Sunday, July 17, 2016

Luscombe 8E Silvaire, N2759K: Accident occurred July 17, 2016 at Minden-Tahoe Airport (KMEV), Minden, Douglas County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Reno, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N2759K


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Minden, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/25/2017
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8A, registration: N2759K
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot reported that, during the takeoff rotation, he heard a noise that seemed to be coming from the landing gear. Once airborne, the passenger observed the right wheel, including the axle assembly, hanging sideways from a brake cable. The pilot subsequently landed on a grassy area between the runway and a taxiway with the left wheel first, holding the right side off the ground as long as possible. The right main landing gear (MLG) leg then contacted the ground and skidded for about 50 ft before it dug into the grass, which resulted in a nose-over.

Postaccident examination of the right MLG leg revealed that it failed at the axle cluster, which had internal corrosion; the upper portion of the leg was not sealed. The type certificate holder had issued a service recommendation (SR) over 20 years before the accident that addressed corrosion damage above the axle weld area, which had led to the failure of MLG legs. The owner stated that this SR had not been accomplished on the airplane. It is likely that the accident could have been prevented if the SR had been accomplished even though it was not required by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of a main landing gear leg during takeoff due to corrosion, which resulted in a nose-over during the subsequent landing on a grassy area.

On July 17, 2016, about 0850 Pacific daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N2759K, nosed over during a precautionary landing at Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage as a result of the nose over. The local area flight originated from MEV at 0810. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff rotation, he heard a noise that seemed to be coming from the landing gear. Once airborne, the passenger observed the right wheel, including the axle assembly, hanging sideways from the brake cable.

The pilot made a low pass for ground personnel to confirm the problem, and requested emergency equipment. The pilot flew around the airport for approximately 40 minutes until the emergency equipment was in place. The pilot elected to land on a grassy area between runway 34 and taxiway alpha. The pilot landed on the left wheel first, holding the right side of the airplane off the ground as long as possible. The right gear leg skidded for approximately 50 feet before digging in and causing the airplane to cartwheel onto its back.

Post-crash investigation by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right main gear leg failed at the axle cluster. The inspector observed internal corrosion within the axle cluster of the main gear leg. He noted that the upper portion of the leg was not sealed.

The information provided indicated that the failed cluster had current Univair aircraft corporation part numbers and nomenclature.


The Type Certificate holder provided a copy of a Service Recommendation (SR) #4 issued on January 22, 1996. The purpose of the SR was to facilitate the annual inspection of the Luscombe landing gear. It noted that corrosion damage within the 2 inches above the axle weldment had led to failure of the main landing gear legs. The SR provided instructions to examine for compromised structure. It also provided a solution by drilling a hole in the metal to allow moisture to drain out, and let drying air flow in to keep corrosion to a minimum. The owner stated that this SR had not been accomplished on this airplane. Compliance with the SR was not required by federal regulations for this type of operation.



NTSB Identification: WPR16LA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Minden, NV
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8A, registration: N2759K
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 17, 2016, about 0905 Pacific daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N2759K, nosed over during a precautionary landing near Minden, Nevada. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot sustained serious injuries, and the single passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage as a result of the nose over. The local area flight originated from Minden about 45 minutes prior to the accident. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

An airport operations official stated that the pilot reported a collapsed landing gear on takeoff. The pilot flew around about 45 minutes to burn fuel. The pilot elected to land on the grass between the runway and a taxiway. About 250 feet after touchdown, the collapsed gear dug into the ground, and the airplane nosed over.
=====

MINDEN, Nev. (KOLO)-- Two people received minor injuries Sunday morning at Minden-Tahoe Airport when the airplane they were in had a hard landing and overturned, the East Fork Fire Department reported.

The Luscombe single-engine fixed-wing airplane had bad landing gear so the pilot tried to put it down in the dirt next to the runway, said East Fork Fire Protection District Battalion Chief Troy Valenzuela. That helped slow the aircraft, but it still overturned.

The two people inside were taken to Carson Valley Medical Center for minor injuries and also for a precautionary evaluation, Valenzuela said.

The aircraft received substantial damage. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Story and video:  http://www.kolotv.com

LETTER: Pilot says best alternative to landing at Kalispell City Airport (S27) would be Polson Airport (8S1)

I just returned from another fabulous week on Flathead Lake, flying my small plane in and out of Kalispell City Airport all the way from Ohio.  

The many pilots like me who visit the valley annually appreciate the City Airport for many reasons. It is much easier to land and take off when you don’t have the large, fast, jet traffic to deal with, let alone the large landing, ramp, tie down, hangar, and fuel fees at the international airport.

After landing, we had a great lunch at the Mckenzie River Pizza Co. and then shopped for our week’s groceries at Rosauers. We come to Kalispell during the week to check on the plane, shop, eat and have fun. We visited Costco, Target, Home Depot, Norm’s News, and Hu Hot, just to name a few.

If Kalispell City Airport were to close, I would land in Polson, shop in Polson, eat in Polson, etc. Polson is the logical best alternative for those of us visiting the lake vs. going to Glacier Park International.

I would most certainly visit Kalispell, but much of my economic impact would go to Polson. I apologize if my plane makes a little bit of noise coming and going.

 —David Scott, Akron, Ohio

Original article can be found here:   http://www.dailyinterlake.com

Cessna A188 Agwagon 300, N3547Q: Fatal accident occurred September 16, 2016 in Alapaha, Berrien County, Georgia

JASON E. WATSON: http://registry.faa.gov/N3547Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Alapaha, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA A188, registration: N3547Q
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 0915 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A188, N3547Q, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Alapaha, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight. The flight originated at Berrien County Airport (4J2), Nashville, Georgia, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137.

According to an assistant who routinely supported the pilot during ground operations, the pilot planned to complete three aerial application flights the day of the accident. The first flight departed 4J2 at 0715 and returned about 1 hour and 15 minutes later. The ground assistant reported that the pilot stated, "everything seems good," and they began preparations for the second flight. The ground assistant loaded about 150 to 160 gallons of insecticide into the airplane and the pilot "topped off" the single fuel tank from his personal trailer-based fuel supply. The pilot put on his shoulder harness and flight helmet, and the airplane then departed at 0855.

According to two witnesses, they each reported that they heard the airplane "flying back and forth" near their separate properties about 0915. They both further reported that the engine noise went silent and subsequently heard the sound of an impact. The witnesses were not co-located, but both reported they were within 1/4 to 1/2 mile of the accident site at the time of the accident. Neither witness observed the airplane in flight.

The airplane was found in an upright position in an open plowed field in the vicinity of 31 degrees, 26.042 minutes north latitude, 083 degrees, 10.443 minutes west longitude. The field in which the airplane was found was just north of the field being sprayed.

The wreckage path, oriented along a 300-degree magnetic heading, commenced with broken branches, an estimated 30 feet above the ground, from trees bordering the two fields. There was then a ground scar about 60 feet beyond the trees, and about 20 feet beyond that was the separated, two-bladed metal propeller. The airplane came to rest about 20 feet beyond the propeller, heading the opposite direction, about 120 degrees magnetic. There were no ground scars between the initial ground scar and the airplane's final location.

All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces or their remnants.

The fuselage exhibited impact and fire damage; however, there was no evidence of fire in flight. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The right wing was found twisted forward of its normal position, the fuselage was canted to the right just forward of the firewall. The empennage displayed metal tearing to the right, all of which were consistent with the airplane having been in a left spin at initial ground impact. The separated empennage control surfaces were found under the rear fuselage.

Both flaps were found in an extended position. The flap handle, which was connected directly to the flaps, was found in a near-vertical position, past the flaps 20-degrees down position; however, the actual position of both the flaps and the handle prior to the initial impact could not be ascertained. The left fixed main landing gear was collapsed upward under the wing, and the right fixed main landing was separated from the wing.

Further examination of the cockpit revealed that the throttle control lever was found about 1/3 forward (from idle). The propeller control lever was found in the forward position (full rpm). The mixture control was found pulled aft (toward idle-cut-off), about 1 inch. The fuel ON/OFF valve was found in the ON position.

A four-point lever lock style buckle was identified latched with the shoulder harness buckle ends engaged in the lever lock. The instrument panel was consumed by the postimpact fire. A fire-damaged agricultural global positioning system was found mounted in the cockpit and was retained to attempt data extraction.

One propeller blade exhibited an aft bend, while the other remained straight. The propeller blade with the aft bend exhibited chordwise scratching from the mid-point to the tip of the propeller, while the straight blade only displayed chordwise scratches at the propeller tip.

The engine exhibited thermal damage. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section of the engine. Thumb compression and suction were attained on all cylinders when the propeller flange was rotated. All twelve spark plugs were examined with no anomalies observed. Each magneto was removed and rotated manually; spark was observed at each individual ignition lead. The engine driven fuel pump drive coupling was intact and no anomalies were found when examined. The oil filter screen was removed from the oil pump housing and no contaminants were found.


The fuel manifold was examined; the filter screen was clear of debris and no fuel was present. The six individual fuel injectors were found to also be absent of debris. The throttle body/metering unit was found to contain debris, and the screen filter was damaged but remained inside the filter chamber. The fuel throttle/metering unit was retained for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.








ALAPAHA, GA (WALB) -   Officials in Berrien County and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash that left one man dead.

Nashville native, Jason Watson, was flying the plane when it crashed. 

It was a sad scene, as people kept driving by to look at the wreckage and briefly speak with WALB about the pilot. 

Some individuals said they heard the plane crash Friday morning and felt helpless when they got over to the scene. 

It was just before 9:30 in the morning when people working and living on the other side of a fence heard a crop duster buzzing over head.  

A normal sound that quickly made a turn for the worst. 

"It went blank. There wasn't no noise of the plane and you couldn't hear the motor running," explained witness James Davis.

"Five to ten seconds later, that's when I heard a boom. Then I seen the smoke. Then I rushed over here," said witness Ray Heath. 

Just moments after hearing the crash, people quickly headed over to help the pilot of the plane.

"I got there and I was expecting to see somebody standing outside the plane watching the plane burn, but it wasn't like that when I crossed the fence," said Davis. "Starting off I said, no I don't see him. I thought maybe he's out here somewhere, ya know. Sure enough, I rounded the plane and I was like, the pilot's in the plane, he's no longer, no longer alive."  

Watson did not survive. 

Davis said that it's a reminder of how dangerous working in the agriculture industry can be.

"Anything to do with agriculture is so dangerous," explained Davis.

The crash is still under investigation, but officials said they believe it could be mechanical. 

As for the pilot, friends, family and co-workers said Watson will not be forgotten. 

"I really hate it for him and his family. He was a really good guy. A really nice guy," said Davis.

"It's a horrible event. Our heart goes out to the family and our prayers are with them," said Sheriff Ray Paulk. 

And eyewitnesses said that it's a chilling memory they will never forget. 

"I don't think I'll ever un-see it," said Davis. 

The crash is still under investigation and WALB will continue to bring you new details as we get them. 

Story and video:   http://www.wfxg.com


ALAPAHA — The pilot of a crop-dusting plane was killed Friday in a crash in a rural Berrien County field, according to a witness.

The plane's pilot, Jason Watson, 31, of Nashville, was killed in the crash, said Berrien County Sheriff Ray Paulk.

The sheriff said the crash occurred after 9 a.m. Friday.

James Davis of Alapaha was working on peanut equipment in a field off Daniel Griffin Road around 9:15 a.m. when he heard the plane's engine quit.

"I felt a 'thump' and heard the crash," he said.

He and a friend who lives nearby, Ray Heath, jumped a fence and ran to the crash site, where they found one occupant in the plane.

"He was already dead," Davis said.

Berrien County Sheriff's Office and the Federal Aviation Administration were on the scene.

ALAPAHA, GA (WALB) -  The identity of the man killed in a plane crash this morning has been released.

Jason Watson, 31, was the pilot of the crop duster airplane. 

The crash happened around 9:30 a.m. near 1130 Daniel Griffin Road.

The FAA will be investigating the crash.

Some witnesses said they heard the plane make a sputtering sound and go silent.

Officials said this is leading them to believe it could have been a mechanical issue. However, they can't confirm that just yet. 

"Starting off I said, no I don't see him. I thought maybe he's out here somewhere, ya know. Sure enough, I rounded the plane and I was like, the pilot's in the plane, he's no longer, no longer alive," said witness James Davis.

The cause of this crash is still under investigation right now.

Source:   http://www.wistv.com

Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III, A and N Company Inc., N2241Q: Fatal accident occurred July 16, 2016 near Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, Schoharie County, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

 Analysis

The private pilot and three passengers departed in the airplane from a 3,000-ft-long runway with a density altitude of about 3,000 ft and a light wind. Surveillance video showed that the airplane did not use the entire length of the runway for takeoff; the pilot began his takeoff roll where the paved section of the part turf/part asphalt runway began, resulting in 2,400 ft of available runway. During the ground roll, the nose of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway, and the airplane became airborne at 1,500 ft. Witnesses described the takeoff and initial climb as "slow" and "sluggish." The wings rocked, and the airplane climbed to about 100 ft in a continuous left turn before descending into trees 1,000 ft left of the runway centerline.

Examination of the airplane and its engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction or anomaly. An estimate of the airplane's takeoff weight indicated that it was about 66 lbs over the maximum allowable takeoff weight of 2,750 pounds. Review of performance charts revealed that the takeoff ground roll distance for the airplane at the maximum allowable gross weight was about 2,180 ft. Review of radar data showed that from rotation to the final radar target, the airplane's groundspeed (which was about the same as its airspeed given the light wind) varied between 61 and 67 knots, which was about the airplane's calculated stall speed of 60 knots. Further, the witness observations were consistent with the pilot failing to attain sufficient airspeed, which resulted in the airplane's wing exceeding its critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall.

It is likely that the pilot lifted off prematurely at a speed lower than normal and was unable to accelerate or climb the airplane once it exited ground effect. A premature liftoff and a climb attempt at a speed significantly below best angle of climb speed (78 knots) placed the airplane in a situation where the power required for level flight was very near or exceeded the available power. To recover from this situation the pilot needed to lower the airplane's nose in order to accelerate the airplane to obtain a positive rate of climb. However, such an action is counterintuitive when low to the ground and requires accurate problem recognition, knowledge of the correct solution, and sufficient terrain clearance to accomplish. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 

The pilot's inadequate preflight weight and balance and performance planning, which resulted in the airplane being over gross weight. Also causal were the pilot's decision not to use the entire runway for takeoff, his premature liftoff, and his failure to attain adequate airspeed, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Aircraft

Maximum weight - Capability exceeded (Cause)
Takeoff distance - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)
Climb rate - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues

Performance calculations - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Incorrect action performance - Pilot (Cause)

SCHOHARIE COUNTY -- A pilot's inadequate pre-flight planning and failure to use all available runway on takeoff likely led to the July 2016 Schoharie County plane crash that killed a Major League Baseball official and two others, according to a final National Transportation Safety Board report issued this week.

The inadequate weight, balance and performance planning on the part of the pilot led to the plane taking off over its gross weight, the report states. Failure to use the full runway led to a stall, the report added.

The small Piper PA-28 aircraft, with four people aboard, crashed into a wooded, swampy area at about 6:45 p.m. on July 16, 2016. All three passengers died. The pilot survived but suffered severe injuries.

The plane was en route from the private Hogan Airport near the Schoharie County hamlet of Sloansville, town of Esperance, to Tweed-New Haven Airport in Connecticut. The occupants were in Esperance to attend a gathering of family and friends near the airfield, sheriff's officials have said.

The final report follows a preliminary report issued last month that noted the estimated takeoff weight as about 66 pounds over the maximum allowable weight -- 2,750 pounds -- for that plane. 

Regarding the runway, the final report states: "It is likely that the pilot lifted off prematurely at a speed lower than normal and was unable to accelerate or climb." Surveillance video indicated the plane used 1,500 feet of runway when 2,400 was available.

Those killed were Andrew M. "Mike" Mydlarz, 50, and his wife, Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut, and Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City.

Hilgefort served as MLB's senior director of broadcasting and business affairs and was one of the league's longest-serving employees, the league said. Her husband was an optician, according to their obituaries.


Jason Klein, owner of Connecticut-based Force 3 Pro Gear, a baseball equipment company, piloted the aircraft and survived. He continues to recover, more than 16 months later, a Force 3 company spokeswoman said last month. Klein has no memory of the crash, according to the NTSB's earlier report.


Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City, New York.

Andrew M. “Mike” Mydlarz, 50, and his wife Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut.  

Susanne and Mike passed away in a Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III plane crash on July 16th, 2016 in Esperance, New York. Also killed in the crash was their good friend, Lisa Quinn.  Jason Klein, owner of Connecticut-based Force3 Pro Gear, a baseball equipment company, piloted the aircraft and survived.


Pilot Jason Klein, founder of Force3 Pro Gear


SCHOHARIE COUNTY — A plane that crashed shortly after takeoff last year, killing a Major League Baseball official and two others, was over its maximum allowable gross weight at the time, according to a new National Transportation Safety Board report.

The report also cites air conditions at the Schoharie County airport as contributing to the accident.

No probable cause was included in the report, which was filed online late last week. Such a determination could come in the final report, which may come by the end of the year.


The small Piper PA-28 aircraft, with four people aboard, crashed into a wooded, swampy area about 6:45 p.m. July 16, 2016. All three passengers died. The pilot survived but suffered severe injuries.


The plane was en route from the private Hogan Airport near the Schoharie County hamlet of Sloansville, town of Esperance, to Tweed-New Haven Airport in Connecticut.


Those killed were Andrew M. "Mike" Mydlarz, 50, and his wife, Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut, and Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City.


Hilgefort served as MLB's senior director of broadcasting and business affairs and was one of the league's longest-serving employees, the league said. Her husband was an optician, according to their obituaries.


Jason Klein, owner of Connecticut-based Force 3 Pro Gear, a baseball equipment company, piloted the aircraft and survived. Klein continues to recover, more than 16 months later, a Force 3 company spokeswoman said this week.


NTSB investigators did not interview Klein, due to his injuries, the new report reads. Instead, he submitted a written statement in which he indicated he has no memory of the incident. 


The report also ruled out drugs or alcohol as factors, noting test results from samples taken from the pilot.


The four people aboard the plane were in Esperance to attend a gathering of family and friends near the airfield, sheriff's officials have said. Several of those remaining at the gathering saw the plane gain altitude and then descend into the trees.


They made their way to the crash site and found one man outside the plane with burns to his face and hands trying to help the others still in the wreckage, officials have said.


The NTSB estimated the takeoff weight of the aircraft, including fuel and passengers, to be about 66 pounds over the maximum allowable gross weight. They estimated the takeoff weight as 2,816.5 pounds; the maximum is 2,750 pounds.


At the maximum weight, the "estimated takeoff ground roll" is 2,180 feet, the report states. The plane got off the ground in about 1,500 feet, based on surveillance footage cited in the report.


The report also highlights the air density at the Schoharie County airport. The report says an FAA pamphlet and pilot handbook warn that air densities at higher altitudes require increased takeoff distances and cause reduced rates of climb, among other complications.


Witnesses described the takeoff as slow and sluggish. Another reported the plane as under full power the entire time. The engine did not fail, according to witnesses. 


The report confirms an examination of the engine showed no evidence of any pre-impact mechanical problems.


Another issue cited by the report is that the "flap control handle" was found set at 10 degrees. The plane's handbook did not include performance charts or procedures for 10-degree flaps during takeoff.


Read more here: https://dailygazette.com


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York
Piper Aircraft Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

A and N Company Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2241Q

Location:  Esperance, NY
Accident Number:  ERA16FA257
Date & Time: 07/16/2016, 1845 EDT
Registration:  N2241Q
Aircraft:  PIPER PA 28R-201
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, collided with terrain after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured, the three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05 and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut.

According to a fixed base operator at HVN, on the day of the accident, the airplane was fueled with 14 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel, which brought the fuel level to "just above the tabs." The pilot then flew the airplane with the three passengers onboard from HVN to NY05. According to witnesses, the pilot and passengers attended a party at NY05. A witness reported that the accident airplane was the last of a group of airplanes to depart from NY05 and that another pilot had suggested to the accident pilot that he depart on runway 12L. A review of surveillance video revealed that the airplane took off on runway 30R, which was 3,000 ft long; the first 600 ft and the final 400 ft of runway 30R were turf, and middle 2,000 ft was asphalt. The surveillance video showed that the pilot began the takeoff roll where the paved section of the runway began (with 2,400 ft of available runway). During the takeoff roll, the nosewheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nosewheel lifted again, and the airplane became airborne with about 900 ft of runway remaining.

Several witnesses observed the airplane's takeoff from runway 30R. They consistently described the airplane's takeoff as "slow" and "sluggish" and reported that it entered a "gentle" left turn immediately after takeoff. One witness stated that the airplane attempted to rotate earlier than the other airplanes that were departing that day. When the airplane became airborne, "the nose was pitched so high that the wings wallowed;" the witness then reached for his phone to dial 911. The airplane overflew a hangar located left of the departure end of the runway at a low altitude as it continued its left turn before descending into trees. Another witness stated that "the airplane was under full power the entire time. The engine did not fail."

Due to his injuries, the pilot was not interviewed. In a written statement, the pilot reported that he had "no personal recollection of the subject flight."

Radar track data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The airplane climbed to about 100 ft above ground level, and its groundspeed ranged between 58 and 67 knots from takeoff to the final radar target. The radar track ended about 100 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 1,000 ft left of the runway centerline.



Pilot Information

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015. The pilot reported about 561 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's logbooks were not recovered and no determination could be made of his flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a 200-horsepower Lycoming IO-360 engine driving a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 1, 2016, at 6,573.6 total aircraft hours.

The airplane's weight and balance condition at the time of takeoff was calculated based on the estimated fuel onboard the airplane and the estimated weights of the passengers. According to the information provided by the fixed base operator at HVN, the airplane departed HVN with about 25 gallons or about 300 lbs of usable fuel. Fuel burn from HVN to NY05 was estimated to be about 8 gallons or 48 lbs. 

The airplane's takeoff weight at NY05 was calculated to be 2,816.5 lbs, which was 66.5 lbs above the maximum allowable gross weight of 2,750 lbs. There are no performance charts for any weight above the maximum gross weight. 

The performance charts indicated that at the airplane's maximum allowable gross weight, the estimated takeoff ground roll was 2,180 ft and the total distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle was 2,750 ft. 

According to the pilot's operating handbook for the airplane, the rotation speed for a normal takeoff was between 65 and 75 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS). With a flap setting of 25°, the rotation speed for a short-field takeoff was between 50 and 60 KIAS. After liftoff, the pilot was to increase airspeed to 55 to 65 KIAS. 

There are no performance charts or procedures for a 10° flap setting during takeoff. The performance charts do not consider the effects of a grass runway surface on takeoff and landing performance. 

The gross weight stalling speed with power off and full flaps is 55 KIAS, and, with flaps up, this speed is increased 5 knots. Loss of altitude during stall can be as great as 400 ft depending on configuration and power. The manufacturer did not publish power-on stall speeds for the airplane. The best rate of climb speed at gross weight is 90 KIAS, and the best angle of climb speed is 78 KIAS.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030° at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles; few clouds at 5,000 ft, scattered clouds at 11,000 ft, broken clouds at 22,000 ft, overcast at 25,000 ft; temperature 27°C; dew point 16°C; and altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury. The calculated density altitude at NY05 was about 3,000 ft.

The density altitude at HVN when the airplane departed at 1845 was 1,971 ft.

Airport Information

NY05 was a private-use airport at 1,260 ft elevation, configured with two parallel runways, each of which was 3,000 ft long. Runway 12R/30L was a turf runway, and runway 12L/30R combined both asphalt and turf surfaces.

The elevation of HVN was 12.4 ft. HVN is equipped with two asphalt runways; runway 2/20 is 5600 ft long, and runway 14/32 is 3,626 ft long.

Wreckage and Impact Information

The airplane came to rest in swampy, wooded terrain and was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a 180° magnetic heading and was 60 ft in length. The main wreckage was oriented on a magnetic heading of 350° and rested upright about 1,400 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 700 ft left of the runway's centerline.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to each control surface. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10°.

The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending and leading-edge polishing. The landing gear was retracted.

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller, and continuity of the drive train, valve train, and accessory section were established. The sparkplugs showed signs of normal wear. The magnetos were destroyed by fire. Thumb compression was confirmed on all cylinders. Examination of the engine and disassembly of its accessories revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

Medical And Pathological Information
The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of samples from the pilot, which were negative for ethanol and drugs of abuse.

Additional Information
According to FAA Pamphlet FAA-P-8740-2, Density Altitude:

Whether due to high altitude, high temperature, or both, reduced air density (reported in terms of density altitude) adversely affects aerodynamic performance and decreases the engine's horsepower output. Takeoff distance, power available (in normally aspirated engines), and climb rate are all adversely affected. Landing distance is affected as well; although the indicated airspeed (IAS) remains the same, the true airspeed (TAS) increases. From the pilot's point of view, therefore, an increase in density altitude results in the following:

• Increased takeoff distance.
• Reduced rate of climb.
• Increased TAS (but same IAS) on approach and landing.
• Increased landing roll distance.

Because high density altitude has particular implications for takeoff/climb performance and landing distance, pilots must be sure to determine the reported density altitude and check the appropriate aircraft performance charts carefully during preflight preparation. A pilot's first reference for aircraft performance information should be the operational data section of the aircraft owner's manual or the Pilot's Operating Handbook developed by the aircraft manufacturer. In the example given in the previous text, the pilot may be operating from an airport at 500 ft MSL, but he or she must calculate performance as if the airport were located at 5,000 ft. A pilot who is complacent or careless in using the charts may find that density altitude effects create an unexpected –and unwelcome – element of suspense during takeoff and climb or during landing.

According to the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Information, Chapter 3 (pg. 3-3, para. 1) per the section entitled Density Altitude (DA):

DA is the vertical distance above sea level in the standard atmosphere at which a given density is to be found. The density of air has significant effects on the aircraft's performance because as air becomes less dense, it reduces:

• Power because the engine takes in less air.
• Thrust because a propeller is less efficient in thin air.
• Lift because the thin air exerts less force on the air foils.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  (Estimated) , 561.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N2241Q
Model/Series: PA 28R-201 201
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28R-7737029
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2749 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6573.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-C1C6
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALB, 312 ft msl
Observation Time: 2251 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 95°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 22000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 30°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Esperance, NY (NY05)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: NEW HAVEN, CT (HVN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1845 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HOGAN (NY05)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1260 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 27 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  42.780556, -74.331944



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Esperance, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201, registration: N2241Q
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, was destroyed by collision with terrain and a post-crash fire after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured and three passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05, and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut. There was no flight plan filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witness provided statements, and their accounts of the accident were consistent throughout. During the takeoff roll from runway 30R, the nose wheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nose wheel lifted again and the airplane became airborne. Witnesses stated that the airplane rotated with approximately 500 feet of the 2,000-foot paved runway remaining. The airplane overflew a hangar at the departure end of the runway "at a very low altitude" as it began a left turn.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation administration depicted a target correlated to be the accident airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The target climbed to about 100 feet above ground level (agl), and the radar track ended about 1,000 feet laterally beyond the departure runway.

The airplane was examined at the accident site on flat, swampy, wooded terrain, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 feet above the ground, was oriented about 170 degrees magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest oriented 350 degrees magnetic and was consumed by post-crash fire.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to their respective control inputs. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire.

The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10 degrees. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending. The landing gear was retracted.

The four seat, low wing, retractable tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 200 horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015, and he reported 385 total hours of flight experience on that date.

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030 degrees at 3 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds 5,000 feet agl, scattered clouds at 11,000 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 22,000 feet agl, overcast skies at 25,000 feet agl. The temperature was 27 degrees C, the dew point was 16 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.04 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City, New York 

Andrew M. “Mike” Mydlarz, 50, and his wife Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut.  Susanne and Mike passed away in a small plane crash on July 16th, 2016 in Esperance, New York. Also killed in the crash was their good friend, Lisa Quinn.



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York
Piper Aircraft Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

A and N Company Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2241Q

Location:  Esperance, NY
Accident Number:  ERA16FA257
Date & Time: 07/16/2016, 1845 EDT
Registration:  N2241Q
Aircraft:  PIPER PA 28R-201
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, collided with terrain after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured, the three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05 and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut.

According to a fixed base operator at HVN, on the day of the accident, the airplane was fueled with 14 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel, which brought the fuel level to "just above the tabs." The pilot then flew the airplane with the three passengers onboard from HVN to NY05. According to witnesses, the pilot and passengers attended a party at NY05. A witness reported that the accident airplane was the last of a group of airplanes to depart from NY05 and that another pilot had suggested to the accident pilot that he depart on runway 12L. A review of surveillance video revealed that the airplane took off on runway 30R, which was 3,000 ft long; the first 600 ft and the final 400 ft of runway 30R were turf, and middle 2,000 ft was asphalt. The surveillance video showed that the pilot began the takeoff roll where the paved section of the runway began (with 2,400 ft of available runway). During the takeoff roll, the nosewheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nosewheel lifted again, and the airplane became airborne with about 900 ft of runway remaining.

Several witnesses observed the airplane's takeoff from runway 30R. They consistently described the airplane's takeoff as "slow" and "sluggish" and reported that it entered a "gentle" left turn immediately after takeoff. One witness stated that the airplane attempted to rotate earlier than the other airplanes that were departing that day. When the airplane became airborne, "the nose was pitched so high that the wings wallowed;" the witness then reached for his phone to dial 911. The airplane overflew a hangar located left of the departure end of the runway at a low altitude as it continued its left turn before descending into trees. Another witness stated that "the airplane was under full power the entire time. The engine did not fail."

Due to his injuries, the pilot was not interviewed. In a written statement, the pilot reported that he had "no personal recollection of the subject flight."

Radar track data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The airplane climbed to about 100 ft above ground level, and its groundspeed ranged between 58 and 67 knots from takeoff to the final radar target. The radar track ended about 100 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 1,000 ft left of the runway centerline.

Pilot Information

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015. The pilot reported about 561 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's logbooks were not recovered and no determination could be made of his flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a 200-horsepower Lycoming IO-360 engine driving a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 1, 2016, at 6,573.6 total aircraft hours.

The airplane's weight and balance condition at the time of takeoff was calculated based on the estimated fuel onboard the airplane and the estimated weights of the passengers. According to the information provided by the fixed base operator at HVN, the airplane departed HVN with about 25 gallons or about 300 lbs of usable fuel. Fuel burn from HVN to NY05 was estimated to be about 8 gallons or 48 lbs. 

The airplane's takeoff weight at NY05 was calculated to be 2,816.5 lbs, which was 66.5 lbs above the maximum allowable gross weight of 2,750 lbs. There are no performance charts for any weight above the maximum gross weight. 

The performance charts indicated that at the airplane's maximum allowable gross weight, the estimated takeoff ground roll was 2,180 ft and the total distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle was 2,750 ft. 

According to the pilot's operating handbook for the airplane, the rotation speed for a normal takeoff was between 65 and 75 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS). With a flap setting of 25°, the rotation speed for a short-field takeoff was between 50 and 60 KIAS. After liftoff, the pilot was to increase airspeed to 55 to 65 KIAS. 

There are no performance charts or procedures for a 10° flap setting during takeoff. The performance charts do not consider the effects of a grass runway surface on takeoff and landing performance. 

The gross weight stalling speed with power off and full flaps is 55 KIAS, and, with flaps up, this speed is increased 5 knots. Loss of altitude during stall can be as great as 400 ft depending on configuration and power. The manufacturer did not publish power-on stall speeds for the airplane. The best rate of climb speed at gross weight is 90 KIAS, and the best angle of climb speed is 78 KIAS.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030° at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles; few clouds at 5,000 ft, scattered clouds at 11,000 ft, broken clouds at 22,000 ft, overcast at 25,000 ft; temperature 27°C; dew point 16°C; and altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury. The calculated density altitude at NY05 was about 3,000 ft.

The density altitude at HVN when the airplane departed at 1845 was 1,971 ft.

Airport Information

NY05 was a private-use airport at 1,260 ft elevation, configured with two parallel runways, each of which was 3,000 ft long. Runway 12R/30L was a turf runway, and runway 12L/30R combined both asphalt and turf surfaces.

The elevation of HVN was 12.4 ft. HVN is equipped with two asphalt runways; runway 2/20 is 5600 ft long, and runway 14/32 is 3,626 ft long.

Wreckage and Impact Information

The airplane came to rest in swampy, wooded terrain and was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a 180° magnetic heading and was 60 ft in length. The main wreckage was oriented on a magnetic heading of 350° and rested upright about 1,400 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 700 ft left of the runway's centerline.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to each control surface. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10°.

The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending and leading-edge polishing. The landing gear was retracted.

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller, and continuity of the drive train, valve train, and accessory section were established. The sparkplugs showed signs of normal wear. The magnetos were destroyed by fire. Thumb compression was confirmed on all cylinders. Examination of the engine and disassembly of its accessories revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

Medical And Pathological Information
The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of samples from the pilot, which were negative for ethanol and drugs of abuse.

Additional Information
According to FAA Pamphlet FAA-P-8740-2, Density Altitude:

Whether due to high altitude, high temperature, or both, reduced air density (reported in terms of density altitude) adversely affects aerodynamic performance and decreases the engine's horsepower output. Takeoff distance, power available (in normally aspirated engines), and climb rate are all adversely affected. Landing distance is affected as well; although the indicated airspeed (IAS) remains the same, the true airspeed (TAS) increases. From the pilot's point of view, therefore, an increase in density altitude results in the following:

• Increased takeoff distance.
• Reduced rate of climb.
• Increased TAS (but same IAS) on approach and landing.
• Increased landing roll distance.

Because high density altitude has particular implications for takeoff/climb performance and landing distance, pilots must be sure to determine the reported density altitude and check the appropriate aircraft performance charts carefully during preflight preparation. A pilot's first reference for aircraft performance information should be the operational data section of the aircraft owner's manual or the Pilot's Operating Handbook developed by the aircraft manufacturer. In the example given in the previous text, the pilot may be operating from an airport at 500 ft MSL, but he or she must calculate performance as if the airport were located at 5,000 ft. A pilot who is complacent or careless in using the charts may find that density altitude effects create an unexpected –and unwelcome – element of suspense during takeoff and climb or during landing.

According to the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Information, Chapter 3 (pg. 3-3, para. 1) per the section entitled Density Altitude (DA):

DA is the vertical distance above sea level in the standard atmosphere at which a given density is to be found. The density of air has significant effects on the aircraft's performance because as air becomes less dense, it reduces:

• Power because the engine takes in less air.
• Thrust because a propeller is less efficient in thin air.
• Lift because the thin air exerts less force on the air foils.



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Esperance, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201, registration: N2241Q
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, was destroyed by collision with terrain and a post-crash fire after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured and three passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05, and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut. There was no flight plan filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witness provided statements, and their accounts of the accident were consistent throughout. During the takeoff roll from runway 30R, the nose wheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nose wheel lifted again and the airplane became airborne. Witnesses stated that the airplane rotated with approximately 500 feet of the 2,000-foot paved runway remaining. The airplane overflew a hangar at the departure end of the runway "at a very low altitude" as it began a left turn.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation administration depicted a target correlated to be the accident airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The target climbed to about 100 feet above ground level (agl), and the radar track ended about 1,000 feet laterally beyond the departure runway.

The airplane was examined at the accident site on flat, swampy, wooded terrain, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 feet above the ground, was oriented about 170 degrees magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest oriented 350 degrees magnetic and was consumed by post-crash fire.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to their respective control inputs. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire.

The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10 degrees. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending. The landing gear was retracted.

The four seat, low wing, retractable tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 200 horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015, and he reported 385 total hours of flight experience on that date.

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030 degrees at 3 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds 5,000 feet agl, scattered clouds at 11,000 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 22,000 feet agl, overcast skies at 25,000 feet agl. The temperature was 27 degrees C, the dew point was 16 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.04 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.


AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES INTO A WOODED AREA, THERE WERE 4 PERSONS ON BOARD, 3 WERE FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, NEAR ESPERANCE, NEW YORK.

ESPERANCE, N.Y. (AP) - Authorities say they've officially identified the three people who died when their single-engine aircraft crashed and burned soon after taking off from a rural airport in upstate New York last weekend.

Matthew Coltrain, a coroner in Schoharie County, identified the victims Thursday as 50-year-old Andrew "Mike" Mydlarz and his wife, Susanne Hilgefort, both of Stamford, Connecticut, and 48-year-old Lisa Marie Quinn of New York City.

A fourth person survived last Saturday's crash in the town of Esperance, about 30 miles west of Albany. That person was taken to the burn unit at Westchester Medical Center. The person's name and condition information haven't been released.

The 48-year-old Hilgefort was a longtime Manhattan-based broadcasting employee of Major League Baseball. MLB officials on Tuesday confirmed the couple's death.


The cause of the crash remains under investigation.




Andrew M. “Mike” Mydlarz, 50, and his wife Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut 



An executive with Major League Baseball was among the three people killed in Saturday's plane crash in Schoharie County, according to MLB.com

Susanne Hilgefort, the league's 38-year-old senior director of broadcasting business affairs, was one of the longest tenured employees of MLB, the league's official website noted.

Hilgefort's husband, Michael Mydlarz, also died in the crash, according to MLB.

The identity of the third person who died has not yet been released.

A fourth passenger was taken to the burn unit at Westchester Medical Center.

The plane, a Piper PA-28, crashed Saturday evening just outside of the perimeter of a private airstrip in Esperance.

Schoharie County Sheriff Anthony Desmond said Sunday that three bodies were removed from the wreckage and transported to Albany Medical Center Hospital, where autopsies were expected to be performed Monday. Schoharie County Coroner Matthew Coltrain declared the passengers deceased at the scene.

The sheriff said the plane took off from the air strip called Hogan Airport, 212 Brandon Road, in the town of Esperance, and managed to stay airborne for about 1,000 feet before crashing southwest of the airport into a woody, swampy area. On Sunday, police were restricting access to a gravel, private road that runs along the air strip property named Whitetail Lane. A State Police helicopter was also stationed at the air strip, and was occasionally taking off to view the crash area.

http://www.timesunion.com

Beloved MLB employee Hilgefort dies in plane crash: http://m.mlb.com






What caused a small plane to crash and kill three on board and critically injure another is now a question for investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and State Police.

After the crash of the Piper PA-28 near Hogan Airport in the town of Esperance Sunday, three bodies were removed from the wreckage and transported to Albany Medical Center Hospital.

A fourth male passenger was flown to Alb Med and then transferred to the Westchester Medical Center burn unit, Schoharie County Sheriff Anthony Desmond said. 

The sheriff said the plane took off from the air strip called Hogan Airport and managed to stay airborne for about 1,000 feet before crashing southwest of the airport in a wooded, swampy area.FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen says the aircraft crashed around 6:45 p.m. Saturday and was destroyed by fire.

NTSB Investigator-in-charge Millicent Hoidal arrived at the airport and documented damage to the aircraft and marks made on the ground, and he interviewed two witnesses.

Hoidal, who in the past worked as an investigator in Anchorage, Alaska, said she hopes to move the wreckage from its swampy resting place to a more secure environment. The NTSB is charged by Congress with investigating every civil aviation accident in the United States. It will release a report in seven to 10 days, a spokesman said.

Desmond said he did not know the identities of the victims, but said they were apparently traveling back to Connecticut.

The air strip, which sits on the border between Schoharie and Montgomery counties, is listed as being owned by Tim Hogan, who has an address near the air strip and in Bedford Hills, Westchester County.







ESPERANCE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – State Police and NTSB investigators are taking the lead on the investigation into the small plane crash in Schoharie County that left three dead and one severely injured Saturday afternoon.

Officials say four people took off in the small plane at Hogan Airport, a small private airport around 6:45 p.m.

Esperance Fire Chief Matthew Deffer says the plane did take off and go airborne, before it lost engine power and then crashed in the woods, about 1,000 feet from the runway.

Chief Deffer says he believes the only person to make it out of the plane alive was the pilot, a man the chief describes as in his 40s or 50s who was a trained pilot who has been flying for years.

The pilot was originally transported by helicopter to Albany Medical Center, but was then transferred to the Westchester Medical Center Burn Unit late Saturday evening.

Chief Deffer says all four passengers were from out of state, and flew into Hogan Airport for a part hosted by the owners of the airfield.

The crash occurred on their way home the party.

Chief Deffer says protecting the area was a joint effort between multiple police and deputies and roughly ten fire departments.

“it was a great sacrifice that we could work together,” said Chief Deffer. “And you know make the best attempt to do what our job is and to protect and save a life.”

It’s going to take investigators time to go through the aircraft, says Chief Deffer.

Investigators are going to pull maintenance records, in an effort to find out exactly what happened.

Officials say recovering the aircraft could still take a couple more days.

Autopsies are schedule for Monday.


Story and video:   http://news10.com



ESPERANCE, N.Y. -- Three people are dead after a small plane crashed in Schoharie County. That's according to the Schoharie County Sheriff's Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration said four people were on board that plane. Sheriff Tony Desmond said one person was airlifted to an area hospital with serious injuries. The three deceased were taken to Albany Medical Center for autopsies. 


Authorities said the plane took off from Hogan Airport in Esperance around 7 last night, when it crashed about 1,000 feet from the airport. They are still working to determine what caused the plane to go down.


"It sounded like the engine lost power and that the plane started to decrease in the air," said Esperance Fire Chief Matthew Deffer. "And it went down into the trees and that's when we received the call." 


The plane was destroyed by fire. Crews said it could take days to clear the debris from the wooded area.


Story and video:   http://www.twcnews.com







SLOANSVILLE – The Schoharie County Sheriff's Office said a small plane went down just outside of Hogan Airport in Sloansville Saturday at around 6:30 pm.

The plane landed in some woods nearby.

Schoharie County Sheriff Tony Desmond said four people were on board when the plane took off from the airport. 

"There were 4 people on that plane,” Desmond said. “One person somehow got out of the plane suffering some burns and was treated here by EMS and then flown by a medic helicopter I believe to Albany medical center,” he said. 

The plane made it about one thousand feet southwest of the airport before it crashed. 

At some point the plane caught fire.

At least one person was able to climb out of the burning plane alive. 

Fire Chief Matthew Deffer of the Esperance Fire Department said three other people on board the plane are presumed to be missing until investigators can confirm their status.

He also said Fire the plane was completely engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived on the scene.  

It took an hour and a half to put out the flames. 

"There's approximately 10 fire departments on the scene and we did have quite an issue getting in there trying to gains access through the wooded area,” Deffer said. “We had to get ATV's and forest vehicles," he said.

Deffer also said witness who called to report the plane going down said it was flying very low.

The chief says the plane was never airborne. 

State police have taken over the investigation and ATF officials will also be assisting in the investigation. 

Fire officials said there is very little is left of the plane, which went down near the boarder of Schoharie and Montgomery counties.

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SCHOHARIE COUNTY — A small airplane with four people onboard crashed on takeoff Saturday night in Schoharie County, possibly resulting in multiple fatalities, authorities said. 

The crash of the private plane occurred near the town of Esperance.

The Daily Gazette received unconfirmed reports that the crash killed three people and a fourth person was airlifted to Albany Medical Center.

“That’s what we think, but the coroner’s on-scene and nobody has been declared dead,” Schoharie County Sheriff Anthony Desmond said about 9 p.m.

All four were believed to be occupants of the plane. None of their identities were immediately available.

Desmond said the plane took off from a private airport near the Town of Esperance.

“The plane never became fully airborne and it went into the woods just southwest of the airfield,” he said.

The private field, called Hogan Airport, is located in the town of Sloansville. The scene of the crash appears to be near Old Brandon Road in Sloansville.

Tim Hogan, who owns the airfield, told The Daily Gazette he was told three people were killed.

“I wasn’t down there but apparently [three people died], that’s what the state police are telling me,” said Hogan. He said he could not comment further at the time.

“They didn’t gain altitude during takeoff and it went down,” said Desmond of the crash.

Desmond could not say what kind of plane was involved.

“It wasn’t in any shape that I could identify what kind of plane it was,” said Desmond.

Desmond said State Police are investigating the crash and that the National Transportation Safety Board is being advised.

Members of the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, the Schoharie County Sheriff’s Office, State Police and about a half-dozen area fire departments responded to the scene, Desmond said.