Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Beech A36 Bonanza, N4198S: Accident occurred June 11, 2018 at Arcadia Municipal Airport (X06), DeSoto County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4198S

Location: Arcadia, FL
Accident Number: GAA18CA344
Date & Time: 06/11/2018, 1600 EDT
Registration: N4198S
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of Control on ground
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane was veering to the left. He attempted to correct for the veer with right rudder and brake to no avail. Subsequently, the airplane exited the left side of the runway, encountered a ditch, and the airplane came to rest.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that the left main tire failed on landing.

The Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector reported that, there were marks on the runway from the failed tire, but he was unable to tell if the tire had failed prior to or upon landing. The inspector also assessed the brakes and did not notice anything abnormal.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/29/2017
Flight Time:

(Estimated) 2874 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1746 hours (Total, this make and model), 2804 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 22.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N4198S
Model/Series: A36
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: E-673
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6594 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520
Registered Owner: FLAT AIR INC
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPGD, 25 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1750 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 206°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: PLANT CITY, FL (PCM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Arcadia, FL (X06)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: ARCADIA MUNI (X06)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 63 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3700 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.197222, -81.838611 (est)

Taylorcraft BC12-D, N43443: Accident occurred June 10, 2018 at Dona Ana County International Jetport Airport (KDNA), Santa Teresa, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N43443

Location: Santa Teresa, NM
Accident Number: CEN18LA222
Date & Time: 06/10/2018, 1100 MDT
Registration: N43443
Aircraft: TAYLORCRAFT BC12 D
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 10, 2018, about 1100 mountain daylight time, a Taylorcraft BC-12D, N43443, experienced a runway excursion after landing at Dona Ana County International Jetport Airport (DNA), Santa Teresa, New Mexico. The airplane came to rest inverted and sustained substantial damage. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was privately registered and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: TAYLORCRAFT
Registration: N43443
Model/Series: BC12 D D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Piper PA-24-250, N6839P: Incident occurred June 11, 2018 in Brownfield, Terry County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock

Aircraft landed on a highway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6839P

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 19:42:00Z
Regis#: N6839P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BROWNFIELD
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, registered to and operated by Aviator Air LLC, N363CK: Accident occurred June 09, 2018 at Hillsboro Municipal Airport (KINJ), Hill County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N363CK

Location: Hillsboro, TX
Accident Number: GAA18CA340
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1200 CDT
Registration: N363CK
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during a touch and go, he came in too fast and the airplane landed hard and bounced. He added that, he should have gone around but chose to "ride it out". Subsequently, the airplane porpoised, the nose wheel collapsed, and the airplane came to rest nose down on the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system at the accident airport reported that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 180° at 8 knots, and that about 15 minutes after the accident, the wind was 170° at 8 knots, gusting to 15 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/20/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/21/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 99 hours (Total, all aircraft), 97 hours (Total, this make and model), 19 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N363CK
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 172S9634
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2457 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: AVIATOR AIR LLC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: AVIATOR AIR LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KINJ, 685 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1655 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 123°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3800 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GRAND PRAIRIE, TX (GPM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Hillsboro, TX (INJ)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1130 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HILLSBORO MUNI (INJ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 685 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3998 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.086111, -97.100833 (est)

Beech A24R, N9788L: Accident / Incident occurred June 11, 2018 in Houston, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston

Nose gear collapsed on landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9788L

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N9788L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A24R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Date: 11-JUN-18
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N9788L
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE24
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage:  SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Loss of Control in Flight: Trendak Tercel, N640BE, accident occurred June 11, 2018 in Cokeville, Lincoln County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N640BE


Location: Cokeville, WY
Accident Number: CEN18LA219
Date & Time: 06/11/2018, 0715 MDT
Registration: N640BE
Aircraft: ASTON KINSEY TERCEL
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The sport pilot reported that, while performing maneuvers in the gyrocopter south of the private airstrip, he felt no response when he applied left cyclic, and the gyrocopter "was stuck in a moderate right turn." The pilot initiated an emergency descent back to the private airstrip. During the approach, the pilot was unable to regain control of the gyrocopter, and it impacted terrain while sliding to the right. The gyrocopter rolled over and came to rest on its right side. Postaccident examination of the gyrocopter revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of gyrocopter control for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the gyrocopter revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Findings

Aircraft
Performance/control parameters - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information 

On June 11, 2018, at 0715 mountain daylight time, an Aston Kinsey Tercel gyrocopter, N640BE, impacted terrain during landing at a private airstrip near Cokeville, Wyoming. The sport pilot and passenger were not injured, and the gyrocopter sustained substantial damage. The gyrocopter was registered and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight departed the private airstrip at 0700.

According to the pilot, while performing maneuvers south of the private airstrip, he felt no response when he applied left cyclic, and the gyrocopter "was stuck in a moderate right turn." The pilot initiated an emergency descent back to the private airstrip. During the approach, the pilot was unable to regain control of the gyrocopter, and it impacted terrain while sliding to the right. The gyrocopter rolled over to the right and came to rest on its right side.

Post accident examination of the gyrocopter by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors revealed the gyrocopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor blades, fuselage structure, vertical stabilizers, and horizontal stabilizer. A cyclic push/pull tube was fractured consistent with damage sustained during the impact; no additional anomalies were noted with the flight control systems. The examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. 

History of Flight

Maneuvering
Miscellaneous/other

Landing
Off-field or emergency landing
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 42, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/17/2018
Flight Time: 95 hours (Total, all aircraft), 90 hours (Total, this make and model), 77 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ASTON KINSEY
Registration: N640BE
Model/Series: TERCEL NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: T&SG20815S
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/14/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1322 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 79 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 130 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912UL
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 125 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AFO, 6220 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 40 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0715 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:  
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Cokeville, WY
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Cokeville, WY
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0700 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.082778, -110.955278 (est)

Federal Aviation Administration Safety Rules for Commercial Drones Are Overly Strict, Report Says: Report concludes agency should peg drone safety to hazards such as those posed by small private-plane crashes or pedestrian-vehicle accidents



The commercial drone industry is being stifled by unnecessarily stringent federal safety rules enforced by regulators who frequently pay only lip service to easing restrictions or streamlining decision-making, according to a report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The unusually strongly worded report released Monday urges “top-to-bottom” changes in how the Federal Aviation Administration assesses and manages risks from drones.

The report, which was requested by Congress, also criticizes the agency for extending its traditional focus on “near-zero tolerance for risk” involving airliners and applying it to cover small drones flying at low altitudes away from airports. Instead, the report concludes, the agency should peg drone safety to more-comparable hazards confronting people on the ground such as those posed by small private-plane crashes or pedestrian-vehicle accidents.

Such minimal but persistent levels of risk already are accepted by the public,according to the report. A fundamental issue is “what are we going to compare [drone] safety to?” said consultant George Ligler, who served as chairman of the committee that drafted the document.

“We do not ground airplanes because birds fly in the airspace, although we know birds can and do bring down aircraft,” the report said.

The FAA, which received a copy of the report and a verbal briefing late last month, on Sunday said it “is working to safely accelerate [drone] integration on multiple fronts,” including establishing pilot programs and drafting proposed rules. The report “confirmed that the FAA executive team has a consistent approach to risk management,” according to the agency’s statement.

The FAA also called the report “an endorsement of our efforts and encouragement to accelerate” changes in its procedures.

But some types of comparative-risk analyses endorsed by the study appear to pose departures from previous FAA pledges that widespread drone operations won’t be permitted if they threaten to erode the safety standards affecting U.S. airspace.

Written by a 14-member panel of academics, researchers and aviation experts—with industry representatives in the minority—the report amounts to one of the most pointed criticisms yet of institutional and cultural roadblocks facing the burgeoning drone industry inside the FAA.

FAA leaders have talked about cutting through bureaucracy, issuing exemptions and embracing new procedures to quickly authorize a wide range of drone applications, including emergency medical deliveries and everyday package shipments to consumers.

During a drone conference in Baltimore three months ago, agency officials encouraged would-be operators to file paperwork, promising speedy and hopefully favorable decisions with the catchphrase: “The FAA is open for business.” Senior White House and Transportation Department officials have chimed in to demand accelerated FAA approvals.

But “fear of making a mistake” often prompts midlevel FAA managers to balk because they believe “allowing new risk could endanger their careers even when that risk is so minimal,” the report said.

In an interview over the weekend, Mr. Ligler said the committee’s research indicated the FAA’s high-level “philosophy isn’t reflected in practice.”

The criticism comes as lawmakers, startups, Silicon Valley stalwarts and large aerospace companies ratchet up pressure on the FAA to expand unmanned aircraft uses. According to some government and industry estimates, commercial operations in domestic airspace could quadruple to include more than 450,000 unmanned aerial vehicles by 2022.

The list of companies pushing for regulatory relief resembles a who’s-who of the aviation industry, including Boeing Co. , Airbus SE and General Electric Co. Others seeking stepped-up action include Amazon.com Inc., Intel Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google unit.

In the near term, the report is bound to provide ammunition for drone proponents as debate revs up on Capitol Hill. In April, the House passed a five-year FAA reauthorization bill promoting the start of limited package-delivery flights beyond the sight of ground operators. As the Senate considers its own version of the legislation, the industry is poised to weigh in on proposals for traffic-control systems for drones.

By next summer, the report recommends the FAA publish guidelines for implementing a predictable risk-based process to approve drone applications. But even if the FAA wholeheartedly implements revised risk-management techniques and revamps many regulatory procedures, Mr. Ligler said it would take “three to five years to move to where we think we ought to be” in terms of oversight.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Champion 7ECA Citabria, N5169X: Incident occurred June 10, 2018 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage

Ground loop.

Flight Safety Alaska Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5169X

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 22:47:00Z
Regis#: N5169X
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 7ECA
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-18 Super Cub, N1203A, registered to the previous owner and operated by the pilot : Fatal accident occurred June 09, 2018 in Sitka, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1203A

Location: Sitka, AK
Accident Number: ANC18FA044
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 2000 AKD
Registration: N1203A
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On June 9, 2018, about 2000 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N1203A, was substantially damaged after impacting a river about 8 miles north-northeast of Sitka, Alaska. The commercial pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to the previous owner and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules other work use flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was filed and activated. The local flight departed the Alaska Seaplane Base (A29) in Sitka, Alaska, about 1934.

The pilot was the co-owner of a lodge in Sitka, and according to a friend of the passenger who was travelling with him and staying at the lodge, the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to take the passenger on a short sightseeing flight near Katlian Bay to view mountain goats. The pilot filed a flight plan with the Juneau Flight Service Station (FSS) for a 56-minute flight that was due to return to A29 at 2030. When the airplane was deemed overdue, an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued by Juneau FSS at 2237 and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Sector Juneau coordinated a search and rescue operation with the support of the Alaska State Troopers and the Civil Air Patrol. No emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal was received.

According to USCG Sector Juneau records, a USCG MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter located the airplane on June 10 at 2210 about .2-mile up river from Katlian Bay on an arm of the Katlian River and a rescue swimmer observed that the pilot was fatally injured. A USCG helicopter located the fatally injured passenger downriver from the airplane on June 11 at 1009.

The airplane came to rest nose down in a small river surrounded by heavy brush and trees within a valley surrounded by steep mountainous terrain with the fuselage and wings sustaining substantial damage.

The wreckage has been recovered and a detailed examination is pending. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine and an ACK E-01 121.5 MHz ELT.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N1203A
Model/Series: PA 18
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASI, 67 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 AKD
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: SITKA, AK (A29)
Destination: SITKA, AK (A29)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 57.171667, -135.276667 (est)


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Jim Ronge
February 10, 1952- June 9, 2018

A one of a kind husband, father and friend… Jim’s sudden death has shocked so many who loved him. Last week, he was in Sitka, Alaska with good friend Randy Smith for a fishing trip. On his last day of the trip, he seized the opportunity to go sightseeing. Jim died when the small plane he was traveling in crashed into the Katlian River. He is survived by his beloved wife of 42 years, Elaine, and two children Becky (Dan)and Joey. Jim also leaves his three cherished grandsons, Dylan, Hudson and Wyatt. Jim was born and raised in Lancaster, NY by Charles and Katherine Ronge. His older brother Charles (Cheryl) has passed away and Jim’s nephew, Bryan resides in Florida. Jim leaves his sister Betty Wick and her husband Mark, and their children Michelle and Steven, all now living in Colorado. Jim moved from the Buffalo, NY area in his 20s and resided in Southern California with Elaine. Through one of their many adventurous road trips, they discovered the Central Valley and decided to begin their family, residing in Turlock since 1981. Most of Jim’s career was spent as a member of the Cement Masons Union; he worked for 20 years on construction sites across the Valley. He then later worked in the Maintenance Department at the Stanislaus Fairgrounds in Turlock, retiring in November 2013. Family always came first for Jim. He prided himself on hosting family and friends in his home and on camping trips. There were countless road trips across the country to visit family in Buffalo, NY. Jim was fiercely loyal and could be counted on whenever a friend needed a hand. Working on cars was a passion and he was a familiar face at Turlock swap meets where he would haggle over antique car parts and make deals on his recent renovations. All will miss the laughter pouring out from his garage, where he was often found tinkering on one of his many projects. Family will be hosting a Celebration of Life on Saturday, August 4th from 3 – 6 PM at the fairgrounds in Turlock to share stories and support all the people who were touched by Jim.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.turlockjournal.com

The loss of Stonie “Mac” Huffman in a weekend float plane crash will be hard news for many Sitkans to take — especially those who remember his near-miraculous escape from death six years ago when his fishing boat capsized offshore.

Huffman was fishing off of Cape Edgecumbe in his 28-foot drop-bow troller, the Kaitlin Rae, on September 7, 2012, when the boat was swamped in heavy seas.


Neither Huffman or his deckhand, 19-year old Ryan Harris had time to radio a mayday call before the boat went under. Huffman managed to pull on a survival suit, and Harris got into an empty blue fish tote.


When the boat was reported overdue early the next morning the Coast Guard launched an intensive air search. Huffman drifted about 10 miles in his survival suit and went ashore — unharmed — at Pt. Amelia on the outer coast of Kruzof Island.


Ryan survived all night and the following day in the blue tote, when he was spotted by the troller Nerka near Gilmer Bay.


Both men were rescued by the Coast Guard roughly twenty-four hours after they went into the water.


Read a first-person account of the rescue of Ryan Harris in Tele Aadsen’s blog, “Hooked.”


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kcaw.org


Two men died in a plane crash this weekend north of Sitka during a sightseeing trip. The National Transportation Safety Board and Alaska State Troopers are now on scene investigating.

According to the Coast Guard, the Piper float plane with two people aboard departed Sitka on Saturday for a 20-minute flight and never returned.

After an extensive search, an Air Station Sitka helicopter crew found the wrecked plane Sunday night. It was found submerged where the Katlian River meets the Katlian Bay.

The pilot, 45-year-old Stonie Huffman of Sitka, and passenger, 66-year-old James Ronge of California, were both located deceased. Ronge’s body was found after an extensive search on Monday.

In a published statement, Captain Stephen White with Coast Guard Sector Juneau said, “It’s with heavy hearts that we found the men deceased and our thoughts are with the families and friends of these individuals during this difficult time.”

Other agencies involved in the search included Civil Air Patrol, the Alaska Air National Guard, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Air Force, the Sitka Police and Fire Departments, and Sitka Mountain Rescue.

With the search over, the Alaska State Troopers and two National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) agents, Noreen Price and Eric Swenson, are now conducting an investigation of the incident. 

“The intent for the next 24 hours, or as soon as possible, is to get to the accident site and go ahead and document it to the best of our ability,” said Clint Johnson the Alaska Region Chief for NTSB. “[The plane] is partially submerged is in some brackish water, or a creek or a stream is our understanding right now. That’s all preliminary information. Then, we’ll go into recovery, as far as recovering the wreckage.”

The plane was a white and red colored PA-18 Super Cub float plane. It departed the Sitka seaplane dock on Saturday at 7:15 p.m. for a tour of Katlian Bay and Olga Strait.

Note: Pilot Stonie “Mac” Huffman, who perished in this weekend’s crash, previously was a survivor in a celebrated maritime rescue in 2012.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kcaw.org

Schweizer 300C, N698SH: Incident occurred January 05, 2020 in Mesa and Incident occurred June 08, 2018 in Gilbert, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

January 05, 2020: Rotorcraft did autorotation and hit the ground in desert.   

Canyon State Aero LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N698SH

Date: 05-JAN-20
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N698SH
Aircraft Make: SCHWEIZER
Aircraft Model: 300
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: MESA
State: ARIZONA

June 08, 2018:  Rotorcraft made forced landing after pilot declared engine failure.

Date: 08-JUN-18
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N698SH
Aircraft Make: SCHWEIZER
Aircraft Model: 300C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: GILBERT
State: ARIZONA

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, N3617L: Incidents occurred June 18, 2020 and June 10, 2018 at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

June 18, 2020:  Aircraft nosed over on taxi.

Associated Aircraft LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N3617L

Date: 18-JUN-20
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: 2T1A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

June 10, 2018:  Aircraft departed left side of runway 28L and nosed over.

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 14:49:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: G2T1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Flight Number: SKYTRS3
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Birdstrike: Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N383ME, accident occurred June 09, 2018 near Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR), Fairfield County, Connecticut

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N383ME

Location: Danbury, CT
Accident Number: GAA18CA345
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1330 EDT
Registration: N383ME
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 

According to the flight instructor, a bird struck the airplane during initial climb. He and his student returned to the airport and landed without further incident.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing's ribs.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A collision with a bird during initial climb.

Findings

Environmental issues
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Initial climb
Birdstrike (Defining event) 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/06/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/26/2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 13000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1280 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 57, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/22/2018
Flight Time: 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N383ME
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S8567
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: PARLU VENTURES LLC.
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: PARLU VENTURES LLC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDXR, 457 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 221°
Lowest Cloud Condition:Clear 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Danbury, CT (DXR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Danbury, CT (DXR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:Class D  

Airport Information

Airport: DANBURY MUNI (DXR)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 456 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.371667, -73.482222 (est)