Monday, April 17, 2017

American Airlines Drops Charter Flights for Six NFL Teams Including Dolphins and Steelers

American Airlines says it has suspended its arrangements to provide charter flights for six NFL teams because it lacks sufficient aircraft.

American will end agreements to fly the Arizona Cardinals, the Baltimore Ravens, the Indianapolis Colts, the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Miami Dolphins and the Pittsburgh Steelers during the 2017-2018 season, according to an internal memo obtained by Forbes.

American will, however, continue to transport three teams: the Carolina Panthers, the Dallas Cowboys and the Philadelphia Eagles.

It is hard to ascertain a clear pattern in the selection. Dallas is American’s biggest hub in terms of departures, passengers and employees. Charlotte is second biggest in terms of departures and passengers.  Dallas, Charlotte, and Philadelphia all have maintenance bases.

But Miami and Phoenix are also hubs. Miami has a maintenance base and ranks third in both employees and passengers. Chicago is third in terms of daily departures.

“After careful evaluation, we are reducing the number of charter operations for 2017 to ensure we have the right aircraft available for our passenger operation,” said American spokeswoman Lakeesha Brown.

In the memo, American informs crew members, who had the ability to bid for the chartered flights as part of their flying schedules, of the change.

“We wanted to let you know of a strategic change to our NFL charter commitments this fall,” the memo said. “Network planning has advised we will have fewer aircraft available for charter flying in 2017 and after careful analysis it is necessary to reduce the number of NFL teams we carry this season.

“This was a very tough decision as many of the teams have been longstanding customers of the airline,” the memo says. “The decision came down to available aircraft, location and input from senior leadership.

“We have completed the difficult task of notifying the Cardinals, Ravens, Dolphins, Colts, Jaguars and Steelers that we will not be able to support them this season.

“For those of you who worked these teams, we share your disappointment,” the memo said. “We hope to have the opportunity to support these teams in the future should resources become more readily available.”

Original article can be found here:  https://www.forbes.com

Cessna 172C Skyhawk, N288GB: Accident occurred June 29, 2016 in Gray, Jones County, Georgia



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N288GB

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA277 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2016 in Gray, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N288GB
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot, his passenger, and his 80- to 100-lb dog were on a cross-country flight and had just leveled off at 2,500 ft when the engine suddenly stopped producing power. The pilot was unable to restart the engine and made a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane struck a tree and a fence, which resulted in substantial damage to the firewall, fuselage, and wings. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed the right fuel tank had 15 gallons of fuel in it and that the left tank was empty. The fuel selector valve was found between the "left" and "both" tank positions. The front right seat had been removed before the flight to accommodate the pilot's dog, who sat on the floor during the flight. The pilot said he departed with the fuel selector valve in the "both" position, but during the flight, the dog must have inadvertently moved the valve's handle toward the "left" tank position, which resulted in the loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. A functional check of the fuel selector valve revealed no mechanical issues, and the valve seated securely into each detent. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical deficiencies with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to properly manage the available fuel supply, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

Piper PA-32-260 Cherokee Six N44255: Accident occurred June 19, 2016 at Block Island State Airport (KBID), New Shoreham, Washington County, Rhode Island




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston Massachusetts 

http://registry.faa.gov/N44255

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA218
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 19, 2016 in Block Island, RI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA32, registration: N44255
Injuries: 6 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, while on final approach to land on a 2,502-ft-long, asphalt runway, he observed another airplane back-taxiing on the runway and then depart. He continued the approach, performed a "normal" full-flaps landing, and the airplane touched down about midfield. During the rollout, he determined that there was insufficient runway remaining to stop and chose to attempt a go-around. The airplane subsequently struck the airport perimeter fence and then a roadway guard rail before it impacted terrain, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He also stated that the accident might have been prevented by aborting the landing earlier.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain the proper touchdown point and the airplane’s subsequent collision with obstacles during an attempted go-around.




Experimental, amateur-built Loomis Xenon 4 gyroplane, N912XV, owned and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred April 17, 2017 near Knoxville Municipal Airport (KOXV), Marion County, Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Ankeny, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N912XV

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Knoxville, IA
Accident Number: CEN17LA156
Date & Time: 04/17/2017, 1341 CDT
Registration: N912XV
Aircraft: LOOMIS Xenon 4
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 17, 2017, about 1341 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Loomis Xenon 4 gyroplane, N912XV, sustained substantial damage after takeoff from the Knoxville Municipal Airport (OXV), Knoxville, Iowa. The gyroplane climbed to about 500 ft above ground level when it experienced a partial loss of power, and during the forced landing, hit a powerline and landed in a ditch. The sport pilot and pilot rated passenger were not injured. The gyroplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was not on a flight plan. The flight was departing OXV on a local flight.

The pilot reported that on the day of the accident, he and his son had flown from Knoxville, Iowa, to Newton, Iowa, and back. The flight was about 1-hour long. After they landed, he checked the fuel and it showed 10 gallons remaining. He was about to refuel the gyroplane when the accident passenger came over to the aircraft and talked about getting a ride. Since the pilot's brother had already offered to give the passenger a ride, the pilot offered to go for a 10-minute flight. He stated that the passenger weighed about 220 lbs and he weighed 165 lbs. With 10 gallons of fuel on board, he stated that they were within the weight and balance limits of the aircraft.

The pilot taxied to the end of the runway and did a full-length departure. He stated that the taxi, runup, takeoff, and climb to 500 ft above ground level (agl) were normal. The engine was running fine. He had planned to climb to 1,000 ft agl, circle around, and come back to the airport. However, while continuing to climb through about 500 ft agl, the gyroplane stopped climbing and started to descend. He didn't remember hearing any change to the sound of the engine and he thought the engine was still running, but he was aware that the gyroplane wasn't climbing anymore. He checked the altimeter and confirmed that they were in a descent. He started to turn back to the airport but realized he couldn't make it back and tried to land in a field. He saw that he would not clear the powerlines, so he turned sharply, but the gyroplane hit the powerline and crashed on the side of the ditch. He turned the engine and fuel off and he and the passenger climbed out the aircraft. A small grass fire had started in the ditch by the fallen powerline about 20 yards from the gyroplane and it was quickly extinguished; it did not affect the gyroplane wreckage.

The pilot rated passenger reported that the takeoff was uneventful. He stated that during the initial climb, he heard a change in the sound of the engine, like a decrease in engine RPMs. The pilot told him that they were losing power as he was attempting to troubleshoot the problem. The pilot turned to an open field to the right side of the gyroplane but was unable to avoid hitting the powerline. He reported that it was about 10 to 15 seconds from the time of the loss of power until impact. The accident site was located about 800 ft south of the departure end of runway 15.

The gyroplane wreckage was transported back to the airport. The next day Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors examined the aircraft. The engine appeared to be operational, so they decided to try start the engine. It started without hesitation and it was run at idle power, but only for a brief time, since the propeller was broken, and it created a lot of vibration.

The Xenon 4 Executive model gyroplane was a one-piece monocoque structure made of carbon composite with a fixed tricycle landing gear arrangement. It was a two-seat gyroplane with a maximum takeoff weight of 1,234 lbs. The kit was manufactured by Celier Aviation and it was registered as an experimental, amateur-built gyroplane in the United States. The engine was a turbocharged 135-horsepower Rotax 912 ULST that was modified by Celier Aviation from the 100-horsepower Rotax 912 ULS engine. Two metal tail booms exited the rear of the fuselage and had vertical stabilizers and rudders mounted to each boom. A horizontal stabilizer and elevator were mounted between the vertical stabilizers. The control surfaces were also of composite construction. A metal mast was affixed to the fuselage structure, on which the control head with the lifting rotor was mounted. The two-blade rotor had a metal structure with blades made from drawn aluminum.

The brother of the accident pilot stated that the dealer for the gyroplane was in Dubuque, Iowa, which was about 100 miles from his home. He stated that he built and assembled the gyroplane from the manufactured kit, and that it took about four, 12-hour days to complete building the gyroplane. He stated that the maximum takeoff weight of the gyroplane was 1,320 lbs. The gyrocopter was issued a special airworthiness certificate on February 16, 2016. He stated that the kit manufacturer provided the owners a Rotax 912 ULS maintenance manual for the engine, but they did not provide a maintenance manual for the modified, turbocharged Rotax 912 ULST engine. The pilot's operator manual for the gyroplane did not provide any information concerning the operation of the turbocharger. The aircraft logbook did not indicate that an annual condition inspection had been performed before the accident occurred.


Figure 1 View of the Celier Aviation Modified Rotax 912 ULST Engine


The brother of the pilot stated that the gyroplane operated flawlessly until they started having carburetor problems with flooding. The engine logbook entry dated January 1, 2017, indicated that the gyroplane's hour meter read 266.2 hours. The logbook entry indicated that the carburetors' floats were changed, and new floats were installed. An aviation mechanic familiar with Rotax engines installed the new carburetor floats. The mechanic synchronized the carburetors and it seemed to fix the flooding problem. The mechanic was a trained Rotax mechanic, but he was unfamiliar with the modified turbocharger installation and did not know how to maintain or repair it.

The brother of the pilot stated that the gyroplane continued to have problems developing full power. He stated that the engine would develop about 3,500 RPMs instead of developing full power at 5,200 to 5,300 RPMs. The dealer suggested he try removing the orifice (manifold pressure probe) and clean it of any oil, grease or debris. He removed the orifice and cleaned it. However, there was no index on the orifice, so he reinstalled it in the same position as best as he could determine. By trial and error, he would loosen the lock nut on the orifice and turn it 1/16-inch one way or the other until the engine developed full power at 5,300 RPMs. He stated that the engine would develop full power for a while and then it would revert to only producing about 3,500 RPMs. Then he would readjust the orifice until he got it to produce full power again. He stated that he repeated this process about 5 or 6 times, and the gyroplane was flown about 30 more hours. He compared the engine problem to when a "choke" lever is pulled when an engine is operating - it loses power and can't develop enough power for operation.


Figure 2 Manifold Pressure Probe


The pilot wrote in his pilot's logbook on April 7, 2017, "Not running right – missed at high RPM." The pilot did not fly that day and entered 0 hours flown in his logbook. The brother of the pilot reported that he changed the orientation of the manifold pressure probe again until it produced full power. He reported that the gyroplane operated 7.9 hours without any anomalies before the accident occurred on April 17th.

The brother of the pilot reported that he was not sure what the TURBO knob located on the center pedestal controlled or what its function was. He said he turned it occasionally, but it didn't make any difference in the turbo boost. He said it would make a change to the turbo manifold pressure gauge of about 1/10th degree. He said that when the engine developed 5,300 RPMs at full power, the manifold pressure gauge would indicate about 40" Hg. When in cruise flight, the gauge would indicate 10 – 15" Hg. The accident pilot also stated that he did not know what the function of the TURBO knob was, and that he would not move it.

The dealer for the experimental Xenon 4 reported that the gyroplane met the "51%" rule for an experimental, amateur-built gyroplane. He stated that the aircraft's rotor is test flown to ensure proper balance and tracking of the rotor head. It was then disassembled and shipped with the rest of the gyroplane kit to the United States. The owner/builder then built and assembled the gyroplane which complied with the "51%" rule.

The dealer reported that the manifold pressure probe is located on the aluminum tube that is between the intercooler and the airbox. It senses the turbocharged air pressure and provides vacuum to the top of the carburetors' diaphragm which then schedules fuel for the carburetors. The greater the turbocharged air pressure, more fuel is required. He stated that the position of the orifice is critical and it's a very sensitive adjustment. If it moves or becomes obstructed in any way, then the pressure schedule to the carburetors is adversely affected and the engine fails to produce the required power. He stated that the Turbo adjustment knob on the center pedestal is for adding boost power. The knob is connected to the wastegate via a transparent plastic hose. It bleeds off turbo vacuum pressure which overcomes the turbo springs, allowing for more boost power. He stated that kit manufacturer did not provide operating or maintenance manuals for the gyroplane. There were no procedures provided about how to operate or maintain the turbocharged Rotax 912 ULST. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 121 hours (Total, all aircraft), 121 hours (Total, this make and model), 121 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LOOMIS
Registration: N912XV
Model/Series: Xenon 4
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: CAM14M2E02AA023
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/11/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 300 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS-T
Registered Owner: LOOMIS DWIGHT M
Rated Power: 135 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PEA, 885 ft msl
Observation Time: 1335 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 60°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 3°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Knoxville, IA (OXV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Knoxville, IA (OXV)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1336 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Knoxville Municipal (OXV)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Concrete
Airport Elevation: 928 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude:  41.326389, -93.092500

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA156 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 17, 2017 in Knoxville, IA
Aircraft: LOOMIS Xenon 4, registration: N912XV
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 17, 2017, about 1341 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Loomis Xenon 4 gyroplane, N912XV, sustained substantial damage after takeoff from the Knoxville Municipal Airport (OXV), Knoxville, Iowa. The gyroplane climbed to about 500 ft above ground level when it experienced a loss of power, and during the forced landing, it hit a powerline and landed in a ditch. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The gyroplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was not on a flight plan. The flight was departing OXV on a local flight.

At 1255, the surface weather observation at the Pella Municipal Airport (PEA), Pella, Iowa, located 10 nm northeast of OXV was: wind 270 at 6 knots; sky clear; 10 miles visibility; temperature 21 degrees C; dew point 3 degrees C; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury.



Monday afternoon at approximately 1:40 p.m. emergency crews responded to a scene just south of the Knoxville airport after receiving reports of an experimental rotorcraft force landed.

Knoxville Fire and Rescue, Knoxville Township Rural Fire Department, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, the Knoxville Police Department, Marion County Emergency Management, and the Iowa State Patrol all responded to the scene.

Two people later identified as pilot Miles Loomis of Des Moines and passenger Jeffrey Lee Jorgenson of Pella were treated by emergency crews and declined to be transported to the hospital.

Chief Jim Mitchell with Knoxville Fire and Rescue tells KNIA/KRLS news shortly after takeoff the rotorcraft lost power and went down striking a powerline during descent.

The powerline sparked a small grass fire that was extinguished quickly by Knoxville Township Rural Fire Department. 

Dan Van Donselaar, Knoxville Airport Manager, tells KNIA/KRLS News it’s always a good day when everyone walks away from an aviation accident. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted and will be conducting an investigation. 

Source:  http://kniakrls.com



KNOXVILLE, Iowa —

Emergency crews were called to a rotorcraft force landing near Knoxville early Monday afternoon.
Advertisement

The crash happened near the Knoxville Airport at around 1:45 p.m. at Nixon Street and Highway 14.

Monte Goodyk shot photos and video near the site and said a rotorcraft stalled at about 500 feet and went into an uncontrolled descent, clipped a power line and crashed into a ditch.

Two people were being treated at the scene and crews had to put out a small grass fire at the scene.

Goodyk said the pilot and passenger were shaken up but otherwise uninjured.

A gyroplane is a helicopter and airplane hybrid, with a propeller for thrust and a free-rotating set of blades, similar to a helicopter, for lift.

Story and raw video:  http://www.kcci.com





KNOXVILLE, Iowa  —  A gyroplane crashed near the Knoxville Airport on Monday.

At approximately 1:41, the helicopter went down at Highway 14 and Nixon Street. The Marion County Sheriff’s Department says the gyroplane lost power shortly after takeoff and came down abruptly.

The crash caused a small grass fire.

The Federal Aviation Administration is currently on the scene, and the pilot and passenger are both said to be okay.

Source:  http://whotv.com

Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, US Army: Fatal accident occurred April 17, 2017 in Leonardtown, St. Mary's County, Maryland




LEONARDTOWN, Md. - A military helicopter crashed on a Leonardtown, Maryland golf course Monday, killing one crew member and injuring two others, according to The U.S. Army Military District of Washington.

The Fort Belvoir UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter endured a hard landing around 1:37 p.m. near the Breton Bay Golf & Country Club on Society Hill Road. The Blackhawk is from the 12th Aviation Battalion, stationed at Davison Airfield, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and it was conducting a routine training flight at the time of the accident.

According to the Associate Press, one crew member is in serious condition, one is in critical condition, and they are being treated at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore.

"We are deeply saddened by this loss within our community," said Maj. Gen. Bradley A. Becker, commanding general, Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region and the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. "Our condolences go out to the families and friends affected by this tragedy, and our team is focused on supporting them during this difficult time."

A team from the Army Combat Readiness Center in Fort Rucker, Alabama will be at the site of the incident on Tuesday to conduct an investigation. Leonardtown is about 60 miles southeast of Washington, D.C.

Witness said they saw a military helicopter go down.

Less than two weeks ago, a fighter jet crashed into a wooded area in Prince George’s Count in Maryland.

The F-16C fighter jet took off from Joint Base Andrews at around 9:15 a.m. Wednesday and was participating in a routine training mission before it suffered a mechanical issue and went into a wooded area near Piscataway Road and Steed Road in Clinton, Maryland, about six miles from Joint Base Andrews and 12 miles south of Washington D.C.

Story and video:  http://www.fox5dc.com

Beech 58 Baron, N6040R: Incident occurred April 16, 2017 at Perryville Regional Airport (KPCD), Perry County, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N6040R

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  St. Louis, Missouri 

Aircraft on taxi, went off the taxiway and the nose gear collapsed.  

Date: 16-APR-17
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N6040R
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: PERRYVILLE
State: MISSOURI

Bombardier CRJ-700, Elite Airways: Incident occurred April 14, 2017 in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey 

Flight MNU302,   Elite Airways, Bombardier CRJ7.  Aircraft, registration not reported, while inbound wing struck large birds.  Landed without incident.  No injuries. Unknown damage. 

Date: 14-APR-17
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: MNU302
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Aircraft Operator: ELITE AIRWAYS
Flight Number: MNU302
City: NEWARK
State: NEW JERSEY

Piper PA-28-180, N7909W: Incident occurred April 15, 2017 at Martha's Vineyard Airport (KMVY), Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N7909W

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts 

Aircraft on takeoff, wheel and strut collapsed. 

Date: 15-APR-17
Time: 18:28:00Z
Regis#: N7909W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: VINEYARD HAVEN
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Hawker 800XP, Blue Sky Aviation Group LLC, N520JF: Incident occurred April 16, 2017 in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio

Blue Sky Aviation Group LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N520JF

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio 

Aircraft during flight was struck by lightning, landed without incident.  Unknown damage. 

Date: 16-APR-17
Time: 22:22:00Z
Regis#: N520JF
Aircraft Make: RAYTHEON
Aircraft Model: HAWKER 800XP
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Operator: BLUE SKY AVIATION
City: DAYTON
State: OHIO

Cessna 210, N7358E: Accident occurred April 15, 2017 near Minden Airport (KMNE), Webster Parish, Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7358E

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA157
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 15, 2017 in Minden, LA
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N7358E
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 15, 2017, about 1150 central standard time (CST), a Cessna 210, N7358E, experienced a loss of engine power during final approach for landing at Minden Airport (MNE), Minden, Louisiana. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was unregistered and was privately operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no instrument flight rules flight plan was filed.

Cessna 208, Baron Aviation Services: Incident occurred April 14, 2017 in Post, Garza County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Flight BVN8793, Cessna 208, Baron Aviation Services. Aircraft, registration not reported, force landed in a field.  

Date: 14-APR-17
Time: 11:55:00Z
Regis#: BVN8793
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C208
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: BARON AVIATION SERVICES
Flight Number: BVN8793
City: POST
State: TEXAS

Cessna 185A Skywagon, N405NR: Incident occurred April 15, 2017 in Watkins, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N405NR

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 

Aircraft experienced a bird strike.  Landed without incident.  Minor damage. 

Date: 15-APR-17
Time: 16:28:00Z
Regis#: N405NR
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C185
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: WATKINS
State: COLORADO

Piper Aerostar 601P, N824MZ: Incident occurred April 16, 2017 at Snohomish County Airport / Paine Field (KPAE), Everett, Washington




http://registry.faa.gov/N824MZ

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 16-APR-17
Time: 22:03:00Z
Regis#: N824MZ
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: AEROSTAR 601P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EVERETT
State: WASHINGTON




Cirrus SR20, Premium Lifestyle Inc., N822SR: Incident occurred April 15, 2017 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Premium Lifestyle Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N822SR

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway and struck a sign.

Date: 15-APR-17
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N822SR
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Injured skydiver awarded $760,000 in negligence lawsuit


Makenzie's father, Joe Wethington, made the 200-mile drive to Oklahoma with her and was the first to jump from the plane that morning. The skydivers were making a static-line jump, where a lanyard attached to the plane is connected to the parachute, causing the chute to open automatically.



Since she was a young girl growing up in Texas, Makenzie Wethington had dreamed of one day jumping out of an airplane.

But the day her dream came true in Oklahoma turned into a nightmare. Her parachute malfunctioned, sending her spinning uncontrollably toward the ground.

Wethington, 16 at the time, miraculously survived the 3,500-foot fall on Jan. 25, 2014, in Chickasha.

Now, an Oklahoma City federal judge has awarded Wethington $760,000 in damages. The owner of a closed skydiving business was ordered to pay the judgment.

U.S. District Judge Timothy D. DeGiusti on Wednesday awarded $400,000 for Wethington's past and future physical pain and suffering and $350,000 for her mental pain and suffering. The judge also awarded $10,000 for future medical expenses.

A negligence lawsuit, filed by Wethington's mother, accused the owner of Pegasus Air Sports, Robert Swainson, of failing to properly train Wethington for the jump. The lawsuit also alleged her parachute was “inappropriate” for her skill level, as well as "30 years old" and in poor condition.

Swainson, 70, closed the Chickasha-based skydiving business in December 2014 and has since moved overseas. He contended the lawsuit had no merit and Wethington “injured herself.”

“I have been convinced that the reason for her accident was that she did not follow all of the instruction that she received by myself prior to the jump,” Swainson wrote in a court document in 2015. “I believe that she panicked when things did not go exactly as expected and did nothing to correct it.”

The judge, though, accepted Wethington's allegations that her training was "inadequate and the parachute assigned to her was too small and fast for a person of her young age and relative experience."

“It's like giving a 16-year-old a Porsche,” Wethington's attorney, Robert Haslam, said last month.

Haslam said he'll attempt to collect the judgment by filing another legal action in London.

Read more here:  http://newsok.com

Piper PA-28, N5046W: Accident occurred May 08, 2016 in Pomona, Los Angeles County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot estimated that he departed on the 10-minute, 16-mile, local flight with one fuel tank about one-half full and the other tank about one-quarter full; he did not recall which tank he had the fuel selector positioned to during takeoff. During descent for landing, the pilot observed the engine rpm decrease to between 500 and 600 rpm, at which time he declared an emergency. The pilot switched fuel tanks but did not remember which tank he selected or whether the engine lost total power. The pilot made a forced landing on the roof of an industrial office building.

During examination of the airplane after it was recovered from the roof of the building, about 7.5 gallons of fuel was drained from the left wing, and about 1 quart of fuel was drained from the right wing; no visible contamination was observed. Additionally, the fuel selector was selected to the right tank position. Other than the absence of fuel in the right tank, examination of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation. Further, the lack of rotational damage to the propeller was consistent with a loss of engine power before impact. While atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to carburetor ice, the physical evidence supports the position that total loss of engine power was due to fuel starvation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's mismanagement of the available fuel, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California 
Piper Aircraft, Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engine; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5046W


Pilot Don Bach


NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2016, about 1640 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28, N5046W, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing on top of an office/industrial building complex in Pomona, California. The private pilot, who was the registered owner and sole occupant of the airplane, sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the 16 nautical mile (nm) local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from the Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California, about 1630, and the intended destination was Brackett Field (POC), La Verne, California.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) about 6 weeks after the accident, the pilot reported that before departing on the 10-minute flight, he estimated that one fuel tank was about one-half full and the other fuel tank was about one-quarter full; he did not recall which tank contained what amount of fuel or which tank the fuel selector was positioned to use. The pilot stated that the pre-takeoff run up was "ok", and that the carburetor heat worked well. The pilot further stated that, after departing FUL, he climbed to 2,200 ft. mean sea level (msl), was cleared for a left downwind to runway 26L at POC, and contacted the POC tower over Diamond Bar, a small town just west of POC. He then descended to 2,000 ft. msl, and during the descent he observed the engine rpm decrease to between 500 and 600 rpm, at which time he radioed "MAYDAY, MAYDAY." The pilot stated that he then switched fuel tanks but was not sure which one he selected. He further stated that he was not sure if the engine had completely lost power or not. The pilot said that he was looking for a field to land in but could not find one. The pilot added that the only thing he saw was a rooftop, which he aimed for, and he subsequently "belly flopped" the airplane onto the roof of the building. The pilot concluded by saying that he did not remember when he had last refueled the airplane.

The building the airplane landed on was located about 2 nm southwest of the destination airport. An initial survey of the accident site was performed on the evening of May 8, 2016, by NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) investigators. The wreckage was located on the top of a building, which measured about 200 ft. in length, and about 100 ft. in width; the roof was about 30 ft. above ground level. The airplane came to rest nose down with the building's roof collapsed around the engine cowling to the top of the propeller spinner. The left main landing gear collapsed aft, and the left wheel separated and was found on the roof. The nose wheel separated and was found inside the building. Some blue staining was observed on the roof.

On the day after the accident, the wreckage was examined in more detail after it was lowered from the roof of the building. During the examination, investigators drained about 7.5 gallons of fluid from the left wing tank's fuel drain; it was a light blue fluid, which looked and smelled like aviation gasoline. There was no visible contamination. Additionally, investigators drained about 1 quart of fluid from the right wing tank's fuel drain; it was a light blue fluid, which looked and smelled like aviation gasoline. There was no visible contamination. Investigators also drained a few ounces of fluid from the carburetor; it was amber in color, and smelled like aviation gasoline. The gascolator was displaced from its position; the screen appeared clean. The fuel selector was observed positioned to the right fuel tank.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange, and the spinner remained attached to the propeller. One propeller blade was bent aft, and the other propeller blade did not appear to be bent. Neither blade displayed leading edge gouging or S-bending.

On June 14, 2016, a detailed examination of the engine and airframe, performed under the supervision of the NTSB IIC, revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the engine. For details of the examination, refer to the Summary of Airplane Examination report, which is available in the public docket for this accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 61, possessed an FAA private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot reported to the NTSB that he had a total flight time of 900 hours of which 300 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane. He also reported that he had accumulated a total of 5 hours flight time in the last 90 days and 2 hours in the last 30 days, all in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The pilot completed his most recent flight review on February 27, 2016. He was issued a third-class FAA airman medical certificate on December 4, 2015, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Piper PA-28, serial number 28-48. It was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a fixed tricycle landing gear.

Examination of the airplane's airframe logbook indicated that the airplane's last two annual inspections revealed several discrepancies, and the airplane was not signed off as airworthy. The annual inspection performed on October 4, 2014, at a tachometer time of 1,249.97 hours and 4,098.97 hours total time, revealed the following discrepancies: needs an engine data plate (missing); needs Right side exhaust shroud for carb heat replace; needs compass correction card entries legible/replaced. The most recent annual inspection, which was performed on November 1, 2015, at a tachometer time of 1,261.0 hours and 4,110.27 hours, revealed the following discrepancies: needs an engine data plate (missing); needs Right side exhaust shroud for carb heat replaced; needs engine front crankshaft seal replaced; left wing fuel sump drain weeping.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1547, the weather reporting facility at POC reported: wind from 260° at 8 knots, 10 miles visibility, overcast ceiling at 3,100 ft. above ground level, temperature 17° C, dew point 10° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. According to the carburetor icing probability chart, conditions were conducive to moderate icing at cruise power, and serious icing at descent power. The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with moderate icing at cruise power, and serious icing at descent power.
















NTSB Identification: WPR16FA103
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 08, 2016 in Pomona, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N5046W
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2016, about 1630 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-28, N5046W, sustained substantial damage after making a forced landing on top of an office/industrial building complex, about 2 nautical miles southwest of Brackett Field (POC), La Verne, California. The private pilot, who was the registered owner and sole occupant of the airplane, sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed from the Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California, about 1600.

According to local law enforcement personnel, the pilot reported that while approaching POC at an altitude of about 2,000 feet, the engine experienced an initial power loss to about 1,000 rpm. The pilot stated that the mixture was in and that he had switched fuel tanks, however, he could not restore power to the engine. The pilot further stated that when he realized he would not be able to make it to his destination, he elected to make a forced landing. The pilot reported that rather than land in a residential area, he opted to land on the roof of a corporate building. After touching down, the airplane came to an abrupt stop upright and on the top of the building, with the engine partially imbedded into the roof.

The airplane was recovered to a secured storage facility for further examination.