Saturday, March 9, 2019

JetBlue, Embraer ERJ-190AR, N279JB: Incident occurred January 03, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois

https://registry.faa.gov/N279JB

NTSB Identification: DCA19CA062
14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Jetblue Airways
Aircraft: Embraer ERJ190, registration: N279JB

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Bell UH-1B Iroquois, N64RA: Fatal accident occurred March 08, 2019 in Forks, Clallam County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Crashed under unknown circumstances.

Iron Eagle Helicopter Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N64RA

Date: 08-MAR-19
Time: 15:40:00Z
Regis#: N64RA
Aircraft Make: RICHARDS HEAVYLIFT HELO INC
Aircraft Model: UH 1B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 133
City: FORKS
State: WASHINGTON

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST — The body of a pilot who died during a logging operation when his helicopter crashed in the West End on Friday morning was carried down a rugged hill from the wreckage Saturday afternoon.

Joshua M. Tripp, 44, of Missoula, Mont., was killed when his UH-1 Huey crashed in the West Twin River area about 7 miles west of Lake Crescent on Friday, said Brian King, Clallam County Sheriff’s Office chief criminal deputy.

Tripp, the president of Iron Eagle Helicopter Inc., was based at a logging camp in Olympic National Forest, authorities said.

No one else was aboard the helicopter.

A team of about 15, which included investigators with the National Traffic Safety Board (NTSB), secured the helicopter so that Tripp’s body could be extricated from it, said King, speaking on a cell phone from the crash site on Saturday afternoon.

At 2:30 p.m., Tripp’s remains were carried down a steep, snow-covered hillside to the command center set up about 6 miles up Forest Service Road, King said.

The tools needed to remove his body were back-packed up the hill to the crash site, which was about 500 yards form the command center, King said.

He added that the terrain was so rugged that it had been feared they would have to drop the tools in by air.

Working together were personnel with the Clallam County Search and Rescue team, Clallam County Fire District 1 and Forks Ambulance, as well as the NTSB investigators.

The sheriff’s office is turning the investigation into the cause of the crash over to the NTSB, which will work in unison with the Federal Aviation Administration, King said.

The plan is to begin bringing parts of the helicopter down today, King said.

“It will be an aerial operation,” he said. “We’re trying to take advantage of the weather,” which he described as cold but clear.

He said that, so far, there is nothing to explain why the copter went down. The weather was clear Friday morning, he added.

The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and other agencies, including the U.S. Coast Guard, initially investigated.

The Sheriff’s Office said Peninsula Communications received a 9-1-1 call at 7:40 a.m. Friday regarding the crash of a UH-1 Huey helicopter conducting forestry operations in the area of West Twin Road in Olympic National Forest.

Tripp had been conducting grapple-logging operations in Olympic National Forest, hoisting logs he moved to a site before they were put on loaders, King said.

He left the landing pad at the logging site at about 7:30 a.m.

“It was a short time later that he reported going down, and they lost contact,” King said.

“We don’t know if he was actually picking up a log.”

A logger found the crash site at 8:52 a.m. Friday and confirmed that the pilot had died.

A Coast Guard aircraft assisted in the search, spokeswoman Amanda Norcross said.

Olympic National Forest spokeswoman Susan Garner said the helicopter was subcontracted to a logging operation doing work under the KOCC Sale in Olympic National Forest.

An Olympic National Forest Service law enforcement officer was sent to the site, she said.

“We’re all pretty shook up about this,” Garner said.

“It’s a terrible tragedy for everyone.”

Clallam County Sheriff’s deputies, Clallam County Search and Rescue, Clallam County Fire District No. 1 and the State Patrol were in the area Friday morning, said the Sheriff’s Office.

The Port Angeles Disaster Response Team (DART) was activated for the first time for a mission when it was asked to take aerial photos of the crash site on Friday.

Life Flight Network, which moved into facilities at the Port of Port Angeles’ Fairchild International Airport last month, volunteered its services on Friday as well.

Original article ➤ http://www.peninsuladailynews.com

Beechcraft 76 Duchess, operated by Nexgen Aviation LLC as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight, N7KY: Accident occurred February 21, 2019 at Capital City Airport (KFFT), Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7KY


Location: Frankfort, KY
Accident Number: ERA19LA105
Date & Time: 02/21/2019, 1045 EST
Registration: N7KY
Aircraft: Beech 76
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On February 21, 2019, about 1045 eastern standard time, a Beech 76 airplane, N7KY, collided with terrain during an aborted landing at Capital City Airport (FFT), Frankfurt, Kentucky. The commercial pilot was not injured, and a flight instructor incurred minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by Nexgen Aviation LLC as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Blue Grass Airport (LEX), Lexington, Kentucky about 0910, and was destined for FFT.

According to the operator, the purpose of the flight was to prepare the pilot for an upcoming commercial multi-engine check ride. After airwork in the local area, the flight proceeded to FFT for approaches and landings. The pilot set up for a simulated single engine landing on runway 25. While over the runway for landing, the approach became unstable, and the pilot attempted a go-around. The airplane veered to the left and the left wingtip contacted the ground between the runway and taxiway. The airplane then collided an embankment and came to a stop. A postaccident fire ensued, and the pilots egressed the airplane and were met by first responders.

The wreckage was recovered by aircraft salvage personnel and was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N7KY
Model/Series: 76 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Nexgen Aviation LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FFT, 812 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lexington, KY (LEX)
Destination: Frankfort, KY (FFT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.110000, -84.540000 (est)







FRANKFORT, Kentucky – Everyone is OK following a plane crash in Frankfort.

It happened around 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the Capital City Airport.

Officials say the plane crashed during an instructional training course and caught fire.

“It’s very rare that we have incidents at this airport,” said Naitore Djigbenou, of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. “We have around 50 landings and takeoffs a day. The airport will continue to operate.”

There were two passengers on the plane at the time. They both sustained minor injuries, but declined medical treatment.

The Federal Aviation Administration is currently investigating and will release details at a later time.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://lex18.com

Piper PA-23-250 Aztec C, registered to L-Holding LLC and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight, N5894Y: Fatal accident occurred March 08, 2019 in Pahokee, Palm Beach County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdfg

https://registry.faa.gov/N5894Y 


Location: Pahokee, FL
Accident Number: WPR19FA093
Date & Time: 03/08/2019, 1526 EST
Registration: N5894Y
Aircraft: Piper PA23
Injuries: 5 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - 

On March 8, 2019, about 1526 eastern standard time, a Piper PA 23-250 airplane, N5894Y, impacted a lake during an emergency landing at the Palm Beach County Glades Airport (PHK), Pahokee Florida. The commercial pilot and four passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to L-Holding LLC, and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Tampa International Airport (TPA), Tampa, Florida about 1420 and was destined for North Palm Beach County General Aviation Airport (F45), West Palm Beach, Florida.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported that the pilot declared an emergency to air traffic control and reported a rough running left engine. The pilot further reported that he was going to shut down the left engine and divert to PHK. The controller cleared the pilot to land; the pilot's last transmission was when he reported the airport in sight.

Witnesses reported that their attention was drawn to the airplane when they observed it in a 45o nose and left-wing low rapid descent before it impacted the water.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N5894Y
Model/Series: PA23 250
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: F45, 22 ft msl
Observation Time: 1535 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Tampa, FL (TPA)
Destination: West Palm Beach, FL (F45) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 26.790278, -80.692778 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Florida  — Saturday, the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office identified the five victims who were killed in a small plane crash into Lake Okeechobee.

Four of the victims worked at Peterson Bernard law firm. The fifth was the pilot, Eduardo Mulet. Mulet was well-known in the aviation community. Mulet was a licensed pilot and flight instructor.

Mulet lived in Palm Beach Gardens with his wife, Cassandra Mateo. The couple did not have any children, but they had many nieces and nephews. Marianne Rodriguez tells WPBF she will miss the fun times with her uncle.

“Yesterday we were planning to take the Brightline, as a matter of fact, to see how it was. We even bought the tickets for today at 11 o’clock,” Rodriguez said.

Mulet leaves behind a community of aviation enthusiasts who will forever be grateful for the time he dedicated to helping others.

Jim Wethington has been a friend of Mulet’s family for over a decade. Saturday was the five-year anniversary of the day that Wethington was able to fly aboard one of Mulet’s planes.

“He said when you get your weight down, we’re going to go flying. That’s what we’re going to do. And it was five years ago today. Five years ago today, we went on that flight,” Wethington said.

Although the family and friends will miss Mulet, his life will always be known to encourage people to soar.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wpbf.com

Eduardo Mulet 45, of West Palm Beach

TAMPA — The five people found dead in an airplane that landed in Lake Okeechobee after taking off from Tampa International Airport on Friday have been identified.

The victims were Eduardo Mulet, 45, of West Palm Beach; Eric Peterson, 73, of Lighthouse Point; Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens; Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter; and Edwin Mortell III, 54, of Stuart. The crash happened at about 3:30 p.m. just north of Pahokee Airport, also known as Palm Beach County Glades Airport, according to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office.

The Piper PA-23-250 Aztec C went down 400 yards from shore. The passengers’ bodies were recovered less than three hours later. The cause of the crash has not been determined. The National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the incident while local authorities handle the death investigation.

Peterson, Fiorello, Bridwell and Mortell were attorneys at Peterson Bernard, a law firm with offices in Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach and Stuart, according to the firm’s webpage.

Calls to the firm’s main office were not immediately returned.

Mulet was a commercial pilot and owner of Pilotguy Consulting, records show.

“What I hear was that he was flying a two-engine plane and one engine failed,” said Mulet’s wife, Casandra Mateo. “That’s all I know.”

Reached by phone, Mateo said her husband had been flying for decades, everywhere he’s lived from New Jersey to Florida.

“He got his first flying license when he was a teenager, when he was 15,” Mateo said. “He’s been flying nonstop since that time. Flying was his passion.”

A software developer, Mulet always made time to fly, mostly for leisure, rarely for business clients, his wife said.

“He was always, always there for anybody, at any time,” Mateo said. “Everywhere he went he left marks, and in a very, very positive way. He was a leader.”

Mateo said she couldn’t describe the relationship between her husband and the passengers on board, but had heard the attorneys were in Tampa for a business trip.

Bridwell’s husband declined to comment.

The airplane was registered to a Delaware LLC held by The Company Corporation, owned by the Corporation Service Company, headquartered in Wilmington, FAA records show.

On its website, the Corporation Service Company says it is the “world’s leading provider of business, legal, tax, and digital brand services to companies around the globe,” and the partner of nearly 10,000 law firms.

Original article ➤ https://www.tampabay.com

Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter; Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens; Edwin Mortell III, 54, of Stuart; and Eric Peterson, 73, of Lighthouse Point.

The five victims of Friday’s deadly plane crash in Lake Okeechobee were South Florida residents, three of them from Palm Beach County, the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office reported.

The wife of crash victim Matthew Fiorello said the plane was en route to the North Palm Beach County Airport, but was diverted to Pahokee after a problem during the flight.

“He was texting me from the plane. He told me he loved me. He told me he loved the girls. He told me he couldn’t talk right now because there was an issue on the plane and they were being diverted and trying to land,” said Rachel Backoff Fiorello, who married Matthew nearly seven years ago. They have two young daughters, ages 5 and 2.

In addition to being a lawyer, Fiorello was a local singer and musician. She said the four attorneys on the flight were good friends in addition to being colleagues at the firm.

“He’s the most loving, giving person. He would do anything for anybody before doing something for himself,” says his wife. “He was an incredible father and husband.”

UPDATE: 2:30 p.m.

Four of the five victims of Friday’s deadly plane crash in Lake Okeechobee were attorneys at the South Florida-based Peterson Bernard law firm. Among them were the law firm’s founder, Eric Peterson, 73.

The firm, which has offices in West Palm Beach, Stuart and Fort Lauderdale, also lists victims Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens, Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter, and Edwin “Ted” Mortell III, 54, of Stuart among its attorneys.

The fifth victim, Eduardo Mulet, 45, of West Palm Beach, was a licensed commercial pilot, who also worked as a computer technician at the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff’s office spokeswoman Teri Barbera said Mulet was not an agency employee but serviced the agency’s computers as an employee of a private contractor.

Peterson, of Lighthouse Point, was one of the firm’s founding partners and oversaw its West Palm Beach office and focused on construction litigation, according to the firm’s website. The firm’s website lists 20 attorneys.

Bridwell, an avid boater with a passion for physical fitness and exercise, lived in Jupiter with her husband, Jason, and their 8-year-old daughter. Jason Bridwell said that Heather and her colleagues at the law firm were returning from a meeting with a client when the crash occurred.

“I’m still trying to process everything,” Jason said. “She has a husband and an 8-year-old daughter that she’s leaving behind. We were a great family.”

UPDATE: The five victims of Friday’s deadly plane crash in Lake Okeechobee were South Florida residents, three of them from Palm Beach County, the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office reported Saturday.

The victims were identified as Eduardo Mulet, 45, of West Palm Beach, Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens, Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter, Edwin Mortell III, 54, of Stuart, and Eric Peterson, 73, of Lighthouse Point.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators continued their probe Saturday into a deadly crash of a twin-engine Piper plane into Lake Okeechobee. The aircraft went down Friday afternoon in shallow waters upon its approach to the Pahokee airport, killing five people on board, according to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office.

The Piper PA-23-250 Aztec C plane had departed from Sheltair Aviation Services at Tampa International Airport and crashed just north of the Palm Beach County Glades Airport at about 3:30 p.m.

Rescue workers from PBSO’s marine unit and Palm Beach County Fire Rescue found the plane just 400 yards from shore and were able to recover five bodies, a PBSO spokeswoman said. Authorities have not released the names of the victims.

Sheltair Aviation, a private aircraft firm based in Fort Lauderdale, unveiled a $6.5 million executive hangar complex at the Tampa airport less than three weeks ago.

Story and photo gallery ➤ https://www.palmbeachpost.com

Eduardo Mulet 45, of West Palm Beach

PAHOKEE, Florida  —  The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office has released the names of the five people killed in Friday's plane crash near Pahokee Airport.

Deputies say Eduardo Mulet, 45, of West Palm Beach; Eric Peterson, 73, of Lighthouse Point; Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens; Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter; and Edwin Mortell III, 54, of Stuart, were killed after the plane went down around 3:30 p.m into Lake Okeechobee.

The pilot of the plane was Mulet, who also worked at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office.

Mulet was a licensed commercial pilot, and worked as a computer technician. Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Teri Barbera said Mulet was not an agency employee but serviced the agency’s computers as an employee of a private contractor.

Peterson, Bridwell, Mortell and Firoello all worked for the same law firm, Peterson Bernard. The law firm has offices in Stuart, West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale.

PREVIOUS STORY - Five people were killed Friday when the plane they were in crashed into Lake Okeechobee.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the twin-engine Piper aircraft had left from Tampa International Airport and was on approach to Pahokee Airport when it crashed just before 3:30 p.m.

"I seen it circling. It went around two times," said a witness, Laura Lester. "And it went up in that corner and it didn't come back."

The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office and Palm Beach County Fire Rescue sent divers into the water hoping to rescue survivors.

Initial reports from witnesses were that someone was seen swimming away from the wreckage.

That gave rescuers hope they might find someone alive.

But when they reached the plane, they found all five passengers still on board.

They had all been killed.

The five bodies were recovered and brought back to land.

The identities of the victims have not been released.

The cause of the plane crash remains unclear.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wpbf.com

PAHOKEE, Florida — The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office released the identities of five people killed after the plane they were flying in crashed into Lake Okeechobee.

A rescue began Friday afternoon after their Piper PA-23-250 Aztec C aircraft went down about 400 yards from the lake's southeast shore near the Pahokee Airport. It had taken off from Tampa International Airport.

In a news release, the sheriff's office says its marine unit and the Palm Beach County Fire Rescue recovered the bodies of five Florida residents from the plane's fuselage.

They are as follows: Heather Bridwell, 43, of Jupiter; Matthew Fiorello, 36, of Palm Beach Gardens; Edwin Mortell III, 54, of Stuart; Eduardo Mulet, 45, of West Palm Beach; and Eric Peterson, 73, of Lighthouse Point. Bridwell, Fiorello, Mortell and Peterson were all attorneys at Peterson and Bernard. 

The events leading up to the plane crash are not yet known.

Sheriff's office investigators are handling the death investigation while the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board investigate the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wtsp.com

Friday, March 8, 2019

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N7970U: Incident occurred March 07, 2019 near Paul C. Miller-Sparta Airport (8D4), Sparta, Michigan



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Made emergency landing on a road.

https://registry.faa.gov/N7970U

Date: 07-MAR-19
Time: 20:55:00Z
Regis#: N7970U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172F
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: SPARTA
State: MICHIGAN






ALPINE TOWNSHIP, Michigan — It was a close call for a pilot in Kent County Thursday afternoon when he and a man he was training were forced to make an emergency landing on a stretch of M-37.

Steven Chanter has almost 20 years of flying experience. While he’s experienced engine issues and emergency landings before, he’s never experienced anything like this.

Around 4 p.m., drivers in Alpine Township were greeted by an unfamiliar sight on M-37.

"I was so surprised," said Cindy Muller, who witnessed the landing. "She says ‘Is that thing going to crash?' Because it didn’t occur to me that’s what it was going to do. 'It’s going to land, it’s going to land,’ she says.”

The engine of flight instructor Steven Chanter’s Cessna 172 went out mid-flight on his way back to Sparta Airport. Chanter and a pilot-in-training were only about a mile and a half from the landing strip.

"We were headed back to Sparta to finish up for the day," said Chanter. "We were descending down and got to the altitude that we needed to get to be in the traffic pattern, and the engine started running rough, and the student said, 'Hey something’s not quite right.'”

Chanter did some checks and noticed his oil pressure was at zero, then something else went wrong.

"Very shortly thereafter, the engine completely stopped which made that decision very easy for me," said Chanter. "We needed to land, and it was going to be on M-37, which was right in front of us. We had actually been practicing engine-out maneuvers that day and didn’t realize that we could be practicing one for real.”

Chanter had to maneuver over some power lines and underneath traffic signals. Luckily, a red light at the 10 Mile Road intersection gave them an almost clear landing area on M-37.

"There was one car sitting at the light in the left lane, and we passed it on the right," said Chanter. "They probably have quite a story to tell their family, too."

Chanter landed the plane on the road safely, and neither he nor his trainee was injured. The plane isn't damaged.

He says he’s thankful it turned out the way it did.

"Fortunately the Lord said, 'Hey this is where you’re going to land', and fortunately I didn’t make the turn and go towards the airport," said Chanter. "There’s no way we would’ve made it.”

Chanter says the Federal Aviation Administration and a mechanic on Friday are going to take the engine apart to look and see what was wrong with it; he said the engine was leaking oil.

Traffic on M-37 was pushed to one lane for about 45 minutes and was reopened in both lanes before 5 p.m.

Story and video ➤ https://fox17online.com



ALPINE TOWNSHIP, Michigan -- A pilot said he was grateful for light traffic when he was forced to land a single-engine plane on M-37 near Sparta following engine trouble.

Steven Chanter, a flight instructor, was with a student pilot about 4 p.m. Thursday, March 7 when their Cessna began to sputter and the oil pressure cut out.

He knew they would not be able to make it back to the Sparta airport so he chose the road.

“It’s very intense and there’s very little time to do very much. We were only about 1,000 feet off the ground,” he said following the safe landing.

No one was hurt and the plane was not damaged.

Chanter managed to maneuver under power lines that service the traffic light at 10 Mile Road.

“Everything happened within probably less than a minute from losing the engine to putting the plane on the ground,” he said.

“Fortunately the traffic was clear. We had an open lane on southbound M-37 that we could go through and there was no traffic on 10 Mile Road. Once we cleared that intersection, it was a normal landing at that point.”

Chanter has been a pilot since 2000 and flight instructor since 2003.

After Thursday’s landing, the plane was loaded onto a flatbed two truck and hauled to a nearby business. Workers planned to take the wings off to transport it back to Sparta airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mlive.com

Piper PA-18-150, N726: Accident occurred March 07, 2019 in Colfax, Richland County, North Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota
Larson Flying Service

https://registry.faa.gov/N726

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA158
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 07, 2019 in Wyndmere, ND
Aircraft: Piper PA18, registration: N726

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Force landed in a field.

Date: 07-MAR-19
Time: 14:56:00Z
Regis#: N726
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 18 150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: COLFAX
State: NORTH DAKOTA

Just Aircraft Highlander, N102XP: Accident occurred March 07, 2019 at Union County Airport (KMRT), Marysville, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

https://registry.faa.gov/N102XP

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA156
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 07, 2019 in Marysville, OH
Aircraft: Just JUST AIRCRAFT HIGHLA, registration: N102XP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Veered off the runway and flipped over.

Date: 07-MAR-19
Time: 15:39:00Z
Regis#: N102XP
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: JUST AIRCRAFT HIGHLANDER 
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MARYSVILLE
State: OHIO

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N9290P: Incident occurred March 07, 2019 at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma

Gear up.

Spartan Education LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N9290P

Date: 07-MAR-19
Time: 20:19:00Z
Regis#: N9290P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA

American Airlines, Boeing 757-223, N173AN: Accident occurred September 06, 2018 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

American Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N173AN

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: New York, NY
Accident Number: DCA18LA285
Date & Time: 09/06/2018, 1245 EDT
Registration: N173AN
Aircraft: Boeing 757
Injuries: 1 Serious, 112 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled 

On September 6, 2018, at about 1245 eastern daylight time, American Airlines flight 279, a Boeing 757, N173AN, experienced an abrupt maneuver while descending into John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), Jamaica, New York. Of the 113 passengers and crew onboard, one flight attendant received serious injuries. The airplane was not damaged. The regularly scheduled international passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 from Edinburgh Airport (EGPH), Edinburgh, Scotland, to KJFK.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Boeing
Registration: N173AN
Model/Series: 757 223
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: American Airlines
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 8 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 104 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 112 None
Latitude, Longitude: 

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight, N7207A: Accident occurred November 27, 2018 in Whittier, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Soldotna, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


https://registry.faa.gov/N7207A


Location: Whittier, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA008
Date & Time: 11/27/2018, 1230 AKS
Registration: N7207A
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 27, 2018, about 1230 Alaska standard time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N7207A, was destroyed during a forced landing and postcrash fire following a total loss of engine power shortly after departure from an off-airport landing site on Montague Island about 60 miles east of Seward, Alaska. The student pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules (VFR) flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

According to the pilot, on a previous flight the same day, while on final approach to the off-airport landing site on Montague Island the engine lost all power. He applied carburetor heat and was able to restart the engine and landed uneventfully.

Following the event, the pilot sumped the fuel system and removed 7 vials of water. He then taxied for departure and completed a run-up. The engine continued to run rough for a short period of time, then began to smooth out with no anomalies noted.

Just after departure from the off-airport landing site, at about 30 ft above ground level, the engine lost all power. The airplane impacted Alder trees off the departure end of the airstrip and was destroyed by postcrash fire.

The aircraft was equipped with a Continental Motors O-300 series engine. A detailed wreckage examination is pending.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7207A
Model/Series: 172 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAWD
Observation Time: 2253 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3800 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Whittier, AK
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  59.878889, -147.747778 (est)

PSA Airlines, Bombardier CRJ-200ER, N202PS: Accident occurred December 01, 2018 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York, New York

https://registry.faa.gov/N202PS

NTSB Identification: DCA19CA035

14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of PSA Airlines
Accident occurred Saturday, December 01, 2018 in New York, NY
Aircraft: Bombardier CL 600 2B19, registration: N202PS

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Rockwell S-2R Thrush Commander, operated by Farm Aviation Inc under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight, N5022X, fatal accident occurred August 22, 2017 in Calipatria, Imperial County, California -and- Rockwell International S-2R, N4913X, accident occurred August 01, 2017 in Brawley, Imperial County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California
Farm Aviation Incorporated; Brawley, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5022X 



Location: Calipatria, CA
Accident Number: ANC17FA047
Date & Time: 08/22/2017, 1100 PDT
Registration: N5022X
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 22, 2017, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R agricultural airplane, N5022X, was destroyed by a collision with terrain and postcrash fire about 8.5 miles east of Calipatria, California. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Bank of Utah and was being operated by Farm Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight. The local flight originated about 1050 from an unimproved dirt airstrip about 4 miles from the accident location.

The accident flight was the pilot's second chemical load flight of the day. The first flight originated from Brawley Municipal Airport (KBWC), Brawley, California, about 1020.

According to a witness located about 100 yards from the accident location, the airplane completed an agricultural spray pass from west to east. As the airplane approached the witness's position, it began a turn to reverse course and re-enter the spray area. Following a slight right turn, the airplane rolled wings level, and the witness anticipated that it would enter a left turn back to the field. When the wings were rolled level, at an estimated altitude of between 150 ft above ground level (agl) and 200 ft agl, the nose dropped, and the airplane impacted the field in near vertical attitude. A postimpact fire ensued, which consumed most of the airplane's fuselage, left wing, and empennage.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 

The pilot, age 40, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument ratings. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine and instrument ratings. The pilot was issued a second-class airman medical certificate on April 26, 2017, without any limitations. On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported that he had accumulated 2,210 total hours of flight experience of which 280 hours were in the last 6 months.

The pilot was involved in an aviation accident (WPR17LA174) in a different agricultural airplane on August 1, 2017; this accident is still under investigation. According to the preliminary report on the earlier accident, the pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, while conducting a low-altitude reconnaissance of a field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot subsequently initiated a forced landing to the field. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the pilot was not injured.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL
Registration: N5022X
Model/Series: S 2R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 5054R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R1340
Registered Owner: BANK OF UTAH TRUSTEE
Rated Power:
Operator: FARM AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: FAYG 

The single-seat, low-wing airplane, serial number 5054R, was manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340-59 reciprocating radial engine, serial number E-142. The overhauled engine was installed on February 24, 2017. According to the operator, the engine had accumulated about 75 hours at the time of the accident.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIPL, -58 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 213°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 37°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Calipatria, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Calipatria, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1050 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

The closest weather reporting facility to the accident site was at Imperial County Airport (KIPL), Imperial, California, about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1053, KIPL reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 98°F; dew point 60°F, and altimeter setting 29.90 inches of mercury.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.114444, -115.365278 

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board examined the wreckage at the accident scene on August 23, 2017. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was the engine, which was separated from the airframe and lying flat on the ground oriented propeller side down. A linear ground impact scar extended from both sides of the engine; the two ground scars contained yellow paint fragments and were consistent with wing leading edge imprints. The main wreckage was located about 20 ft north of the FIPC; the fuselage was inverted and oriented on a 263° magnetic heading.

Most of the empennage fabric was consumed by fire. The vertical stabilizer remained relatively free of impact damage. Elevator trim tab control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the trim tab. Rudder control continuity was established from the rudder to the fuselage. The left rudder cable remained intact to the pedal, and the right cable was detached at the bellcrank. Elevator control continuity could not be determined on scene due to impact damage.

The outboard and inboard connecting rods on the left aileron remained attached to the left wing. The middle control rods were detached from the aileron. Left aileron control continuity could not be determined due to thermal damage. The right aileron remained relatively free of impact damage and exhibited signatures consistent with thermal damage. Control continuity was established from the right aileron to the fuselage. Right aileron control continuity from the fuselage to the cockpit could not be established due to thermal damage.

All three propeller blades remained intact and attached to the propeller hub and was buried about 1ft under dirt and grass. Blades 1 and 2 (numbers arbitrarily assigned) exhibited torsional twisting and aft bending, consistent with engine operation at the time of impact. Blade 3 was relatively free of impact damage.

Investigators conducted further examination of the wreckage at Air Transport, Phoenix, Arizona, on October 4 and 5, 2017. The last 4 ft of elevator control tube continuity was established through fractured segments. The fractures were consistent with impact damage.

The propeller rotated freely by hand. The forward spark plugs from the Nos. 1, 8, and 9 cylinders were damaged by impact. The forward spark plugs were removed from all cylinders and exhibited a normal wear signature; coloration could not be determined due to oil saturation. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. The carburetor exhibited impact damage. The throttle valve could be moved from stop to stop with difficulty due to the presence of debris from impact. The carburetor case was opened, and no anomalies were observed with the floats and accelerator pump. The fuel filter was removed, and no anomalies were observed. The fuel pump fuel adjustment cover safety wire was separated, and the cap was loose. The fuel pump was disassembled with no debris or anomalies observed; all splines appeared without defect. Testing of the magnetos was not possible due to severe impact damage.

The electric flap motor drive screw measured about 1 1/4 inches and about 9 threads were visible. The jackscrew assembly was not located; therefore, the flap setting could not be determined.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Imperial County Coroner's Office, El Centro, California, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to "multiple traumatic injuries."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The testing was negative for ethanol and drugs.

NTSB Identification: ANC17FA047
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 22, 2017 in Calipatria, CA
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R, registration: N5022X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 22, 2017, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R agricultural airplane, N5022X, was destroyed when it collided with terrain following a loss of control while maneuvering, about 8.5 miles east of Calipatria, California. The airplane was registered to the Bank of Utah and was being operated by Farm Aviation Inc. as a visual flight rules (VFR) aerial application flight, under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137, when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated at an unimproved dirt strip, about 4 miles from the accident location, at about 1050 and was a local flight for aerial application.

According to the owner of Farm Aviation Inc., this was the pilot's second chemical load flight of the day. The first flight originated from Brawley Municipal Airport (KBWC), Brawley, California, about 1020.

According to a witness located about 100 yards from the accident location, the accident airplane completed an agricultural spray pass from west to east. As the airplane approached his position, the airplane began a right turn to turn around and re-enter the spray area. Following a slight right turn, the airplane rolled wings level before what would typically be a left turn back to the field. When the wings were rolled level, at an estimated altitude of between 150 ft above ground level (agl) and 200 ft agl, the nose dropped and the airplane impacted the field in near vertical attitude. A postimpact fire ensued, which incinerated a majority of the airplane's fuselage, left wing, and empennage. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with another NTSB investigator reached the accident site on the afternoon of August 23. The wreckage was in an alfalfa field at an elevation of about 20 ft below sea level. 

Following the initial impact, the fuselage separated from the engine and came to rest about 20 ft north of the engine. The airplane impacted the terrain in a nose-down, near vertical attitude. All of the airplane's major components were located at the wreckage site. 

The closest weather reporting facility was the Imperial County Airport (KIPL), about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1053, a METAR from KIPL was reporting, in part: Wind, calm; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, clear; temperature, 98°F; dew point, 60°F; altimeter, 29.90 inches of mercury.

The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney R-1340 series engine. A detailed examination is pending.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N4913X


Location: Brawley, CA

Accident Number: WPR17LA174
Date & Time: 08/01/2017, 0655 PDT
Registration: N4913X
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 1, 2017, about 0655 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S-2R airplane, N4913X, was substantially damaged following a partial loss of engine power and subsequent off-airport landing near Brawley, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Farm Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from a private airstrip in Brawley at 0645.


The pilot reported that he departed westbound from the private airstrip with about 180 gallons of chemical and 70 gallons of fuel on board. After climbout, he made a right turn to the east to conduct a low-level reconnaissance of the field he intended to spray. As he began to set up for the eastbound pass on the north side of the field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot leveled the wings, the engine momentarily regained some power, but started to lose power again shortly after. The pilot subsequently initiated an emergency landing to an open field. During the landing roll, the propeller struck the ground and the landing gear was torn off. Both wings, the engine mounts, and the bottom of the fuselage sustained substantial damage.


On October 3, 2017, the Pratt & Whitney R1340 radial engine was examined by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors. The inspectors reported that the engine was partially disassembled before their arrival. The inspectors reported that one of the supercharger drive gear teeth was separated and found in the engine oil sump. Further disassembly of the supercharger drive section revealed that two additional gear teeth were separated from the supercharger drive. Slight rubbing marks were observed on the supercharger impeller. The thrust bearing exhibited damage consistent after a propeller strike. The oil filter revealed signs of high carbon content and some debris with very little metallic content. Surface rust was noted on internal oil transfer tubes, the camshaft drive gear, and the supercharger drive gear. The spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures. The inspectors further reported that the carburetor was visually inspected, and no foreign objects were observed in the venturi. The magnetos were externally examined before the gears were rotated by hand. No anomalies were found


The separated supercharger gear teeth were examined at the National Transportation Safety Board Materials (NTSB) laboratory, Washington, DC. The fracture surfaces were examined using a stereomicroscope at moderate magnifications. The fractures exhibited features and topographies consistent with bending overstress separations. Contact patterns and pitting were noted on the pressure faces of the remaining intact gear teeth indicative of heavy loading. No indication of preexisting cracking was apparent.


During a conversation with a representative from an engine overhaul facility, who commonly overhauls Pratt & Whitney R1340 radial engines, he reported that from his experience, the gear teeth most often break off due to either a sudden engine stoppage or due to fatigue or stress cracking. The fatigue or stress cracking can often be the result of a propeller strike and, if left unchecked, can result in the eventual separation of the affected gear teeth. He reported that it is possible for an engine to continue a relatively normal operation with only one gear tooth missing, however multiple broken teeth would result in a decrease in power of the supercharger section.


The pilot reported that the engine had accumulated about 783 hours since overhaul, and 74 hours since the last annual inspection on November 16, 2016. No maintenance records were made available for review to determine if there was a report of a previous propeller strike or sudden engine stoppage.


Pilot Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial

Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/26/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2017
Flight Time:  2400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 500 hours (Total, this make and model), 2280 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL

Registration: N4913X
Model/Series: S 2R UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 2104R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/16/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6615 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: R-1340- AN1
Registered Owner: Ironwood Equipment Leasing Inc
Rated Power: 600 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site:

Visual Conditions:  
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIPL, -58 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 208°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.78 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brawley, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Brawley, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0645 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.033611, -115.453056 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA174

14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 01, 2017 in Brawley, CA
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R, registration: N4913X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 1, 2017, about 0655 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R, N4913X, sustained substantial damage following a partial loss of engine power and subsequent emergency landing near Fresno, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by Farm Aviation Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137 as an aerial application flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The local flight departed from a private airstrip at 0645.


The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, while conducting a low-level altitude reconnaissance of the field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot subsequently initiated a forced landing to the field. During the landing, both wings and the engine firewall sustained substantial damage.