Saturday, February 23, 2019

Southwest Airlines Needs to Make Peace With Its Mechanics As Soon As Possible

Over the past two weeks, long-running tensions between Southwest Airlines and its maintenance workers (and their union) have come to a boil. Southwest has seen a sharp spike in out-of-service planes, magnifying the impact of severe weather on its operations. As a result, it has experienced an unusually high number of flight delays and cancellations.

The airline and the mechanics' union have traded blame for this situation, but it doesn't really matter who's right and who's wrong. The longer these reliability issues persist, the greater the potential damage to Southwest Airlines' reputation. That's why Southwest needs to do what's necessary to resolve this dispute -- even if it adds to the company's costs over the next few years.

Tensions have been growing

Airline labor contracts never formally expire. Strikes and lockouts are permitted only on rare occasions, when the National Mediation Board, a federal agency, determines that negotiations are at a complete impasse. Nevertheless, it is customary for airlines and their unions to agree on new multiyear contracts -- usually with raises built in -- around the time that the old ones become amendable.

Southwest Airlines has nearly 50,000 unionized employees across a dozen different work groups. Most of its unions -- accounting for 94% of Southwest's unionized workforce -- are working under contracts that are not yet amendable or have become amendable within the past few months.

Southwest's mechanics are by far the biggest exception. This roughly 2,500-strong group is working under a contract implemented more than a decade ago, which became amendable in August 2012. Years of negotiations have failed to result in a new ratified contract.

Not surprisingly, this stalemate has led to bad blood between the two sides. For example, in late 2017, the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association (AMFA) threatened to block Southwest Airlines from flying to Hawaii due to its maintenance plans. Tensions finally seemed to cool last year, when the airline and AMFA reached a tentative contract agreement, but the deal was rejected by the union's membership, largely based on the proposed pay rates.

Accusations fly

This brings us to this month's events. Beginning around Feb. 12, Southwest Airlines experienced a sharp increase in the number of aircraft out of service because of maintenance issues. The airline generally has up to 20 aircraft impacted by unexpected maintenance problems on any given day, but it has had more than twice that number of aircraft out of service in recent days.

Southwest Airlines declared an "operational emergency" on Feb. 15 to address the spike in maintenance issues, threatening to fire any mechanics who missed work without a valid doctor's note. Nevertheless, the problems have been getting worse, not better. Southwest canceled nearly 200 flights last Tuesday, about half because of maintenance issues. The carrier then canceled more than 400 flights both on Wednesday and on Thursday, as severe weather began to have a bigger impact on its operation.

Southwest's management claims that the spike in out-of-service aircraft occurred only in certain maintenance bases and can't be explained by changes in personnel or procedures. The company also alleges that "AMFA has a history of work disruptions" and that the recent uptick in maintenance cancellations came suspiciously soon after a contract negotiation session.

Lastly, Southwest Airlines says that it has already offered its mechanics an industry-leading pay package. The implication is that its mechanics aren't being reasonable -- and Southwest can't afford to absorb an even bigger unit cost increase Opens a New Window. to meet their demands.

AMFA has retorted that Southwest Airlines isn't assigning overtime to its members despite the supposed operational emergency. The union claims that the company is trying to scapegoat its workers for a variety of safety issues. AMFA is also drawing attention to the fact that Southwest employs fewer mechanics per aircraft than rivals.

This situation is toxic

Most customers probably don't care whether the blame for Southwest's recent spike in delays and cancellations lies more with management or more with the union. They just want to get to wherever they need to go on time. Southwest Airlines has let many customers down in that respect over the past two weeks or so.

Over time, this could sully the airline's sterling reputation. Southwest routinely has the lowest rate of official complaints to the Department of Transportation of any major U.S. airline, but the recent combination of delays, cancellations, and sniping between management and the union will test customers' patience (and loyalty).

Aside from these reputational concerns, the ongoing feud between Southwest and its mechanics could have one immediate, practical impact. Southwest Airlines recently completed the final steps Opens a New Window. needed to secure the "ETOPS" authorization it needs for Hawaii flights. Yet the FAA may hesitate to give the final sign-off in the midst of this fight, causing further delays.

Southwest Airlines' desire to keep costs down is understandable. But the difference between the terms it is offering and what its mechanics would accept appears to be quite small compared to the airline's total earnings.

Thus, Southwest Airlines' negotiating strategy appears to be pennywise but pound-foolish. The company needs to prioritize protecting its reputation and its business plans -- and that means finalizing a generous contract for its mechanics as soon as possible.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.foxbusiness.com

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N224TA; fatal accident occurred February 23, 2019 at Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9), Bristol County, Massachusetts

Sydney Miti, Flight Instructor

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N224TA



Location: Mansfield, MA
Accident Number: ERA19FA107
Date & Time: 02/23/2019, 1225 EST
Registration: N224TA
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

After practicing maneuvers during the instructional flight, the flight instructor and student pilot approached the airport for landing. Witnesses and airport surveillance video indicated that the airplane entered the landing flare, but continued to float down the runway a significant distance, touching down about 2,800 ft down the 3,503-ft-long runway. The pilots then initiated a takeoff (touch-and-go). Although the published airport traffic pattern for the runway indicated left turns, the airplane performed a climb in a steep right bank before slowing and entering a spiraling decent toward a grass area near the airport terminal building. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. It is likely that the flight instructor allowed the airplane to exceed its critical angle of attack during a turning initial climb after a touch-and-go landing, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Although it could not be determined who was flying the airplane at the time of the accident, the flight instructor is ultimately responsible for the safety of the flight. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's failure to maintain airplane control during initial climb after a touch-and-go landing, which resulted in an exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall. 

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Initial climb
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Aerodynamic stall/spin

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

On February 23, 2019, about 1225 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N224TA, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9), Mansfield, Massachusetts. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by New Horizon Aviation Inc. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Norwood Memorial Airport (OWD), Norwood, Massachusetts, about 1125.


After performing maneuvers over the local area, the airplane approached 1B9 for landing. Witnesses and review of airport surveillance video revealed that the airplane was on approach to runway 32, a 3,503-ft-long, 75-ft-wide asphalt runway. The airplane flared over the runway and floated a significant distance before touching down about 2,800 ft down the runway. The pilots then initiated a takeoff (touch-and-go). Although the published traffic pattern for runway 32 indicated left turns, the airplane performed a climb in a steep right bank before slowing and entering a spiraling descent toward a grass area near the airport terminal building.

Sydney Miti 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/11/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/01/2018
Flight Time:  386 hours (Total, all aircraft), 150 hours (Total, this make and model), 66 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 18, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine, issued on November 1, 2018. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on January 11, 2019. Review of the flight instructor's logbook revealed that he had accumulated a total flight experience of about 386 hours; of which, 66 and 33 hours were flown during the 90- and 30-day periods preceding the accident, respectively.

The student pilot did not possess a student pilot certificate nor was he required to. Review of the student pilot's logbook revealed that, at that time of the accident, he had completed six lessons with the operator and had accrued a total flight experience of 7.6 hours.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N224TA
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S9224
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/29/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5660 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: New Horizon Aviation Inc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: New Horizon Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle landing gear airplane was manufactured in 2002. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 180-horsepower engine equipped with a two-blade, fixed-pitch McCauley propeller. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 29, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accrued 5,660 total hours since new and the engine had accrued 3,358 hours since new.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OWD, 49 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 10°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Norwood, MA (OWD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mansfield, MA (1B9)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1125 EST
Type of Airspace: 

The accident site was located about 11 miles south of OWD. The 1253 recorded weather at OWD included wind variable at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 4°C, dew point -7°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury.



Airport Information

Airport: Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 121 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3503 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around





Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 42.004444, -71.199722

The wreckage came to rest nose down in grass oriented on a magnetic heading about 270°; no debris path was observed. Fuel had leaked out of both wings and into the grass. Both wings exhibited leading edge impact damage. The cockpit was crushed, but both front seatbelts remained intact and were unlatched by rescue personnel. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wings and measurement of the flap actuator corresponded to a flaps-retracted position. The rudder and elevator remained attached to the empennage and measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a 5° tab-up (nose-down) trim position. Control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit controls. The right aileron cable had separated and both cable ends exhibited broomstraw separation consistent with overstress.

The engine had separated from the airframe. The propeller remained attached to the engine; one blade remained undamaged and was bent slightly forward. The other blade was bent aft and exhibited chordwise scratches. The propeller and rear accessories were removed from the engine. The top spark plugs were removed and their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The crankshaft was rotated via an accessory drive gear. Crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. Fuel was found in the engine-driven fuel pump, fuel servo, flow divider, and in the fuel lines. The fuel inlet screen of the fuel servo and oil suction screen were absent of debris. Both magnetos produced spark at all leads when rotated by hand. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Massachusetts Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Boston, Massachusetts, performed autopsies on both pilots. The cause of death for both pilots was blunt force injuries.

Toxicology testing performed on both pilots by the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory was negative for drugs and alcohol. The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N224TA

Location: Mansfield, MA
Accident Number: ERA19FA107
Date & Time: 02/23/2019, 1225 EST
Registration: N224TA
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On February 23, 2019, about 1225 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N224TA, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9), Mansfield, Massachusetts. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by New Horizon Aviation Inc. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Norwood Memorial Airport (OWD), Norwood, Massachusetts, about 1125.

After performing maneuvers over the local area, the airplane approached 1B9 for landing. Witnesses and review of airport surveillance video revealed that the airplane was on approach to runway 32, a 3,503-ft-long, 75-ft-wide asphalt runway. The airplane flared over the runway and floated a significant distance before touching down about 2,800 ft down the runway. The pilots then initiated a takeoff (touch-and-go). Although the published traffic pattern for runway 32 indicated left turns, the airplane performed a climb in a steep right bank before slowing and entering a spiraling descent toward a grass area near the airport terminal building.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/11/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/01/2018
Flight Time:  386 hours (Total, all aircraft), 150 hours (Total, this make and model), 66 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 18, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine, issued on November 1, 2018. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on January 11, 2019. Review of the flight instructor's logbook revealed that he had accumulated a total flight experience of about 386 hours; of which, 66 and 33 hours were flown during the 90- and 30-day periods preceding the accident, respectively.

The student pilot did not possess a student pilot certificate nor was he required to. Review of the student pilot's logbook revealed that, at that time of the accident, he had completed six lessons with the operator and had accrued a total flight experience of 7.6 hours.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N224TA
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S9224
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/29/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5660 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: New Horizon Aviation Inc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: New Horizon Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle landing gear airplane was manufactured in 2002. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 180-horsepower engine equipped with a two-blade, fixed-pitch McCauley propeller. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 29, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accrued 5,660 total hours since new and the engine had accrued 3,358 hours since new.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OWD, 49 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 10°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Norwood, MA (OWD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mansfield, MA (1B9)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1125 EST
Type of Airspace: 

The accident site was located about 11 miles south of OWD. The 1253 recorded weather at OWD included wind variable at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear sky, temperature 4°C, dew point -7°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury.

Airport Information

Airport: Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 121 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3503 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 42.004444, -71.199722

The wreckage came to rest nose down in grass oriented on a magnetic heading about 270°; no debris path was observed. Fuel had leaked out of both wings and into the grass. Both wings exhibited leading edge impact damage. The cockpit was crushed, but both front seatbelts remained intact and were unlatched by rescue personnel. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wings and measurement of the flap actuator corresponded to a flaps-retracted position. The rudder and elevator remained attached to the empennage and measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a 5° tab-up (nose-down) trim position. Control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit controls. The right aileron cable had separated and both cable ends exhibited broomstraw separation consistent with overstress.

The engine had separated from the airframe. The propeller remained attached to the engine; one blade remained undamaged and was bent slightly forward. The other blade was bent aft and exhibited chordwise scratches. The propeller and rear accessories were removed from the engine. The top spark plugs were removed and their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The crankshaft was rotated via an accessory drive gear. Crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. Fuel was found in the engine-driven fuel pump, fuel servo, flow divider, and in the fuel lines. The fuel inlet screen of the fuel servo and oil suction screen were absent of debris. Both magnetos produced spark at all leads when rotated by hand. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Massachusetts Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Boston, Massachusetts, performed autopsies on both pilots. The cause of death for both pilots was blunt force injuries.

Toxicology testing performed on both pilots by the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory was negative for drugs and alcohol. 

Location: Mansfield, MA
Accident Number: ERA19FA107
Date & Time: 02/23/2019, 1225 EST
Registration: N224TA
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On February 23, about 1225 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N244TA, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain, during a go-around at Mansfield Municipal Airport (1B9), Mansfield, Massachusetts. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by New Horizon Aviation Inc. under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight that originated from Norwood Memorial Airport (OWD), Norwood, Massachusetts, about 1020.

After performing maneuvers over the local area, the airplane approached 1B9 for landing. Witnesses and review of airport surveillance video revealed that the airplane was on approach to runway 32, a 3,503-ft-long, 75-ft-wide, asphalt runway. The airplane remained in the landing flare over approximately 2,800 ft of runway before a go-around was initiated. Although the airport traffic pattern for runway 32 required left turns, the airplane performed a climb in a steep right bank, before slowing and descending in a spiral toward a grass area near the terminal building.

The wreckage came to rest nose down in grass, oriented about a magnetic heading of 270°, and no debris path was observed. Fuel had leaked out of both wings and into the grass. Both wings exhibited leading edge impact damage. The cockpit was crushed, but both front seatbelts remained intact and were unlatched by rescue personnel. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to their respective wing and measurement of the flap actuator corresponded to a flaps retracted position. The rudder and elevator remained attached to the empennage and measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a 5° tab up (nose down) trim position. Control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit controls. The right aileron cable had separated and both cable ends exhibited broomstraw separation.

The engine had separated from the airframe. The propeller remained attached to the engine and one blade remained undamaged and was bent slightly forward. The other propeller blade was bent aft and exhibited chordwise scratches. The propeller and rear accessories were removed from the engine. The top spark plugs were removed and their electrodes were intact and light gray in color. The crankshaft was rotated via an accessory drive gear. Crankshaft, camshaft and valve train continuity were confirmed and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. Fuel was found in the engine-driven fuel pump, fuel servo, flow divider, and in the fuel lines between. The fuel inlet screen of the fuel servo and oil suction screen were absent of debris. Both magnetos produced spark at all leads when rotated by hand.

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle landing gear airplane, was manufactured in 2002. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 180-hp engine equipped with a two-blade, fixed-pitch, McCauley propeller. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 29, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accrued 5,660 total hours since new and the engine had accrued 3,358 hours since major new.

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine, which was obtained on November 1, 2018. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate was issued on January 11, 2019. At that time, the flight instructor reported a total flight experience of 325 hours.

The student pilot did not possess a student pilot certificate, nor was he required to. At that time of the accident, the student pilot had completed six lessons with the operator and had accrued a total flight experience of 7.6 hours.

The accident site was about 11 miles south of OWD. The recorded weather at OWD, at 1253, was: wind variable at 3 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear sky; temperature 4° C; dew point -7° C; altimeter 30.41 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N224TA
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: New Horizon Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OWD, 49 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Norwood, MA (OWD)
Destination:  Mansfield, MA (1B9)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 42.004444, -71.199722

Sydney Miti, Flight Instructor





MANSFIELD — Pilots and others waiting to be seated for breakfast Sunday at the Mansfield Municipal Airport restaurant expressed sadness over a plane crash that killed an instructor and his student at the airport the day before.

The crash, which was reported around 12:30 p.m. Saturday, killed 31-year-old Sydney Miti of Waltham who was the instructor pilot, and his student, 18-year-old Julian Lattermann of Dover, according to Mansfield Police.

One experienced pilot, David Middleton of Attleboro, who was waiting for a seat at the restaurant Sunday morning, said he was working on his plane, preparing it for an afternoon flight, when he saw the distressed Cessna 172 fly overhead the hanger where he was working on Saturday.

“I saw the plane fly by at a 45 degree angle at about 200 feet,” Middleton estimated.

He said that the angle and the altitude were his best guess.

Middleton had noticed the plane as it practiced take-offs and landings.

He said the engine sounded fine, and then as it flew over the hangar, referred to as the “shanty town” due to the rust color of the hangar, the plane struck the ground, nose first.

Middleton said he was one of the first on the scene, running towards the wreckage, but then had to stay back when he saw how much fuel was spilling from the plane and the extent of the damage.

He said he immediately had those with him call for an ambulance and firefighters.

Middleton said he has been flying for 30 years, and earlier in the day, he and another pilot flew to Nashua, N.H. for breakfast. He said it was a perfect day for flying and until the crash he planned to take his plane out for a flight. The Mansfield Municipal Airport was closed immediately after the crash.

He and other pilots all said the crash was very unfortunate.

Police said the plane, a Cessna 172S, was owned and operated by Horizon Aviation of Norwood.

Police, in a press release issued late Saturday, said the plane left Norwood airport around 11:26 a.m. There was a radio transmission at around 12:30 p.m. from the plane that it missed an approach as it maneuvered away from runway 32. The plane then flew past the airport administration building and crashed into a turf landing area.

Mansfield Fire Chief Neal Boldrighini said the first responding fire crews and a Boston Med Flight, which is stationed at the airport, quickly determined the two occupants of the plane had perished in the crash.

The chief said firefighters poured foam over the wreckage as a precaution because vapors from aviation gas is volatile. He said the plane never caught fire.

A crane was called to the site and was used to pull the plane out of the ground and then assisted fire crews to remove the aircraft’s engine and propeller before the victims could be removed.

Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board officials are investigating the crash along with Massachusetts State Police and the Bristol County District Attorney’s office.

A state police helicopter and drone took pictures of the crash site.

Paul Bjoukman, a resident of Mansfield and a pilot for the last 14 years, went to the airport with family members to view the crash scene on Saturday.

He quickly identified the aircraft as a Cessna and said that it seats four people.

Bjoukman talked about taking his initial flight training in Mansfield, and then speculated how the plane ended up where it did, because he didn’t think it was near either the paved or the grass runway.

Local police said Saturday the crashed plane would remain at the airport overnight and that federal authorities will take over the crash site.

The National Transportation Safety Board will determine a probable cause for the accident, according to the FAA.

The last aviation fatality in the Attleboro area took place in June 2015 in Plainville when a single-engine Beechcraft crashed into a home on Bridle Path and burst into flames, killing a Tennessee couple and their daughter in the plane. Residents of the home escaped unharmed. That plane was headed to the Norwood airport.

There have been a few accidents the past several years at the Mansfield airport, including in February 2014 when a student pilot escaped injury when a Cessna 172 made what was described as a hard landing at the airport. The plane’s wheel hit a snowbank and went into a skid off the runway, causing an estimated $45,000 damage. The pilot had been practicing landings.

In October 2013, a plane crashed into a group of trees about 25 feet off the ground, but the pilot and a student pilot managed to get out of the wreckage on their own. The two were reportedly practicing take-offs and landings.

And in December 2011, a North Attleboro man escaped with minor injuries after a plane he built himself veered off the runway and flipped over.

Also, in April 2008, another student pilot’s plane cruised off the runway and flipped over, but no injuries were reported.

The worst accident at Mansfield Airport took place in September 2007 when two people from Maine were killed and two others injured, including a Mansfield resident, when a plane crashed after takeoff. Federal investigators attributed the crash to pilot error and an overweight plane.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.thesunchronicle.com


 January 15th, 2019:  Sydney Miti has joined the instructor team at Horizon Aviation. He brings expertise, experience, and a warm smile to our staff at the Norwood Memorial Airport (KOWD).










A flight instructor and his student were killed Saturday when a single-engine airplane crashed nose-first into the ground at Mansfield Municipal Airport.  

Mansfield police say Sydney Miti, 31, of Waltham, and Julian Lattermann, 18, of Dover, were both killed upon impact.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families during this tragic time," Mansfield police said in a statement.

Miti's family tells NBC10 Boston it was his dream to fly, and all of his nephews wanted to be like him. The pilot's grieving family celebrated his life at a vigil Saturday night where his mother and wife described his contagious positivity and kindness.

"I was so worried," Gertrude Miti said of her son's profession. "I said Sydney, 'why did you take this job?' It's too risky for you, it's too risky."

Miti's mother describes him as a loving, friendly, and kind father, son, husband, uncle, and brother.

"Everybody loved you Sydney, everybody loved you. You know that," Gertrude Miti said.

An initial investigation shows Miti was giving Lattermann a lesson aboard a 2002 Cessna 172S aircraft on Saturday. It was in the Mansfield area after having taken off from the Norwood Airport around 11:26 a.m. 

The Mansfield Police Department communications center received multiple 911 calls reporting the accident around 12:30 p.m. When emergency crews responded, they found the plane had crashed into the ground at runway 4, the turf landing strip located on the north side of the airport adjacent to Fruit Street.

Police say a radio transmission from the aircraft indicated a missed approach as it maneuvered away from Mansfield runway 32. Moments later, the Cessna flew past the Municipal Airport administration building and crashed into the turf landing area

"I just came by and saw all the commotion so I stopped," said Mansfield resident Ginnie Boucher, whose husband is a private pilot. "If they had mechanical trouble, they did a good job getting back to the airport and staying away from all the residents and the bikes."

Miti and Lattermann were the only ones on board when the aircraft crashed nose-first into the ground, crushing the cockpit.

"It's really not good," said Boucher who lives near the airport. "Nose-first, and it seems to be buried all the way up to the seats."

"It's shocking," adds Paul Bjorkman, who rents a small plane and flies out of the Mansfield Airport all the time. 

Bjorkman says he can't figure out what happened.

Federal investigators used a drone to help them piece together how it all unfolded.

Mansfield firefighters responded to the scene and sprayed the plane with foam to mitigate the dangers of leaking fuel while the victims were extricated from the wreckage.

The scene was cleared around 6 p.m. and the aircraft was turned over to investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The FAA is investigating, and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the crash.

Mansfield and Massachusetts State Police detectives are assisting in the investigation.

The aircraft was owned and operated by Horizon Aviation, of Norwood. The company declined to comment Saturday night.

Story and video ➤ https://www.necn.com

STOL UC-1 Twin Bee, owned by ESP Aviation LLC and privately operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N65NE, fatal accident occurred February 23, 2019 near Winter Haven Regional Airport (KGIF), Polk County, Florida -and- Cessna 208 Caravan I, N208SS, accident occurred March 24, 2012 off Abalone Caye, Port Honduras Marine Reserve, Belize

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania  

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N65NE

Location: Winter Haven, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA106
Date & Time: 02/23/2019, 1243 EST
Registration: N65NE
Aircraft: STOL Aircraft Corp UC-1
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On February 23, 2019, about 1243 eastern standard time, a STOL Aircraft Corp UC-1 amphibious airplane, N65NE, impacted a residence shortly after takeoff from Winter Haven Regional Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida. The flight instructor was fatally injured, the commercial pilot receiving instruction sustained minor injuries, and there was one serious ground injury. The airplane was owned by ESP Aviation LLC and privately operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight which departed at 1239.

According to the commercial pilot receiving instruction (the pilot), he and a colleague were receiving initial airplane multiengine sea training from the flight instructor in the accident airplane. The accident flight was the third flight of the day.

According to the pilot, the instructor advised him before takeoff that he would introduce a simulated engine failure at some point during takeoff or climbout. Shortly after takeoff from runway 23, about 200-300 ft above ground level (AGL), the instructor reduced the throttle on the left engine and the left engine stopped producing power, and the propeller feathered. They identified the failed engine, the instructor took over the flight controls, and selected a forced landing site.

During the descent, the flight crew's engine restart procedures were unsuccessful and they determined that the airplane would not reach the selected forced landing site. The instructor then chose a lake to the airplane's left as an alternate site. During the left descending turn, the airplane slowed, the left wing dropped, and the airplane impacted a house, seriously injuring one of its occupants.

A witness in a fuel truck at GIF stated she watched the airplane fly overhead. She saw both propellers rotating and watched as the left propeller stopped rotating. The witness said she then watched as the airplane "sank" in a descending left turn until it disappeared from view.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane single-engine sea, and instrument airplane He held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued October 24, 2017. He reported 820 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The flight instructor held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, and single- and multiengine sea. He held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued January 25, 2019. He reported 15,000 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The five-seat, twin-engine, high-wing, amphibious airplane was manufactured in 1986. It was powered by two Lycoming IO-360, 180-horsepower engines, equipped with Hartzell two-blade, constant-speed propellers. A review of the airplane maintenance records revealed that a 100-hr inspection was completed on February 23, 2019.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest inside the house and rested in a near vertical, nose-down attitude. All major components were accounted for at the scene. The cockpit area was destroyed and crushed inward. The top of the fuselage between the engines was crushed inward. The fuselage beyond the fifth seat was intact and undamaged. The throttle quadrant, which ran along the top of the cockpit, was separated during the impact sequence. The wings remained attached and were removed for recovery. After recovery of the airplane, control continuity was traced from the cockpit, through several cable breaks to all flight control surfaces.

The right-wing leading edge inboard of the engine was crushed inward. The front and inboard side of the cowling was crushed. The right-engine propeller blades displayed chordwise scratching and tip curling. The wing outboard of the engine was undamaged. The left-wing leading edge inbound of the engine was crushed. The left propeller blades were feathered and undamaged. There was damage to the outboard portion of the wing, which included wrinkled skin, and upward folding of the wing and skin. The wingtip was crushed inward.

The left and right engine crankshafts were rotated by hand at the propeller hub, and continuity was confirmed through the powertrain to the valve train and accessory section. Compression was confirmed on all cylinders of both engines using the thumb method. All of the ignition harness leads were intact and undamaged. The right engine's magnetos were manually rotated and produced spark at all terminal leads.

A test run of the left engine mounted on the left wing was attempted. An external battery and engine controls were connected, and an external fuel tank was plumbed directly to the fuel pump inlet. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously at all selected power settings without interruption.

No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction was noted during the examination of the recovered airframe and engines.

At 1153, the weather conditions reported at GIF included, wind from 170° at 12 knots, gusts to 17 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,400 ft, temperature 29° C, dew point 20° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: STOL Aircraft Corp
Registration: N65NE
Model/Series: UC-1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGIF, 146 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / 17 knots, 170°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Winter Haven, FL (GIF)
Destination: Winter Haven, FL (GIF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  28.056111, -81.753333

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Timothy Sheehy, the 33-year-old student pilot who was involved in a plane crash in Florida over the weekend, is also a Purple Heart recipient and the CEO of Ascent Vision and Bridger Aerospace in Belgrade, Montana.
















WINTER HAVEN, Florida (FOX 13) - One person has died after a plane crashed into a Winter Haven home Saturday afternoon.

The crash happened around 12:45 p.m. at a home on a Idylridge Way, just south of the Winter Haven Airport.

Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said 64-year-old instructor pilot James Wagner of Lakeland and 33-year-old student pilot Timothy Scheehy of Bozeman, Montana were on board when the plane took off from the Winter Haven Airport. They were scheduled to perform simulated engine failure training when the plane crashed.

Wagner died in the crash, but Judd said Scheehy was able to climb out of the wreckage on his own. He suffered minor injuries.

According to the sheriff's office, three people were inside the home at the time of the crash, and three children, ages 2, 11 and 15, were playing in the front yard.

Carmelle Ngalamulume, 17, was in one of the bedrooms and became pinned and trapped after the crash.

"We're shocked at how minor her injuries are," Judd said, noting the teen was transported to the hospital.

Judd said Carmelle's brother, 20-year-old Joel, was in an adjoining room and tried to free his sister. Their mother, Emerance, was taking a shower when the plane went down into the home.

"As tragic as this was for Mr. Wagner, it was a blessing today that we didn't have an entire family wiped out," Judd said. "It is an unbelieveable set of circumstances. We certainly expected to find the worst."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox13news.com

Cessna 208 Caravan I, N208JS: Accident occurred March 24, 2012 off Abalone Caye in Punta Gorda, Belize


 

The wreckage of a float-equipped Cessna 208 Caravan I that crash landed on March 24th, 2012 in the waters offshore southern Belize has been recovered. No one was hurt in the incident. The sole occupant of the aircraft at the time of the incident was pilot James Glen Wagner. An alert viewer of Love Television snapped these photographs of the plane being towed away from the site of the crash-landing . 

Love News understands that the plane was being towed north towards the mouth of the Monkey River.  The float-equipped Cessna 208 Caravan I went down in the Caribbean Sea near Abalone Caye around three thirty on March 24, 2012. According to the pilot, he had just dropped off some guests in Placencia village and was attempting to land the aircraft in the sea when it flipped over.  Investigators from the Civil Aviation Department are conducting an aircraft accident investigation.

Source:  http://www.lovetv.com.bz


March 24th, 2012
Cessna 208 Caravan I, N208SS


On March 24th, 2012, a routine maneuver shook up 57-year old James Glen Wagner, the pilot. 

Wagner of Lakeland Florida said that on March 24th, 2012 after taking guests to Placencia Village in his float-equipped Cessna 208 Caravan I, he took off again and intended to land in the sea near Abalone Caye. But the 

But the Cessna 208 Caravan I, N208SS, flipped on contact.

Wagner did not sustain any injuries and the plane was later moored on Abalone Caye.