Sunday, July 6, 2014

Iran slams European countries for not selling jet fuel to Iranian aircraft

Deputy Director of Iran Civil Aviation Organization said that some European airports still refuse to sell jet fuel to Iranian airplanes, which violates the Convention on International Civil Aviation.

Mohammad Khodakarami said that the countries have been refusing to sell jet fuel to Iran since 2010, Iran's IRNA News Agency reported on July 6.

"The mentioned airports didn't make any change in their policy even after the interim deal between Tehran and the P5+1 group of countries," he explained.

According to Khodakarami nine countries including Germany, France, and England currently refuse to sell jet fuel to Iran.

Read more here:   http://en.cihan.com.tr

Flight Design CTSW, N508CT: Fatal accident occurred July 05, 2014 in Gasport, New York

SCHNABEL JOHN A:   http://registry.faa.gov/N508CT

http://dms.ntsb.gov
 
NTSB Identification: ERA14LA329

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 05, 2014 in Gasport, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/02/2016
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CT-SW 2006, registration: N508CT
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The private pilot was taking off in the light sport airplane for a local flight. Witnesses reported seeing the pilot
begin the takeoff. During the rotation, the airplane appeared to pitch up higher than normal, followed by up-and-down pitch oscillations and left bank oscillations; it climbed no higher than about 75 ft. The airplane began a slow left bank, which was not consistent with a normal takeoff procedure, before impacting trees south of the runway in a left-wing-low attitude. The pilot indicated to his son before he died that the airplane experienced flight control issues related to the autopilot. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the flaps were symmetrically extended 15 degrees, and there was no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction of the flight controls for roll, pitch, or yaw. According to an airplane performance study, the pilot was operating the airplane about 4 knots above its stall speed during the left turn; however, the location of the main wreckage with respect to the airplane’s last GPS data point indicated that the bank angle likely increased and exceeded the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Data from the engine’s recording device indicated that, during the beginning portion of the takeoff sequence while the airplane was over the runway, the engine rpm decreased about 50 rpm and then increased nearly 900 rpm about the point and time when the airplane banked left and hit the trees. Postaccident operational testing of the engine revealed that it produced full-rated power with no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. The reason for the reduced power setting at takeoff could not be determined.

Although the pilot reported that the pitch-and-roll oscillations during takeoff were related to the autopilot, it could not be determined during examination of the autopilot whether the autopilot was engaged during the accident flight. Postaccident testing of the autopilot controller and roll servo revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction; the override torque value of the roll servo was within limits. 

The autopilot controller minimum airspeed was found set to a value of 0, which would have disabled the minimum airspeed alert if the autopilot were engaged. The pitch servo was found inoperative due to a failed voltage regulator; however, this condition would not have caused any increased torque or servo runaway. Following replacement of the failed component, the pitch servo tested satisfactorily, and the override value was within limits. Therefore, if the autopilot had been engaged and an autopilot malfunction had occurred, the pilot would have been able to override any pitch and yaw servo commands. Further, if the autopilot had been engaged and the controller minimum airspeed had been set to an appropriate value, it is likely that a stall alert would have occurred that provided the pilot with adequate time to respond to and avert an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed following a left turn during takeoff, which led to the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 5, 2014, about 1104 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH CT-SW 2006, N508CT, collided with trees then the ground shortly after takeoff from Royalton Airport, Gasport, New York. The private rated pilot, the sole occupant was fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal, local flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the occurrence.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) personnel, witnesses reported the pilot performed an engine run-up at the approach end of runway 7, then back taxied down the runway where he turned around and initiated takeoff from runway 25. At rotation the airplane appeared to pitch up higher than normal followed by up and down pitch oscillations and left bank oscillations, climbing no higher than approximately 75 feet. The airplane also began a slow bank to the left, before impacting trees south of the runway in a left wing low attitude. The airplane came to rest nearly inverted on an easterly heading in a heavily wooded area. Witnesses called 911 to report the accident and the pilot was rescued and transported to a hospital, where he died on July 16, 2014.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 78, held an airline transport pilot certificate with rating(s) airplane multi-engine land; at the airline transport pilot level he held type ratings in B727 and DC-9. He held a commercial pilot certificate with rotorcraft helicopter, and instrument helicopter ratings; at the commercial level he was type rated in a SK-58. He also held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating, and held flight engineer certificate with turbojet and turboprop ratings. He held a third class medical certificate with a limitation to have available glasses for near vision on May 24, 2011. On the application for the last medical certificate he listed a total time of 30,225 hours, and his weight was listed as 222 pounds. There were no records of previous accidents or incidents or FAA enforcement actions.

A review of the pilot's pilot logbook from September 12, 2012, to the last entry dated May 21, 2014, revealed he logged 20 flights in the airplane totaling 34.5 hours. The first flight of September 17, 2012, was associated with the date he purchased the airplane and was logged as dual received and also as pilot-in-command (PIC). The remainder of the flights were only logged as PIC.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 2006 by Flight Design GmbH, as model CT-SW 2006, and was designated serial number 06-10-06. It was powered by a Rotax 912 ULS carbureted engine rated for 5 minutes maximum at 100 horsepower at 5,800 rpm, or 95 horsepower maximum continuous performance at 5,500 rpm. It was equipped with a fixed pitch propeller.

Review of the maintenance records revealed the airplane was last inspected in accordance with an annual inspection that was signed off on June 24, 2014. The airframe logbook entry indicated in part that the autopilot computer was overhauled at the factory, and an invoice provided by the pilot's son indicated the inoperative roll servo was removed and a loaner roll servo was installed and rigged. The airplane total time at that time was reported to be 317.1 hours. Excerpts from the airframe maintenance records are contained in the NTSB public docket.

According to the mechanic who performed the last annual inspection, following installation of the overhauled autopilot computer and loaner roll servo, he test flew the airplane twice totaling about 1.2 hours. During both flights he operated the autopilot later reporting no discrepancies with the system including the loaner roll servo.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (BUF), Buffalo, New York, at 1054, or approximately 10 minutes before the accident indicates the wind was from 260 degrees at 8 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, and few clouds existed at 25,000 feet. The temperature and dew point were 22 and 09 degrees Celsius respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.25 inches of Mercury (inHg). The accident site was located about 16 nautical miles and 28 degrees from BUF.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Royalton Airport is a public-use airplane equipped with a single runway designated 7/25; the airport elevation is 628 feet. The asphalt runway is 2,530 feet long and 35 feet wide.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The airplane was equipped with a Rotax Flydat engine recording device that recorded and retained engine data associated with time, exhaust gas temperature, pressure, engine rpm, water temperature and oil temperature. The airplane was also equipped with a Garmin 396 GPS. Both devices were removed from the airplane and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory located in Washington, D.C. The Flydat was subsequently hand carried by a NTSB investigator to Rotax's facility in British Columbia, for readout. The data was provided to a NTSB specialist in Washington, D.C. The GPS was read-out by the NTSB specialist located in Washington, DC.

According to the NTSB specialist's factual report, correlation of the data recorded by the FLYdat and the GPS data was performed which resulted in an error of plus or minus 3 seconds. Based on the GPS data, the groundspeed began to increase between 1104:02, and 1104:10. The airplane accelerated to 32 knots groundspeed while maintaining runway heading at 1104:19. The next data point 1 second later, while over the runway, indicates the airplane had accelerated to 39 knots groundspeed, the altitude was 6 feet higher, and the heading had changed over 5 degrees to the left. Five seconds later, or at 1104:25, the airplane was over trees south of the runway, had attained the maximum recorded groundspeed value of 41 knots, the altitude was recorded to be 679 feet, and the heading was recorded to be 207.5 degrees.

Plotting on a map of GPS data and correlation of the FLYdat and GPS data revealed that during the takeoff while over the runway, the engine rpm increased to 3,230 rpm, and remained at that value for about 5 seconds. The rpm dropped about 50 rpm, then increased to the maximum recorded value of 4,590 rpm at 1104:32, which was the last FLYdat data point. The last valid in-flight data point from the GPS was determined to be at 1104:25.

Review of FLYdat data for the previous flight revealed that during takeoff, the engine rpm sharply increased to about 5,000, and remained at the value until being reduced. A report from the NTSB specialist regarding the FLYdat and GPS, and the data downloaded from the FLYdat and GPS are contained in the NTSB public docket.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane crashed in a heavily wooded area south of the runway and came to rest nearly inverted on a nearly due east heading at 43 degrees 10.87 minutes North latitude and 078 degrees 33.41 minutes West longitude. That location when plotted was located about 180 feet south of the southern edge of the runway, and 242 feet and 133 degrees from the last GPS in-flight target.

Following recovery of the airplane, it was inspected by representatives of the FAA along with a representative of the airframe manufacturer. The examination determined that the flaps were symmetrically extended 15 degrees, which equated to the flap selector. The ballistic parachute was not deployed, and inspection of the flight controls for roll, pitch, and yaw revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction.

Examination of the cockpit revealed the choke was off, the throttle was full forward, and the brake was off. The ballistic parachute activation safety pin remained in place in the activation handle. The airspeed indicator was near 0. The on-board FLYdat engine monitor and Garmin 396 GPS receiver were retained and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Division for read-out.

Following recovery of the airplane, examination of the engine was performed by a representative of the engine manufacturer with FAA oversight. The inspection revealed crankshaft, camshaft and valve train continuity was confirmed; compression was noted in all cylinders. During hand rotation of the engine, no unusual sounds were noted coming from the gearbox. Impact damage was noted to the radiator, but coolant was noted in the expansion tank. The carburetor bowls were removed and corrosion was noted inside. The engine was shipped to a facility for an attempted engine run.

Operational testing of the engine was performed with FAA oversight; a calibrated test club propeller pitched for 5,600 rpm was installed. In preparation for the engine run, the oil tank was replaced in order to avoid possible contamination and the muffler was replaced because it was crushed. The engine was placed on a test stand with no additional work performed, and the oil system was then purged of air in advance of the attempted engine run. While priming the fuel system, a slight fuel leak was noted in a location between the fuel pump and carburetor. The engine was started and operated to 5,600 rpm remaining at that setting for about 2 minutes. The magnetos checked good and the engine was operated using the ignition system components installed at the time of the accident. During the engine run the oil pressure and oil temperature were within limits and no discrepancies were noted. The engine was secured, and then operated a 2nd time with no discrepancies noted. A copy of the report from the engine manufacturer representative is contained in the NTSB public docket.

Examination of the three bladed propeller revealed all blades were fractured at varying lengths.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot was reported by his son to be in good health on the day of the accident; the pilot died while hospitalized on July 16, 2014, or 11 days after the accident; therefore, a postmortem examination was not performed.

Approximately 6cc's of blood taken upon hospital admittance was obtained from the hospital by the medical examiner and that sample was sent to the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated that testing for carbon monoxide and cyanide was not performed, and the results were negative for volatiles and tested drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Examination of the autopilot system components consisting of the computer, pitch and roll servos was performed at the manufacturer's facility with FAA oversight. According to the report, it was not possible to determine whether the autopilot system was engaged at the time of the accident. The autopilot controller which is also a flight instrument was inspected and the display was centered and correct, which indicates that either it was unpowered during the accident, or the autopilot remained powered and functional after the accident. The manufacturer reported the display would have required less than 30 seconds of power for the display to re-zero. After power application the settings were consistent with what would be expected for the accident airplane. It was noted that the minimum airspeed was set to a value of zero, which disabled an alert of a low airspeed situation. The autopilot was tested to the standards of a new unit and no issues were noted.

Further examination of the autopilot system components consisting of the roll servo revealed the safety shear pin which by design will shear in the event of motor corrosion or gear jam was determined to have been properly installed and not sheared. The motor was tested and capable of 34.5 inch pounds of torque. The torque enhancer was impact damaged and could not be tested. The gears were inspected and were free of foreign objects or foreign object damage (FOD). Upon connection to the test equipment, the servo operated correctly, and the output torque and override torque values were within specification. Inspection of the pitch servo revealed the safety shear pin which by design will shear in the event of motor corrosion or gear jam was determined to have been properly installed and not sheared. The motor is capable of approximately 45 inch pounds of torque. Attempts to operationally test the pitch servo revealed it was not operational; this was attributed to be from a failed voltage regulator. The manufacturer reported it could not be determined if the failed voltage regulator was pre-accident or the result of the accident sequence. The manufacturer also indicated the failure of the voltage regulator could not cause any increased torque or servo runaway. The safety shear which by design will shear in the event of motor corrosion or gear jam was determined to have been properly installed and not sheared. The failed voltage regulator was replaced, and the pitch servo was tested and found to operate correctly and was capable of 40 inch pounds of torque. The output torque and override torque values were within specification. The gears were inspected and were free of foreign objects or foreign object damage (FOD). A copy of the report from the manufacturer and FAA concurring statement are contained in the NTSB public docket.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION/DATA

Pilot's Account

The pilot's son reported in writing that during one visit with his father 3 days after the accident following removal of the breathing tube, he asked his father if he was aware what had occurred and he said yes, he had crashed. The son asked his father if he wanted to talk about it and he nodded his head yes. Aware that witnesses had observed the airplane roll to the left three times, corrected, and then pitch up and roll to the left, he asked his father if there was a flight control issue. His father said yes and nodded his head up and down strongly. He then asked his father if he thought the flight control issue was related to the autopilot and he said yes and again nodded his head up and down strongly. A statement from the son is contained in the NTSB public docket.

Weight and Balance

Weight and balance calculations were performed using the empty weight of the airplane (715 pounds), and the weight of the pilot per his last medical examination (222 pounds). Since the fuel load at the time of the accident could not be determined, for calculation purposes the fuel tank in each wing was considered to be full, resulting in a total usable fuel capacity of 33.0 gallons. Based on a fuel weight of approximately 6 pounds per gallon, the fuel weight was calculated to be 198 pounds. The empty weight at the moment of engine start was calculated to be 1,135 pounds, which was approximately 188 pounds less than the specified maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) of 1323 pounds.

Performance Information

According to the NTSB Performance Study, the aircraft's true airspeed (TAS) for the last GPS points was approximately 46 knots. Assuming that the aircraft's flight path between the last three GPS points was part of a smooth coordinated turn, the radius of that turn was calculated to be 368 feet. Based on the aircraft's TAS of 46 knots and radius of 368 feet, the necessary bank was calculated to be about 27 degrees for the lift to balance the centripedal force of the turn and keep the airplane aloft. Additionally, the study indicates that the near 30 degrees of bank needed to maneuver between the last GPS points correlates to the airplane flying about 4 knots above the stall speed. Based on the wreckage being located on an easterly track 230 feet from the final GPS location, assuming a single banked turn, the aircraft's bank angle would have had to increase beyond the 27 degrees and the aircraft's stall speed would have continued to increase. A copy of the Performance Study and information from the airplane manufacturer regarding stall speeds are contained in the NTSB public docket.

http://dms.ntsb.gov

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA329
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 05, 2014 in Gasport, NY
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CT-SW 2006, registration: N508CT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 5, 2014, about 1233 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH CT-SW 2006, N508CT, collided with trees then the ground shortly after takeoff from Royalton Airport, Gasport, New York. The private rated pilot sustained serious injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal, local flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the occurrence.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) personnel, witnesses reported the pilot performed an engine run-up at the approach end of runway 7, then back taxied down the runway where he turned around and initiated takeoff from runway 25. Witnesses reported to FAA personnel that at rotation the airplane appeared to pitch up higher than normal followed by up and down pitch oscillations and left bank oscillations, climbing no higher than approximately 75 feet. The airplane also began a slow bank to the left, before impacting trees south of the runway in a left wing low attitude. The airplane came to rest nearly inverted on an easterly heading in a heavily wooded area. Witnesses called 911 to report the accident and the pilot was rescued and transported to a hospital for treatment of his injuries.




John A. Schnabel


John Schnabel 
Obituary 

March 11, 1936 - July 16, 2014
Resided in (A) Williamsville, NY

Obituary


Schnabel, John Arthur; March 11, 1936-July 16, 2014; beloved husband of Karole (nee Piper) Schnabel; loving father to John (Birthe), Jeffrey (Jaime), James (Bodil), Kay Marie (Richard) Kassel and Jack (Kim) Schnabel; cherished grandfather of John, Jr., Christopher, Sarah, Adam, Michael, Mary, Maxwell, Evelyn, Caroline, William, Thomas, Joseph and Alex; son of the late John and Casimera Schnabel. John was a 1954 Graduate of Lafayette High School, 1958 Graduate of Buffalo State College, longtime member of the West Side Rowing Club, he served for 39 years in the U.S. Military which included 4 years U.S. Navy Reserve, 13 years U.S. Marine Corps, 22 years U.S. National Guard and had 30 years service at American Airlines as a captain. The family will be present Saturday and Sunday from 4-8 PM at the (Amherst Chapel) AMIGONE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 5200 Sheridan Drive (corner Hopkins Road) where prayers will be offered on Monday at 9:15 AM and followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 AM from St. Pius X Church. Share condolences at www.AMIGONE.com



 
The FAA and the NTSB will be investigating two small plane accidents that happened this weekend in Western New York. One claimed the life of the pilot and the pilot of the other plane was injured. Both pilots were over 75 years old. Time Warner Cable News reporter Kevin Jolly asked one expert if there should age limits for pilots. 

"There are probably some people that are 35 years old that shouldn't be flying and there are probably some 80 and 85-year-old pilots that are sharp as a tack and are very capable of being able to fly," said David Sanctuary, Aviation expert.

David Sancutary was the Jamestown Airport Manager for five years and was also in charge of training pilots for Continental Airlines. He says while there is no age restriction on non-commercial airline pilots, private pilots have to meet some strict requirements.


 - See more at: http://centralny.twcnews.com

Aircraft noise causes resident’s distress call

A Port Macquarie resident, distressed by aircraft noise, has called for changes to a training circuit.

Robin Voight bought a house expecting to live in a quiet neighborhood at Innes Peninsula but the aircraft noise changed all that.

Ms Voight believes most of the noise is due to international pilot training.   Port Macquarie-based Arena International Aviation confirmed last year 150 pilot cadets a year from China will train under its guidance in a step towards becoming pilots with Hainan Airlines.


 Read more and Comments:   http://www.portnews.com.au

Why Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority grounds airlines after crashes

The Acting Director-General of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority, NCAA, Mr Benedict Adeyileka has opened up as to why the regulatory agency grounds airlines immediately after accidents.

Adeyileka attributed such groundings to the decision by the authority to restore public confidence and carry out full audit of such airlines.

Apart from this, he also disclosed that in most cases, airlines involved in crashes are reluctant to return to flight operations immediately, which further leads to longer grounding of their entire fleet, not by the agency, but by the airlines themselves.


Read more here:  http://www.tribune.com.ng

Hunters injured in helicopter crash

Two people have been injured in a helicopter crash in Marlborough.

One person has a broken leg while the other person on board suffered a back injury.

Sergeant Jim Currie said the people involved in the crash are believed to have been hunting in the area.

Read more here:   http://m.tvnz.co.nz

Cessna 150J, N50824: Fatal accident occurred July 06, 2014 in Topping, Virginia

MYERS STEPHEN L: http://registry.faa.gov/N50824 

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA328 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 06, 2014 in Topping, VA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150J, registration: N50824
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 6, 2014, about 1643 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150J, N50824, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground in an open field in Topping, Virginia, shortly after departing Hummel Field Airport (W75), in Saluda, Virginia. The airplane was owned and operated by an individual. The pilot and sole passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to several eyewitnesses, the airplane was observed near the airport and it "would not gain altitude." The airplane made two landing attempts and while on a southerly heading, the airplane was flying "very low," made a "hard right turn" to the east, and subsequently descended and impacted the ground.

The wreckage debris path was 17 feet in length, from the impact point to the main wreckage, and the main wreckage came to rest on a 280 degree heading The airplane impacted the field in a nose down attitude. The initial impact crater measured 8 inches deep. In addition, there was a linear indentation in the dirt that spanned approximately 17 feet in either direction of the impact crater, which was similar in dimension as the wingspan. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. Examination of the engine and airframe revealed that there were no anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation prior to the accident.

Two engine monitoring instruments were removed from the cockpit and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for download.


Aircraft crashed for unknown reasons.

Flight Standards District Office:   FAA Richmond FSDO-21



MCINTYRE, Misty MCINTYRE 

Misty Dawn Misty Dawn McIntyre, 48, of Newport, Va., passed unexpectedly on Sunday, July 6. She is survived by her daughters, Summer and Cassie Brown; son, Mark McIntyre; sisters, Kari LeMay, Rebel Cannan, and Michael Ann Loftus-Harting; mother Lori LeMay; and father, Eugene Barfield. Misty was best known for her desire to mother and nurture not just her own children, as any person or animal in need of shelter or love was taken in or supported without question. This spirit was shared with many during her time as a labor and delivery nurse and then later, as a home health nurse throughout southwestern Virginia. Misty will always be remembered for her optimism and faith in the face of hardship, her love of all things feline and equine, and contagious smile offered without hesitation to friends and strangers alike. An outdoor service will be held Saturday, July 12, 11 a.m., at 593 Bluegrass Trail in Newport. We want to encourage everyone that would like to share in this celebration of Misty's life to attend and stay after for a potluck lunch and visitation with her family and friends. If desired, memorial donations may be made in Misty's name to either the Ocracats at P.O. Box 993, Ocracoke NC 27960 or the Blind Cat Rescue at www.blindcatrescue.com.
 
TOPPING, VA (WWBT) -  A second person has died from a plane crash in Middlesex on Sunday.

Misty Dawn McIntyre of Newport passed away as a result of her injuries, according to State Police. She was in the plane piloted by Stephen L. Myers when it went down in the Topping area of the county around 5 p.m.

Officials say the plane was taking off from Hummell Field Airport, about a half mile from where it crashed. The owner of the home closest to where the plane crashed says he pulled McIntyre from the plane. She was tangled in seatbelts. McIntyre was taken to Norfolk General Hospital in critical condition. 


Volunteer firefighters arrived on the scene in minutes. Crews stopped the plane from leaking fuel.  A witness said he heard the plane making unusual noises, while circling multiple times prior to the crash.  The crash is still an active Virginia State Police, FAA, and NTSB investigation.
Source Article:  http://www.nbc12.com

Foreign airport scrutiny focuses on electronic devices

Don't bring dead phones or laptops to those overseas airports for flights heading to the USA.

Department of Homeland Security officials warned last week that security would tighten at airports where flights head directly to the USA but without providing much detail about how the scrutiny would change.

But security officials said Sunday that the attention is focused on explosives that could be disguised as electronic devices.


Story and Comments:  http://www.usatoday.com

No mobile phones allowed on United States bound flights unless charged

Mobile phones and laptops will be banned from planes heading for the US if they are not charged up, amid heightened fears of an imminent terrorist attack.

And last night it emerged that passengers at Dublin airport may soon be forced to turn on electronic devices to prove they are real at security in light of mounting threats of an Al-Qaeda bomb attack.

Both the Dublin Airport Authority and Aer Lingus have confirmed they are noting the new guidelines.

- See more at: http://www.independent.ie

Fatal skydiving accident occurred July 06, 2014 in Marshall, Michigan

MARSHALL, Mich. (WOOD) — A 76-year-old Indiana man died while skydiving in Calhoun County Sunday. 

Around 11 a.m., police officers were called to the area of Pratt Avenue and Wooley Drive, about a quarter-mile from Brooks Field Airport in Marshall.

When officers arrived, the victim was already dead, according to the Marshall Police Department.

He was identified as 76-year-old George Speakman of Angola, Ind.

The details surrounding and the cause of the death are not yet known.

Workers at the airport said the company involved is Skydive Michigan. People at the office of the company declined to comment Sunday.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson said the agency will investigate whether the plane or pilot played a role in the death, though that did not immediately appear to be the case.

Marshall police say they and the Calhoun County Medical Examiner continue to investigate.

Story and video:  http://woodtv.com

Rockwell International 500-S, N101AA: Accident occurred July 02, 2014 at Cochise County Airport (P33), Willcox, Arizona

On Wednesday July 2, at about 7:35 p.m., the Cochise County Sheriff's Office was advised of an airplane crash at the Willcox airport.  

Sheriff's Deputies arrived on scene along with Willcox Rural Fire Department, Arizona DPS Air Rescue, DPS, and HCI medical and located the twin engine airplane and two occupants.

No significant injuries occurred to the two occupants, who were taken to a local hospital to be evaluated and later released.

Story and photo:  http://www.willcoxrangenews.com

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, COCHISE COUNTY AIRPORT, WILLCOX, AZ


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

http://www.asias.faa.gov/N101AA 

AMERICAN EAST AIRWAYS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N101AA 

Aeronca 7CCM Champion, N82442: Accident occurred July 05, 2014 in Prentiss, Mississippi

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA332
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 05, 2014 in Prentiss, MS
Aircraft: AERONCA 7CCM, registration: N82442
Injuries: 2 Minor,1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 5, 2014, about 1130 central daylight time, an Aeronca 7CCM, N82442, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a forced landing, following a total loss of engine power during cruise flight near Prentiss, Mississippi. The private pilot and one passenger incurred minor injuries, while a second passenger was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local flight. The flight originated from Prentiss County Airport (M43), Prentiss, Mississippi, about 0930.

The pilot reported that he completely filled the fuel tanks prior to departing. Toward the end of the approximate 2 hour flight, the engine suddenly lost all power without warning. He switched from the header fuel tank to the right main fuel tank. He also set up for a forced landing to a hayfield as the rest of the nearby terrain was wooded. Just prior to landing, the engine regained power for approximately 3 seconds and then lost all power again. The momentary gain in power placed the airplane on a high glidepath for the hayfield. The pilot did not want to risk landing in the surrounding trees and stalled the airplane as he was maneuvering to land in the hayfield. After the accident, he confirmed there was fuel in the header fuel tank and right wing fuel tank. He did not know why the engine lost all power. The airplane was not insured and the pilot planned to scrap it. As such, he had no planes to further troubleshoot why the engine lost all power.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that during the impact, the right main landing gear separated and the right wing partially collapsed downward. The airplane was utilizing automobile gasoline, which was approved by a supplemental type certificate. The inspector noted that the header fuel tank was compromised during the impact and did not contain fuel. The right wing fuel tank was intact and contained fuel. The airplane was not equipped with a left wing fuel tank. Due to the disposition of the wreckage (right gear and wing collapse), the inspector was only able to rotate the propeller about 90 degrees before ground contact, but did not note any mechanical binding. He was also not able to access the fuel bowl. The inspector added that a rear seat passenger was carrying her 5-year-old son on her lap. The pilot and adult passenger received lacerations. The son was not injured.



 PRENTISS, MS (WDAM) - Three people were injured in Jefferson Davis County around noon when their single-engine plane crashed in a field near the Covington County line. The pilot, Sammy Glen Hooks of Collins, Kristie Wade, 37, of Collins and her son, Connor Wade, 5, were injured in the crash. 

All three were taken by private vehicle to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, and the pilot and Connor Wade have been released from the hospital.

Authorities said the plane took off from an airstrip in Prentiss.  A witness said it came in low over a tree line and bounced once, losing a wheel before coming to a stop. 


Read more here:  http://www.wdam.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N82442

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, N3723T: Fatal accident occurred July 06, 2014 in Lake Elsinore, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items  -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Riverside FSDO-21


DOUGLAS J.  SYMICZEK:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3723T  

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA282
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 06, 2014 in Lake Elsinore, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/18/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-180, registration: N3723T
Injuries: 3 Fatal.


NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A video made by a witness located in a restaurant parking lot near the top of a ridge initially shows the airplane wings level at a low altitude with a steady engine rpm and the landing gear in the retracted position. The airplane then makes about a 45-degree, left turn. The airplane subsequently levels off, flying in the direction toward the ridgeline with the landing gear in the extended position. The airplane continues at a low altitude toward the rising terrain, and then the video ends. Shortly thereafter, witnesses reported seeing smoke in the area where the airplane had disappeared from their sight. The wreckage was found about 0.32 mile southwest of the restaurant parking lot, and the airplane had impacted trees on the rising terrain. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

This airplane was equipped with a back-up landing gear extension system, which incorporates a pressure-sensing device to automatically lower the landing gear at airspeeds between about 85 and 105 mph depending upon the power setting and regardless of the position of the gear handle in the cockpit. The system can be overridden by manually holding the emergency gear lever in the raised position. About 16 years before the accident, the manufacturer issued a mandatory two-part service bulletin requiring that either (1) the back-up landing gear extension system be removed from the airplane or (2) that the owner and operator review and understand the information about the system in the airplane flight manual and Pilot’s Operating Handbook, including its operation and limitations. The mechanic who conducted the airplane’s most recent annual inspection reported that the airplane’s back-up landing gear extension system was still operational and that it had not been disabled. 

The pilot was maneuvering at a low level in an area with no suitable terrain for landing; therefore, it is likely that he did not intentionally lower the landing gear. During the steep turn, the airspeed likely decreased enough for the back-up landing gear system to engage and extend the gear. With the increased drag of the landing gear and low airspeed, the airplane did not have sufficient power or altitude to clear the rising terrain and subsequently collided with trees.    

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control when the landing gear unintentionally extended while maneuvering at low altitude and airspeed, which increased the airplane’s drag and decreased its ability to climb over the rising terrain. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 6, 2014, about 0920 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-180, N3723T, collided with mountainous terrain near Lake Elsinore, California. The private pilot and two passengers died and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from French Valley Airport (F70), Murrieta, California at about 0815.

A witness reported that he was standing in the parking lot for a popular cliff side restaurant with about 25 other people. He heard and observed an extremely low flying airplane buzz overhead. The airplane made about a 45 degree banking turn towards the ridgeline when he heard a hydraulic noise ("gggeee"); he observed the landing gear doors open and the landing gear extend. He reported that the gear took about three seconds to lower; it wasn't a sudden drop. The witness also stated that it didn't sound as if the airplane was operating at full power, but at about half power. As the airplane leveled off in a southwesterly direction, it barely cleared the powerlines along the road and proceeded towards the ridge before going out of sight. About five seconds later they observed a plume of smoke. The witness mentioned that it appeared as if the pilot was "showing off."

One witness videoed the flyby while standing in the restaurant parking lot. The airplane was seen coming from the southeast with a steady engine RPM, and the landing gear in the retracted position. The pilot made a hard left turn; when the airplane started to level off towards the southwest, the landing gear was in the extended position. The airplane went out of sight flying towards rising terrain with the right wing slightly lower than the left, and the video ends. The provider of the video reported that a few seconds after the video ended he observed a cloud of smoke rise where the airplane had disappeared.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 49, held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land with an instrument rating issued January 18, 2004, and a third-class airman medical certificate issued April 17, 2014 with no limitations. During his most recent medical examination, he reported he had accumulated 3,400 total flight hours, none of which were within the past six months.

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot purchased the airplane in about 2008 and used it to commute to work for about one or two years. After a change in work, the pilot did not fly the airplane for about five years. During that time, the pilot had the airplane's engine overhauled and airframe completely inspected. After the work, and an annual inspection was completed, the airplane was test flown and broken-in about 5-7 weeks prior to the accident. The pilot had told his friend that, after the maintenance, the airplane had been flying better than ever before.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial #28R-30029 was manufactured in 1967. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-B1E, 180 horsepower engine and equipped with a Hartzell, constant speed propeller. Review of copies of maintenance logbook records showed an annual inspection was completed May 12, 2014, at a recorded tachometer reading of 4,651.1 hours, and airframe total time of 9,487.1 hours. Due to extensive damage, the tachometer and the Hobbs hour-meter were unable to be identified within the wreckage.

This airplane was equipped with a back-up landing gear extension system. This system incorporates a pressure sensing device to automatically lower the landing gear at airspeeds between about 85 MPH and 105 MPH depending upon the power setting, and regardless of the position of the gear handle within the cockpit. The system can be overridden by manually holding the emergency gear lever in the raised position.

The mechanic who conducted the airplane's most recent annual inspection reported that the airplane's back-up landing gear extension system was still operational, and that the system had not been disabled.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting station was located at the March Air Reserve Base (RIV), Riverside, California, about 17 miles north of the accident site. At 0858, the weather was reported as calm wind, clear skies, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 28 degrees C, dewpoint 7 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury.

Witnesses reported that the wind was calm the morning of the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was approximately 560 yards (0.32 miles) southwest of the restaurant parking lot at an elevation of about 2,585 feet. The first identified points of impact were three topped trees near the edge of a ravine. The trees measured between about 3-5 inches in diameter and were topped about mid-height. About 20 feet beyond the trees was the right wing and right wing landing gear at the edge of the ravine. The aileron and flap were partially attached to the wing, which sustained fire damage specifically in the fuel tank area.

The main wreckage came to rest at the bottom of the ravine; no impact damage was noted to the ravine wall between the right wing and main wreckage, however, this area was heavily burned and trafficked by emergency personnel. The engine was found inverted and partially covered in dirt and debris. One propeller was visible, and the outboard about 1/3rd of it was bent forward. The other blade was partially underneath the firewall and forward fuselage; it was noted that it was bent aft about midspan. The forward cabin was on top of and slightly to the right of the engine. The forward cabin area was heavily damaged and burned. The instrument panel was unreadable, and the fuel selector was unable to be located. The front two seats and rear bench seat were burned and located within this area. Further to the right was the empennage, which was heavily damaged and burned.

The left wing was separated from the fuselage at the wing root and came to rest on top of, and to the left of, the engine. The left wing sustained heavy fire damage specifically in the fuel tank area. The aileron and flap were partially attached to their attachment points.

Control continuity was established throughout the airframe. The cables leading to the wings sustained fractures consistent with tension overload, and the empennage control cables had been cut by emergency personnel.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on July 8, 2014, by the Riverside County Sheriff - Coroner Division located in Perris, California. The cause of death was thermal injuries with inhalation of products of combustion.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot with negative results for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and tested for drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The airplane was recovered and transported to a recovery yard; there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operations.

The Engine:

Postaccident visual examination of the engine revealed no evidence of catastrophic mechanical failure or malfunction.

The engine and fuel system sustained heavy thermal damage throughout. The fuel flow divider was still secured to its mount and the fuel lines were still secured from its fittings to each cylinder's fuel injector. The throttle and mixture controls were still secured to their respective control arms on the fuel servo, and the throttle lever was found against the stop in the full open position. The throttle plate displayed heavy thermal damage and was bent in half.

The magnetos were still attached to the aft portion of the engine, but they sustained heavy thermal damage and were unable to be tested. The ignition harness was still secured from its respective magnetos to the spark plugs. The top spark plugs were removed and the electrodes displayed wear consistent with normal operations when compared to the Champion Spark Plugs "Check-A-Plug" chart AV-27. The rocker covers were removed and no thermal damage was noted. The propeller was attempted to be rotated by hand; but it would not rotate. The accessory section sustained heavy thermal damage. Further examination revealed melted aluminum was found covering the accessory gears that connect to the crankshaft, restricting its movement.

A borescope was used to examine the inside of the cylinders combustion chambers. The combustion chambers, piston heads, and valves were intact and undamaged. There was no evidence of foreign objects or oil deprivation. Holes were drilled into the crankcase to examine the crankshaft, connecting rods, and camlobes. The crankshaft and the connecting rods were well oiled and displayed no evidence of oil deprivation, contamination, or heat distress. The camshaft was intact and all camlobes appeared to have their normal shape.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Piper Aircraft Corporation issued a mandatory service bulletin (No. 769) on October 19, 1983 recommending that a landing gear back-up extension override mechanism be installed onto the airplane within the next 100 hours of operation, or at the next scheduled inspection or maintenance, whichever occurs first. This mechanism will override the back-up landing gear extension system without the pilot having to manually hold the emergency gear lever.

On March 4, 1988, Piper Aircraft Corporation issued a two part service bulletin (No. 866A) requiring the back-up landing gear extension system to be removed from the airplane or that the owner and operator review and understand the system, how it operates, and its limitations. To remove the back-up gear extend system, Piper provides a back-up landing gear extender removal kit. However, the removal kit can only be used if service bulletin No.769 has already been complied with. If the owner and/or operator chooses to continue to use the system, Piper requires that not only does the owner/operator understand the system, how it operates, and its limitations, but they require a copy of this service bulletin to be attached to the airplane flight manual. Piper also mandates that an entry is made in the airplane logbook indicating compliance with Part II of this service bulletin.



Separate memorial services will be held over the next week for three family members who died in a plane crash near Lake Elsinore on July 6. 

 Doug Symiczek, 49, of Menifee; Kyle Parton, 29, of Menifee; and Jacob Giffiths, 32, of Costa Mesa died when the small plane piloted by Symiczek crashed in the 31900 block of Ortega Highway as a result of engine failure.

Symiczek and his wife Kim are 25-year residents of Menifee who were preparing to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary. Parton and Griffiths were their sons-in-law.

Symiczek's daughter Breanna and her husband Kyle Parton have lived in Menifee for four years. Their second child, a daughter named Trulee, was born one week after the accident, on July 13. Breanna's sister Amanda Griffiths, expecting her first child in January, also lost her husband and her father in the crash. The Griffiths own a home in Costa Mesa.

Separate memorial services will be held over the next week for three family members who died in a plane crash near Lake Elsinore on July 6.

Doug Symiczek, 49, of Menifee; Kyle Parton, 29, of Menifee; and Jacob Giffiths, 32, of Costa Mesa died when the small plane piloted by Symiczek crashed in the 31900 block of Ortega Highway as a result of engine failure.

Symiczek and his wife Kim are 25-year residents of Menifee who were preparing to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary. Parton and Griffiths were their sons-in-law.

Symiczek's daughter Breanna and her husband Kyle Parton have lived in Menifee for four years. Their second child, a daughter named Trulee, was born one week after the accident, on July 13. Breanna's sister Amanda Griffiths, expecting her first child in January, also lost her husband and her father in the crash. The Griffiths own a home in Costa Mesa.

Kyle Lawrence Parton (right) was born Oct. 1, 1984 and grew up in Yucaipa. A 2002 graduate of Yucaipa High School, he was employed by Burnham Energy and worked as a solar panel instructor.

Parton was described by his sister as someone who was "fun loving and an adventurous spirit who enjoyed golfing, hunting, dirt biking, and any other outdoor activity among the company of family friends. He will also be looked up to as a loving and caring father, husband, son, uncle and brother. He will be remember for his easygoing personality, sense of humor, and loving and compassionate ways."

Parton is survived by his wife Breanna; son Ryder, age 3; daughter Trulee, born July 13; parents Mark and Barbara Parton of Yucaipa; and sister Jen Parton of Yucaipa.

Following is information on the memorial services:

Service for Jacob Timothy Griffiths
Friday, July 18, 2 p.m.
Mariners Worship Center
5001 Newport Coast Drive
Irvine, CA
Reception on the lawn immediately following the service.

Service for Douglas John Symiczek
Saturday, July 19, 2 p.m.
Hans Christensen Middle School
27625 Sherman Road
Menifee, CA
Reception to follow

Service for Kyle Lawrence Parton
Wednesday, July 23, 11 a.m.
Redlands Calvary Chapel Packing House
9700 Alabama St.
Redlands, CA
Reception to follow

Kim Symiczek's wishes are that the July 19 memorial service for her husband in Menifee also be a celebration of the life of all three men.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made at the nearest Chase Bank or bank-to-bank online to the Symiczek, Griffiths and Parton Memorial Fund. Account number is 3025577627.

Donations may also be made through this gofundme account online.


http://www.menifee247.com

Douglas John Symiczek  


Kyle Lawrence Parton 




Breanna Parton and her daughter Trulee, born on July 13. 
(Photo courtesy of Jen Parton)


 
 Family members say Kyle Parton, second from left, Doug Symiczek, center, and Jacob Griffiths, second from right, were killed in a plane crash Sunday in Lake Elsinore. Parton and Symiczek were from Menifee. 
COURTESY OF THE SYMICZEK FAMILY 


COURTESY OF SUSAN GRIFFITHS 
Costa Mesa man remembered after plane crash 
 Jacob Griffiths, 32, was expecting a baby with his wife when he died with three others in accident. 



 Donations can be made at gofundme.com/dougjacobkyle.

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA282
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 06, 2014 in Lake Elsinore, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-180, registration: N3723T
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 6, 2014, about 0920 Pacific daylight time, a Piper 28R-180, N3723T, collided with mountainous terrain near Lake Elsinore, California. The private pilot and two passengers were fatally injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from French Valley Airport (F70), Murrieta, California about 0815.

Witnesses reported that they observed the airplane flying in a northerly direction about 200 feet above the ground. The airplane made a steep, climbing turn to the left, barely clearing nearby powerlines. The wings leveled and the airplane flew in a southwesterly direction towards rising terrain. The airplane flew out of view, and about five seconds later they observed a plume of smoke.

Initial review of the accident site revealed the airplane had impacted two trees before coming to rest at the base of a ravine. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.


In honor of Doug, Jacob and Kyle

On Sunday July 6th 2014, Doug Symiczek, Jacob Griffiths and Kyle Parton passed away in a tragic plane accident.

Doug Symiczek, 49, left behind his wife Kim, and two daughters, Amanda and Breanna.

Jacob Griffiths, 32, left behind his wife Amanda and their unborn child.

Kyle Parton, 29, left behind his wife Breanna, their 3 year old son, Ryder and their unborn baby girl.

All donations will be given directly to the spouses of Doug, Jacob and Kyle for any funeral costs or extra expenses as well as supporting the new babies.

We appreciate your donations and ask that you continue to pray for the family and friends affected by this great tragedy.


Please continue to share this link with everyone you know. 

The family needs as much support as they can! 

God bless you.
 

Source:  http://www.gofundme.com/dougjacobkyle


It was supposed to be a quick Sunday morning flight from French Valley to Corona Airport for breakfast at Doug Symiczek’s favorite cafe. Then he and his two sons-in-law were to return to southwest Riverside County and get a boat from Symiczek’s Menifee home, family members said. 

“He had just put a new motor in his boat and they were going to take it out to Lake Elsinore,” said Bob Dennison, Symiczek’s brother-in-law.

But Symiczek, 49, the pilot, and passengers Kyle Parton, 29, of Menifee, and Jacob Griffiths, 32, of Costa Mesa, never made it back to French Valley Airport.

Witnesses said that the 1967 Piper PA28 they were in abruptly made a sharp turn, clipped some trees and crashed into the mountains above Lake Elsinore in a fiery explosion shortly after 9 a.m. Sunday.

Beckie Dennison, Symiczek’s sister-in-law, said initial reports suggest the plane’s sputtering single engine was failing.

“(Doug) knew what was going on, and that he needed to land right away,” she said an interview Monday in Menifee. “If he hadn’t hit the tree, they would have landed safely. It’s such a freak accident.”

The National Transportation Safety Board sent an investigator to the crash site Monday to investigate.

NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss said the agency was “trying to get a sense of the history of the flight” in the hopes of determining what went wrong.

“They’re racing against the daylight hours to gather as much data as they can,” Weiss said by telephone.

Weiss said a preliminary report will be released in a week to 10 days, but it likely will be a year before the cause is determined.

Bob and Beckie Dennison, who live in La Quinta, said Symiczek had hired a firm to rebuild the engine and the plane was recently cleared for flight. They said he had been flying since 1990 and had owned the plane since 1991, and that many times they had flown with him.

Beckie Dennison said the accident couldn’t have come at a worse time. Kyle Parton and his wife Breanna Parton were expecting a baby girl. Sunday was Breanna’s due date. It also came in the month that Doug and Kim Symiczek were to mark their 30th wedding anniversary. There was talk of celebrating in Hawaii.

“They were the most amazing men – all of them,” said Doug’s wife, Kim. “My husband was the best pilot ever.”

Kyle Parton leaves behind not only his pregnant wife but also a 3-year-old son, Ryder. Meanwhile, Jacob Griffiths’ wife, Amanda, is three months along with her first child.

Jacob Griffiths grew up in Orange County, graduating from Garden Grove High School. He later moved to Irvine where his father and stepmother – Scott and Susan Griffiths – live, and most recently lived in Costa Mesa.

The Griffiths family frequented Mariners Church in Irvine long before pastor Eric Heard arrived 15 years ago.

“He was a young man of noble character,” Heard said of Jacob, who was involved in the church’s outreach ministry.

“These are just good people,” he said.

Parachute School of Toronto 'stunned' after skydiver death: Victim was trying to perform high-speed landing called 'swoop landing,' club president says

The president of a parachute school north of Toronto says his club is stunned after one of its skydivers died on Saturday.

Adam Mabee, president of Parachute School of Toronto, said “everyone knows and respects” the 39-year-old victim.

The incident happened in Georgina, Ont., north of Toronto near Lake Simcoe.


Read more here:  http://www.cbc.ca

Freedom isn't free, even at 35,000 feet

Congested airports. Crowded planes. Costly luggage fees. 

Airline passengers don't need another reason to gripe as this holiday travel weekend comes to a close. But one's being foisted on them anyway.  Travelers are poised to fork over more money to Uncle Sam when they book a flight.

Not enough to break the bank, it's the latest levy from what's been called the "terrorist tax.

Read more here:  http://www.postandcourier.com

NASA ready to fly the Front Range: Planes will pass over Longmont as part of pollution test

NASA wants to see where the Front Range is having a bad air day.

Starting July 16, the space agency will fly a pair of airplanes over the Front Range to distinguish between high-altitude air pollution and the sort found closer to the ground. The information will be used to improve how satellites monitor pollution.

The flights will continue through Aug. 20 and would pass over Longmont three times a day, according to NASA.

Read more here:   http://www.timescall.com

Wagga man killed in South Coast plane crash

 A Wagga resident killed in a light plane crash off the South Coast has been remembered as a gentleman and a highly regarded flying instructor. 

Graham White, a contractor at the Australian Airline Pilot Academy who conducted flying tests for cadets and instructors since 2010, was one of two men aboard a light plane that crashed into the ocean off Barlings Beach, south of Batemans Bay, about 12.10pm on Sunday.
His body was recovered from the ocean on Sunday afternoon.
Mr White, 60, had also been an instructor and member of the Temora Aero Club for the past five years.
The president of the Temora Aero Club, Robert Maslin, said while Mr White only visited the town intermittently, he was highly regarded by its aviation community and would be sadly missed.
"He was very well liked by the aviation community (in Temora) and highly rated and regarded in the aviation community as a whole," Mr Maslin said.
"It's a very sad occasion that we've lost an experienced instructor and what I considered a real gentleman."
Mr White had been in Temora as recently as Saturday for a function at the town's Airpark Estate that evening.
Having purchased a block at the Airpark Estate, Mr White had plans to relocate to Temora and build a hangar and home on his site, according to Mr Maslin.
"He was somebody we were really looking forward to see settle in the estate," he said.
"His experience and services would've been greatly appreciated by all out there."

http://www.batemansbaypost.com.au
 
RELATED CONTENT:
Light plane crash: one dead, one missing            

Divers on the scene. 

Recreational Pilots Fight Requirement for Medical Exams

Groups that represent recreational pilots want to eliminate a Federal Aviation Administration requirement for regular medical exams, a change that is being opposed by a group that sets medical standards for the aviation community.

If the change were made, recreational pilots’ only medical requirements would be the same as for their drivers’ licenses, although they would still be required to take regular flight certification tests.

That’s not enough, says Jeff Sventek, executive director of the Aerospace Medical Association. The group sets medical standards for the aviation community. Its members, about 23,000 physicians, provide funding, and it recommends pilot medical standards to the FAA. The members also test pilots. Sventek is a retired Air Force aerospace physiologist who trained Air Force crews. 


Read more here:   http://www.forbes.com

Beech S35 Bonanza, N8985M: Accident occurred March 29, 2014 in Marathon, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N8985M

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA175 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Marathon, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/05/2014
Aircraft: BEECH S35, registration: N8985M
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that after takeoff the flight proceeded IFR towards the destination airport (The Florida Keys Marathon Airport), Marathon, Florida. He cancelled his IFR clearance, and performed the pre-landing checklist. While on the base leg over water during the dark night, he became distracted by the failure of the landing light. With the landing gear and flaps extended for landing but the power set to 15 inches of manifold pressure, he did not recognize the airplane was descending. When the airplane impacted the water he thought they were at 1,000 feet. He also stated that he attempted to activate the runway lights using the common traffic advisory frequency but stated he could not see them. In hindsight he stated that he must have been too low at that time to see the runway lights.

According to the County of Monroe Assistant Director of Airports, the runway lights at The Florida Keys Marathon Airport come on automatically at night and remain on "step 1." Being a 14 CFR Part 139 airport, a complete night inspection is performed each Friday and Monday, and each working day in the morning a continuous inspection is performed on the runway lighting circuit. As noted in the Daily Self Inspection Reports, the airfield runway lights were functioning properly during the course of the weekend and there were no issues with the runway lighting system. The runway end identifier lights for runway 7 were out of service at that time.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's distraction in the cockpit while on a visual approach over water during a dark night resulting in the airplane descending until impact with the water.

According to the County of Monroe Assistant Director of Airports, the runway lights at The Florida Keys Marathon Airport come on automatically at night and remain on "step 1." Being a 14 CFR Part 139 airport, a complete night inspection is performed each Friday and Monday, and each working day in the morning a continuous inspection is performed on the runway lighting circuit. As noted in the Daily Self Inspection Reports, the airfield runway lights were functioning properly during the course of the weekend and there were no issues with the runway lighting system. The runway end identifier lights for runway 7 were out of service at that time.

Bid Sheet: http://www.avclaims.com/N8985M.Bid

Photos:  http://www.avclaims.com/n8985m_Photos