Friday, July 7, 2017

Austria to Retire Eurofighter Combat Jets: Austria will buy a new fleet of 18 supersonic combat planes that could save it more than $2 billion



The Wall Street Journal
By Robert Wall
July 7, 2017 6:27 a.m. ET


LONDON—The Austrian government Friday said it would buy a new fleet of 18 supersonic combat planes and retire its controversial Eurofighter Typhoon combat jets in a move it says could save more than $2 billion.

The move is the latest twist in a prolonged saga over the Eurofighter planes Airbus SE sold Austria over a decade ago. The deal has been mired in controversy amid fraud allegations. The Austrian government this year said Airbus Chief Executive Tom Enders was among those being investigated as part of the corruption probe. 

Airbus has denied wrongdoing and said it was cooperating with authorities. It is one of several corruption probes Europe’s largest aerospace company is battling.

Suspicions of corruption were raised as early as 2002, before the contract was completed, but remained unsubstantiated until 2006, when a parliamentary committee in Vienna identified suspect payments apparently related to the sale. At the time, it had little evidence of the rationale behind the payments and investigations continued.

Austrian defense minister Hans Peter Doskozil on Friday said in a statement that “we need to get the escalating costs of the Eurofighter under control and minimize the enormous cost risks associated with it—in the interests of the taxpayer and also in relation to the other branches of the armed forces.”

Austria had been evaluating its combat aircraft plans with the pending retirement of the more-than 40-year old Saab 105OE trainers also used for air surveillance.

It had considered buying a replacement plane and upgrading the Eurofighter Typhoons to add combat capability. Austria has early versions of the plane that don’t sport many of the capabilities other air forces such as the U.K. and Germany have in more modern versions of the plane.

But the government has determined buying a replacement plane for both the Saab and the Eurofighter would be €100 million ($114.2 million) to €2 billion cheaper depending on which new plane it buys. Those savings estimates are based on a total cost including operations to 2049 and reflect the higher upfront cost involved in buying a new plane. Austria said it would now move to a single-plane type and buy 18 new supersonic jets, 15 single-seat planes and three dual-seaters.

Airbus said the decision was one for the Austrian government. It added only that “the Eurofighter works very well for all other customers.”

The new plane would be introduced in Austria in the 2020 to 2023 timeframe, an Austrian Defense Ministry official said. The government said it would start talking to potential bidders. Potential bidders could include Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp. , as well as Sweden’s Saab AB and France’s Dassault Aviation . A purchase decision isn’t expected before next year.

The potential order adds to a growing list of competitions in Europe for new combat planes. Switzerland, Belgium and Finland are among other countries in the region considering buying new jet fighters.

https://www.wsj.com

Cessna T337D Turbo Super Skymaster, N337J: Accident occurred July 07, 2017 near Greenwood County Airport (KGRD), South Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, South Carolina
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron; Kansas City, Kansas


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N337J

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA235
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 07, 2017 in Greenwood, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA T337, registration: N337J
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2017, about 0735 eastern daylight time, a Cessna T337D, N337J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Greenwood County Airport (GRD), Greenwood, South Carolina. The flight instructor and a private pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, their intention was to fly the airplane around the local area to get the private pilot familiar with a multiengine airplane. The private pilot performed the preflight checklist with no anomalies noted, and the main fuel tank was three-quarters full. The engine run-up was normal and they departed from runway 27. After departure, they flew outside of the airport traffic pattern to get the private pilot comfortable at the controls, then they returned to the airport and performed three touch-and-go landings. After the third touch-and-go landing, they departed the traffic pattern again and practiced some steep turns and performed one aerodynamic stall. After the practicing the stall, the front engine started to surge from high power to low power and then lost all power. The flight instructor told the private pilot to turn back to the airport and fly to the runway while he looked in the emergency checklist for the engine-out procedure. The rear engine was still operating normally at the time. The flight instructor turned the boost pump on, switched the fuel tank from main to auxiliary, and then back to main when the front engine did not restart. He recalled that sometime during the flight back to the airport, the rear engine also experienced a total loss of power. The airplane was too low to reach the runway, and the private pilot transferred control to the flight instructor, who performed a forced landing into the trees.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest on its right side. The right wing separated from the fuselage and was found inverted on the fuselage. The left wing and strut were still attached to the fuselage. Both wings had impact marks consistent with hitting trees. The front and rear engine propellers did not exhibit rotational scoring. The landing gear was down and locked.


The airplane was retained for further examination.








Two people sustained non life-threatening injuries Friday morning after the airplane they were traveling in crashed on approach to the Greenwood County Airport.

It happened just before 7:30 a.m. in the area of Airport and Bucklevel roads near Leath Correctional Institution.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said the 1968 Cessna T337D Turbo Skymaster was preparing to land at the time, and federal officials will further investigate, the FAA said.

The plane is registered to John Lumley of Greenwood, a relative confirmed to the Index-Journal. Lumley was not in the aircraft at the time of the incident.

During a Friday morning press conference at the airport, Greenwood County Sheriff Dennis Kelly said emergency responders were on scene within 7 minutes.

“Our first reaction was to check on all occupants and get this assistance if they needed it,” Kelly said. “We had a lot of officers, EMS and firefighters respond to the scene.”

The passenger and pilot were transported to Self Regional Medical Center.

Kelly said officials didn’t know where the plane was coming from, and did not cause a fire when it crash landed.

The crash also had no impact on business either at the airport or prison, Kelly said.

“It didn’t interfere with any of the operations,” he said.

According to an FAA database, Friday marked the ninth airplane crash in Greenwood County since 1978, and the first since June 2012.

http://www.indexjournal.com





GREENWOOD COUNTY, S.C. — Two people were injured when a small plane crashed Friday morning in Greenwood County.

The plane went down about 7:30 a.m. in a wooded area near the end of the runway at the Greenwood County airport on Terminal Road, according to Greenwood County officials.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.

The people injured were taken to Self Regional Healthcare.

http://www.wyff4.com

Cessna 172D Skyhawk, N2492U: Accident occurred July 07, 2017 in Cape Coral, Lee County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2492U

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 07, 2017 in Cape Coral, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2492U
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 7, 2017, about 0950 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172D airplane, N2492U, experienced a total loss engine power over Cape Coral, Florida, and was substantially damaged during the ensuing forced landing. The pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, while in cruise flight at an altitude of 1,200 ft above ground level (agl), he noticed a partial loss of engine power. He immediately changed his course to return to FMY and applied carburetor heat to regain power. The engine continued to run rough and produce partial power, but the airplane maintained an altitude of 800 ft agl. As the pilot planned for an emergency landing, the engine lost all power. He notified air traffic control and began an emergency descent. The airplane struck power lines and collided with the ground nose first. The pilot exited the airplane and waited for emergency services.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the nose of the airplane was crush aft. The engine was also displaced aft and crushed against the firewall. There was buckling throughout the fuselage and the empennage was partially separated from the airframe. The airplane was retained for further examination.





CAPE CORAL, Fla. -  A small plane crashed Friday morning south of downtown Cape Coral, injuring the pilot and cutting power to hundreds.

The crash happened shortly after 9:30 a.m. on Miramar Street at the Dolphin Key Resort, just west of Cape Coral Street.

Video from the scene shows a Cessna 172D Skyhawk plane lying upside down in a parking lot of the property.

The plane clipped a power line, cutting power to about 1,800 in the area. Power is still out to about 1,200 as of 11:30 a.m.

According to Vicki Moreland with the Lee County Port Authority, the pilot was taken to the hospital. His condition is not known at this time.

The pilot radioed into the tower that he was having engine trouble and said "I'm going down" before he crashed, according to radio chatter obtained from LiveATC.net.

Cape Coral resident Joseph Baker described seeing the plane before it crashed, saying there was no power to the plane.

"I saw the plane go over. It went over the canal and I happened to look up and thought he's awful low, and he had no power to his engine. I thought he's going to try and make it to the river. I didn't think anything of it. I just kept on going," Baker said.

Residents of nearby apartment complexes who were away from their homes when the plane crashed aren't being allowed back to their apartments and are being told it could be several hours before the area is cleared.

Moreland said she doesn't know if the plane was approaching to land or if it had just taken off from Page Field or elsewhere.

Grace Community School is among those reporting no power. School officials say on Facebook that the school wasn't damaged and all are safe, but there is no power or phone service as of 11:45 a.m.

Parents are being asked to pick up their students as soon as they can.

A witness calls the pilot's survival "miraculous" as she saw him sitting on the ground not far from the wreckage.

She says she heard what sounded like an explosion when the plane crashed and that transformers blew.

The FAA has confirmed they will be investigating. They're not expected to be on scene until around 1 p.m.

Cape Coral firefighters cleaned up fuel and fluids that leaked from the plane.

This is the second plane crash in as many weeks in Lee County. A plane crashed into a building on the Chico's campus June 24, killing a passenger and injuring the pilot. The investigation into that crash is expected to take several months.





CAPE CORAL, Fla. One person was injured Friday morning after a small plane crashed near downtown Cape Coral.

A Cessna 172D Skyhawk crashed on the 1500 block of Miramar Street at about 10 a.m., the Federal Aviation Authority said.

The pilot, who was the only person in plane, was hospitalized with minor injuries.

1,800 customers were without power Friday morning, the Lee County Electric Co-Op said. It was not immediately known when power will be restored.

Grace Community School, located near the crash scene, urged parents to immediately pick up their children due to the power outage:

Prior to the crash, the pilot told air traffic controllers at Page Field that he was losing engine power.

“I got an engine losing RPM,” he said, according to radio traffic. “I may have to put it down over here, I can’t make it to the…I may not make it. I may not make the bridge! I can’t restart engine is out.”

Friday’s crash is the second involving a small plane within the past two weeks.

A Piper PA-28-181 aircraft crashed into Chico’s Day Care, 11215 Metro Pkwy., following takeoff from Page Field on June 24. The passenger was killed and the pilot was hospitalized with serious injuries.

http://www.winknews.com























CAPE CORAL, Fla. -- A small plane crash is under investigation near Cape Coral Parkway this morning.

It happened shortly before 10 a.m. Friday on Miramar Street in front of the Dolphin Key Resort, just south of Cape Coral Parkway near Del Prado Boulevard.

One person was in the plane at the time, and was seen walking away from the wreckage.  He reportedly was transported to the hospital as a trauma alert.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirms the plane was a Cessna 172D Skyhawk, and that they will investigate the crash.

Power outages are reported in the area of Miramar Street and Vincennes Court.  LCEC reports between 500-2000 customers without power in the area.

This is the 2nd small plane crash in Southwest Florida in recent weeks.  Just two weeks ago, one person was killed and another injured when a plane crashed at the Chico's headquarters on Metro Parkway.

http://www.fox4now.comTa,[a

Morrisey 2250A, N917JL: Fatal accident occurred July 06, 2017 near Cherry Ridge Airport (N30), Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N917JL

Location: Honesdale, PA
Accident Number: ERA17FA232
Date & Time: 07/06/2017, 1645 EDT
Registration: N917JL
Aircraft: MORRISEY 2150A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 6, 2017, at 1645 eastern daylight time, a Morrissey 2150A, N917JL, was substantially damaged during a collision with trees and terrain during a forced landing after takeoff from Cherry Ridge Airport (N30), Honesdale, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight.

According to a witness who was both a pilot and a mechanic, he watched the airplane perform takeoffs and at least one landing before the accident flight but did not witness the accident. On the first takeoff, the airplane sounded "normal" and returned for landing. After touchdown, the airplane continued for a touch-and-go landing, but the engine, "fumbled… faltered drastically for 3 or 4 seconds" before the pilot aborted the takeoff, taxied back to the beginning of the runway, and took off again.

On the following takeoff, the airplane reached traffic pattern altitude "or close to it" on the downwind leg when the witness heard the engine "miss" and heard further power interruptions before his attention was diverted away from the airplane. He said he was unaware of any additional takeoffs or landings that involved the accident airplane.

Airport surveillance videos showed the airplane on its takeoff roll from runway 18, followed by an initial climb and a left turn in the vicinity of the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern. The airplane was then seen in a shallow descent and a shallow bank angle as it descended from view behind trees. The video was a compilation collected from multiple cameras, and the resolution of the images diminished as the airplane's distance from the cameras increased. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: None
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/27/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 480 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model) 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, and a mechanic certificate with ratings for airframe and powerplant. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued June 27, 2014. He reported 480 total hours of flight experience on that date.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MORRISEY
Registration: N917JL
Model/Series: 2150A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: SP-26
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/12/2012, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 33 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2858.48 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

According to FAA records, the two-seat, tandem-configured, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1961 and was powered by a Lycoming O-320, 150-horsepower engine. The tachometer displayed 2,858.48 aircraft hours at the accident site. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed by the previous owner on July 12, 2012, at 2,825 tachometer hours.

The gross weight and horsepower rating of the accident airplane required pilots to possess a third-class medical certificate for its operation.

According to FAA records, the airplane was purchased by the pilot/owner in May 2016. He took delivery of the airplane in Mt. Holly, New Jersey, and flew the airplane to N30; however, there was no record of an application for the required special flight permit to perform that flight.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMPO, 1915 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 184°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1900 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Honesdale, PA (N30)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Honesdale, PA (N30)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1645 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

At 1653, the weather recorded at Pocono Mountain Municipal Airport (MPO), Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania, located 24 miles south of N30, included few clouds at 1,900 ft, wind from 170° at 7 knots, and visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 21°C, and the dew point was 17°C. The altimeter setting was 30.09 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: CHERRY RIDGE (N30)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1357 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2986 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.515556, -75.251667 (est) 

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The accident site was about 800 ft southeast of the departure end of runway 18.

The wreckage path was about 450 ft long, oriented on a 351° magnetic heading, and ended in densely wooded terrain. The initial impact points were in treetops about 50 ft above the ground.

The cockpit and engine compartment were suspended against a tree about 8 ft above the ground, and the tail section rested on the ground. The forward cockpit and instrument panel were destroyed. The pitch trim actuator handle was not installed; instead a pair of locking pliers were in its place. The lap belt and shoulder harnesses were not buckled. The shoulder harnesses were stowed behind the seat, and the lap belts were stowed to either side of the seat pan. The mold growth, dirt, and corrosion visible on the belts, buckle, and male tabs was undisturbed, and showed no movement of the buckle on the belt, no finger smudges, or metal-to-metal contact.

The left wing was separated at its root but remained largely intact. The right wing was attached, but the wing outboard of the main fuel tank was separated. Both the left wing and right outboard wing remained adjacent to the main wreckage and their respective fuel tanks were intact.

Control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the flight control surfaces through multiple breaks. The breaks were all consistent with impact and overload separations.

Continuity of the fuel system was confirmed. The left main tank was empty, and the right main tank contained 3 ounces of fuel. The remainder of the fuel system contained only trace amounts of fuel. The left and right fuel selectors were in the "On" position. There was no odor of fuel and no evidence of fuel spillage at the scene.

The engine remained attached to its mounts and the crankshaft was fractured at the propeller flange. External examination revealed heavy corrosion on most visible surfaces and a bird's nest between the No. 2 and 4 cylinders. The propeller and crankshaft flange were separated from the engine and came to rest about 30 ft beyond the main wreckage. One propeller blade was undamaged and buried in the ground. The blade above ground was bent aft mid-span and displayed mud and wood smudges along both the chord and the span of the blade.

The engine was placed in a stand and rotated by hand through the vacuum pump drive. Continuity was established through the accessory section to the powertrain and valvetrain. Thumb compression was confirmed. The magnetos were removed and each produced spark at all terminal leads when actuated by a power drill. The engine-driven fuel pump, electric fuel pump, and the vacuum pump were each tested. When actuated, they each produced suction and compression at the inlet and outlet ports, respectively.

The carburetor was removed and disassembled. The copper floats were intact, moved freely, and displayed no hydraulic deformation. The carburetor and the fuel pumps all contained trace amounts of fuel. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Forensic Associates of Northeast Pennsylvania, Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania, performed a postmortem examination on the pilot. The cause of death was multiple traumatic injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on specimens of the pilot. Testing identified 0.972 ug/ml of butalbital, 0.0191 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the primary psychoactive compound in marijuana), and 0.047 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH, an inactive metabolite of THC) in cavity blood. These substances, along with oxymetazoline and acetaminophen, were also identified in urine.

Butalbital is a barbiturate commonly prescribed in combination with acetaminophen and caffeine and marketed as Fioricet, a medication intended to treat headaches. It carries this warning for patients, as the butalbital component can be impairing: "This product may impair mental and/or physical abilities required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks such as driving a car or operating machinery. Such tasks should be avoided while taking this product." Blood levels of butalbital thought to cause psychoactive effects are between 1.0 and 10.0 ug/ml.

The THC in marijuana is a psychoactive drug with psychoactive effects with levels as low as 0.001 ug/ml. It has mood-altering effects, including inducing euphoria and relaxation. In addition, marijuana causes alterations in motor behavior, perception, cognition, memory, learning, endocrine function, food intake, and regulation of body temperature. Specific performance effects include decreased ability to concentrate and maintain attention; impairment of hand-eye coordination is dose-related over a wide range of dosages. Impairment in retention time and tracking, subjective sleepiness, distortion of time and distance, vigilance, and loss of coordination in divided attention tasks have been reported.

Oxymetazoline is a potent vasoconstrictor available over the counter as a nasal spray intended to treat nasal congestion. It is not considered impairing.

Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter analgesic often sold with the name Tylenol. It is not considered impairing.




The pilot died in a crash Thursday when a small passenger airplane plunged into a wooded area near Cherry Ridge Airport in Wayne County.

The crash claimed the life of 52-year-old Joseph P. Kinney of Delaware Twp., Wayne County Coroner Edward Howell said. An autopsy will be performed.

The plane went down just before 6 p.m. about a half-mile from the airport in Cherry Ridge Twp. near Honesdale, said Rick Breitenfeldt, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration. There were no other people on board.

The FAA will investigate the incident.

Airport manager Vincent Van Laak said he did not see the crash.

“He was apparently trying to get back to the airport,” he said. “I can’t do more than theorize right now (about what happened).”

Breitenfeldt described the plane as a Morrissey 2150A aircraft, an old model, two-seat plane.

An upset Van Laak offered his condolences to Kinney’s family.

“I wish things like this didn’t happen,” he said.

The last fatal crash at Cherry Ridge Airport happened May 5, 2012, when 67-year-old Jeffrey Gilbert of Rock Hill, New York, attempted to abort a landing and crashed a Cessna 177B into the ground, a National Transportation Safety Board report said.

Toxicology testing showed Gilbert had taken an over-the-counter antihistamine that carries a warning it may impair mental and motor skills and is not approved for use while flying, the report added.

Authorities also investigated three other non-fatal crashes around Cherry Ridge Airport since then, with other NTSB reports describing:

A Cessna 182Q failing to land with enough remaining runway to safely stop on May 25, 2015.

A Cessna 172P substantially damaged during a hard landing on June 20, 2016.

A Piper PA 28-161 aborting a takeoff on June 29, 2016 headed off the runway and collided with “vegetation and terrain,” which the board attributed to the pilot’s poor preflight planning.


http://thetimes-tribune.com

CHERRY RIDGE TOWNSHIP -- A plane crash near an airport in Wayne County has claimed the life of a Pike County man.

According to reports, a small plane crashed in a wooded area near the Cherry Ridge Airport near Honesdale around 4:30 p.m. Thursday afternoon.

The Wayne County Coroner has confirmed the crash killed 52-year-old Joseph P. Kinney of Dingmans Ferry.

State police, federal aviation officials and fire crews were all on scene after the crash. They told Newswatch 16 that Kinney was piloting a small plane when he crashed into a wooded area not far from the Cherry Ridge Airport near Honesdale.

There is still no word on what caused that crash in Wayne County, but state police along with other officials plan to return to the scene Friday to continue the investigation.

The Wayne County Coroner also confirms that there will be an autopsy.

While Newswatch 16 did speak with some people at the Cherry Ridge Airport today, they did not want to appear on camera. However, they did say that what happened today is "a nightmare."

http://wnep.com

Cessna T210L Turbo Centurion, N333GK: Accident occurred July 06, 2017 at Sutter County Airport (O52), Yuba City, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Yuba City, CA
Accident Number: GAA17CA423
Date & Time: 07/06/2017, 1815 PDT
Registration: N333GK
Aircraft: CESSNA T210L
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot in the retractable-landing-gear airplane reported that he made a normal approach, but he failed to extend the landing gear. The airplane touched down on the runway and skidded to a stop on the lower fuselage.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the lower fuselage.

Per the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot Aircraft Accident Report, the pilot noted that the accident could have been prevented if he had performed a "double and triple check of my GUMPS checklist."

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to extend the landing gear before landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Gear extension and retract sys - Not used/operated (Cause)

Personnel issues
Forgotten action/omission - Pilot (Cause)

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N333GK

Location: Yuba City, CA
Accident Number: GAA17CA423
Date & Time: 07/06/2017, 1815 PDT
Registration: N333GK
Aircraft: CESSNA T210L
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the retractable landing gear airplane reported that he had made a normal approach, but he failed to extend the landing gear. The airplane touched down on the runway and skidded to a stop on the lower fuselage.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the lower fuselage.

Per the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot Aircraft Accident Report, the pilot noted that the accident could have been prevented if he had performed a, "double and triple check of my GUMPS checklist."

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: None
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/17/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 392 hours (Total, all aircraft), 27 hours (Total, this make and model), 322 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N333GK
Model/Series: T210L M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21061282
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO -520-H
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 280 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMYV, 62 ft msl
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 127°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 40°C / 9°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 230°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration:

No Obscuration; No Precipitation

Departure Point: Redding, CA (KRDD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Yuba City, CA (O52)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0515 PST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: SUTTER COUNTY (O52)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 58 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3045 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.123611, -121.605278 (est)

Mooney M20F Executive, N3861N, Camellia Chemical LLC: Incident occurred July 06, 2017 at Peter Prince Field Airport (2R4), Milton, Santa Rosa County, Florida (and) Incident occurred November 19, 2016 at Pensacola International Airport (KPNS), Escambia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham

Camellia Chemical LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3861N

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 06-JUL-17
Time: 17:15:00Z
Regis#: N3861N
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MILTON
State: FLORIDA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham

Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Date: 19-NOV-16
Time: 22:50:00Z
Regis#: N3861N
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20F
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PENSACOLA
State: Florida