Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Beech A36 Bonanza, N4198S: Accident occurred June 11, 2018 at Arcadia Municipal Airport (X06), DeSoto County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa

Flat Air Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N4198S

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA344
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 11, 2018 in Arcadia, FL
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N4198S

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft went off the runway.

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 20:05:00Z
Regis#: N4198S
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ARCADIA
State: FLORIDA

Taylorcraft BC12-D, N43443: Accident occurred June 10, 2018 at Dona Ana County International Jetport Airport (KDNA), Santa Teresa, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N43443

Location: Santa Teresa, NM
Accident Number: CEN18LA222
Date & Time: 06/10/2018, 1100 MDT
Registration: N43443
Aircraft: TAYLORCRAFT BC12 D
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 10, 2018, about 1100 mountain daylight time, a Taylorcraft BC-12D, N43443, experienced a runway excursion after landing at Dona Ana County International Jetport Airport (DNA), Santa Teresa, New Mexico. The airplane came to rest inverted and sustained substantial damage. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was privately registered and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: TAYLORCRAFT
Registration: N43443
Model/Series: BC12 D D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Piper PA-24-250, N6839P: Incident occurred June 11, 2018 in Brownfield, Terry County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock

Aircraft landed on a highway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6839P

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 19:42:00Z
Regis#: N6839P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BROWNFIELD
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N363CK: Accident occurred June 09, 2018 at Hillsboro Municipal Airport (KINJ), Hill County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aviator Air LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N363CK

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA340
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 09, 2018 in Hillsboro, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N363CK


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft bounced several times on landing, collapsed nose gear and struck prop.

Date: 09-JUN-18
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N363CK
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HILLSBORO
State: TEXAS

Beech A24R, N9788L: Accident / Incident occurred June 11, 2018 in Houston, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston

Nose gear collapsed on landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9788L

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N9788L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A24R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N9788L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE24
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage:  SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Trendak Tercel, N640BE: Accident occurred June 11, 2018 in Cokeville, Lincoln County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N640BE

Location: Cokeville, WY
Accident Number: CEN18LA219
Date & Time: 06/11/2018, 0715 MDT
Registration: N640BE
Aircraft: ASTON KINSEY TERCEL
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 11, 2018, at 0715 mountain daylight time, a Aston Kinsey Tercel gyrocopter, N640BE, impacted terrain during landing at a private airstrip near Cokeville, Wyoming. The sport pilot and passenger were not injured, and the gyrocopter sustained substantial damage. The gyrocopter was registered and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight departed the private airstrip at 0700.

According to the pilot, while performing maneuvers south of the private airstrip, he felt no response when he applied left cyclic, and the gyrocopter "was stuck in a moderate right turn." The pilot initiated an emergency descent back to the private airstrip. During the approach, the pilot was unable to regain control of the gyrocopter, and it impacted terrain while sliding to the right. The gyrocopter rolled over to the right and came to rest on its right side.

The gyrocopter was recovered to the pilot's residence for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ASTON KINSEY
Registration: N640BE
Model/Series: TERCEL NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AFO, 6220 ft msl
Observation Time: 0715 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 40 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cokeville, WY (PVT)
Destination: Cokeville, WY (PVT) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.082778, -110.955278 (est) 

Federal Aviation Administration Safety Rules for Commercial Drones Are Overly Strict, Report Says: Report concludes agency should peg drone safety to hazards such as those posed by small private-plane crashes or pedestrian-vehicle accidents



The Wall Street Journal 
By Andy Pasztor
June 11, 2018 11:00 a.m. ET

The commercial drone industry is being stifled by unnecessarily stringent federal safety rules enforced by regulators who frequently pay only lip service to easing restrictions or streamlining decision-making, according to a report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The unusually strongly worded report released Monday urges “top-to-bottom” changes in how the Federal Aviation Administration assesses and manages risks from drones.

The report, which was requested by Congress, also criticizes the agency for extending its traditional focus on “near-zero tolerance for risk” involving airliners and applying it to cover small drones flying at low altitudes away from airports. Instead, the report concludes, the agency should peg drone safety to more-comparable hazards confronting people on the ground such as those posed by small private-plane crashes or pedestrian-vehicle accidents.

Such minimal but persistent levels of risk already are accepted by the public,according to the report. A fundamental issue is “what are we going to compare [drone] safety to?” said consultant George Ligler, who served as chairman of the committee that drafted the document.

“We do not ground airplanes because birds fly in the airspace, although we know birds can and do bring down aircraft,” the report said.

The FAA, which received a copy of the report and a verbal briefing late last month, on Sunday said it “is working to safely accelerate [drone] integration on multiple fronts,” including establishing pilot programs and drafting proposed rules. The report “confirmed that the FAA executive team has a consistent approach to risk management,” according to the agency’s statement.

The FAA also called the report “an endorsement of our efforts and encouragement to accelerate” changes in its procedures.

But some types of comparative-risk analyses endorsed by the study appear to pose departures from previous FAA pledges that widespread drone operations won’t be permitted if they threaten to erode the safety standards affecting U.S. airspace.

Written by a 14-member panel of academics, researchers and aviation experts—with industry representatives in the minority—the report amounts to one of the most pointed criticisms yet of institutional and cultural roadblocks facing the burgeoning drone industry inside the FAA.

FAA leaders have talked about cutting through bureaucracy, issuing exemptions and embracing new procedures to quickly authorize a wide range of drone applications, including emergency medical deliveries and everyday package shipments to consumers.

During a drone conference in Baltimore three months ago, agency officials encouraged would-be operators to file paperwork, promising speedy and hopefully favorable decisions with the catchphrase: “The FAA is open for business.” Senior White House and Transportation Department officials have chimed in to demand accelerated FAA approvals.

But “fear of making a mistake” often prompts midlevel FAA managers to balk because they believe “allowing new risk could endanger their careers even when that risk is so minimal,” the report said.

In an interview over the weekend, Mr. Ligler said the committee’s research indicated the FAA’s high-level “philosophy isn’t reflected in practice.”

The criticism comes as lawmakers, startups, Silicon Valley stalwarts and large aerospace companies ratchet up pressure on the FAA to expand unmanned aircraft uses. According to some government and industry estimates, commercial operations in domestic airspace could quadruple to include more than 450,000 unmanned aerial vehicles by 2022.

The list of companies pushing for regulatory relief resembles a who’s-who of the aviation industry, including Boeing Co. , Airbus SE and General Electric Co. Others seeking stepped-up action include Amazon.com Inc., Intel Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google unit.

In the near term, the report is bound to provide ammunition for drone proponents as debate revs up on Capitol Hill. In April, the House passed a five-year FAA reauthorization bill promoting the start of limited package-delivery flights beyond the sight of ground operators. As the Senate considers its own version of the legislation, the industry is poised to weigh in on proposals for traffic-control systems for drones.

By next summer, the report recommends the FAA publish guidelines for implementing a predictable risk-based process to approve drone applications. But even if the FAA wholeheartedly implements revised risk-management techniques and revamps many regulatory procedures, Mr. Ligler said it would take “three to five years to move to where we think we ought to be” in terms of oversight.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Champion 7ECA Citabria, N5169X: Incident occurred June 10, 2018 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage

Ground loop.

Flight Safety Alaska Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5169X

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 22:47:00Z
Regis#: N5169X
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 7ECA
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-18 Super Cub, N1203A, registered to the previous owner and operated by the pilot : Fatal accident occurred June 09, 2018 in Sitka, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1203A

Location: Sitka, AK
Accident Number: ANC18FA044
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 2000 AKD
Registration: N1203A
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On June 9, 2018, about 2000 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N1203A, was substantially damaged after impacting a river about 8 miles north-northeast of Sitka, Alaska. The commercial pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to the previous owner and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules other work use flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was filed and activated. The local flight departed the Alaska Seaplane Base (A29) in Sitka, Alaska, about 1934.

The pilot was the co-owner of a lodge in Sitka, and according to a friend of the passenger who was travelling with him and staying at the lodge, the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to take the passenger on a short sightseeing flight near Katlian Bay to view mountain goats. The pilot filed a flight plan with the Juneau Flight Service Station (FSS) for a 56-minute flight that was due to return to A29 at 2030. When the airplane was deemed overdue, an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued by Juneau FSS at 2237 and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Sector Juneau coordinated a search and rescue operation with the support of the Alaska State Troopers and the Civil Air Patrol. No emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal was received.

According to USCG Sector Juneau records, a USCG MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter located the airplane on June 10 at 2210 about .2-mile up river from Katlian Bay on an arm of the Katlian River and a rescue swimmer observed that the pilot was fatally injured. A USCG helicopter located the fatally injured passenger downriver from the airplane on June 11 at 1009.

The airplane came to rest nose down in a small river surrounded by heavy brush and trees within a valley surrounded by steep mountainous terrain with the fuselage and wings sustaining substantial damage.

The wreckage has been recovered and a detailed examination is pending. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine and an ACK E-01 121.5 MHz ELT.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N1203A
Model/Series: PA 18
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASI, 67 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 AKD
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: SITKA, AK (A29)
Destination: SITKA, AK (A29)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 57.171667, -135.276667 (est)


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Jim Ronge
February 10, 1952- June 9, 2018

A one of a kind husband, father and friend… Jim’s sudden death has shocked so many who loved him. Last week, he was in Sitka, Alaska with good friend Randy Smith for a fishing trip. On his last day of the trip, he seized the opportunity to go sightseeing. Jim died when the small plane he was traveling in crashed into the Katlian River. He is survived by his beloved wife of 42 years, Elaine, and two children Becky (Dan)and Joey. Jim also leaves his three cherished grandsons, Dylan, Hudson and Wyatt. Jim was born and raised in Lancaster, NY by Charles and Katherine Ronge. His older brother Charles (Cheryl) has passed away and Jim’s nephew, Bryan resides in Florida. Jim leaves his sister Betty Wick and her husband Mark, and their children Michelle and Steven, all now living in Colorado. Jim moved from the Buffalo, NY area in his 20s and resided in Southern California with Elaine. Through one of their many adventurous road trips, they discovered the Central Valley and decided to begin their family, residing in Turlock since 1981. Most of Jim’s career was spent as a member of the Cement Masons Union; he worked for 20 years on construction sites across the Valley. He then later worked in the Maintenance Department at the Stanislaus Fairgrounds in Turlock, retiring in November 2013. Family always came first for Jim. He prided himself on hosting family and friends in his home and on camping trips. There were countless road trips across the country to visit family in Buffalo, NY. Jim was fiercely loyal and could be counted on whenever a friend needed a hand. Working on cars was a passion and he was a familiar face at Turlock swap meets where he would haggle over antique car parts and make deals on his recent renovations. All will miss the laughter pouring out from his garage, where he was often found tinkering on one of his many projects. Family will be hosting a Celebration of Life on Saturday, August 4th from 3 – 6 PM at the fairgrounds in Turlock to share stories and support all the people who were touched by Jim.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.turlockjournal.com

The loss of Stonie “Mac” Huffman in a weekend float plane crash will be hard news for many Sitkans to take — especially those who remember his near-miraculous escape from death six years ago when his fishing boat capsized offshore.

Huffman was fishing off of Cape Edgecumbe in his 28-foot drop-bow troller, the Kaitlin Rae, on September 7, 2012, when the boat was swamped in heavy seas.


Neither Huffman or his deckhand, 19-year old Ryan Harris had time to radio a mayday call before the boat went under. Huffman managed to pull on a survival suit, and Harris got into an empty blue fish tote.


When the boat was reported overdue early the next morning the Coast Guard launched an intensive air search. Huffman drifted about 10 miles in his survival suit and went ashore — unharmed — at Pt. Amelia on the outer coast of Kruzof Island.


Ryan survived all night and the following day in the blue tote, when he was spotted by the troller Nerka near Gilmer Bay.


Both men were rescued by the Coast Guard roughly twenty-four hours after they went into the water.


Read a first-person account of the rescue of Ryan Harris in Tele Aadsen’s blog, “Hooked.”


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kcaw.org


Two men died in a plane crash this weekend north of Sitka during a sightseeing trip. The National Transportation Safety Board and Alaska State Troopers are now on scene investigating.

According to the Coast Guard, the Piper float plane with two people aboard departed Sitka on Saturday for a 20-minute flight and never returned.

After an extensive search, an Air Station Sitka helicopter crew found the wrecked plane Sunday night. It was found submerged where the Katlian River meets the Katlian Bay.

The pilot, 45-year-old Stonie Huffman of Sitka, and passenger, 66-year-old James Ronge of California, were both located deceased. Ronge’s body was found after an extensive search on Monday.

In a published statement, Captain Stephen White with Coast Guard Sector Juneau said, “It’s with heavy hearts that we found the men deceased and our thoughts are with the families and friends of these individuals during this difficult time.”

Other agencies involved in the search included Civil Air Patrol, the Alaska Air National Guard, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Air Force, the Sitka Police and Fire Departments, and Sitka Mountain Rescue.

With the search over, the Alaska State Troopers and two National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) agents, Noreen Price and Eric Swenson, are now conducting an investigation of the incident. 

“The intent for the next 24 hours, or as soon as possible, is to get to the accident site and go ahead and document it to the best of our ability,” said Clint Johnson the Alaska Region Chief for NTSB. “[The plane] is partially submerged is in some brackish water, or a creek or a stream is our understanding right now. That’s all preliminary information. Then, we’ll go into recovery, as far as recovering the wreckage.”

The plane was a white and red colored PA-18 Super Cub float plane. It departed the Sitka seaplane dock on Saturday at 7:15 p.m. for a tour of Katlian Bay and Olga Strait.

Note: Pilot Stonie “Mac” Huffman, who perished in this weekend’s crash, previously was a survivor in a celebrated maritime rescue in 2012.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kcaw.org

Schweizer 300C, N698SH: Incident occurred June 08, 2018 in Gilbert, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale

Rotorcraft made forced landing after pilot declared engine failure.

Canyon State Aero LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N698SH

Date: 08-JUN-18
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N698SH
Aircraft Make: SCHWEIZER
Aircraft Model: 300C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: GILBERT
State: ARIZONA

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, N3617L: Incident occurred June 10, 2018 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego

Aircraft departed left side of runway 28L and nosed over.

Associated Aircraft LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N3617L

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 14:49:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: G2T1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Flight Number: SKYTRS3
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N383ME: Accident occurred June 09, 2018 near Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR), Fairfield County, Connecticut

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks

Parlu Ventures LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N383ME

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA345
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 09, 2018 in Danbury, CT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N383ME

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck a bird two (2) miles north of airport.

Date: 09-JUN-18
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N383ME
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: DANBURY
State: CONNECTICUT

Cessna 421C, N13RF, registered to TM Aero LLC and operated by Digital Aerial Solutions LLC: Accident occurred June 11, 2018 at Plant City Airport (KPCM), Hillsborough County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N13RF

Location: Plant City, FL
Accident Number: WPR18LA166
Date & Time: 06/11/2018, 0140 EDT
Registration: N13RF
Aircraft: CESSNA 421C
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On June 11, 2018, about 0140 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 421C, N13RF, sustained substantial damage when it collided with an airport perimeter fence during an aborted takeoff at the Plant City Airport (PCM), Plant City, Florida. The Airline Transport pilot sustained minor injuries and the passenger was not injured. The airplane was registered to TM Aero LLC and operated by Digital Aerial Solutions LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as an aerial observation flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, during the takeoff roll, the airplane did not accelerate adequately, and he elected to abort the takeoff. Subsequently, the airplane exited the end of the runway, struck an airport perimeter fence, crossed a road, and then came to rest in a field.

The takeoff runway 28, was 3,950 ft in length, and the asphalt surface was dry. At 0155, the wind was reported as calm and no significant weather was in the area.

The airplane was recovered to a secure storage facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N13RF
Model/Series: 421C C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Digital Aerial Solutions
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: TPF, 7 ft msl
Observation Time: 0155 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Plant City, FL (PCM)
Destination: Plant City, FL (PCM) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.000278, -82.163333 (est)

Rutan Long-EZ, N757T: Incident occurred June 10, 2018 in Orlando, Orange County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft returned for landing after reporting rough engine operation, found portion of propeller blade had separated.

Hot Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N757T

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 11:49:00Z
Regis#: N757T
Aircraft Make: EXP
Aircraft Model: RUTAN LONG EZ
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: ORLANDO
State: FLORIDA

Luscombe 8A, N2354K: Incident occurred June 09, 2018 at Barrow County Airport (KWDR), Winder, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Aircraft ground looped and gear collapsed after landing runway 31.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2354K

Date: 09-JUN-18
Time: 14:15:00Z
Regis#: N2354K
Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Aircraft Model: 8-A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WINDER
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 172P, N3927: Accident occurred June 06, 2018 at Kahului Airport (PHOG), Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu

Lani Lea Sky Tours LLC


http://registry.faa.gov/N3927

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA333
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 06, 2018 in Maui, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N3927

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck prop on landing.


Date: 06-JUN-18
Time: 03:00:00Z
Regis#: N3927
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KAHULUI
State: HAWAII

Let L-23 Super Blanik, N317BA, registered to Teton AvJet LLC and was operated by Teton Aviation Center: Fatal accident occurred June 09, 2018 in Moose, Teton County, Wyoming

Kristine Ciesinski poses for a portrait for the Teton Valley Magazine at the Driggs Airport. Ciesinski, an international opera star, teacher and pilot, died June 9 while piloting a glider that crashed over the Tetons. A passenger with her also died. He was David Ross, 65, of Salt Lake City.

David J. Ross

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Air Accidents Investigation Institute; Letnany, FN
Blanik Aircraft CZ s.r.o.; Letnany, FN
Teton Aviation Center; Driggs, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Moose, WY
Accident Number: CEN18FA217
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1115 MDT
Registration: N317BA
Aircraft: LET L 23 SUPER BLANIK
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business - Sightseeing 

On June 9, 2018, about 1115 mountain daylight time, a retractable tandem-geared LET L-23 (Super BlanĂ­k) glider, N317BA, collided with remote mountainous terrain while en route about 7 miles northwest of Moose, Wyoming after departing from the Driggs-Reed Memorial Airport (DIJ), Driggs, Idaho. The commercial pilot and the passenger sustained fatal injuries. The glider was destroyed. The glider was registered to Teton AvJet, LLC, Driggs, and was operated by Teton Aviation Center, Driggs, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules sightseeing tour flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from DIJ at 0950 and was released from the tow airplane at 1037.

Teton Aviation Center based at DIJ, conducts Title 14 CFR Part 91 sightseeing tour flights to the public in both airplanes and gliders, staying within a 25-statue mile radius of DIJ. DIJ is located at an elevation of 6,231 feet mean sea level (MSL). The purpose of the sightseeing tour flight was to facilitate viewing of the Teton Range mountains for the passenger. A friend of the passenger purchased the sightseeing tour flight as a gift for the passenger.

The operator reported that a sightseeing tour flight typically is about 1 hour in duration, with the first thirty minutes for the tow operation, with the remaining thirty minutes gliding back to DIJ. The glider typical spends about 15 minutes at the altitude it was released at before it begins the descent. The sightseeing tour flight predominately flies over the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, encompassing both Idaho and Wyoming.

The tow pilot, employed by Teton Aviation Center who flew a tailwheel-equipped Aviat A-1 airplane, reported he and the glider pilot discussed the planned route of flight prior to takeoff. The planned route after departure from DIJ was to head south toward Darby Canyon, then proceed north along the ridges near the Grand Targhee Resort, Alta, Wyoming, and then along the ridges of Teton Canyon toward the Grand Teton National Park. The tow pilot further reported that he and the glider pilot briefed safe altitudes for the route of flight, and then completed the preflight duties for the glider together.

After departing from DIJ, the tow airplane and glider reached 10,000 feet MSL. The two aircraft proceeded south and climbed to 11,000 feet MSL and turned west toward Darby Canyon. Both aircraft arrived at the foothills of Darby Canyon at 11,500 feet MSL and the tow pilot reported "there wasn't much lift." Both aircraft then flew east toward the boundary of Grand Teton National Park. Prior to reaching the boundary, both aircraft flew north, paralleling the Teton Range and were "slowly climbing." Upon reaching a point 3 miles west of the South Teton peak, at an altitude of 13,800 feet MSL, the glider pilot released the glider at 1037. The tow pilot reported that he obtained visual confirmation of the release in his rear-view mirror and departed back to DIJ without further incident, landing at about 1045.

During the tow operation, the tow pilot reported that he maintained radio communication with the glider pilot throughout the entire flight and they worked together to find lift to gain sufficient altitude for release. The glider pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider during the tow operation.

The front desk manager for Teton Aviation Center was expecting the glider to return to DIJ between 1115 to 1130. Starting at 1130, the front desk manager attempted to make multiple radio calls on a universal communications frequency (commonly referred to as "UNICOM") to the glider with no success. At 1220, the glider was reported overdue to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). At 1240, an Alert Notice (commonly referred to as an "ALNOT") was issued by the FAA.

A National Park Service (NPS) search and rescue team consisting of NPS Rangers from Jenny Lake Rescue, working in conjunction with Teton County (Wyoming) Search and Rescue, utilized data acquired from a cellular phone onboard the glider to determine the last known coordinates. The owner of Teton Aviation departed from DIJ at about 1435 in a private helicopter and flew to the area of the last known coordinates. The owner was able to obtain visual confirmation of the wreckage at about 1450. No emergency locator transmitter was onboard the glider, nor was one required to be.

Photograph 1 - Aerial view of the accident site 
(courtesy of the National Park Service).

The wreckage was in steep mountainous terrain, about 11,000 feet MSL between the Middle Teton peak (12,809 feet MSL) and the South Teton peak (12,519 feet MSL), near the frozen Icefloe Lake, in the Teton Range, located in the Grand Teton National Park. The accident site was classified as technical mountaineering terrain. The NPS search and rescue team was inserted to the accident site via a NPS-contracted helicopter for recovery and documentation purposes at about 1530. Photographs provided by the NPS showed both wings and an impact crater located on a west facing snow and ice-covered saddle. The photographs further showed the fuselage, empennage, and miscellaneous debris located near the base of the saddle, by Icefloe Lake. The saddle originates at the South Teton Peak and extends to the northeast culminating at the Middle Teton peak.

The wreckage was extracted via external load with a NPS-contracted helicopter to a secure location in the Grand Teton National Park for a wreckage layout and examination. On June 13, the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with an aviation safety inspector (ASI) from the FAA Salt Lake City Flight Standards District Office traveled to the operator in Driggs to tour the company facilities and conduct interviews with company personnel. On June 14, the NTSB IIC, the FAA ASI, and two representatives from Teton Aviation Center traveled to the Grand Teton National Park to conduct a wreckage layout and examination. During the examination, no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider were noted. All major structural components of the glider were accounted for. The glider was found to be assembled correctly for flight operations. An examination of the maintenance records revealed no evidence of uncorrected mechanical discrepancies with the glider.


Photograph 2 - Exemplar photograph of N317BA
 (courtesy of Teton Aviation Center). 

The two-seat capacity non-motorized glider, serial number 978406, was manufactured in 1997 in the Czech Republic. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LET
Registration: N317BA
Model/Series: L 23 SUPER BLANIK NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Glider
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Teton AvJet, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Teton Aviation Center
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJAC, 6419 ft msl
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: DRIGGS, ID (DIJ)
Destination: DRIGGS, ID (DIJ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  43.724722, -110.819167 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




No stage was too small for Kristine Ciesinski, an international opera star who inspired the Teton Valley community not only with her voice, but also through her generosity of spirit and grace that knew no bounds.

Ciesinski died on June 9 while piloting a glider tour over the Tetons. The passenger with her also died. He was David Ross, 65, of Salt Lake City. The accident is still under investigation by the Grand Teton National Park, but the details of her death feel small in the bright light of her legacy.

“Her priority was making the world more beautiful and that was incredible,” said Hannah Rose Linville, a student of Ciesinski’s. “I think the valley was so lucky to have her. She was world-renowned and then she plopped herself down into podunk Idaho. It’s incredible that I had the opportunity to work with her. All of us students were lucky to share in her talent and to be in her light and I’m so glad to have known her.”

Ciesinski defied the mold, weaving a fine thread into the diverse tapestry of the Teton Valley community. Serving on the Teton Valley Hospital Foundation Board and the Earthfire Institute, founding various organizations in the community, and teaching as an adjunct professor at BYU-I in Rexburg, the reach of her generosity, her example and commitment, not to mention her devilish sense of humor, knew no bounds. She grounded her life in generosity and flew with the greatest of ease as a glider pilot circling the Tetons with passengers who often knew little of the famous person guiding them through the clouds.

“Kristine had a strong sense of community and strong sense of place,” said longtime friend and neighbor Carol Taylor. “I don’t think she ever saw the magnitude of who she was in our community. If she could help anyone she would do it.”

Ciesinski used her voice to shine light on pieces of the valley community in need. From the Teton High School Music Department, to Teton Valley Hospital and all the small and ever significant places in-between, Ciensinski could be called upon. Her presence, said her friends and colleagues, always elevated an event or fundraiser, though Ciensinski’s humility made her approachable and so much fun to be around.

She opened the Geotourism Center a few years ago by performing on the sidewalk in a long flowing gown in front of an adoring audience, her voice rising and falling while the amp tried to keep pace.

Afterward she whipped off her dress and mixed and mingled with the crowd in her jeans and T-shirt.

“She had the rights to be a diva, but she wasn’t,” said Jeanne Anderson, Ciesinski’s friend and collaborator on various community events. “In an age when ego can be overinflated, she was the epitome of someone who shared her talents and didn’t flaunt them. She had a lot of grace, a lot of class. She was also very sophisticated, but she was a hell of a lot of fun.”

Ann Loyola agreed.

“She served on the Teton Valley Hospital Foundation board for at least six years and very actively supported the hospital,” said Loyola, Director of Marketing and Public Affairs for Teton Valley Health Care. “She was the star of the Gathering of Friends fundraiser where she and her husband Norman and sister Katherine would perform and all of the funds supported cancer prevention and hospice home health services. Her concerts were always sold out and it was so meaningful. If you wanted to go to see that kind of performance anywhere else, you would have to pay a minimum of $300 to see that kind of star power. But she wanted to bring music to the community and to know that she was helping people — that’s why she organized those events.”

When Ciesinski wasn’t performing or flying, she was teaching. She spent almost 11 years at Brigham Young University of Idaho in Rexburg and there influenced many students both in and out of the classroom.

“I have lived in major cities and I have never run across a pedigree like Kris,” said Rebecca Smith Lord, a third year faculty member at BYU-I in the music department. “She’s one of a kind. She had a gift of being able to break it down for students so they could grasp a better usage of their voice. And after a while, I decided she needed to be my teacher too.”

Lord said that as the two worked together, she invited Ciesinki to teach students out of her home in Rexburg. Ciensinski ran group classes at a low rate for students who couldn’t afford private lessons or class credits.

“She could see the spark in each of her students. She was so encouraging,” said Lord. “It was beautiful to see her mentorship in my students. She had a heart of gold.”

Linville was Ciesinski’s student and sought her guidance after landing the lead in the Center for the Art’s production of Mary Poppins in her senior year of high school. Linville said Ciesinski could “kick your butt.”

“I would say knowing her and being a part of her life and her being a part of mine, she inspired me in a lot of ways,” Linville said. “I remember how elegant she was with so much grace and poise and confidence. I still aspire to grow up and be like her, to have that kind of poise and to treat everyone with kindness. I think the hardest part about losing her is knowing she gave me my voice. All these things that make me happy, I owe to her. She helped me sing. It meant so much to me that she took me through this process with her believing in me so I could believe in myself.”

While Ciesinski was always finding ways to “reinvent herself,” as she told Teton Valley Magazine in 2011, she remained steadfast and true to what drove her. She used her talents to not only touch a community, but move friends and family to do the same.

“The legacy she leaves this community, is the gentle calling to each of us to remember who we are and why we're here and what is precious about this place,” said Taylor. “To recognize our differences and be there for one another. And that wasn’t something she said, it was something she did – she just did it.”

https://idahostatejournal.com

David J. Ross, age 65, passed away in a glider accident on Saturday, June 9, 2018 in the lower Teton Mountains, near Jackson Hole, WY. He was born on June 8, 1953, in Fremont, Ohio, to Joseph and Helen Ross. Having obtained a BS degree in Information and Computer Science from Georgia Tech in 1976, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Theta fraternity and MS degrees in Computing Science from UC Davis in 1981, David has programmed videogames nearly as long as the genre has existed.

David started his career as a scientific programmer in 1976 with Texas Instruments in Plano, TX, where he also received his private pilot's license. In 1978, he moved to Lawrence Livermore Labs, where he did theater-level nuclear facility threat analysis. He took the opportunity to join Bally Sente in Sunnyvale, CA in 1982, where he was also a Big Brother to numerous mentees and met his best friend and love of his life, Vic. They were married in 1988. Also, in 1988, he took a position as lead programmer for Mediagenic in Menlo Park. 1991, saw Dave's move to Salt Lake City, where he remained for the rest of his life. His first job in Salt Lake City was with Sculptured Software/Acclaim Entertainment and in 1999, moved to his last and best employer, Avalanche Software, where he remained through their various acquisitions by Disney Interactive and Warner Brothers Games.          

Additionally, Dave applied his prodigious work ethic and boundless passion to his family, a truly amazing circle of close friends and colleagues, golf, and motorcycles. He was the type of guy who was interested in everything and reveled in being the "go-to" for his co-workers and family. His wife and son, Mitchell, are surrounded by a group of very good friends that Dave has worked and played with for over 25 years. Clearly, in Dave's other-driven life, it was the people with whom he came into contact, made friends with, or just helped, that made life endlessly meaningful and exciting.      

Dave was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his wife, Vic, his son Mitchell, his sister, Regina Albert, his brother, Captain Thomas Ross and numerous nieces and nephews.    

His family asks that Dave's numerous friends, neighbors and colleagues, join them for a Celebration of Life, Wednesday, June 20, 2018 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Starks Funeral Parlor, 3651 South 900 East, Salt Lake City. Given his propensity to be a "casual" dresser, the family asks that celebrants joining us to also dress casually and bring your recollections of Dave's zest for life. Guests are encouraged to use the complimentary valet parking on the north side of the building.