Saturday, September 8, 2018

Cessna U206G , VH-LHQ: Accident occurred March 06, 2018 in Southport, Australia

Collision with water involving Cessna 206 floatplane, VH-LHQ, Southport Broadwater, Queensland, on March 06, 2018 

An investigation has been launched the collision with water of a Cessna 206 floatplane, registered VH-LHQ, Southport Broadwater, Queensland, on 6 March 2018.

At about 1040 local time, during take-off, the aircraft’s nose dropped and collided with the water. The pilot and the two passengers on board were not injured.  Subsequent inspection of the aircraft identified the float’s forward spreader bar had failed.

As part of the investigation, the ATSB will interview relevant persons, including the pilot, and obtain other necessary information.

A final report will be released at the end of the investigation.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

NTSB Identification: WPR18WA240
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, March 04, 2018 in Southport, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA 206, registration:
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 4, 2018, about 1040 local time, a Cessna U206G airplane, VH-LHQ, was substantially damaged when it impacted water during takeoff near Southport, Queensland, Australia. The pilot and two passengers were not injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: +612 6274 6054
Fax: +612 6274 6434
www.atsb.gov.au

Palm Springs, Riverside County, California: Locals Take Closer Look at Key Aircraft Trainer used in WWII



On September 8, 1951, 48 nations signed the San Francisco Peace Treaty officially ending the Allied Powers occupation of Japan post World War II, but before peace was reached, air combat was one of them main way to conquer battles and a key aircraft used for winning happens to sit inside the Palm Springs Air Museum.

The Vice-Chairman of the museum, Fred Bell, said the U.S. Army Air Corps service-members first trained in an AT-6 Texan, the cockpit fits two, the pilot and the trainer.

Bell said, “So if they had a problem they can learn in that airplane with an instructor before they went and fight in there by themselves.”

Training pilots how to fly a war plane seems obvious but in the middle of war, details went out the window. Bell said the lack of flight training by the Axis Powers was just one of the reasons to its eventual defeat.

Bell said, “And they send them right into combat and these pilots might only know straight level flight and so it was fatal.”

American Pilots spent 100 hours training inside an AT-6 Texan.

On this Saturday, visitors of the museum were able to take a closer look at the war plane and actually go inside the cockpit, Zane Hathaway and his little sister were one of the visitors who saw the inside of the plane, he said, “You could move it left and right to move the wings up and down.”

The plane inside the Palm Springs Air Museum still flies and even though the aircraft will not fly out of the hangar anytime soon, the curiosity to go inside a cockpit of a war plane from WWII goes beyond children.

James Stuck visited the museum from Orange County with his wife, he was one of many visitors to hop on the AT-6 Texan.

“It’s a different sensation to sit inside an older plane and look at what they were dealing with,” Stuck said. “How a plane worked back in that day compared to what we have today and it was just a nostalgic feeling.”

The staff of at the museum are happy to share the plane’s history with visitors, but most importantly they want to raise interest for a new generation of pilots.

Bell said, “We’re supporting the generations that built these airplanes, and remembering them, but also it’s about getting kids and young adults excited about careers in aviation.” 

Story and video ➤ https://kmir.com

Man arrested at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), accused of trying to smuggle cocaine in checked bag

A 45-year-old man was arrested at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix after he tried to smuggle more than 2 pounds of cocaine in a checked bag early Saturday, officials said.

Phoenix police spokesman Sgt. Vince Lewis said Jason Bunts was arrested at 1:15 a.m. after Transportation Security Administration agents found more than 2 pounds of cocaine in a checked bag belonging to him.

Bunts' American Airlines flight to Chicago had to return to the gate briefly for police to place him under arrest, Lewis said.

He was booked into a Maricopa County jail on suspicion of possession of narcotic drugs for sale.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.azcentral.com

Agusta A109S Grand, registered to North Memorial Health Care and operated by North Memorial Air Care, N91NM: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Field Airport (KAXN), Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota
Honeywell; Phoenix, Arizona
Leonardo Helicopters; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pratt & Whitney Canada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N91NM


Miles Weske, a flight paramedic, was the most seriously injured in a September 17, 2016 helicopter crash in Alexandria, Minnesota. He suffered fractures of his C2 and C3 vertebrae, a liver laceration, multiple broken ribs, a broken sternum, broken femur, broken ankle, collapsed lungs and blood in his lungs. 

The three crew members were identified as pilot Joshua Jones, 47, flight nurse Scott Scepaniak, 44, and flight paramedic Miles Weske, 34.

Location: Alexandria, MN
Accident Number: CEN16FA372
Date & Time: 09/17/2016, 0204 CDT
Registration: N91NM
Aircraft: AGUSTA A109
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 3 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency)

Analysis 

The pilot and two medical crewmembers were conducting a night instrument flight rules cross-country flight to pick up a patient. During the instrument approach to the destination airport, the weather conditions deteriorated. The pilot was using the helicopter's autopilot to fly the GPS approach to the airport, and the pilot and the medical crew reported normal helicopter operations. Upon reaching the GPS approach minimum descent altitude, the pilot was unable to see the airport and executed a go-around. The pilot reported that, after initiating the go-around, he attempted to counteract, with right cyclic input, an uncommanded sharp left 45° bank . Recorded flight data revealed that the helicopter climbed and made a progressive right bank that reached 50°. The helicopter descended as the right bank continued, and the airspeed increased until the helicopter impacted treetops. The helicopter then impacted terrain on it's right side and came to rest near a group of trees.

Postaccident examinations of the helicopter and flight control systems did not reveal any malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The helicopter was equipped with a GPS roll steering modification that featured a switch that allowed the pilot to manually select the heading reference source. In case of a malfunction or an erroneous setting, the helicopter's automatic flight control system had at least two limiters in place to prevent excessive roll commands. Further testing revealed that the GPS roll steering modification could not compromise the flight director and autopilot functionalities to the point of upsetting the helicopter attitudes or moving beyond the systems limiters.

Recorded helicopter, engine, and flight track data were analyzed and used to conduct flight simulations. The simulations revealed that the helicopter was operated within the prescribed limits; no evidence of an uncommanded 45° left bank was found. The helicopter performed a constant right climbing turn with decreasing airspeed followed by a progressive right bank with the airspeed and descent rate increasing. In order to recover, the simulations required large collective inputs and a steep right bank; such maneuvers are difficult when performed in night conditions with no visual references, although less demanding in day conditions with clear visual references. The data are indicative of a descending accelerated spiral, likely precipitated by the pilot inputting excessive right cyclic control during the missed approach go-around maneuver, which resulted in a loss of control. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's excessive cyclic input during a missed approach maneuver in night instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in a loss of control and spiraling descent into terrain.



Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Lateral/bank control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Flight control system - Incorrect use/operation (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Incorrect action performance - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Clouds - Effect on operation
Low ceiling - Effect on operation
Below approach minima - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-IFR missed approach
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

On September 17, 2016, at 0204 central daylight time, an Agusta (Leonardo) A109S helicopter, N91NM, impacted trees and terrain near Chandler Field Airport (AXN), Alexandria, Minnesota. The commercial rated pilot and two crew members sustained serious injuries and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to North Memorial Health Care and operated by North Memorial Air Care under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as an air medical positioning flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The helicopter departed Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport (BRD), Brainerd, Minnesota at 0137 and was destined for the Douglas County Hospital helipad, Alexandria, Minnesota, via AXN. 

A review of the air traffic control (ATC) communications and radar data revealed that the pilot requested a clearance at 0135 and departed about two minutes later. Radar data indicated the helicopter climbed to 4,000 ft above ground level (agl) and flew southwest toward AXN. The radar data showed a generally straight and level flight with minimal altitude changes after the initial climb. 

The pilot contacted ATC and requested to proceed direct to KILVE, the initial approach fix for the RNAV (GPS) approach to runway 22 at AXN. The controller cleared the pilot for the approach and instructed him to maintain 4,000 ft until established on the approach. One minute later ATC lost radar contact with the helicopter and instructed the pilot to report when established on the approach. Ten minutes later the pilot reported inbound on KILVE. Additional radar data later indicated that the helicopter made a slight left turn which corresponded to an extended line of the final approach course to runway 22. The controller, who was still not in radar contact with the helicopter, approved a frequency change and requested that the pilot report the cancellation of the IFR flight plan, to which the pilot acknowledged; no further communications from the pilot were recorded. Radar data later indicated that the helicopter remained on the final approach course while descending until the last radar target was recorded at 0201:06; 4.75 nautical miles from the runway about 2,050 ft agl. An onboard device recorded the accident flight coordinates; figure 1 shows the helicopter's final flight path. 


Figure 1 – Final Flight Path

In a postaccident statement the pilot stated that he received a call for a flight about 0100; after a review of the weather conditions he accepted the flight and then filed an IFR flight plan to AXN. He was in radio contact with ATC, but radar contact was lost about half way through the flight. About 20 miles from AXN he noticed clouds quickly forming underneath the helicopter. He stated that ATC cleared the flight for the RNAV (GPS) 22 approach to AXN as clouds were still forming beneath the helicopter. With the landing sight not visible, he initiated a missed approach by utilizing the go-around function of the helicopter's autopilot and had 100% engine power applied. He stated that during the missed approach the helicopter made a quick 45° left bank so he applied right cyclic. Then the helicopter banked sharply to the right. 

The flight nurse who was seated in the middle cabin, stated that the IFR flight to AXN was uneventful until they were near the airport. When the helicopter descended near AXN and he could see the runway lights beneath the helicopter through the fog. He couldn't determine the altitude of the helicopter because they were in the fog. He added that the pilot stated to the crew that they weren't going to break out of the fog and they would go-around. He did not know exactly why they needed to go around. He added that the helicopter banked to the right, then shuddered when the alarms and bells sounded. The helicopter shudder was "on the lighter side" of intensity, but he had never felt the helicopter shudder like that before. The engines sounded normal throughout the flight and he did not recall any unusual sounds or anomalies with the helicopter until the shudder. He did not remember if the helicopter entered a spin during the event. 

The helicopter impacted the tops of several tall trees and the ground, then continued into a wooded area (figure 2). Several nearby residents were awake at the time of the accident and heard the helicopter's engines and then the sound of the impact. 


Figure 2 – Accident Site

A review of the recorded flight data revealed that the flight path was in line with the GPS approach course and followed the respective waypoints. The helicopter intercepted the approach's last waypoint, WANBI, at 02:02:31 then the flight path started to deviate right of course (figure 3). The flight path continued toward AXN while maintaining the slight right deviation until 02:03:11 when the helicopter reached 1,840 ft, which is the approach's minimum descent altitude. Between 02:03:12 and 02:03:14 the collective position percentage increases, which is consistent with the reported go-around maneuver (figure 4). The helicopter descends to 1,740 ft until a climb began at 02:03:17. The helicopter climbed and turned right with a maximum bank angle of 50°. The flight path continued right as the helicopter then descended and the collective position continued to increase. 


Figure 3 – Flight Path

Figure 4 – Flight Data Graph 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/10/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/21/2016
Flight Time:  4057 hours (Total, all aircraft), 965 hours (Total, this make and model), 3167 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1116 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The pilot was the Director of Operations for North Memorial Air Care. 

In the preceding 6 months the pilot had accumulated 2.4 hours of flight time in actual instrument conditions, logged 11 precision instrument approaches, and 6 landings at night. 

The North Memorial Operation's Manual stated that for recent night flight experience, each pilot is to abide by the requirements of 14 CFR Part 135.247(a)(2), which required in the preceding 90 days, he pilot must complete 3 takeoffs and 3 landings as the sole manipulator of the flight controls in the same aircraft category and class. The pilot had logged 6 night takeoffs and landings in the preceding 90 days. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AGUSTA
Registration: N91NM
Model/Series: A109 S
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22014
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/13/2016, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 1659.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PW207C
Registered Owner: North Memorial Health Care
Rated Power: 633 hp
Operator: North Memorial Air Care
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

On June 12, 2015, the helicopter was equipped with a Spectrum Aeromed Medical Conversion Kit, supplemental type certificate (STC) SR02974CH, consisting of a base assembly with pivot, a stretcher, a medical attendant seat, and other medical components. 

The helicopter was equipped with a GPS roll steering modification that featured a HEADING/GPS STEER switch, per an STC. The switch allows the pilot to manually select the heading (HDG) reference source. When the switch is selected to 'HEADING', the flight director (FD) computer calculates the necessary roll commands to bank the helicopter to intercept and maintain the heading selected on the electronic horizontal situation indicator (EHSI). With the switch selected to 'GPS STEER', the FD computer receives the heading error signal as computed by a dedicated STC box which compares the requested GPS heading and the actual heading. The FD transmits the calculated roll commands to the helipilot computers, which would in turn drive the pitch and roll rotary trim actuators to achieve the target attitude, rate, and heading.

In case of a malfunction or erroneous setting of the system, the A109S automatic flight control system (AFCS) has two different limiters in place to prevent excessive roll commands: one in the Flight Director computer, which imposes a max roll command in HDG mode of ±20°, when coupled to the AFCS for hands-off flying, and one in the helipilot computers, which had a target maximum roll attitude of ±24° and a maximum commanded roll rate of ±8.2° per second for short term stabilization purposes. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAXN, 1431 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0209 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 157°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  4 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 300 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: BRAINERD, MN (BRD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Alexandria, MN (AXN)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0135 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

At 0201, the AXN automated surface observing system (ASOS) recorded wind from 290 degrees at 10 knots, 9 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 400 ft, broken clouds at 3,600 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

At 0209, the AXN the ASOS recorded wind from 290 degrees at 12 knots, 4 miles visibility, mist, broken clouds at 300 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

An AIRMET Sierra for IFR conditions due to mist and precipitation was issued on September 16 at 2145 and was valid at the accident time.

A search of official weather briefing sources indicated the pilot used the ForeFlight application on his iPad at 0119 and received Lockheed Martin Flight Service weather briefing information in both text and graphical format. The weather information contained all valid AIRMETs, weather observations, and forecasts valid between the departure and destination airports; the pilot viewed the graphical images on his iPad. There is no record of the pilot receiving or retrieving any other weather information before the flight.

Airport Information

Airport: CHANDLER FIELD (AXN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1425 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: Global Positioning System; RNAV
Runway Length/Width: 4098 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 45.874722, -95.398056 

The accident site was located in a residential area surrounded by trees about 1,000 yards northwest of the approach end of AXN's runway 22 (figure 5). The debris path was about 130 yards long and began with lopped tree tops (95 to 100 ft tall) and ended about 30 yards beyond the main wreckage. The middle of the debris path was in a back yard of a residence and consisted of lopped tree tranches, fragmented main rotor blades, and pieces of the helicopter. The initial impact marks were several parallel ground scars followed by the helicopter's tail skid in an impact crater. The debris path continued with a large ground impact area that contained helicopter pieces, followed by the main wreckage. The fuselage came to rest on its left side, was separated aft of the engines, and wrapped around two trees. The right side of the fuselage exhibited ground impact damage and mud smearing. The tail and aft portion of the rear fuselage were pointing in an opposite direction from the fuselage. The bottom of the tail contained mud smearing and splatter marks near the tail rotor. The right pilot seat and one passenger seat pan had separated from their respective mounts. 


Figure 5 – Wreckage Diagram

A postaccident examination of the helicopter and related systems was conducted by the NTSB with assistance provided by technical representatives from the helicopter manufacturer and system component manufacturers. The flight control and autopilot system, which included mechanical, hydraulic and electronic components, revealed no malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operations. The HEADING/GPS STEER pushbutton was found in the HEADING position and electrical continuity was confirmed. To confirm switch functionality of the GPS STEER position, the pushbutton was depressed. Electrical continuity was confirmed to the GPS STEER position and the HEADING position was no longer active. 

Tests And Research

Computed Tomography (CT) Scans

The helicopter's control system actuators were subjected to CT scans to confirm internal component configuration and integrity without disassembly. The following actuators were scanned: roll trim actuator, both left and right roll linear actuators, and both left and right pitch linear actuators. The scans did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The NTSB CT Specialist Factual Report is included in the public docket for this accident report.

Actuator and Computer Testing

The roll artificial feel and trim actuator were examined at the manufacturers facility under the supervision of the Agenzia Nazionale per la Sicurezza del Volo (ANSV) of Italy. Results of the examination showed that there were no mechanical or electrical malfunctions with the actuator and the unit passed its acceptance testing.

The two helipilot computers and the FD computer were examined at the manufacturers facility under the supervision of the ANSV. The first helipilot computer sustained minor external damage, but there was no evidence of internal mechanical damage, or electrical/burn failures of the components located on the circuit boards or the circuit boards. All internal circuits were within specification. Control of the servo amplifiers output signal was confirmed with no anomalies noted. The test confirmed that the computer provided the correct command signal to position the linear actuators; the tests performed were successful and each pitch, roll, and yaw channel worked properly. Based on the results of the testing, no functional anomalies were found. The second helipilot computer sustained significant external damage and internal damage to the motherboard; the yaw, pitch, and roll cards were found separated from the motherboard due to the mechanical deformation of the chassis. The gain card was undamaged. Due to the internal damage, functional testing was limited to the roll and gain cards by using an exemplar chassis assembly. All internal circuits were within specification. Control of the servo amplifiers output signal was confirmed with no anomalies noted. The tests performed were successful and each pitch, roll, and yaw channel worked properly. Based on the results of the testing, no functional anomalies were found with the roll channel.

The FD computer sustained significant external damage and the internal circuit cards were impact damaged but did not show signs of electrical/burn damage. A functional test of the FD computer could not be performed.

The three main rotor actuators, identified as red, yellow, and blue, were examined at the manufacturers facility under the supervision of the ANSV. The red and yellow actuators attachments were fractured under overload. The actuators were subjected to the manufacturer's functional tests procedures; each actuator passed the functional tests and disassembly of the units was not performed. The results of the functional testing are provided in the NTSB Systems Factual Report included in the public docket for this accident report.

Leonardo Helicopters (Agusta) Flight Simulation and Testing

Leonardo Helicopters completed extensive flight simulations and testing based on the accident data. The simulator session was performed with an Agusta A109E level D full flight simulator (FFS) at the Leonardo Helicopter Training Academy, to reproduce the accident Flight and identify anomalies or contributing factors. An A109S FFS was not available, but the functionally of the A109E FD and helipilot computers are identical among the two simulator types. The testing revealed that the helicopter was operated within the prescribed limits and there was no evidence of a mechanical malfunction. The data revealed that the helicopter performed a constant right climbing turn with decreasing airspeed followed by a progressive right bank with airspeed and descent rate increasing. The simulator testing did not find evidence of an uncommanded 45° bank as reported by the pilot. The simulation required large collective inputs and steep right bank, which were the most critical conditions in the simulations, especially when performed in night conditions with no visual references. The simulation recovery maneuver was less demanding in day conditions with clear visual references. Further testing revealed that the GPS roll steering modification on an A109S cannot compromise the FD and AFCS functionalities up to the point of upsetting the helicopter attitudes.

Additional Information

Data Collection Unit (DCU)

Each engine is equipped with a DCU and both units were downloaded by the engine manufacturer under the supervision of the Transportation Safety Board of Canada. The purpose of the DCU is to serve as a repository for various engine parameters, accumulated operation time, accumulated part cycles, and specific operational exceedance data. The electronic engine controls automatically store the data in the DCU in snapshot format when there is a triggering event. Engine data stored during the last 100 hours of operating time was analyzed. Both engines were producing power at the moment of impact and no preimpact engine anomalies were recorded.

Data Acquisition Unit (DAU)

The DAU was examined and downloaded by the manufacturer under the supervision of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The unit did not exhibit any significant impact damage and the download of both channels A and B was successful. The data was redundant from both channels and did not reveal any recorded faults or exceedances.

Sandel ST3400

The Sandel ST3400 is an integrated Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS). The device is capable of recording GPS coordinates, track, barometric altitude, vertical velocity, and radar altitude. The data retrieved from the device revealed an operating time from 01:25:54 to 02:03:42 CDT. On approach to AXN the device produced no voice callouts since the input from the radar altimeter never met the mandatory call-out threshold of 300 ft AGL. Additionally, there were no forward-looking terrain avoidance or ground proximity warning system alerts recorded in the flight data during the approach phase of the accident flight as the alerting buffer never indicated terrain and/or obstacle clearance issues.

Appareo Stratus 2S

The Appareo Stratus 2S is a battery-operated automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) receiver with GPS capability designed to interface with an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch running the ForeFlight Mobile application. The device did not have any recorded data from the accident flight.

Apple iPad Air 2

The iPad was found in the wreckage and displayed a map page within the ForeFlight application. The device was given to the operator and later sent to the NTSB Recorders Lab for download since the device was capable of storing non-volatile memory. When a download was attempted by the NTSB, the device had been manually reset and no data was retrieved.

Garmin GNS 530 Data Card

The data card was inserted into a surrogate Garmin GNS 530W unit at the NTSB Recorders Laboratory. When the device is powered using the docking station, the GPS is automatically put into a "simulator" mode; therefore, the map location shown on the screen was not indicative of any accident information. The map database was version 4.00 and the aviation database expiration date as October 13, 2016. When powered on, the device's communication (COM) frequency was set to 123.000 megahertz MHz and the localizer (LOC) frequency was set to 109.70 MHz. These frequencies correspond to the pilot's statement that the last LOC frequency would have been selected for BRD instrument landing system (ILS) RWY 34 approach, which utilizes 109.7 MHz.

Miles Weske

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA372
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Alexandria, MN
Aircraft: AGUSTA A109, registration: N91NM
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, at 0207 central daylight time, an Agusta S.p.A A109S helicopter, N91NM, impacted trees and terrain near Chandler Field Airport (AXN), Alexandria, Minnesota. The commercial rated pilot and two crew members sustained serious injuries and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to North Memorial Health Care, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, and operated by North Memorial Medical Center under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a positioning flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The helicopter departed Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport (BRD), Brainerd, Minnesota about 0135 and was destined for the Douglas County Hospital helipad, Alexandria, Minnesota. 

The pilot stated that he received a call for a flight request about 0100, accepted the flight, and then filed an IFR flight plan to AXN. He was in radio contact with air traffic control (ATC), but radar contact was lost about half way through the flight. About 20 miles from AXN he noticed clouds quickly forming underneath the helicopter. The pilot was cleared for and attempted the RNAV GPS 22 approach to AXN as clouds were still forming beneath the helicopter. The pilot initiated a missed approach by utilizing the "go around" function of the helicopters autopilot. During the missed approach, the helicopter made an uncommanded left bank followed by a right bank. The pilot attempted to counteract the bank by applying opposite cyclic control. 

The helicopter impacted several tall trees and then the ground and continued into a wooded area. Several nearby residents were awake at the time of the accident and heard the helicopters engines and then the sound of the impact. Two other witnesses were outside of their homes east of the airport and observed the helicopter flying overhead prior to the accident. 

At 0201, the AXN weather observation recorded wind from 290 degrees at 10 knots, 9 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 400 ft, broken clouds at 3,600 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

At 0209, the AXN weather observation recorded wind from 290 degrees at 12 knots, 4 miles visibility, mist, broken clouds at 300 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

The helicopter has been retained for further examination.

Cirrus Vision SF50, N3AD: Incident occurred February 26, 2018 in Nuuk, Greenland


https://registry.faa.gov/N3AD

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA111
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Incident occurred Monday, February 26, 2018 in Nuuk, Greenland
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SF50, registration: N3AD
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On February 26, 2018, about 1804 coordinated universal time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SF50 Vision Jet, serial number 0034, United States registration N3AD, sustained minor damage during landing roll on runway 23 at Nuuk Airport (BGGH), Nuuk, Greenland. The pilot and his passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the ferry flight that departed Iqaluit Airport (CYFB), near Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Accident Investigation Board of Denmark. This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of Denmark.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Accident Investigation Board of Denmark
Jættevej 50A, 1. sal, mf.
4100 Ringsted
Denmark
Telephone: +45 38 71 10 66
E-mail: aib@aib.dk
Website: http://www.havarikommissionen.dk







På trods af høj solskin og en ubetydelig vind røg et jetfly af mærket Cirrus 50 af banen, da den mandag klokken 15.05 landede i Nuuk Lufthavn. Lufthavnen var i flere timer lukket, men netop genåbnet her til aften.

Jetflyet røg ind i en snedrive, hvor den i løbet af eftermiddagen blokerede for al flyvning til og fra lufthavnen i hovedstaden. Flyvningerne til lufthavnen, der berørte cirka 200 Air Greenland-passagerer, blev genoptaget ved 19-tiden.I

Bremsesvigt

Pilotten har forklaret, at det sandsynligvis var et svigt i det ene sæt bremser, der fik jetflyet ud af kurs under landingen, forklarer driftsdirektør i Mittarfeqarfiit Niels Grosen over for Sermitsiaq.AG.

Han glæder sig over, at de to personer om bord ikke kom til skade, og de var i god behold efter den usædvanlige landing. Flyet var på vej fra Iqaluit i Canada til Reykjavik med en planlagt mellemlanding i Nuuk, hvor man ville have en overnatning. 

Havarikommissionen

Vi er i kontakt med Havarikommissionen i Danmark, som er den myndighed, som skal give os lov til at fjerne flyet fra snedriven, så vi kan genoptage beflyvningen af lufthavnen, forklarede Niels Grosen mandag eftermiddag, før tilladelsen til at fjerne flyet blev givet, så lufthavnen kunne fungere igen.

Politiet og Havarikommissionen skal nu i gang med at finde frem til, hvorfor ”hændelsen” skete og om det vitterligt var bremsesystemet, der svigtede.

Lukningen af lufthavnen berørte ca. 200 passagerer på syv Air Greenland ankomster, heraf omdirigeres fem af ankomsterne til Kangerlussuaq, oplyste Air Greenland i en pressemeddelelse, der blev udsendt kort efter jetfly-uheldet.

Så snart lufthavnen åbner vil et nyt trafikprogram blive sat op, og passagererne få besked om ny rejseplan, oplyser flyselskabet.

http://sermitsiaq.ag



Et mindre jetfly er kørt af landingsbanen i Nuuk Lufthavn med to passagerer ombord. Der er ikke sket skader på hverken passagerer eller fly, oplyser Mittarfeqarfiit til KNR.
    
Der er tale om et jetfly af mærket Cirrus, som efter planen skulle mellemlande i Nuuk for at tanke. Flyet var på vej fra Canada til Island, men den plan må de to passagerer nok udskyde lidt.

Klokken 16 mandag er meldingen fra Mittarfeqarfiit, at man afventer Havarikommissionen, der skal godkende, at flyet kan flyttes.

- I første omgang er landingsbanen lukket til 17.30, men passagerer kan følge med på flyinfo.gl, siger driftdirektør Niels Grosen.

Han oplyser, at uheldet skete klokken 15.05. Niels Grosen ønsker ikke at konkludere på, hvad der forårsagede ulykken, da det er Havarikommission, der skal undersøge sagen.

Han oplyser dog, at landingsbanen var ren og tør. Piloten har oplyst, at bremsen på det ene hjul svigtede og førte til, at flyet kørte ud i siden af landingsbanen, hvor det stadig holder mandag eftermiddag.

https://knr.gl

Cessna 152: Accident occurred September 08, 2018 in Hastings, St. Johns County, Florida






HASTINGS, Florida - A small plane crash-landed then overturned in a field, according to crews with the St. Johns County Fire Rescue team.

The pilot of the plane lost control and crashed-landed in a field at Smith Farms off County Road 13 South near the former town of Hastings, according to officials.

Florida Highway Patrol Sergeant L. Foureau said the pilot, Shrey Chopra, 19, from Daytona Beach, was flying back to Ormond Beach after stopping at the Palatka Airport when the small plane had mechanical failure.

Chopra made an emergency landing in a farm field around 11:30 am Saturday and was able to walk away without injuries, according to the FHP.

Troopers said the pilot, who is a student at Sunrise Aviation, was flying a 1981 Cessna 152 at the time of the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate what went wrong.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com



A Daytona Beach man escaped injury when his small private plane went down Saturday morning in a field in rural St. Johns County.

Shrey Chopra, 19, was alone in the 1981 Cessna 152 aircraft when it crashed and flipped upside down about 11:30 a.m. in the field at Smith Farms in the 9200 block of County Road 13 South in Hastings, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The Highway Patrol said Chopra was flying back to Ormond Beach after stopping at Palatka-Kay Larkin Airport. Chopra said the two-seat, single engine aircraft experienced a mechanical failure forcing him to make an emergency landing, according to the Highway Patrol.

Chopra was out and walking around when St. Johns County first responders arrived. Fire Rescue paramedics examined him at the scene and determined he didn’t need to be taken to the hospital, according to agency officials.

He told first responders the plane had about 14 gallons of fuel on board when it went down. No fuel leak nor other hazards were found at the scene, according to St. Johns Fire Rescue.

The crash is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration with assistance from the Highway Patrol and St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.jacksonville.com

Stemme S12, N612ST: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2018 near Joaquin Balaguer International Airport, Dominican Republic



TCC Air Services Inc  

https://registry.faa.gov/N612ST

NTSB Identification: ERA18WA223
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, August 19, 2018 in Santo Domingo Norte, Dominican Republic
Aircraft: STEMME S12, registration: N612ST
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.




The government of Dominican Republic has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a STEMME S12 glider that occurred on August 19, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Dominican Republic's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Dominican Republic.

Dos personas murieron luego que la avioneta en la que se trasladaban se estrellara cerca del aeropuerto internacional Joaquín Balaguer, en la ciudad de Santo Domingo, República Dominicana.

Las víctimas fueron identificadas como Douglas Bournigal, un cardiólogo que manejaba la nave. Él falleció junto al empresario Bruno Vincent, informó en su cuenta de Twitter la Junta de Aviación Civil (JAC) de República Dominicana.

Equipos especiales llegaron a la zona boscosa, donde se estrelló la aeronave, para recuperar los cadáveres, los cuales fueron trasladados a la Base Aérea de San Isidro.

Autoridades de República Dominicana explicaron que la aeronave cayó a una milla de cabecera de la pista 19 del aeropuerto y desde que se produjo el accidente se activó el plan de emergencia.

Por el momento, no se han ventilado las posibles causas que habrían provocado el accidente, pero las autoridades de República Dominicana ya iniciaron las investigaciones del suceso y esperan tener una respuesta lo más pronto posible.

Trascendió que Douglas Bournigal era reconocido en el ámbito local como un destacado cardiólogo y conocida su afición por la aviación.

Hace algunos años, Douglas Bournigal logró una hazaña al ser el primer piloto al conducir su avioneta desde Carolina del Norte en Estados Unidos hasta la ciudad de Montecristi, en el noroeste de República Dominicana, cruzando por el misterioso Triángulo de Las Bermudas.

https://larepublica.pe



Dos hombres perdieron la vida en un accidente aéreo ocurrido al norte del aeropuerto de Joaquín Balaguer, conocido como el Higüero.

Los fallecidos son el médico cadiólogo Douglas Bournigal, y Bruno Vincent, gerente ejecutivo de la compañía GB Energy- Texaco.

La avioneta matricula N-612ST cayó a una milla del aeropuerto en horas de la tarde, el director de comunicación corporativa de Aerodom, Luis José López. 

Aerodom explicó que la eronave cayó a una milla de la cabecera de la pista 19 del aeropuerto y desde que se produjo el accidente se activó el plan de emergencia. Aun no se ha establecido desde dónde venían los fallecidos. 

Bournigal estaba casado con Maricarmen Morales, dermatóloga  y cirujana de la piel y trasplante de pelo, con quien ha procreado sus hijos Michelle y Emil, hermanos de Ernesto, Jonathan y Nicole, de su primer matrimonio.

Pasó a la historia como el primer piloto que logra llegar en un vuelo internacional en un planeador desde Carolina del Norte hasta Montecristi, cruzando por el misterioso Triángulo de Las Bermudas.

https://listindiario.com

Visit the B52 crash site at Elephant Mountain, Maine



As more and more visitors discover the beauty and recreation opportunities of the Moosehead Lake re­gion in Maine, the county is im­proving access to and helping folks navigate the sometimes rugged terrain.

One site that is worth visiting is the B52 bomb­er crash site on the side of Elephant Mountain, not far from the center of Greenville. Clear, bright blue signs guide visitors to the location for viewing an unusual scene.

In January 1963, a crew from Westover AFB in Chicopee, Massachusetts set out on a training mission to practice low level flying. Terribly cold temperatures and howling winds created turbulence that took advantage of a weak tail vertical stabilizer which broke off and cause the B-52C Stratofortress to lose altitude and crash. Only two crew members survived — Navigator Captain Gerald Adler survived an ejection in his seat without the parachute deploying, and the pilot, Lt. Col. Dante Bulli, who was suspended in a tree in subzero temperatures until he was rescued. Seven other airmen were killed in the crash.

The Strategic Air Command, or SAC, was so afraid of a nuclear sneak attack at the time that it had bombers flying 24 hours a day and practice missions were common in the US while missions with thermonuclear warheads were flown close to Soviet airspace overseas. It was the Cold War. The bomber was an enormous aircraft stretching the length of three tractor trai­lers and sporting wings that were so long “Boe­ing had to put little wheels on the tips to keep them from dragging.”

Several B-52 crashes hap­pened in similar conditions in very close succession, forcing the Air Force and Boeing to reexamine the plane.

The crash site is eight miles in on maintained dirt roads, well signed, and has a small parking area, though no restroom facilities at this time. The land is owned by Weyerhaeuser, who recently purchased much of the logging land in the area from Plum Creek Timber. Care for the site is shared by several groups including the Moosehead Riders Snowmobile Club, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, the American Legion, the U.S. Airforce and the Maine Air National Guard.

It is both haunting and interesting to walk among the debris, some strewn in trees and other large pieces on the ground. Though the area was cleared years ago, much of the debris has been returned and carefully positioned and the site remains a memorial to the airmen who lost their lives on that mission. No tree harvesting is allowed on this part of the mountain and people are asked to not touch any of the artifacts.

Small American flags have been placed around the site and some remains of floral memorials are evident. Interestingly, a Maine forest ranger found one of the ejection seats on a remote logging road in 2012, and it was confirmed that it was the pilot’s seat.

In addition to the crash site, several artifacts are on display at the Center for Moosehead History courtesy of the Moosehead Riders Snowmobile Club right in downtown Greenville.

So, the next time you find yourself up at Moosehead, be sure to plan to swing up to the crash site and pay tribute to the airmen and remember an important time in our country’s history.

www.mooseheadhistory.org

Original article can be found here ➤ http://homenewshere.com

Cessna 170, N4244V: Fatal accident occurred April 15, 2017 at Williston Municipal Airport (X60), Levy County, Florida

Video: Listen to Nate Enders at work as a TRACON controller.

Nate Enders began his Federal Aviation Administration career as a certified professional controller at New York TRACON. Shortly after, Nate became a certified professional controller at Dallas TRACON and most recently became certified at Atlanta TRACON. 

On Easter Sunday April 15th, 2017 Nate Enders, his beautiful wife Laura, and 2 of their sons Jaden and Eli died doing what they loved doing when their plane crashed at Williston Municipal Airport (X60), Florida.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4244V




Location: Williston, FL
Accident Number: ERA17FA155
Date & Time: 04/15/2017, 1523 EDT
Registration: N4244V
Aircraft: CESSNA 170
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The commercial pilot and three passengers were making a personal cross-country flight in the airplane. After a refueling stop, the airplane taxied to the runway and departed. Security video and flight data showed that the airplane had just departed the airport and was about 280 ft above the ground when it stalled and spun to the left, impacting the ground in a nose-down attitude. Post-accident examination of the engine and airframe revealed no evidence of a mechanical anomaly or failure that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. The recorded weather at the airport at the time of the accident included a right-quartering headwind at 8 knots gusting to 17 knots. The flight data revealed that the airplane slowed to a groundspeed of 48 knots just before the stall occurred, which was below the airplane's published power-on stall speed of 53 knots; however, the gusting wind conditions likely resulted in a further decease of the airplane's airspeed and increase of its critical angle-of-attack.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed during initial climb in gusty wind conditions, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall/spin. 

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 15, 2017, about 1523 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 170, N4244V, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Williston Municipal Airport (X60), Williston, Florida. The commercial pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot in accordance with the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight that was destined for Inverness Airport (INF), Inverness, Florida.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, earlier on the day of the accident, the airplane departed from its base at Eagles Landing Airport (5GA3), Williamson, Georgia. Fueling records showed that the airplane stopped at Thomaston-Upson County Airport (OPN), Thomaston, Georgia, and was fueled there at 1131. The airplane then flew from OPN to X60, and an airport security video showed the airplane being fueled at X60 about 1448. The video then showed the airplane as it taxied onto runway 5 at intersection C and took off.

Video from another security camera at X60 showed the airplane immediately after takeoff as it climbed to about 280 ft above ground level and leveled off. The video then showed the airplane make a slight right turn followed by a sharp left turn and a steep descent as it rolled to an inverted position.

Flight data was downloaded from a Stratus ADS-B receiver that was recovered from the airplane and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Records Laboratory, Washington, DC. Review of the downloaded data revealed that the airplane's ground speed was about 48 knots just before it began to roll to the right.

PERSONAL INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, glider, and instrument airplane. He held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multi-engine, and instrument airplane. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate, issued March 27, 2017. At the time of the medical examination for this medical certificate, the pilot reported 2,350 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's current logbooks could not be located.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, tailwheel-equipped airplane was manufactured in 1948. It was powered by a 145-horsepower Continental C-145-2H engine and equipped with a two-blade McCauley propeller. The last annual inspection was completed on June 3, 2016. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine each had a total time of 3,657.4 hours and 46 hours since the annual inspection. The engine had 194.3 hours since major overhaul.

The airplane owner's manual stated that the power-on stall speed with no flaps was 53 knots.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1519, the recorded weather at X60 was wind from 080° at 8 knots gusting to 17 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 30°C, dew point temperature 14°C, and altimeter 30.23 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, which was located near the departure end of runway 5 about 543 ft left of the runway's centerline. The airplane was resting on its nose and displayed signatures consistent with a nose-down attitude at ground impact. The wing leading edges were crushed aft by impact forces, and the engine was buried about 2 ft in the dirt. The fuselage was crushed (accordioned) aft by impact forces. The airplane came to rest on a magnetic heading of about 050°.

The left-wing fabric was torn in several places. The fuel cap separated and was found next to the airplane. Aviation 100LL fuel was noted in the left tank, which appeared to be full of fuel. The left aileron and flap remained attached and intact.

The right wing exhibited more severe leading-edge damage than the left wing. The leading edge was crushed by impact forces, and the fabric was torn in several places. The two fuel tanks in the right wing contained aviation 100LL fuel. The right fuel cap had separated and was found next to the airplane. The right flap and the aileron remained attached and intact.

The tail of the airplane did not contact the ground; the rudder and elevator were intact and not damaged. Flight control continuity was confirmed to all primary flight controls. The elevator trim was in the neutral position. The cockpit was destroyed.

The propeller remained attached to the engine. The propeller blades were bent aft. The engine and propeller were pushed into the instrument panel and upwards at a 45° angle.

The engine remained attached to the airframe by the right rear engine mount only. The other three engine mounts were fractured by impact forces. The engine case was impact damaged, and several pieces of the case were fractured and missing in the front of the engine. All six cylinders remained attached to the engine case and displayed varying amounts of impact damage. Valve train continuity was established through the engine by visual confirmation during an engine teardown. There were no pre-impact anomalies noted during the teardown that would have prevented normal engine operation or production of rated horsepower.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Gainesville, Florida, performed an autopsy of the pilot, and his cause of death was injuries sustained in the accident.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma performed forensic toxicology testing of specimens from the pilot; The tests were negative for carbon monoxide, drugs, and alcohol. 

History of Flight

Initial climb
Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 



Nate Enders

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 37, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2350 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N4244V
Model/Series: 170 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18600
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/03/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 46 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3657.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:  C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: C145-2H
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: X60, 76 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1519 EDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 17 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Williston, FL (X60)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: INVERNESS, FL (INF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1523 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: WILLISTON MUNI (X60)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 75 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 5
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6999 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  29.366111, -82.463611 (est)