Saturday, October 29, 2016

New airline returns reliable service to Riverton and Fremont County





RIVERTON — The first thing you notice about Riverton Regional Airport is the free parking. Inside the terminal, taxidermy animals line the walls — a stuffed mountain goat is perched near the ceiling. Jackrabbits hop along the edge of the runway. A friendly police officer greets passengers.

For a long time, all this small town airport lacked was flights.

Mike Bailey used to show up at Riverton Regional Airport unsure whether his plane would be there. Bailey, who travels for his work as a petroleum marketer, gave up on using his local airport several years ago and began driving to Casper for connecting flights to Denver.

“There’s nothing wrong with Casper airport except that it’s two hours away,” Bailey said.

Bailey was one of many victims of canceled flights by Great Lakes Airlines, the Cheyenne-based air carrier plagued by staffing issues since the Federal Aviation Association raised the requirements for commercial pilots in 2013.

Riverton mayor John “Lars” Baker said there were periods where the airline was canceling half its flights.

“They’d have four flights scheduled, and some days one of them would make it,” Baker said.

The unreliable nature of Great Lakes service led many Fremont County residents turn to Casper, or even make the long drive to Denver or Salt Lake City, to leave town.

But things have been looking up since Denver Air Connection joined Great Lakes in July. Public Works director Kyle Butterfield said the new carrier has not canceled a single flight and is restoring confidence in local air service.

Denver Air also offers flights to Denver from Sheridan and a handful of other cities in Colorado.

Gone are the days of exponential declines in passengers flying out of Riverton.

The trouble began with the new Federal Aviation Administration regulations in the summer of 2013. In response to a commuter airline crash in New York, the agency raised the number of training hours pilots for small commercial flights needed from 500 to 1500 — the same as major airlines.

That made it difficult for regional airlines like Great Lakes to find pilots who would accept the lower pay and often grueling schedules that come with serving small markets.

Butterfield said that prior to 2013 Riverton airport was averaging 13,000 boardings each year with highs of 18,000 passengers flying out of Fremont County. But after Great Lakes began canceling flights that number plummeted.

“We were losing our flying markets in halves almost each year,” Butterfield said.

Over 1,500 passengers were flying out of Riverton in July three years ago. But last July only 207 passengers boarded flights. When the airport dropped below 10,000 annual boardings it lost $850,000 in federal funding.

Local citizens organized a committee to solve the problem and ultimately made an agreement with Denver Air Connection to guarantee $200,000 in minimum annual revenue. That means if the company makes less than that amount the city is on the hook to cover the difference.

Great Lakes does not receive a revenue guarantee.

The public works director said he expects the city to pay a substantial subsidy for at least the next few years but Butterfield said Riverton is receiving assistance from the state, county and federal government along with the nearby town of Lander.

“We have a challenge regaining our market and getting people to believe in Riverton Regional again,” he said. “We understand it will be a commitment of several years before the Denver Air Connection route is self-sustaining.”

Asked how Denver Air is able to provide consistent service while Great Lakes struggled, Baker, the mayor, offered a knowing look. He said that through all of Great Lakes scheduling problems Riverton still had two reliable air ambulance services that reported no problem finding pilots.

“What’s the difference?” Baker asked rhetorically. “Great Lakes pays their guys about $20,000 a year.”

Great Lakes and Denver Air Connection did not respond to requests for comment by press time.

As the city fights to gain back local passengers it has launched a “Fly Riverton” campaign that includes a marketing push and even a fighter jet adorned with the campaign’s logo near the entrance of the airport.

Butterfield said that the arrival of Denver Air has led to increase in passengers flying out of Riverton each month so far. In September, 507 people flew out or Riverton airport, up from 295 in July. He added that data on future bookings also show an upward trajectory.

The increased bookings have even helped Great Lakes, which increased its service to three daily flights in July after initially announcing plans to cut back to a single afternoon flight. While airport data shows that Denver Air is attracting more business on a monthly basis, Great Lakes had also raised its passenger total over the course of the summer.

“The rising tide is raising all ships,” Butterfield said. “Anytime we can provide more options to our community, to the flying market, that’s a good thing.”

Source:   http://trib.com

Unregistered ultralight: Incident occurred October 28, 2016 near West Middlesex Airport (PA21), Shenango Township, Mercer County, Pennsylvania

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allegheny PFSDO-03

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT, UNKNOWN MAKE AND MODEL, CRASHED INTO A WOODED AREA, MERCER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Date: 28-OCT-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MERCER
State: Pennsylvania


SHENANGO TWP., Mercer Co., Pa. -   There's new information on a small plane crash in Mercer County that occurred Friday afternoon.

The West Middlesex Airport Manager tells 21 News that the pilot was becoming reacquainted with flying after taking about an eight year break and that Friday was the most time he spent in the air since then.

The small, ultralight plane came down about 2:30 p.m. First Responders say the pilot was coming in for a landing in Shenango Township when the wind caught him. He ran into a tree and was found about a half mile from the West Middlesex runway in a patch of briar bushes.

The pilot was taken to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries, according to Shenango Township's Assistant Fire Chief. The airport manager identifies the pilot as Gary Fobes.

"He decided that he would go around and make a normal landing which he did two times, he made beautiful landings," said West Middlesex Airport Manager Al Walker.

The airport manager says Fobes' third landing of the day did not go as smoothly. He says this isn't Fobes first plane crash. More than 10 years ago, he crashed into some electric wiring while coming in for a landing.

Source:   http://www.wfmj.com




WEST MIDDLESEX, Pa. (WKBN) – A single-engine plane went down near the West Middlesex Airport on Friday afternoon.

Investigators at the scene said the pilot was in the process of landing at the airport when he crashed into a wooded area nearby around 2:30 p.m.

It took crews two hours to get to the man following the accident.

“We couldn’t get him out through the airport, so we had to come back in off of Fetsko Road and got in there with quads, got him on the quad and brought him out,” said.

The pilot had injuries but was alert and able to communicate when he was rushed to St. Elizabeth Health Center, investigators said. His name has not yet been released.

Police are not yet revealing any more details of what happened before the crash, though they have talked with the pilot.

Story and video:   http://wkbn.com



SHENANGO TWP., Mercer Co., Pa. -     A small ultralight plane crashed near the West Middlesex airport Friday afternoon. The one person on board was taken to the hospital.

A first responder told 21 News that the pilot was an older gentleman and he had an issue with the wind.

The plane went down deep in the woods in brier patches about a half mile off of Fetsco Road.

The pilot was taken to the hospital but his condition was unknown.

Shenango Fire Department crews and an ambulance were on scene.

American Airlines, Boeing 767-300, N345AN: Accident occurred October 28, 2016 at Chicago O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

 http://registry.faa.gov/N345AN



Location: Chicago, IL
Accident Number: DCA17FA021
Date & Time: 10/28/2016,  
Registration: N345AN
Aircraft: BOEING 767
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Uncontained engine failure
Injuries: 1 Serious, 20 Minor, 149 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The NTSB's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/AccidentReports.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-18/01.

On October 28, 2016, about 1432 central daylight time, American Airlines flight 383, a Boeing 767-323, N345AN, had started its takeoff ground roll at Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois, when an uncontained engine failure in the right engine and subsequent fire occurred. The flight crew aborted the takeoff and stopped the airplane on the runway, and the flight attendants initiated an emergency evacuation. Of the 2 flight crewmembers, 7 flight attendants, and 161 passengers on board, 1 passenger received a serious injury and 1 flight attendant and 19 passengers received minor injuries during the evacuation. The airplane was substantially damaged from the fire. The airplane was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The failure of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) stage 2 disk, which severed the main engine fuel feed line and breached the right main wing fuel tank, releasing fuel that resulted in a fire on the right side of the airplane during the takeoff roll. The HPT stage 2 disk failed because of low-cycle fatigue cracks that initiated from an internal subsurface manufacturing anomaly that was most likely not detectable during production inspections and subsequent in service inspections using the procedures in place. Contributing to the serious passenger injury was (1) the delay in shutting down the left engine and (2) a flight attendant's deviation from company procedures, which resulted in passengers evacuating from the left overwing exit while the left engine was still operating. Contributing to the delay in shutting down the left engine was (1) the lack of a separate checklist procedure for Boeing 767 airplanes that specifically addressed engine fires on the ground and (2) the lack of communication between the flight and cabin crews after the airplane came to a stop. 

Findings

Aircraft
Turbine section - Failure (Cause)
Fuel system - Damaged/degraded

Personnel issues
Use of policy/procedure - Cabin crew (Factor)
Delayed action - Flight crew (Factor)
Lack of communication - Flight crew (Factor)
Lack of communication - Cabin crew (Factor)

Organizational issues
Equipment manufacture - Manufacturer (Cause)
Task design - Manufacturer (Factor)

Factual Information

The NTSB's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/AccidentReports.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-18/01.

On October 28, 2016, about 1432 central daylight time, American Airlines flight 383, a Boeing 767-323, N345AN, had started its takeoff ground roll at Chicago O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois, when an uncontained engine failure in the right engine and subsequent fire occurred. The flight crew aborted the takeoff and stopped the airplane on the runway, and the flight attendants initiated an emergency evacuation. Of the 2 flight crewmembers, 7 flight attendants, and 161 passengers on board, 1 passenger received a serious injury and 1 flight attendant and 19 passengers received minor injuries during the evacuation. The airplane was substantially damaged from the fire. The airplane was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. 

History of Flight

Takeoff-rejected takeoff
Uncontained engine failure (Defining event)

Other
Fire/smoke (non-impact)
Evacuation 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Engineer
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/22/2016
Flight Time: 17400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4000 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Engineer
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/03/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/07/2016
Flight Time:  22000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1846 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N345AN
Model/Series: 767 323
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: N345AN
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 220
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/15/2011, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: General Electric
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: CF6-80C2 B6
Registered Owner: American Airlines Group, Inc.
Rated Power: lbs
Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code:  AALA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KORD
Observation Time: 1951 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Chicago, IL (KORD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Miami, FL (KMIA)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1432 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Chicago O'Hare International A (KORD)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Concrete
Airport Elevation: 668 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 13000 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 8 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 19 Minor, 141 None
Aircraft Fire:  On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 20 Minor, 149 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.968889, -87.917778




U.S. air-accident investigators have called for upgraded engine-inspection practices and better-coordinated procedures for passenger evacuations, in their final report about a fire that badly damaged an American Airlines Group Inc. jet on a Chicago runway two years ago.

The findings and recommendations released by the National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday stem from an October 2016 accident in which a rare manufacturing defect caused part of the right engine on a Boeing Co. 767 bound for Miami to rupture violently late in the takeoff roll. Metal parts flew as far as 3,000 feet, a fuel leak caused a massive fire under the right wing and all 161 passengers used emergency slides to leave the jet.


There were no fatalities, but the National Transportation Safety Board issued industrywide recommendations for modernized engine inspections and stepped-up airline crew training to ensure safer emergency evacuations.


According to the National Transportation Safety Board, United States regulators haven’t updated guidance on conducting emergency evacuations for three decades, despite several high-profile examples of problems getting passengers off airliners in just the past few years.


Investigators concluded that a rare manufacturing flaw dating back to the late 1990s—and likely undetectable through recent years—created microscopic cracks in the high-energy internal disc that eventually led to the accident at O’Hare International Airport. General Electric Co. manufactured the engines.


Even with significant safety advances in engines and overall airline performance over the last few decades, “there’s still improvements that can be made,” said Robert Sumwalt, the safety board’s chairman. Inspection methods “that can fail to uncover a defect in a safety critical component of an airliner,” he said, “need a closer look.:


Regarding the crew’s response, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the pilots, after hearing a loud bang, acted appropriately to halt the takeoff and shut down the damaged engine. But the report was critical of the level of cooperation between the cockpit crew and flight attendants.


Investigators, among other things, found that flight attendants hadn’t received adequate training on systems to communicate with the cockpit or passengers. Two attendants told the safety board they couldn’t operate the intercoms to contact the pilots, as smoke billowed inside the cabin and passengers disregarded instructions by climbing over seats and insisting on grabbing carry-on bags.


With one of the wide-body jet’s engines still running as the evacuation began, a passenger suffered a serious injury as he was hit by jet blast. The pilots told investigators the only emergency engine shut-off checklist they had didn’t call for immediately turning off the remaining engine.


Modern jet turbines are designed to prevent broken parts from being spewed outside the engine cover. But violent disintegration of some internal parts has dogged certain models of GE’s CF6-80 model engines since 2000, prompting a series of stepped-up safety actions by the manufacturer and the Federal Aviation Administration.


An Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman didn’t have any immediate comment on the nonbinding safety recommendations.


American, which has revamped flight attendant training, told investigators the cabin crew took appropriate steps to initiate the evacuation despite communication difficulties.



Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

American Airlines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N345AN

Location: Chicago, IL
Accident Number: DCA17FA021
Date & Time: 10/28/2016, 
Registration: N345AN
Aircraft: BOEING 767
Injuries: 1 Serious, 19 Minor, 150 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

On October 28, 2016, at about 2:32 CDT, American Airlines flight number 383, a Boeing B767-300, N345AN, powered by two General Electric CF6-80C2B6 turbofan engines, experienced a right engine uncontained failure and subsequent fire during the takeoff ground roll on runway 28R at the Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Chicago, Illinois. The flightcrew aborted the takeoff and stopped the aircraft on runway 28R and an emergency evacuation was conducted. Of the 161 passengers and 9 crew members onboard, one passenger received serious injuries during the evacuation and the airplane was substantially damaged as a result of the fire. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a domestic scheduled passenger flight to Miami International Airport (MIA), Miami, Florida.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N345AN
Model/Series: 767 323
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KORD
Observation Time: 1951 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 180°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Chicago, IL (KORD)
Destination: Miami, FL (KMIA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 9 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 19 Minor, 141 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 19 Minor, 150 None
Latitude, Longitude:




Late last month, passengers on a Chicago to Miami flight were sent hurtling down evacuation slides from an American Airlines Boeing 767 after the plane’s engine caught fire, engulfing the runway in billowing black smoke.

Now, 18 passengers — including three from South Florida — are suing the airline, Boeing and GE, the engine’s manufacturer, for the injuries caused by the allegedly “defective and unreasonably dangerous” aircraft, the suit says. The lawsuit was filed in Illinois circuit court, where the incident took place.

On the afternoon of Oct. 28, 170 crew and passengers on Flight 383 from Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport to Miami International Airport were forced to evacuate when the engine on the right side of the plane burst into flames on the tarmac. Footage from the scene shows passengers quickly evacuating on slides on the front and rear left side of the plane and running into a grassy area while smoke and fire rise in the background. The plane’s right wing can be seen melting and drooping.

About 20 people suffered minor injuries, officials said.

According to the lawsuit, the plaintiffs suffered “personal and bodily injuries, both physical and psychological in nature” and either have or will sustain “future medical bills, lost earnings, disability, disfigurement, and pain and suffering and emotional distress,” as a result of the accident.

The suit claims GE sold the defective engine to Boeing, which was negligent in “designing, manufacturing, assembling, and selling the accident aircraft as as not to cause injury to plaintiffs.” It also alleges that American Airlines failed to maintain, service, inspect and repair the aircraft appropriately enough to avoid the accident.

American Airlines declined to comment, citing pending litigation.

The plaintiffs are represented by Chicago-based Wisner Law Firm, which focuses solely on representing people injured or killed in aviation accidents. The firm recently resolved a similar case for an undisclosed amount involving more than 100 passengers and crew on a September 2015 British Airways. Like the Chicago to Miami flight, the British Airways flight involved a faulty GE engine on a Boeing plane that failed and caught fire at Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport.

“GE and Boeing and American, as well, need to take a harder look at this problem because I’m concerned it’s a recurring problem,” said Floyd Wisner, principal at the law firm. “It’s not just a rare occurrence.”

The law firm expects to add other passengers as plaintiffs, as well as other parties, such as material suppliers or component manufactures, as defendants if certain parts of the engine are found as contributing to the fire.


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com

CHICAGO (WLS) -- Officials said 20 people sustained minor injuries when a plane caught fire at O'Hare International Airport Friday afternoon.

District Chief of EMS for O'Hare Juan Hernandez said 20 people had been transported to local hospitals with minor injuries including bruising, scrapes and ankle injuries sustained in the evacuation of the plane.

American Airlines flight 383 bound for Miami was forced to abort takeoff at about 2:35 p.m. The pilot heard a thump and thought a tire had blown. The air traffic control tower alerted the pilot to flames. A large fire quickly consumed the plane's right-side engine and wing. Flight crew immediately stopped the plane and evacuated it using the inflatable slides on the left hand side of the aircraft.

Federal officials said the cause of the fire was "uncontained" engine failure, meaning pieces were blown out of the engine.

All 170 passengers, including flight crew, and a dog were evacuated, Chicago Deputy Fire Commissioner Timothy Sampey said.

Sampey said the fire was mostly extinguished quickly, but crews are still working to put out hot spots on the plane. The plane was carrying 43,000 lbs. of fuel at the time.

"This could have been absolutely devastating if it happened later, if it happened farther. There's about a thousand variables but again, they brought the aircraft to a halt, the air tower did a great job communicating to the pilot what fire they saw and they got everybody off the plane immediately," Sampey said.

Patients were taken to hospitals including Lutheran General Hospital and Presence Resurrection.

Passenger Hector Cardenas said the plane was seconds away from taking off when he heard an explosion. Large flames and a plume of black smoke could be seen rising from the aircraft.

"Within 10 or 15 seconds we would have been in the air," Cardenas said.

Sarah Ahmed was also on the flight and described the chaos in the moments after the fire broke out.

"We were almost up in the air. We were full throttle, full speed ahead and then we heard this huge bang and there's fire at the window, and so everyone on the right side of the plane got up, jumped up and they'er now on the left side of the plane. So there's a stampede at the left side. The plane comes to a screeching stop. People are yelling 'open the door, open the door!' everyone's screaming and jumping on top of each other to open the door. Within that time, I think it was seven seconds, there was now smoke in the plane and the fire is right up against the windows and it's melting the windows," Ahmed said.

Conversation between the cockpit and air traffic control revealed how quickly the situation unfolded.

"American 383 heavy stopping on the runway."
"Roger, roger. Fire."
"Do you see any smoke or fire?"
"Yeah fire off the right wing."
"Ok, send out the truck."
"Sending them."
"American 383 can you give us any information right now?"
"Uh, standby. Chicago American 383, we're evacuating."
"American 383 roger, trucks are on the way."

In a statement, the airline said, "American Airlines is fully cooperating with the National Transportation Safety Board in its investigation of flight 383. We are operating a special flight tonight to take our customers to Miami. Twenty passengers and one flight attendant reported non-critical injuries. Several were transported to Chicago-area hospitals to be evaluated. Members of American's specially trained employee volunteer CARE Team have been mobilized and dispatched to those hospitals, and Chicago O'Hare International Airport to provide assistance for our customers, crew members and their families."

The National Transportation Safety Board have taken over the investigation. The plane will remain on the runway until the NTSB is finished with their on-site investigation.

Sampey said in his estimation it's been about eight years since an incident equivalent to this occurred at O'Hare.

One runway remains closed at O'Hare. Operations at the airport are normal. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are on their way to O'Hare Airport s of 4 p.m.

ABC7 Doppler 7 MAX picked up the smoke plume from the plane fire on radar.

Story and video:   http://abc7chicago.com

Federal Express, McDonnell Douglas MD-10, N370FE: Accident occurred October 28, 2016 at Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (KFLL), Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Express Corporation: http://registry.faa.gov/N370FE


NTSB Identification: DCA17MA022
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Federal Express
Accident occurred Friday, October 28, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 10-10F, registration: N370FE
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 28, 2016, about 1751 eastern daylight time, FedEx Express flight 910, a McDonnell Douglas MD-10-10F, N370FE, experienced a left main landing gear collapse after landing on runway 10L at Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The airplane came to rest off the left side of the runway and subsequently caught fire. The two flight crew members were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The cargo flight was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 121 and had originated from Memphis International Airport (MEM), Memphis, Tennessee.





A FedEx cargo plane's landing gear collapsed shortly after landing at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Airport Friday, sparking a fire, according to the Federal Aviation Authority.


FedEx 910, a DC-10 aircraft, was rolling on Runway 10 Left when one of the plane's landing gears collapsed and it's left wing caught fire, a Fort Lauderdale airport spokesman said.

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue officials said the two pilots on board escaped using a rope ladder on the side of the plane.

FedEx officials said the two pilots are safe after the incident. The plane had just arrived from Memphis.

Video footage from witnesses posted on social media showed an explosion followed by smoke billowing from the plane, which appeared to be tilted on its side.

"We turned and saw smoke billowing out and we took video and pics and we were walking back to our car and heard this huge explosion, we assumed it was the engine," witness John Anderson said. "It was crazy, we just hoped everyone was safe."

Aerial footage showed crews working to put out the fire. The plane's charred left wing, and surrounding runway and grass was immersed in foam.

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue responded to the scene and officials said the flames were quickly extinguished.

Fire Rescue officials said units were on the scene in two minutes and found a trail of fire down the runway.

"There was a trail of fire, it was like a fireball, a running fuel fire down the runway leading to the jet," Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles said. "So this fire started wherever contact was made with the wing, engine and the tarmac."

A ground stop was issued at the airport and delays were reported as the airport closed just before 6 p.m. The south runway re-opened at 7 p.m. but the north runway remained closed while the incident was investigated.

A total of 29 flights were diverted during the closure, airport officials said.

Officials said there were 40,000 pounds of fuel on the plane when it landed. It was also carrying US mail but officials said it appeared that the damage was confined to the outer part of the plane.

The FAA and NTSB will investigate the incident.

"We have to let the NTSB do their investigation, then we have to go in and get the plane out of there and then do the repairs to the runway," airport spokesman Greg Meyer said.

Story and video:  http://www.nbcmiami.com

Cirrus SR22, Coastal King Aviation LLC, N234PJ: Accident occurred October 28, 2016 in Bloomfield, San Juan County, New Mexico (and) Incident occurred May 13, 2016 in Dothan, Alabama

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Coastal King Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N234PJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA030
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 28, 2016 in Bloomfield, NM
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N234PJ
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 28, 2016, about 1015 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus Design SR22 airplane, N234PJ, was substantially damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during cruise flight near Bloomfield, New Mexico. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to Coastal King Aviation, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Albuquerque International Airport (ABQ), Albuquerque, New Mexico, about 0915. The intended destination was the Stevens Field Airport (PSO), Pagosa Springs, Colorado.


The pilot reported that a few minutes after leveling at a cruise altitude of 11,500 feet mean sea level, the engine starting "missing" and within two minutes lost power completely. His attempts to restart the engine were unsuccessful. He was unable to locate a suitable forced landing site within the glide range of the airplane and subsequently elected to activate the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System. The airplane came to rest in an area of low brush and small trees. The aft fuselage/empennage separated from the airframe and was located immediately adjacent to the airplane at the accident site.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Birmingham FSDO-09

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING SUSTAINED UNKNOWN DAMAGE, DOTHAN, ALABAMA. 

Date: 13-MAY-16
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N234PJ
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DOTHAN
State: Alabama




BLOOMFIELD, N.M. — A Colorado man escaped injury when the small plane he was piloting crashed in an area of farmland in New Mexico.

New Mexico State Police say the Cirrus SR22 aircraft went down about 10 a.m. Friday some five miles east of Bloomfield.

They say 53-year-old Robert George Hart III of Pagosa Springs told responding officers that he was flying home after taking off from Albuquerque when the plane's engine malfunctioned.

Hart says the aircraft began to lose altitude so he activated the parachute on the plane and landed safely in an open area.

Authorities say the aircraft is registered to Coastal King Aviation LLC of Corpus Christi, Texas.

State Police say there was no property damage caused by the crash, which will be investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Source:   http://gazette.com

BLOOMFIELD  — The pilot of a single-engine plane that came down near Bloomfield this morning escaped with no injuries after deploying the plane's parachute and landing in an open field.

Robert Hart III, 53, of Pagosa Springs, Colo., was flying a Cirrus Model SR22 aircraft north from Albuquerque to Pagosa Springs when the plane's engine started to malfunction, according to New Mexico State Police press release.

Hart was flying about 5 miles east of Bloomfield around 10 a.m. when he activated the plane's parachute and used it to land the plane and him safely in an open field, the press release states.

The plane crashed along the San Juan River, just north of County Road 4990, according to San Juan County Sheriff's Office detective Lt. Kyle Lincoln.

No property damaged resulted from the crash, according to state police.

The plane was found on the south side of the San Juan River just north of 664 County Road 4990, according to coordinates provided by Lincoln.

The San Juan County Communications Authority received multiple calls about the incident, Lincoln said. One caller hiked down to make contact with Hart and reported that he had no injuries.

Sheriff's office deputies responded to the scene, along with the San Juan County Fire Department, paramedics from the San Juan Regional Medical Center and state police officers.

According to state police, the plane was registered to Coastal King Aviation LLC, based out of Corpus Christi, Texas.

The investigation is being handled by state police, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been contacted about the incident.

Story and photo:  http://www.daily-times.com

Cessna R182 Skylane, N9187C: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Lone Rock, Richland County, Wisconsin

STICK & RUDDER LLC:   http://registry.faa.govN9187C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, LONE ROCK, WISCONSIN.  

Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N9187C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LONE ROCK
State: Wisconsin

Air Tractor AT-502B, Wilbur Ellis Air LLC, N8525G: Accident occurred October 27, 2016 in Hereford, Deaf Smith County, Texas



Wilbur Ellis Air, LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8525G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Lubbock FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA027
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, October 27, 2016 in Hereford, TX
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502B, registration: N8525G
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 27, 2016, about 1235 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-502B, single-engine airplane, N8525G, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain while maneuvering near Hereford, Texas. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Wilbur Ellis Air, LLC; Huron, South Dakota; as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 agricultural application flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had not been filed. 

The pilot reported that that he was in a right turn and flying a circular swath to "trim-up" on the outside edges of a center-pivot irrigated cotton field when the right wingtip "got too far into the cotton crop" and control was lost. The airplane impacted terrain and cartwheeled, but came to rest upright in a partially nose-up attitude. The propeller, and engine were impact separated and there was substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage, tail surfaces, both wing spars, and all control surfaces. There was a fuel leak at the scene but there was no postimpact fire. A witness called 9-1-1, and emergency responders arrived quickly and assisted the pilot to exit the wreckage.

At 1235 the KHRX Automated Surface Observation System at Hereford, Texas, about 5 miles northeast from the accident location, reported wind from 180 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear of clouds, temperature 24 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 10 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.33 inches of mercury.
























AIRCRAFT: 2005 Air Tractor 502B, N8525G S/N: 502B-2575

ENGINE – Pratt & Whitney PT6A-34AG S/N: PCE-PH0325

PROPELLER – Hartzell Propeller, Inc. HC-B3TN-3D/T10282NS+4 Hub Model: HC-B3TN-3D

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   5711.5 HOBBS

PROPELLER:    5711.5 HOBBS

AIRFRAME:        5711.5 HOBBS         

OTHER EQUIPMENT:        See photos
       
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft made a turn and wing contacted ground causing it to “cartwheel” and crash.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Phoenix    

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N8525G.htm