Friday, August 17, 2012

Piper PA-46-500TP, N428DC: Accident occurred January 11, 2009 in Milton, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA09FA133 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, January 11, 2009 in Milton, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/20/2010
Aircraft: PIPER PA-46-500TP, registration: N428DC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot filed a flight plan from his home airport to an airport about 1 mile from the Gulf of Mexico. During the flight, the pilot reported to air traffic control that he was encountering moderate to severe turbulence and, later, that the windshield was "cracking." After reporting the loss of the airplane’s door, the pilot advised that the windshield "has gone." The pilot later transmitted that the airplane’s flight controls were locked, that he was bleeding profusely, and that he was "graying out." The pilot further advised that he intended to "point the aircraft at the gulf," and he then parachuted from the airplane without advising air traffic control. As the airplane continued toward the Gulf of Mexico, air traffic controllers continued attempts to assist the pilot, with no response. The airplane eventually impacted wooded terrain, under power, about 18 nautical miles north of the Gulf of Mexico and about 100 yards from a residential area. An examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact failures or malfunctions, that the door was still attached to the airframe, and that the windshield was undamaged and secured in its frame. A law enforcement investigation subsequently determined that the pilot, who was facing legal problems, intentionally parachuted from the aircraft near where he had previously stashed a motorcycle. The pilot was apprehended and subsequently plead guilty to federal criminal charges.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's intentional inflight abandonment of the airplane.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT
On January 11, 2009, at 2116 central standard time, a Piper PA-46-500TP, N428DC, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain in Milton, Florida. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed from Anderson Municipal Airport (AID), Anderson, Indiana, to Destin-Fort Walton Beach Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a Kankakee, Illinois, Automated Flight Service Station partial transcript, the pilot contacted the facility on January 11, 2009, at 1629, to obtain a weather briefing and file the IFR flight plan for a flight from AID to DTS. As part of the weather briefing, the briefer advised the pilot that an AIRMET (Airmen’s Meteorological Information) advisory was current for moderate turbulence above 24,000 feet. During the briefing, the pilot also filed the IFR flight plan for the flight, with a proposed departure time of 1730. He stated to the briefer that the flight would be 2 hours’ duration, and that he would have 4 hours and 10 minutes of fuel on board.

According to air traffic control (ATC) voice communications and radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane departed AID at 1744. At 1920, while the airplane was flying level at an altitude of 24,000 feet in the vicinity of Guntersville, Alabama, the pilot reported to Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center, "um severe chop at two four oh." He was asked to repeat the transmission and stated, "moderate to severe turbulence at two four oh."

The controller subsequently asked the pilot what altitude he would like to descend to, and the pilot responded 2 minutes later, "atlanta meridian four two delta charlie requesting emergency descent." The controller approved the descent, and the pilot responded, "…my windshield is cracking." The controller acknowledged the pilot's transmission and again approved the descent.

At 1924, the pilot stated, "and we're going down to descending down to (unintelligible)." Eight seconds later the pilot reported that he lost the door of the airplane.

At 1926, the pilot stated, "…looks like my windshield has gone into my (unintelligible)." The controller acknowledged the report and stated, "eight delta charlie the gadsden airport it's at uh ten o'clock and fifteen miles birmingham airport is at one o'clock and about thirty miles sir." About 40 seconds later, the pilot reported that he had 3 hours of fuel on board. At the time, radar data indicated that the airplane was descending through 15,600 feet and was heading approximately 180 degrees magnetic.

At 1927, the pilot reported, "(unintelligible) we pointed toward the ocean toward the gulf," and shortly thereafter, "I'm bleeding profusely gonna go ahead and point the aircraft at the gulf we have three hours of fuel left we're losing altitude (unintelligible)." The controller acknowledged the report and issued vectors to the pilot for the two closest airports.

At 1929, the pilot asked, "center what's the terrain clearance?" The controller responded, "eight delta charlie in your area a good altitude is three thousand five hundred we got the gadsden airport off to your left sir if you pick up a one hundred heading it's about ten miles off your left and about a one hundred heading sir."

The pilot subsequently responded, "ah i have the controls locked and i'm graying out." The controller stated, "…roger there's an airport at your one o'clock...that's robbins field sir."

Although the controller continued to provide vectors to the pilot to different airports as the airplane proceeded toward the Gulf of Mexico, no further transmissions were received from the airplane.

Radar data indicated that the airplane remained level at 4,000 feet, heading approximately 180 degrees magnetic, until it turned slightly to the west in the vicinity of Vincent, Alabama.

The airplane subsequently continued to the southwest, passing west of Montgomery, Alabama, on a heading of approximately 190 degrees magnetic.

Military fighter jets were scrambled from New Orleans, Louisiana, to intercept the airplane as it flew south into Florida. According to the military pilots, as they approached the airplane, it was at an altitude of 3,800 feet and flying at an airspeed of 90 knots. The pilots reported that there were no lights on inside or outside the airplane, and that the door was open. Flares were used in an attempt to get the pilot's attention, with no response. About 10 minutes after the use of the flares, the airplane initiated “what appeared to be a slow, relatively controlled descent.”

Radar data indicated that the airplane initiated a descent at 2024, 2 miles south of Roberts, Alabama. The airplane continued southbound for 24 nautical miles, in a gradual descent, until it impacted wooded terrain near Milton, Florida.

One of the military pilots reported that the airplane initiated a slow right turn just prior to impacting terrain, about 100 yards west of a residential area near the edge of a lake.

Search and rescue efforts were immediately initiated, and the airplane was located by ground units at 2216, with no indication of the pilot being onboard at the time of impact.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He did not possess a current FAA medical certificate, but on his latest application, the pilot reported 9,200 total hours of flight experience.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the accident airplane was a Piper PA-46-500TP (Piper Meridian),manufactured in 2002, and registered to the owner in 2005. The Meridian was a single-engine airplane powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT-6A-42A turbo-propeller engine, with a flat rated power of 500 shaft horsepower. The airplane had a normal operating speed range of 79 to 188 knots, and a stall speed of 79 to 69 knots with the landing gear and flaps retracted.

The airplane was equipped with an Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS), which interfaced with a three-axis autopilot system.

According to an employee of the Anderson Municipal Airport, the airplane was fueled with 57 gallons (385 pounds) of Jet A fuel, which "topped off the tanks," on January 11, 2009, at 1501. The employee stated that the pilot told him that he was going to Destin, Florida, to visit his father. He additionally stated that he would return the following day.

According to the Piper PA-46-500TP Pilot's Operating Handbook, the airplane had a total fuel capacity of 1,160 pounds of Jet A fuel, 20 pounds of which were unusable. The fuel system consists of two main, inboard, and header wing tanks. Fuel is drawn from both wings simultaneously, with float valves and switches employed to prevent air ingestion. An inline electric boost pump is located in each wing root just forward of the header tanks. Control of these pumps is through a three-position switch located on the left overhead panel with selections: MAN, OFF, and AUTO. The pumps operate in unison to provide emergency back up for the engine driven pump, boost pressure for starting, and vapor suppression at high altitudes. The fuel pump switch was observed in the AUTO position after the accident.

Fuel burn calculations performed by a representative of the airplane manufacturer estimated that approximately 360 pounds of fuel would have been onboard when the airplane impacted the ground.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather, recorded at nearby Naval Air Station Whiting Field (NDZ), Milton, Florida, at 2156, included winds from 360 degrees at 6 knots, clear skies, temperature 6 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 01 degree C, and an altimeter setting of 30.22 inches mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The airplane impacted densely wooded terrain, about 18 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico, creating a 120-foot debris path heading about 180 degrees magnetic. The start of the debris path was marked by freshly broken tree branches and an outboard section of the left wing which displayed a concave impression on its leading edge. The main wreckage came to rest inverted and marked the end of the debris path.

Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact failures or malfunctions. All major components were accounted for at the scene. The door was also found partially connected to the airframe and the windshield was found undamaged, and secured in its frame.

Both fuel tanks were breached, and trace amounts of fuel were observed in the wings.

All three propeller blades exhibited leading edge damage, chordwise scratching and s-bending.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Law enforcement personnel determined that the pilot deliberately mislead air traffic controllers and parachuted from the aircraft, and, after a brief manhunt, the pilot was apprehended and incarcerated. On June 5, 2009, the pilot appeared before the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida, Pensacola Division, and plead guilty to Federal charges of willful destruction of an aircraft (18 U.S.C. § 32(a)(1)) and knowingly and willfully communicating a false distress message to the United States Coast Guard (14 U.S.C. § 88(c)). In the course of entering his guilty plea, the pilot admitted, among other facts, the following: that on or about December 31, 2008, Indiana state officials had executed search warrants on the pilot’s home and business; that on or about January 10, 2009, the pilot had prepositioned a motorcycle in a storage facility in Harpersville, Alabama; that during the flight, and after descending the airplane to 3,500 feet, the pilot had made course corrections to fly toward Harpersville and, while near Childersburg, Alabama, the pilot parachuted from his aircraft. On August 19, 2009, the pilot was sentenced to serve a 51-month term of imprisonment, and ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $34,649.07 to the United States Coast Guard for costs expended in the search effort and $871,387.85 to the creditor that owned the aircraft.

The NTSB public docket contains relevant court records.



 

INDIANAPOLIS (August 17, 2012) – Secretary of State Connie Lawson and U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita today announced the stunt plane of Marcus Schrenker has been sold. Schrenker was an Indianapolis businessman who ran an intricate ponzi scheme swindling more than $4 million from investors. In January of 2009, he tried to evade the law by crashing his other plane into a Florida swamp in an attempt to fake his own death. He was later arrested in a Florida campground and is currently serving time in prison.

Read more:   Ponzi schemer Marcus Schrenker’s stunt plane sold by Secretary Lawson’s office with help from U.S. Rep. Rokita

  INDIANAPOLIS -- A stunt plane owned by an Indianapolis businessman who stole $4 million from investors before trying to fake his own death has been sold to benefit his victims.

Marcus Schrenker, who was convicted in 2010 of running an intricate Ponzi scheme, had used investor money to buy a Model Extra EA 300/L stunt plane.

Slideshow: Marcus Schrenker's Disappearance, Discovery
Slideshow: Michelle Schrenker Recounts 14-Year Marriage 

An offer of $264,000 was made on the plane this spring, but the Indiana Secretary of State's Office had issues finalizing the deal due to Federal Aviation Administration registration requirements. 

Current Secretary of State Connie Lawson called upon previous secretary of state and current U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita, who was in office when action against Schrenker was first taken. 

After working through red tape, they announced Friday that the plane had been officially sold. 

 "The Secretary of State's Office has been working diligently for years now to sell Schrenker's assets so his victims can receive reimbursement for their losses," Lawson said in a news release.   "Selling this plane is the final chapter in this office's efforts to close this case and gives his victims the closure they deserve." 

All of Schrenker's assets were seized and sold for a total of $306,000. Schrenker crashed his other plane into a Florida swamp in January of 2009 in an attempt to fake his own death but was arrested a short time later. He is currently serving 10 years in prison.

Ponzi schemer Marcus Schrenker’s stunt plane sold by Secretary Lawson’s office with help from U.S. Rep. Rokita

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/31364116/detail.html

State sells Schrenker's stunt plane



Piper PA-46-500TP,  N428DC

 Marcus Schrenker


NTSB Identification: ERA09FA133 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, January 11, 2009 in Milton, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/20/2010
Aircraft: PIPER PA-46-500TP, registration: N428DC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.


The pilot filed a flight plan from his home airport to an airport about 1 mile from the Gulf of Mexico. During the flight, the pilot reported to air traffic control that he was encountering moderate to severe turbulence and, later, that the windshield was "cracking." After reporting the loss of the airplane’s door, the pilot advised that the windshield "has gone." The pilot later transmitted that the airplane’s flight controls were locked, that he was bleeding profusely, and that he was "graying out." The pilot further advised that he intended to "point the aircraft at the gulf," and he then parachuted from the airplane without advising air traffic control. As the airplane continued toward the Gulf of Mexico, air traffic controllers continued attempts to assist the pilot, with no response. The airplane eventually impacted wooded terrain, under power, about 18 nautical miles north of the Gulf of Mexico and about 100 yards from a residential area. An examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact failures or malfunctions, that the door was still attached to the airframe, and that the windshield was undamaged and secured in its frame. A law enforcement investigation subsequently determined that the pilot, who was facing legal problems, intentionally parachuted from the aircraft near where he had previously stashed a motorcycle. The pilot was apprehended and subsequently plead guilty to federal criminal charges.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's intentional inflight abandonment of the airplane.


Full narrative available

Parasailing Death Leads to Investigation

(GULF SHORES, Ala.) After a recent accidental parasailing death in Pompano Beach Florida, local officials are citing their own lessons learned and the success of a city ordinance that gives Gulf Shores officials some degree of control over the industry. 

The ordinance passed in 2010 helps regulate how the Parasailing Business operates through business license regulation. "With that business license application the ordinance requires operators to trim the lines and follow manufacturer specifications on the shoot that is used. The number of passengers is regulated, the safety speech that is done and a lot of what is part of the operation is regulated throughout the city ordinance," said Grant Brown with the City of Gulf Shores.

Brown says the Coast Guard is responsible for safety on the vessel used to tow a parasail and all of the equipment it carries. Brown points to a good safety record over the years. The most recent incident was when a small advertising airplane flew too low near a parasail. The FAA investigated that incident.

Source:  http://www.local15tv.com


Related:  
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/state-regional/ntsb-joins-investigation-in-fatal-parasailing-acci/nRDc4/

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/fl-parasailing-deaths-20120817,0,1991471.story

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N2081U: Accident occurred September 07, 2010 in Mountain Home, Arkansas

NTSB Identification: CEN10FA520 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 07, 2010 in Mountain Home, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/15/2012
Aircraft: CESSNA T210, registration: N2081U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was in cruise flight at 6,700 feet mean sea level when the air traffic controller advised the pilot that a large area of heavy to extreme rain showers was ahead along his flight path for the next 180 miles. The pilot did not change course, and, about 6 minutes later, he requested a descent in order to remain operating under visual flight rules. About 4 minutes later, the controller lost radar contact with the airplane and tried to contact the pilot. There was no response. Witnesses on the ground reported that the airplane’s engine could be heard “revving up and down,” but the airplane could not be seen because of an overcast layer of clouds. Moments later the airplane appeared from the clouds and was observed descending in a nose down spiral. The witnesses added that, before the airplane descended out of sight, one of the wings “appeared to fold.” Postaccident examination indicated that the airplane experienced a positive overload failure of the left wing during the descent and subsequently broke apart. The examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions, anomalies, or failures before the wing separation that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s decision to continue flight into a known area of heavy rain and his subsequent failure to maintain aircraft control.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 7, 2010, about 1320 Central Daylight Time, a Cessna T210N, single-engine airplane, N2081U, sustained substantial damage following an in-flight break up and subsequent impact with trees and terrain near Mountain Home, Arkansas. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger on board the airplane were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Monterey Bay Aviation, Incorporated, Watsonville, California. No flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91 personal flight; however, the pilot was receiving radar flight following from the Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). The cross-country flight originated at Vermilion Regional airport, Danville, Illinois, about 0930 and was en route to Georgetown, Texas.

The pilot contacted Memphis ARTCC at 1245. The controller queried if the pilot could see the precipitation around the Flippin (FLP) VOR (very high frequency omnidirectional radio range) . The pilot replied “Roger.” The airplane was flying on about a 235 degree heading at an altitude of 6,700 feet mean sea level (msl).

At 1305, Memphis ARTCC told the pilot that there was a “very large area” of precipitation 30 miles ahead of him that extended south of Fort Smith Arkansas. The controlled added that it was “a very, very large area [of] moderate to heavy precipitation.” At 1307, the pilot was directed to another frequency.

The pilot checked in with Memphis ARTCC on the new assigned frequency. The pilot was given the current Mountain Home, Arkansas altimeter setting and was informed that weather radar was depicting an area of heavy to extreme precipitation 15 miles ahead of the pilot along his route of flight for the next 180 miles. The pilot responded with, “Thank you.”

At 1317, the pilot requested a descent to 4,500 feet “for VFR” (Visual Flight Rules flight). The control cleared the pilot to “maintain VFR” and would let the pilot know when he lost him on the controller’s radar.

At 1318:51, the airplane initiated a left turn to a heading of about 160 degrees. Two minutes later the airplane made a right turn back to toward the southwest. The turn continued until radar contact was lost at 1320:40. The airplane was at 7 nautical miles south of FLP at 6,600 feet msl when radar contact was lost.

At 1322, the controller broadcast to the pilot that he’d lost the airplane on radar. The pilot did not respond. Memphis made several attempts to contact the pilot. The pilot did not respond to any of them.

According to witnesses in the area, the airplane’s engine could be heard “revving up and down” but the airplane could not be seen because of an overcast layer of clouds. Moments later the airplane appeared from the clouds and was observed descending in a nose down spiral. The witnesses added that before the airplane descended out of sight, one of the wings “appeared to fold.”

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 62-year old pilot in the left seat held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane rating. The pilot’s total flight time could not be determined from his logbook; however, the pilot’s logbook did show that he flew in the accident airplane with an instructor for 2.0 hours on July 18, 2010, and the logbook also indicated that he successfully completed a flight review on July 7, 2010.

The left seat pilot held a Third Class medical certificate dated June 15, 2010. The certificate had limitations that read “Holder shall possess glasses which correct near.” At the date of his medical examination, the pilot reported having 2,000 total flying hours and 20 hours in the previous six months. The pilot also reported that his previous medical certificate had been applied for on August 31, 1998.

The 32-year old pilot in the right seat held a private pilot certificate with single engine land airplane rating. No logbooks were found on the left seat pilot. The left seat pilot did not hold a current medical certificate. The last medical certificate the left seat pilot did apply for was November 23, 2005. At that time, the right seat pilot reported he had 120 total flying hours with no hours flown in the previous six months to the medical examination.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a 1982 Cessna Aircraft Model T210N, serial number 21064764. The airplane was powered by a Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-520-R engine rated at 285 horsepower.

According to the airplane logbook, the airplane underwent an annual inspection on November 20, 2009. The recorded tachometer reading at the time of the annual inspection was 87.2 hours. A logbook entry on October 18, 2009, where the airplane had been repainted, showed the airplane had an airframe time of 426.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 1300 on September 7, 2010 depicted a stationary front extending across southeastern Missouri into northern Arkansas, Oklahoma, and into the Texas Panhandle. Tropical Storm Hermine was located to the southeast over southern Texas with a general moist-unstable air mass over the region. A general weak pressure gradient existed over Arkansas and a deformation zone was indicated by the wind flow over southern Missouri and Arkansas. The station models in the vicinity of the accident depicted an extensive area of rain along and south of the frontal boundary, with overcast clouds.

The NWS Radar Summary Chart depicted a large area of intense to extreme echoes extended over Oklahoma and northern Arkansas along and south of the frontal boundary, and an extensive area of precipitation associated with T.S. Hermine.

The NWS Severe Storm Center’s Convective Outlook (AC) had a general risk of thunderstorms over the region with a slight risk of severe thunderstorms over southern Texas associated with the tropical storms landfall.

At 1253, the aviation routine weather report (METAR) for Baxter County Airport (BPK), Mountain Home, Arkansas, about 7 miles north of the accident site reported a wind from 170° at 5 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, ceiling broken at 2,900 agl, overcast at 3,800 feet, temperature 78° Fahrenheit (F), dew point 71° F, altimeter 30.12 inches of mercury (Hg).

BPK Special weather observation at 1315, wind 200° at 8 knots, gust to 14 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, ceiling broken at 3,300 feet, overcast at 4,700 feet, temperature 75° F, dew point 71° F, altimeter 30.13 inches of Hg.

BKP special weather observation at 1349, wind 200° at 5 knots, visibility 9 statute miles with light rain, a few clouds at 600 feet, ceiling overcast at 5,000 feet, temperature 73° F, dew point 72° F, altimeter 30.13 inches of Hg. Remarks: rain began at 1333, hourly precipitation less than 0.01 inch.

Harrison, Boone County Airport (HRO) located approximately 35 miles west of the accident site reported the following conditions surrounding the time of the accident:

Harrison special weather observation at 1328, automated observation, wind from 170 at 4 knots, visibility 2 ½ miles in moderate rain and mist, a few clouds at 1,300 feet, scattered at 2,700 feet, ceiling overcast at 3,400 feet, temperature 74 F, dew point 72 F, altimeter 30.15 inches of Hg. Remarks: automated observation system, hourly precipitation 0.13 inches.

The Springfield, Missouri (KSGF) WSR-88D weather radar located 78 mile northeast of the accident site base reflectivity image for 0.5° image at 1319 CDT showed a large east-to-west band of echoes extended over northern Arkansas with echoes between 35 and 40 dBZ or moderate to strong echoes over the accident site with maximum echoes of 50 dBZ located 12 miles east, and other echoes of 50 dBZ extending approximately 20 miles south through southwest and west of the accident site. Baxter County Airport (BPK) was located on the northern edge of the precipitation area with Harrison (HRO) located in echoes similar to those over the accident site.

FAA Advisory Circular AC00-24B identifies echoes between 35 and 40 dBZ as having possible moderate to severe turbulence with lightning. Air traffic control weather displays would have identified the precipitation areas as moderate over the accident site with heavy echoes embedded in the area surrounding the accident site.

NWS Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts (TAFs) were issued for BPK for the surrounding time period. The forecast available for a preflight briefing was issued at 0623 and expected winds from 210 degrees at 9 knots, visibility better than 6 miles with showers in the vicinity of the airport, scattered clouds at 5,000 feet and a ceiling broken at 9,000 feet. There were temporary conditions between 1500 and 1900 CDT of visibility 4 miles in thunderstorms and light rain, ceiling overcast at 3,500 feet in cumulonimbus clouds.
The NWS Area Forecast (FA) for the route expected a cold front over the area with scattered clouds at 6,000 feet, broken ceiling at 10,000 feet with widely scattered rain showers and isolated thunderstorms over Arkansas, with tops between 38,000 to 40,000 feet during the period.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was located in a heavily wooded area 5 miles south of Mountain Home, Arkansas.

The accident site consisted of the airplane main wreckage and a debris field that covered approximately 3,850 feet along a line beginning at the main wreckage and extending north on about a 001 degree magnetic heading.

The airplane main wreckage consisted of the airplane’s cabin area and fuselage, the right wing, landing gear and engine. Also in the immediate vicinity of the main wreckage was the propeller hub with one of the three propeller blades. The other two propeller blades were also nearby. The main wreckage was lodged within several trees.

The airplane’s fuselage was oriented on a 262 degree heading. The cowling and cabin area, to include the instrument panel, glareshield and seats were broken open, charred and consumed by fire. The inboard portion of the right wing was charred and consumed by fire. The right aileron was bent forward and charred. An examination of the flight control system showed continuity from the control yokes to the control surfaces.

The engine was broken out, but intact and found resting on its left side. Most of the components were broken out. The propeller hub was broken at the flange mounting bolts. The hub and spinner were crushed and broken aft and inward. One propeller blade remained with the hub. It was curled forward and showed torsional bending, chordwise scratches and leading edge nicks and gouges. The other two propeller blades were located just forward of the engine. They were broken out from the hub. Both blades also showed torsional bending, chordwise scratches and leading edge nicks and gouges.

Airplane components extended to the north from the main wreckage. About 300 feet north of the main wreckage was the center section of the horizontal stabilizers and elevator. The section had been broken out with the most aft part of the fuselage. Both outboard sections of the horizontal stabilizers and elevators were bent downward and broken aft.

About 1,350 feet north of the main wreckage was the outboard portion of the right horizontal stabilizer. About 1,900 feet north of the main wreckage was the outboard portion of the left elevator.

About 2,300 feet north of the main wreckage and resting within tree branches was the vertical stabilizer. It was broken aft at the base. The rudder was broken out. About 2,350 feet north of the main wreckage was the top third of the rudder.

About 2,850 feet north of the main wreckage was the left wing. It was bent upward, twisted and broken aft at the root. The spars were broken upward and twisted aft. The left elevator was broken out. Aileron control cables showed unraveling and cup-cone breakages of the individual strands indicative of an overload failure.

At the farthest extent of the debris, 3,850 feet north of the main wreckage was the outboard half of the left aileron.

The airplane main wreckage and the separated parts were collected and retained for further examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Autopsies were performed on both pilots by the Arkansas State Associate Medical Examiner in Little rock, Arkansas, on September 9, 2010.

Results of toxicology testing of samples taken from the 32-year old pilot were negative for all tests conducted.

Results of toxicology testing of samples taken from the 62-year old pilot showed volatile concentrations of Ethanol in muscle tissue at the level of 21 mg/dl, mg/hg. The Ethanol reported was from postmortem formation and not from ingestion.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The airplane was examined at Clinton, Arkansas on September 9, 2010. The examination of the engine did not reveal any abnormalities that would have prevented normal operation and production of rated horsepower. The examination of the other airplane systems did not reveal any preimpact anomalies.



Emergency personnel work the scene of a plane crash south of Mountain Home in this Sept. 7, 2010, photograph. The National Transportation Safety Board recently issued a report regarding the crash in which two men died.






WATSONVILLE - Federal authorities reported this week that a Watsonville business owner and his son flew their small plane into a large storm before they crashed in the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas in 2010. 

 The report from the National Transportation Safety Board detailed the crash, which took the lives of United Flight Services owner Bob Ross and 32-year-old Michael Ross of Austin, Texas.

The plane appeared to come apart in the sky before it took a spinning nose dive to the ground.

"It was a really great loss," said Chris Kilgus, a friend of the Ross family who lives in Felton. "They obviously flew into a thunderstorm inadvertently," he said Friday.

About 9:30 a.m. Sept. 7, 2010, Bob and Michael Ross took off in their single-engine, 1982 Cessna T210N from Danville, Ill. to Georgetown, Texas, according to the report.

About 1:05 p.m. near Memphis, Tenn., an air traffic controller told them that a "very large area" of precipitation was about 30 miles ahead of them. The front was part of Tropical Storm Hermine, the report later stated.

Both men sat next to each other piloting the plane. They were directed to another radio channel and told that "heavy to extreme" precipitation was 15 miles ahead, according to the report.

One of the pilots replied "thank you." They turned the plane left, then turned it back to the right two minutes later, according to the report.

At 1:22 p.m., the controller broadcast that he lost their plane on his radar. The controller tried to contact them several times, but heard silence.

Witnesses on the ground said they heard the Cessna's engine "revving up and down" but couldn't see it through clouds. They then saw the plane shoot from the clouds and dive in a nose-down spiral.

One of the wings appeared to "fold," the report stated. The plane crashed in a heavily wooded area about 5 miles south of Mountain Home, Ark. The crash site was about 90 miles north of Little Rock near the Missouri border.

Debris was spread across 3,850 feet. The fuselage had caught fire and the two men died in the crash.

The NTSB's "factual report" was limited did not state its cause. A separate "probable cause" report is expected to be released this month, according to the NTSB.

Authorities mentioned that both pilots had certifications and that the plane had its annual inspection in November 2009.

Kilgus, Ross' friend, said small planes like the one that crashed typically do not have sophisticated weather tracking equipment.

Don French, then-general manager of Watsonville Municipal Airport, said after the crash that Bob Ross had been investing in the airport and building a hangar.

Ross' reputation in aviation circles drew people from all over, French said.

"I've known Bob for 20 years," said French. "He was a really good guy."

Ross and Alicia Márquez bought United Flight Services in 2002. It had been based at the Watsonville airport since 1966, according to a statement released at the time of the sale.

When the September 2010 crash was reported, it was the second small plane linked to the business at Watsonville airport to crash in less than a month.

On Aug. 13, 2010 a Piper Cherokee Arrow from the flight-training and plane-rental company crashed in a remote area of the Sierra Nevada mountains, killing a Santa Cruz flight instructor and a college student from Watsonville.

Story and photos:   http://www.mercurynews.com

Robinson R22, N208WM: Accident occurred August 17, 2012 in Spanish Fork, Utah

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA362 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 17, 2012 in Spanish Fork, UT
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R22 BETA, registration: N208WM
Injuries: 1 Serious,1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 17, 2012, at 1642 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R22, N208WM, sustained substantial damage subsequent to a hard landing and rollover at the Spanish Fork - Springville Municipal Airport, Spanish Fork, Utah. The certified flight instructor (CFI) sustained serious injuries and the student pilot receiving instruction sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to Zbura Helicopters LLC and operated by Utah Helicopters as an instructional flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that departed Spanish Fork about 45 minutes prior the accident.

The certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot were practicing autorotations. The student pilot reported that they had completed multiple straight-in autorotations and then initiated one from a 180-degree turn. During the turning maneuver, the main rotor RPM decayed and the helicopter’s descent rate increased; the helicopter subsequently touched down hard and rolled over.

'Attention seeker': British Airways steward jailed for hoax bomb threat he left in plane's toilet so he could 'save the day' and be promoted

A British Airways steward who wrote a bomb threat on a jet’s toilet door mid-flight so he could 'save the day' as a hero and get a promotion was jailed for six months today. 

'Attention seeker' Mathew Davis, 22, was a member of the crew on the Boeing 777 flight from London to Tokyo with 150 passengers on board when he posted the message claiming there was a live bomb on the plane that was going to explode mid-air.

The note read: 'The bomb on board will explode at 16.00GMT unless our demands are met' and he showed it to terrified stewardess Sarah Jane Spencer when the plane was 35,000 feet over the Middle East.

She spent the rest of the flight checking her watch believing her time had come but in reality it was a hoax by Davis so that he could tell the captain and get a promotion.

Judge Anna Guggenheim QC, who noted it was 'highly dangerous behaviour', said: 'This is an extremely serious example of a bomb hoax.

'Several hundred people aboard a plane at high altitude is a common thing in our world but they are extremely vulnerable.

'You wanted to create a crisis in order to be seen to equip yourself well, to be seen well by your employers, to rise in the estimation of your employers, putting it shortly to be a hero.

'Had you been believed the extent of the chaos and disruption and fear would have been very great indeed.'

Davis 'found' the message and told the captain and Ms Spencer but luckily the 'highly experienced' pilot realised it was a hoax almost immediately.

Read more and photos:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk 

Dallas County to continue aerial spraying

 
A Beechcraft airplane sprays insecticide DUET over Forest Rd in Garland,Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, to curb the spread of West Nile virus. The planes took off from Dallas Executive Airport
 Photo: Tom Fox, The Dallas Morning News / AP

DALLAS (AP) — Unfazed Dallas County residents took to recreation areas and running trails one day after airplanes dropped gallons of pesticide from the skies to fight the nation's worst West Nile virus outbreak. 

 After a round of spraying was cut short by rain Thursday, four more planes were scheduled to cruise over the rest of the county Friday night.

The virus spread by mosquitoes has left 10 dead and more than 200 sick in Dallas County, which is home to 2.5 million people and the city of Dallas. Officials say it will be a record year for West Nile virus, and about half of the United States' cases are in Texas.

Although commonplace in other major cities, the efforts have provoked a debate in the Dallas area between health officials trying to quell the disease risk and people concerned about insecticidal mist drifting down from above.

The Environmental Protection Agency has said that the insecticide, Duet, poses no significant threat to humans or animals, though it is toxic to fish and other types of aquatic life.

The first round of aerial spraying covered 52,000 acres in north and east Dallas County on Thursday evening before storms grounded the planes, said state health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams. Health officials also set traps Friday to determine the spraying's effectiveness, and another aerial mission is scheduled for Monday night to catch mosquitoes hatched over the weekend.

In east Dallas on Friday morning, dozens of people ran, walked and biked around White Rock Lake, apparently unconcerned with the pesticide sprayed hours earlier.

Darren Willis, 37, of Garland, caught several fish at the lake, which had been doused with insecticide Duet just hours earlier. He said he stayed indoors during the spraying, but wasn't concerned about lingering chemicals.

Other residents weren't as confident. Some holed up inside their houses to minimize contact with the pesticide, which they fear could harm their pets, children and personal health.

Adrian Serrano, 28, isn't sold on the EPA's seal of approval. He didn't plan on leaving his house Friday, and shut off his air conditioner. His concerns are mostly for his family — two small children and a pregnant wife.

"I'm worried about them breathing it, and it could damage them," Serrano said in a phone interview from his home. "I just don't want them to get exposed to it.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins assured residents that a check of area hospitals Friday morning revealed no reports of negative reaction to the sprayed pesticides.

"We didn't expect and we don't expect to hear any of those reports," Jenkins said at a news conference. "Why would our citizens be any different than every other American who's experienced this?

Jenkins said that though he has listened to aerial spraying opponents, he felt it was the right decision and would prevent more deaths.


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com

Time Lapse video of a Global Express 8C Inspection



http://flyteam.jp/photo/wilmington-trust/Bombardier-BD-700-1A10-Global-Express/374264/L

N949GP Global Express 9049 Operated by Aviation Concepts Inc. based at Subic Bay, Philippines

http://www.flyaci.com/


http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4018/4479971523_508bdecbed_o.jpg  aircraft was new in 1999

Reports awaited in runway incursion probe

The aviation regulator is awaiting the Mumbai air traffic control (ATC) office's report on a minor runway incursion that took place at Mumbai airport on August 9 to begin its probe. A runway incursion is a situation when an aircraft, airfield vehicle or an airport staffer enters the runway without prior permission from the ATC. 

On August 9, a Jet Airways aircraft mistakenly entered the airport's main runway while an Etihad Airways flight was scheduled to land on the same runway.

The aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) alerted the ATC official. The official then asked the arriving aircraft to make a go-around – an aborted landing, where the pilot takes-off mid-air.

"The arriving aircraft was seven nautical miles away from the one on the runway. However, we want to probe the miscommunication between the Jet pilot and the ATC official," said RK Khanna, deputy director, DGCA, western region.

The trainee controller on duty and the AME were suspended pending inquiry.

http://www.hindustantimes.com

Gender Balanced Regional Airport Board Issue

 

 August 10, 2012 by CRIWPUTV 

The State's gender balance law became an issue again at this week's Mahaska County Board of Supervisors Meeting. The supervisors talked about replacing Joe Warrick -- who was appointed in May to the Regional Airport Board -- with former candidate Margaret Ratcliff. This change would satisfy Iowa's Gender Balance Law making the board balanced with three males and three females.
 

Beechcraft A36TC Bonanza 36, N678DR: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, New York

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of air traffic control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot contacted ATC about 0720 and requested clearance to taxi for departure. The controller initially advised the pilot to taxi to runway 1 via taxiway D and A. The pilot subsequently advised the controller that he could accept an intersection departure from runway 1 at D, and was subsequently issued that clearance. At 0722, the pilot requested to depart from runway 1 at D, but was advised that there would be a 3 minute delay due to wake turbulence from a previously departed Boeing 737. The pilot then requested to “waive” the delay, and was issued a takeoff clearance about 1 minute later. In addition to a warning of wake turbulence, the pilot was issued a departure heading of 040 degrees.

The airplane departed from runway 1 at 0724, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised ATC, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the pilot, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 68, held an airline transport pilot certificate with numerous ratings, including airplane single engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with numerous ratings including airplane single engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012 with the limitation, “must have available glasses for near vision.” A review of the pilot’s flight logs showed that he had accumulated 11,008 total hours of flight experience, 1,110 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model. During the 90 days preceding the accident, the pilot had accumulated 143 hours of flight experience, 34 hours of which were in the accident airplane.

According to the pilot’s son, the pilot was a friend of the accident airplane’s owners, and was allowed to utilize the airplane anytime he needed. He further described that the pilot flew very often, and had previously flown many people in the accident airplane. While the passenger did hold a pilot certificate, he had not flown a great deal in the recent past. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot and passenger to attend a business meeting in Plattsburg, New York.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to airworthiness records maintained by the FAA, the airplane was manufactured in 1981 and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520-UB turbo-supercharged, fuel injected engine. Review of maintenance records showed that a factory rebuilt engine was installed on the airplane in May 1996, at an aircraft total time of 1,591 flight hours. The airplane’s most recent annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2011 at 3,190 total aircraft hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated 3,364 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated 1,773 total flight hours since its installation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The ALB airport was comprised of two intersecting runways oriented in a 1/19 and 10/28 configuration, at an elevation of 285 feet. Runway 1 was 8,500 feet long by 150 feet wide. Taxiway A ran parallel to runway 1 and was located to the west of the runway. Taxiway D intersected runway 1 about 3,250 feet beyond the runway approach threshold. From that intersection, about 5,250 feet of runway was available for a departure.

The airplane was most recently serviced with 85 gallons of 100LL fuel by a fixed base operator at ALB on the day preceding the accident. Following the accident, a fuel quality assurance review was conducted by the fixed based operator, and no deficiencies were noted during the inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0753 weather observation at ALB included calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility with patches of fog present to the west and southwest, few clouds at 100 feet, scattered clouds at 8,000 feet, a broken ceiling at 13,000 feet, and a broken ceiling at 25,000 feet. The temperature was 19 degrees Celsius (C), the dew point was 18 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.90 inches of mercury.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The airplane was not equipped with any flight data recording devices, nor was it required to be; however, a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) receiver was recovered from the wreckage, and found to contain data pertaining to the accident flight. The initial data point was recorded at 0721, as the airplane taxied toward runway 1 at ALB via taxiway D. The airplane subsequently taxied onto runway 1 at 0723, at the point where the runway intersected taxiway D.

The airplane accelerated down the runway and began climbing at 0724:26, and 8 seconds later had climbed to a GPS-derived altitude of 341 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 88 knots. At that point, the airplane began a right turn about 1,600 feet prior to reaching the runway departure end. The airplane continued to climb while on an approximate 40-degree magnetic track. At 0725:50, the airplane reached a maximum altitude of 1,115 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 111 knots, about 2 nautical miles northeast of the runway 1 departure end.

Over the next 30 seconds, the airplane turned about 90 degrees left as it descended and slowed. By 0726:24, the airplane had established a heading of 305 degrees, descended to 627 feet, and slowed to a GPS groundspeed of 85 knots. About 25 seconds later, the airplane’s final position was recorded at an altitude of 302 feet and a GPS groundspeed of 76 knots.

A plot of the airplane’s position for the final moments of the flight showed that an open field about 1,000 feet long, and aligned with the airplane’s final approach path, was located about 1,000 feet west of its final GPS-recorded position. Additionally, a two-lane asphalt road paralleled the airplane’s final approach path; however utility wires paralleled and crossed the road at numerous points in the vicinity of the accident site.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB, at an elevation of 260 feet. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by several damaged tree limbs, at a height of about 30 feet, and was located about 45 feet west of the airplane’s final GPS-recorded position. The wreckage path about was about 150 feet long, and oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic. A ground scar, along with the outboard portion of the right wing and aileron, were located about 95 feet beyond the IIP, along the wreckage path. The main portion of the wreckage consisted of the fuselage and inboard portions of both wings, and was located about 45 feet from the ground scar. The fuselage remained upright, and was oriented on a 280-degree magnetic heading. The outboard portion of the left wing was located about 10 feet beyond the main wreckage.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage by all four of its attachment bolts. The outboard portion of the wing separated in the vicinity of the landing gear, and the left main landing gear remained stowed in its well. The right wing also remained attached to the fuselage by its attachment bolts, with the outboard portion separating near the outer portion of the flap. The right main landing gear remained stowed within its well. The landing gear actuator was in the retracted position.

Control continuity was confirmed from the control column to the elevator and left aileron, and through a fracture of the right aileron bellcrank to the right aileron, and rudder control continuity was confirmed from both rudder pedals to the rudder. Measurement of the left and right elevator trim tab actuators revealed extensions corresponding to a 10-degree tab-down position (nose up trim). Measurement of both flap actuator rods corresponded to a flaps retracted position.

The fuel selector was found in the left tank position. Examination of the fuel system revealed that it remained continuous from the firewall, through the selector valve, to both fuel tanks, with no breaches or obstructions noted. Residual fuel was observed in both main and both auxiliary wingtip fuel tanks. The color and odor of the fuel appeared consistent with 100LL aviation fuel, and all samples taken were absent of water or debris. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was found in the HIGH position, though the structure surrounding the switch was deformed consistent with impact.

The pilot and copilot seats remained attached to the seat rails with no deformation noted. The mounting points and buckles for both the pilot and copilot restraints appeared intact and undamaged, and first responders reported that the pilot and passenger were wearing both lap and shoulder restraints upon arriving at the accident scene.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.

The engine was separated from the airframe and shipped to the manufacturer for a test run. The impact-related damage was generally concentrated near the aft portion of the engine. The induction system riser to the number one cylinder, the induction system “Y” pipe, and oil cooler, along with several fuel system fittings, were replaced to facilitate the test run. During preparation for the test run, a red clay/dirt-like substance was found at an impact-damaged port of the fuel metering unit. The fuel manifold valve screen, located downstream of the fuel metering unit within the fuel system, was examined and found to be absent of debris or contamination.

The engine was subsequently placed in a test cell and started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling. The engine rpm was advanced in steps to 1,200, 1,600, and 2,450 rpm for a period of 5 minutes per step to allow for warm-up. The throttle was then advanced to full power for 5 minutes before the throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full power 6 times. The engine performed normally throughout each of the tests without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption of power; however, testing of the magnetos showed that the right magneto was inoperative.

Following the test run, the right magneto was removed from the engine and examined. The points of the magneto exhibited corrosion. The corrosion was subsequently cleaned from the points, and the magneto was then run on a test stand. The magneto operated normally, and further disassembly revealed no anomalies.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot sustained serious injuries during the accident and subsequently succumbed to those injuries on August 28, 2013. An autopsy and toxicological testing were not performed.

ADDITONAL INFORMATION

The airframe manufacturer published an emergency procedure detailing the actions pilots should take following a loss of engine power immediately after lift-off. After eliminating the possibility of fuel exhaustion, the procedure advised the pilot:

“2. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – LOW If a Failed Engine-Driven Fuel Pump is Suspected (Indicated by zero fuel flow):

3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – HI”

A warning was noted below that stated:

“The only reason for the high (HI) boost position is to supply fuel for priming prior to starting and to supply fuel to the engine if the engine-driven fuel pump fails. DO NOT USE THIS POSITION FOR ANY OTHER REASON. If high (HI) boost is selected when the engine-driven pump is operating, the engine will run rich and may quit depending on throttle setting, temperature and altitude.”

The checklist advised that if an ignition problem was suspected, the pilot should verify that the magnetos were selected to the “BOTH” position.

The first step of the procedure for a rough running engine immediately after lift-off stated, “Ensure auxiliary fuel pump is not on HI.”

 

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of preliminary air traffic control information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane departed from runway 01 at ALB, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised air traffic control, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the flight, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

According to FAA records, the left seat pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012, at which time he reported 10,691 total hours of flight experience. The pilot seated in the right seat held a commercial pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 20, 2011.

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB. The initial impact point was identified by several damaged tree limbs, and a wreckage path about 150 feet in length, oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic, extended through the impact area. Fragments of the airplane, including portions of right wing, right wing tip fuel tank, and ailerons were located approximately 40 feet prior to where the fuselage came to rest between two pine trees. The left wing was located approximately 20 feet beyond the fuselage along the wreckage path. The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.
 
TROY - Memorial services are now set for the businessman, killed in this week's plane crash in Clifton Park. 

Calling hours will be from 3 to 8 p.m. at McLoughlin & Mason Funeral Home at the corner of 109th Street and Third Avenue in Lansingburgh.The Mass of Christian burial will begin at 10:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart and St. William Catholic Community located at 310 Spring St. in Troy.
 
Uccellini's friend and colleague, Jim Quinn, remains in critical condition.

Quinn was piloting the plane when it crashed on Wednesday.

Investigators are moving the wreckage to a hangar in Connecticut today for further examination.

Story and video:   http://wnyt.com 


For additional information and online guest book information, please visit www.mcloughlinmason.com.


http://registry.faa.gov/N678DR

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N678DR

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 678DR        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1210

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLIFTON PARK   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 
  WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CLIFTON PARK, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/16/2012 

F-16 crash: Faulty guidance to maintainers cited - Air Force releases findings on F-16 mishap near Kunsan

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii -- Headquarters Pacific Air Forces today released the results of its investigation into an F-16CM aircraft mishap which occurred March 21, 2012, northeast of Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea.  The mishap aircraft was assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron, Osan AB, ROK.

Gen. Gary North, then the Pacific Air Forces commander, directed an investigation into the incident which resulted in the destruction of the aircraft totaling more than $21.5 million.

The accident investigation board found evidence the cause of the mishap was engine failure and subsequent engine stall.

The pilot performed the appropriate emergency checklist procedures in an attempt to recover the engine, but it did not respond and continued operating in a degraded state until impact. After safely ejecting, the pilot was transported to Kunsan Air Base medical clinic by the 6th Search and Rescue Group, Republic of Korea Air Force. The clinic examination revealed the pilot sustained no injuries.
Lt. Col. William Jones served as the Accident Investigation Board president. Colonel Jones is the 8th Operations Group deputy commander, Kunsan Air Base. Colonel Jones is a command pilot with more than 1,900 flight hours, to include the T-38 Talon and the F-16.

For a copy of the Accident Investigation Board report, visit: http://www.pacaf.af.mil/library/publicreports/index.asp.

Cessna 152, N152BA: Accident occurred August 17, 2012 in Rockford, Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N152BA

NTSB Identification: CEN12CA599
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 17, 2012 in Rockford, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N152BA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While on a visual approach to the runway during the instructional flight, the engine lost partial power. The flight instructor reported that the engine was operating normally and then the engine rpm abruptly decreased from 2,200 to about 1,300. The carburetor heat was in the OFF position for the approach. The flight instructor's efforts to regain engine power were unsuccessful. Unable to make a landing at the airport, the instructor executed a forced landing to a field. The airplane touched down short of the airport, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the vertical stabilizer and rudder were bent; no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation were identified. The engine was test run at various power settings with no anomalies noted. Although a carburetor icing probability chart revealed that the ambient temperature and dew point at the time of the accident favored serious carburetor icing at glide power, the pilot reported that the engine was not at glide power when the power loss occurred. Accordingly, the investigation was not able to identify the reason for the power loss.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the engine revealed no anomalies.

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 152BA        Make/Model: C152      Description: 152, A152, Aerobat
  Date: 08/17/2012     Time: 2050

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: ROCKFORD   State: IL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORT OF THE AIRPORT, NEAR ROCKFORD, IL

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Training      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: WEST CHICAGO, IL  (GL03)              Entry date: 08/20/2012 


WREX.com – Rockford’s News Leader

 

ROCKFORD (WREX) - A small, single engine plane crashed in a soy bean field just south of 1100 Samuelson Road on Friday. 

The plane experience engine problems and during the emergency landing, the aircraft flipped on its roof. The pilot and single passenger are okay. The plane is registered to Poplar Grove Airmotive, based at the Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Illinois.

As of 4:50 p.m.Rockford Police are waiting on the FAA decision to remove the plane.


ROCKFORD —   There were no injuries after a single-engine airplane crashed today near the Chicago Rockford International Airport.

Rockford police said the pilot had engine problems and landed the plan in a bean field near the 1100 block of Samuelson Road. The aircraft flipped upside down during the emergency landing, but both the pilot and passenger escaped without injury.

Officers are awaiting a Federal Aviation Administration decision to remove the plan from the field.

ROCKFORD (WIFR) -- A small plane has crashed near the Rockford Airport in the 1300 Block of Samuelson. At this time, information is limited and authorities have not released the type of plane involved.

Police at the scene say two passengers were inside and have reported no severe injuries. It has been reported that the engine stalled and the plane flipped once.

New Hampshire firefighters help rescue skydiver stuck in Maine tree

Rescue in Lebanon 
The Lebanon Rescue Department and Lebanon Fire Department work to get a skydiver out of a tree Thursday evening. (Courtesy photo)


 
Parachute in tree 
 The skydiver was around 50-60 feet in the tree. 
(Courtesy photo)

 
The skydiver, a man from Massachusetts, was stuck 50 to 60 feet in the air.
 (Lebanon Rescue Department) 


LEBANON – The Lebanon Rescue Department and Lebanon Fire Department were dispatched to Upper Guinea Road near Leone Way in West Lebanon on Thursday evening for the report of a skydiver who was stuck in a tree. The call came in at 5:46 p.m., according to a department press release. 

"When emergency crews arrived on scene shortly after the call was received, they located the skydiver from Skydive New England about 50-60 feet up a large tree," Assistant Chief Jason Cole said. "He reported no injuries, he was just a little shook up from the incident. We had requested a ladder truck from Milton, N.H. when the call came in, but due to the skydiver being about 200 feet off the roadway, it could not access them. I then requested a rescue truck from Rochester, N.H. Fire Department to respond with their high angle rescue equipment. Two Milton fire officers and a Rochester firefighter who have training in technical rescue scenes assisted with coming up with a plan on getting the skydiver out of the tree. Additionally, SkyDive New England also had a safety person on scene that helps with these type of rescues so it truly was a team effort."

A 24-foot ladder was placed against the tree and Milton Fire Chief Nick Marique climbed up and started cutting tree limbs so that the safety person from SkyDive New England could then climb the tree with his harness and ropes to rescue the skydiver, Cole said.

At about 7:30, the rescue climber reached the skydiver. Just before 8, the skydiver and rescue climber were both back down on the ground, with no injuries.

"In the 25 years I have been a volunteer in Lebanon, we have been called to maybe a dozen incidents where a skydiver was in a tree," Cole said. "With over 25,000 jumps annually done at SkyDive New England, that is a pretty amazing record. They go over a lot of safety training with each skydiver and they are taught what to do properly if they get in a situation like the male did today and he had to make a landing outside the landing zone. That safety training led to him not being injured. After being cut down, he was already planning his next skydive for tomorrow."

The skydivers jumped at about 13,500 feet today. The skydiver was a man in his 20s from Massachusetts. He is still a student and this was his approximately 10th jump. He was not in a tandem jump and was alone at the time of the accident.


Story and photos:   http://www.keepmecurrent.com

Chicago Midway International (KMDW), Illinois: Airport Worker Charged With Stealing Copper Wire From Runway

 
David Coates was charged with one count of theft and faces up to five years in prison if found guilty, after video surveillance showed him stealing copper wire from an airport runway.

 
Cook County State's Attorney's Office: Press Releases 
Cook County State's Attorney
Communications Department
Chicago, IL 60602

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

August 16, 2012

City Employee Charged In Copper Wire Thefts From Midway Airport

 

Prosecutors have filed charges against a City of Chicago employee for stealing 500 feet of copper wire from Midway Airport, according to the Office of Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez.

David Coates, 57, of Chicago was charged with one count of theft and is facing up to 5 years in prison if convicted.

According to prosecutors, Coates worked for the Chicago Department of Aviation at Midway Airport where he pumped gas. On Tuesday, Coates was captured on video leaving his work site in his truck to cut pieces from a copper runway wire.

Chicago Police investigated the thefts and found that he had taken approximately 500 feet of wire since August 12. Investigators also found Coates had taken the wire, valued at nearly $700, and sold it at a scrap yard.  Investigators also recovered a pair of wire cutters from the defendant when they confronted him about the thefts.

Coates was charged and appeared in court this morning where Judge Edward Harmening set his bond at $25,000. The case was continued to August 22 for a preliminary hearing.

The public is reminded that charging documents contain allegations that are not evidence of guilt. The defendant is entitled to a fair trial at which the state has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

http://www.statesattorney.org


CHICAGO (AP) - A worker at Chicago’s Midway Airport has been charged with stealing copper runway wire. 

 The Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office says David Coates was charged with one count of theft and faces up to five years in prison if found guilty.

Coates worked for the Chicago Department of Aviation and pumped gas at Midway.

Prosecutors say Coates was seen on video Tuesday leaving his work station in his truck to cut pieces from a copper runway wire.

Chicago police found he had taken about 500 feet of wire worth about $700 since Sunday. Prosecutors say he sold it at a scrap yard.

A judge on Thursday set his bond at $25,000. It wasn’t immediately clear if Coates had an attorney. There was no public phone listing for Coates. 


Story and photo:  http://stlouis.cbslocal.com

Flight Instructor in Sweden

 

August 8, 2012 by bealeebjork 

Flight Instructor - Bea-Lee
Steady Cam - Magdalena
Ground Crew - Mikael and Julian

 

Beechcraft A36TC Bonanza 36, N678DR; Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, New York

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of preliminary air traffic control information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane departed from runway 01 at ALB, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised air traffic control, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the flight, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

According to FAA records, the left seat pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012, at which time he reported 10,691 total hours of flight experience. The pilot seated in the right seat held a commercial pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 20, 2011.

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB. The initial impact point was identified by several damaged tree limbs, and a wreckage path about 150 feet in length, oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic, extended through the impact area. Fragments of the airplane, including portions of right wing, right wing tip fuel tank, and ailerons were located approximately 40 feet prior to where the fuselage came to rest between two pine trees. The left wing was located approximately 20 feet beyond the fuselage along the wreckage path. The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.



 
Walter Uccellini

Funeral arrangements have been set for Walter Uccellini, the founder of The United Group of Companies in Troy, New York, who died in a plane crash August 15.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be Tuesday, August 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Sacred Heart and St. William Catholic Community at 310 Spring Ave. in Troy.

Calling hours are Monday, August 20, from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. at McLoughlin & Mason Funeral Home, on the corner of 109th Street and Third Avenue in Lansingburgh.

For more information and to sign an online guest book, click here.

Walter Uccellini, 67, was a passenger in a single-engine plane that crashed in Clifton Park shortly after taking off from Albany International Airport.

The six-seat plane was piloted by James Quinn, vice chairman of The United Group of Companies.

James Quinn, 68, was severely injured and taken to Albany Medical Center. He was listed in critical condition today, according to a spokesman.

They were headed to a business meeting in Plattsburgh.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the crash.

A story about how The United Group is coping with the death of its leader is here.
 
IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 678DR        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1210

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLIFTON PARK   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 
  WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CLIFTON PARK, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/16/2012