller hub assembly remained attached to the engine minus the propeller blades. A section of the left outboard wing was located about 90 feet along the energy path from the crater. The main wreckage came to rest about 150 feet from the crater on an estimated 290-degree heading. Remnants of both wing’s flight control surfaces, engine parts, nose gear, right main gear, and canopy debris were located along the crash energy path.

The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, wings, and empennage with its flight control surfaces. From the engine firewall to the rear cockpit area sustained thermal damage from the post impact fire that ensued. Some instrument panel components and the wing’s cross spar beam were discernible among the melted metal. The right wing was intact with impact damage to the leading edge and thermal damage near the wing root area. The left wing was separated from the wing root area and bent back to the fuselage. The left main gear remained attached to the wing. The empennage areas sustained impact damage and the fabric covered flight control surfaces had thermal damage.


 
George Myers, owner of the Moontown Airport, died in an airplane crash Sunday along with a student pilot, Christian Schmitt.
 (Contributed, moontownairport.com)


HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- A candlelight vigil for Chris Schmitt, who died Sunday in a plane crash near the Moontown Airport, will be Saturday. 

 The vigil will start at 7 p.m. at Columbia High School, where Schmitt was a senior.

All family and friends are invited. For more information, call (256) 428-7576.

Schmitt and Gerald Myers, the former owner of Moontown Airport, crashed in a field just south of the airport on Sunday afternoon during the Moontown Grass Field Fly-in. Schmitt, a student pilot, and Myers were flying in a Soviet-era Yak.

A memorial service will be held for Myers followed by a pot luck dinner on Friday at 5 p.m. at the hangar at the Moontown Airport.



 
In this 2010 photo, Chris Schmitt, left, poses with fellow Columbia High School JROTC cadets, Jake Kite and Christopher Robinson while wearing WWII military costumes as part of the welcome home festivities for the Sept. 11, 2010, Honor Flight.


BROWNSBORO, Alabama -- Chris Schmitt, one of the two people who died in a plane crash Sunday near the Moontown Airport, helped organized relief efforts for victims of the 2011 tornadoes and was an aspiring pilot who had taken flying lessons.

Schmitt, 17-year-old Columbia High School senior, died when the plane he was flying in with George Myers, 74, crashed just south of the airport during the Moontown Grass Field Fly-in. Myers was the owner of Moontown Airport.


Schmitt served three years in the JROTC at Columbia, achieving the rank of first sergeant."He loved what he was doing and always enjoyed life," said Marion Mike, the command sergeant major of the JROTC at Columbia. "He was one of those smiling kids."


An investigator from the National Transportation and Safety Board was at the scene this afternoon. The investigator said the NTSB would have an update on its investigation in about a week.

An official from the Federal Aviation Authority was at the crash site this morning.

Officials have not given a reason for the crash that occurred about 3:20 p.m. The plane crashed into a field about 100 yards from homes near the airport. It broke into at least two pieces.

Schmitt took flying lessons at Madison County Executive Airport in Meridianville and took his first solo flight earlier this year.

Renja Schmitt, who owns and operates Schnitzel Ranch restaurant on University Drive, said her son took control of logistics after the deadly tornadoes last year that left North Alabama without power.

Renja said once she decided to cook all the food she had in stock to give to victims, her son took it from there.


 "Chris was the first one, he was the organization," his mother said. "How long will it take to cook? How many cars do we need? He was the organization manager of the tornado victims to feed them. That's just him."


Chris moved to the United States from Germany in 2008 when he was 12 along with his mother, father Joachim Reinig and sister Jackie. Renja said Monday Chris would entertain friends by translating German comedians.


"He made everybody happy," she said. "He watched Germany comedians a lot and he could do the accents. And just by listening he could turn around and translate it in English and make 50 people laugh. He could make you laugh."


"He was always doing for others," said Gordon Seuell, a close friend of the family. "He had a passion for life."


 Mike, the JROTC instructor, said Chris was a tireless volunteer -- spending time at Special Olympics events and visiting nursing homes as well as taking part in the Honor Flight program that took World War II veterans on daytrips to Washington, D.C.

Chris made it a habit to flatter his mother, she said. It was routine, in fact, for Chris to say to his mother, "Do you know how beautiful you are?"

Renja said that friends who visited Sunday night said that's one thing they will always remember about Chris, "How many times he would say you are so pretty."

Chris didn't just say kind words to his mother, he did kind things as well, she said.

Renja said that when they were living in Germany and she was hospitalized, Chris worried about how to make her feel better.

"We just got a baby cat a few weeks before," Renja said. "He was thinking, 'What can I do to make my mom laugh?'

"He put the cat in a bag and brought it to the hospital."


Story, photos and comments:   http://blog.al.com


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 2207X        Make/Model: YK52      Description: YAK-52
  Date: 09/16/2012     Time: 2021

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: HUNTSVILLE   State: AL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. HUNTSVILLE, AL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: BIRMINGHAM, AL  (SO09)                Entry date: 09/17/2012 


MADISON CO. (WAAY) - George Myers loved to fly. It was his life. WAAY 31's Kalie Lanford learned that first hand today when he took her up in his plane. Just an hour later George was piloting another flight when it crashed. 

“Its tragic I’ve known George for many years…him and his wife,” said Myers friend Jerry Sanderson

George and his passenger Chris Schmitt, 17, were flying in a Russian Yak at the Annual Moontown Fly-In. They were flying in a formation with four other Yaks when suddenly their plane snapped out of formation and crashed. Those who knew George respected him as an excellent pilot and local legend.

“His influence on aviation was impeccable. He was an impeccable pilot and he was the previous owner of moon town airport and had it for years and this airport is known nationally," said Myers friend, Bill Perry.

Myers’s passenger Chris Schmitt was an aspiring pilot. He was in flight school in Madison to get his license. He told me he loved to fly because of the freedom he felt when he was in the air. Both men said some of their happeist moments were in a plane. Now, friends are taking some comfort knowing they died doing something they love.

“He’s been such a great influence on so many people that enjoy flying, and hes going to be very missed,” Perry said.

 

http://www.waaytv.com

MADISON COUNTY, Ala. (WHNT) – The Madison County Sheriff’s Office confirms that two people died Sunday afternoon in a plane crash at the Moontown Airport. The airport is located just off of Highway 72, east of Huntsville.  

Just before 3:30 Sunday afternoon, a call went out over police and emergency radios of an Alert III at the airport.  An Alert III is the most severe type of aircraft emergency.

Witnesses tell WHNT News 19 that the plane appeared to be a Yak.  It’s a single-engine plane developed in the Soviet Union in the 1970s.

According to the airport’s website, their annual fly-in was taking place this weekend.  There were dozens of small planes and even helicopters at the event.


Read more


Brownsboro, Ala.,  (WAAY) - Two people were killed in a plane crash Sunday afternoon at the Moontown Airport near Highway 72 and Moontown Road in Madison County.  Witnesses say the plane went down around It happened around 3:20. 

The airport is hosting its annual Fly-In this weekend featuring vintage and experimental aircraft.

Read more


 http://www.moontownairport.com


MADISON COUNTY, AL (WAFF) -  Two people were killed in a plane crash in Madison County. The plane went down around 3:30 p.m. Sunday on Airport Drive. Officials said it was a small plane that crashed near the Moontown Airport.  The crash may be associated with the annual Moontown Grass Field Fly-In. Three planes were in the air and one of them banked just before crashing.

Authorities have not identified the victims. No other injuries were reported. The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified.

http://www.waff.com

Making flying safer - on the ground

 By Kelly Yamanouchi

The Atlanta Journal-Constitutio
n

Even the most frequent flier may relax just a bit when the wheels of a jetliner touch down on the runway. But the risks of flying - however slight statistically - don’t end with a smooth landing.

Industry officials and regulators say taxiing around an airport, especially one as big and busy as Atlanta’s, involves hazards of its own.

Last year Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport logged 18 incidents on runways or taxiways. They ranged from jets that were on or too close to runways being used by another plane, to fenderbenders between wingtips or tails, to a ground vehicle going where it shouldn’t.

Such incidents are exceedingly rare when considered against Hartsfield-Jackson’s 920,000 annual operations. Over the past five years the number has bounced between a high of 23 in 2007 and a low of 14 in 2009.

Still, the potential for disaster with so many huge machines moving around so close together keeps ground accidents high on the list of safety concerns. Recent incidents elsewhere include one last month at Washington Dulles International Airport, in which a Lufthansa Airbus 330 jet’s wing hit the tail of a small Colgan Air plane while taxiing.

Read more:  http://www.ajc.com


(Hat tip to Augusta Jim ... thank you!)

Cleveland Air Race set for October 13 at airport

The second annual Cleveland Air Race Revival will be held on Oct. 13 beginning at 8 a.m. at the Cleveland Municipal Airport.

The airport gates will open at 8 a.m. and the race starts at 9 a.m. The best time to view the planes is before and after the race, according to Alf Vien, of aviation services at Cleveland Municipal Airport.

“Last year, we had about 32 racers,” said Vien. “I’m expecting about 40 this time. Last year’s race prompted a lot of interest at the local level and brought in lots of people from Conroe, Lake Water Wheel and from various airports in the greater Houston area.”

Pilots will take off one minute apart from Cleveland and fly over Lake Water Wheel in Shepherd to begin. The race will time each plane individually as it starts and crosses the finish line.

“This is not an air show,” said Vien. “There will be lots of aircraft to look at after the planes land.”

There will be two courses available. The longer course will be for larger and faster airplanes and will be 150 miles in length. The second course will be for smaller airplanes and will be approximately 70 miles in length.

“At about 9:30 a.m. lots of planes will be passing Lake Water Wheel,” said Vien. “That will be a fun thing to see. Then spectators can come back to Cleveland to see them cross the finish line. We’re trying to develop a tradition and something that is fun for people to watch.”

Entry to the event is free for spectators. There is a fee to enter the race as a pilot.

Barbecue plates will also be available after the race for the cost of a donation to help cover the expenses of the event.

Pilots that participate will receive a gift bag filled with donated items.

“We want everyone to come out and enjoy themselves,” said Vien.

For more information about the race, visit www.clevelandairracerevival.blogspot.com or call the Cleveland Municipal Airport at 281-592-1282.

http://www.yourhoustonnews.com

Rand-Robinson KR2S, N966G: Accident occurred September 16, 2012 in Pueblo, Colorado

http://www.krnet.org/mvn2008

http://registry.faa.gov/N966G

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA638 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Pueblo, CO
Aircraft: MCHENRY GEORGE B JR KR2S, registration: N966G
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

 
On September 16, 2012, approximately 0820 mountain daylight time, an experimental light sport KR2S airplane, N966G, registered to the pilot, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground while maneuvering to land at the Pueblo Memorial Airport (PUB), Pueblo, Colorado. The sport pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed for the local flight. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated about 0814 from PUB and was returning to land when the accident occurred.

The airplane departed from runway 26L about 0814. Two minutes later, the pilot called PUB tower and requested to return to the airport. The tower controller acknowledged the call and told the pilot to enter a left base for runway 26L. The controller also asked the pilot if he needed any assistance, and the pilot replied that he did not. He was then cleared to land the airplane on runway 26L.

The controller observed that the airplane was approaching the airport "fast" and appeared to attempt a go-around maneuver. The airplane then made a hard turn to the right as if it was trying to land on runway 8L. The controller estimated that the airplane was about 200 feet AGL in the right turn. The airplane descended toward the ground in a nose low attitude and impacted, right wing first, at the northwest corner of where runway 26R and runway 17 intersect.

The airplane wreckage and engine was retained for examination by the NTSB IIC at a hangar located on the Pueblo Airport.



IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 966G        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- KR2S
  Date: 09/16/2012     Time: 1950

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: PUEBLO   State: CO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED WHILE MANEUVERING TO LAND. PUEBLO, CO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Approach      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DENVER, CO  (NM03)                    Entry date: 09/17/2012 

 

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson says they still don't know what caused a plane to crash at Pueblo Memorial Airport around 8:30 Sunday morning; the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating. 

Allen Kenitzer with the FAA says the plane was an experimental aircraft; meaning it was built by an individual, not a manufacturer. Kenitzer says the plane was a homebuilt KR2S. The plane's registry with the FAA lists the plane's manufacturer and owner as the same. It also lists the plane's category as "amateur built" under its' airworthiness status. The registry says the plane was manufactured in 2007. News 5 won't release the plane's identification number until word that the victim's family has been notified.

According to Kenitzer, the plane crashed after doing a 180-degree turn from runway 8 left to runway 26 left. The plane crashed while trying to land, Kenitzer says.

The photo posted with this story is not the specific plane involved in the crash. It's a KR2S model, similar to the one involved in Sunday's crash. The photo is from Airliners.net and photographer Ron Baak.

Labors of love, built to soar

By Luke Hegdal
Sunday, September 16, 2012

 

Flying: There’s always a few people willing to try it. Until modern commercial and private aircraft came along, attempts to fly almost always met with spectacular results and often death, or at least the next best thing.

History is, in fact, full of people who suffered injury while attempting to take to the air. Smarter inventors didn’t attempt to fly themselves. Tito “Mouse Lover” Burattini, for example, was an Italian inventor who tied a cat to model airplane in 1647.

Whether these inventors and visionaries used a large kite, hot air balloon or aircraft that required energetic wing-flapping, they had to build the craft themselves, much like modern experimental aircraft enthusiasts.

Carlos Grageda, who studied airplane mechanics at Boise State University in the 1970s, is one of several airplane owners who keep (and build) experimental light aircraft at Martin Field in College Place.

Read more here:  http://union-bulletin.com

Will Treasure Coast company failures have chilling effect on future incentives?

By Eric Pfahler
Posted September 16, 2012 at 4 a.m.


Story:  http://www.tcpalm.com
 

Digital Domain Media Group's shocking bankruptcy Tuesday has left Treasure Coast residents wondering what will happen the next time a glitzy company promises jobs in exchange for land, buildings, tax abatements, millions in incentives and whatever else it can negotiate.

All three counties have had a bankrolled company that failed to reach employment mandates tied to their state and local incentive packages. Though all three examples are different in nature and how they affected their respective community, each company was promised millions, and given a portion of that, before various problems besieged them.

Though Piper Aircraft Co. still employs more than 700 in Indian River County, and American Energy Innovations has repaid Martin County with hopes of moving forward, Digital Domain in St. Lucie County is the first to leave a local government with millions in future bills and the possible loss of more than $7 million in cash incentives.


Read more:  http://www.tcpalm.com

UNFULFILLED PROMISES

Piper Aircraft (Indian River County)

The promise


Expand from 963 to 1,400 employees with $46,500 average salaries through 2015; spend $45 million in capital investments; not relocate to Oklahoma City or Albuquerque, N.M.

The incentives

$12 million from county, $20 million from state

The outcome

Announced in October the indefinite suspension of Piper Altaire light business jet program, saying small airplane sales had shrunk.

The fallout

The governments are negotiating whether Piper will return some of the county's $4 million and the state's $6.7 million. Piper employs 730 today, 233 fewer than before, but noted it maintained an average payroll of $40 million annually from 2008-11 and has met capital improvement requirements.

Read more:  http://www.tcpalm.com