Sunday, September 25, 2016

Cessna U206F Stationair, C-FWBQ: Fatal accident occurred September 25, 2016 in Lake Kuashkuapishiu, Canada

NTSB Identification: CEN16WA384 
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in Lake Kuashkuapishiu, Canada
Aircraft: CESSNA 206, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On September 25, 2016, a Cessna U206F airplane, C-FWBQ, collided with terrain after departing from Lake Kuashkuapishiu, Quebec. The pilot was seriously injured and two passengers were fatally injured.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of Canada. Any further information may be obtained from:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada

e-mail: airops@tsb.bst.gc.ca

Investigator in Charge: Marc Perrault

e-mail: marc.perrault@tsb-bst.gc.ca

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.

Philippe St-Pierre suffered serious burns after his plane crashed Sunday afternoon. 

Airmedic workers airlifted a badly burned pilot of a Cessna 206 plane from a remote north Quebec crash site Sunday night. 



Two men are dead and a third is in serious but stable condition after a small plane crashed in northern Quebec late Sunday afternoon.


The Sûreté du Québec say someone from the Cessna 206 contacted the province's private air rescue service Airmedic at 3:30 p.m. Sunday to report the crash in the Côte-Nord region .


Aziz Fikri, vice-president of communications for Airmedic, told Radio-Canada a medical team was able to reach the injured pilot, a Gatineau, Que., businessman who was piloting the plane.


Philippe St-Pierre, the owner of several car dealerships in Gatineau, was transferred to a hospital in Quebec City with severe burns to much of his body.


The two victims of the crash were a 55-year-old Gatineau man and a 38-year-old man from Saint-Maurice, Que. Police have not revealed their identities.


Martin Leclair, a manager with Mercedes-Benz in Gatineau and colleague of St-Pierre, said he flew with St-Pierre on a number of occasions and described him as an experienced and meticulous pilot.


Jean Tremblay, a spokesman with the Sûreté du Québec, said investigators believe the crash occurred during takeoff.


Source: http://www.cbc.ca

Mooney M20J, N526AM: Fatal accident occurred September 25, 2016 near Sky Manor Airport (N40), Pittstown, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania  FSDO-05
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf    

http://registry.faa.gov/N526AM

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA325
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in Pittstown, NJ
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J, registration: N526AM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 25, 2016, about 1230 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20J, N526AM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain after an aborted landing at Sky Manor Airport (N40), Pittstown, New Jersey. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, which departed Pennridge Airport (CKZ), Perkasie, Pennsylvania, about 1200.

The pilot rented the airplane at the Trenton-Robbinsville Airport (N87), Robbinsville, New Jersey. According to security camera video, he boarded the airplane alone and departed at 1121. The pilot then flew to CKZ, where he picked up the passenger, and then flew to N40.

Approximately 15 witnesses were interviewed, the majority of which were pilots that were at N40 on the day of the accident. Descriptions varied between witness statements as to the airplane's touchdown point on the runway; however, the preponderance of witness statements were that the pilot attempted twice to land on Runway 25.

During the first landing attempt, the airplane appeared to be about 20 knots too fast on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, and bounced during the touchdown. The pilot then aborted the landing, climbed out and joined the traffic pattern.

During the second landing attempt, the airplane was again fast on the approach, and it touched down approximately halfway down the runway on the nose wheel, then the main landing gear, bounced, and became airborne. It then touched down and bounced twice more, then touched down approximately 400 to 500 feet prior to the end of the runway, this time staying on the runway surface. Engine power was then heard to increase as the airplane approached the end of the runway. The airplane began to climb, but some witnesses commented that it did not seem that the engine was producing full power. During this climb, as it passed over a field that was surrounded by trees at the end of the runway, the airplane appeared to climb slowly. Then as the airplane approached the row of trees at the far end of the field, the airplane appeared to climb steeply over the row of trees. The airplane then abruptly banked steeply to the left, pitched nose down, and descended in a steep, nose down attitude until it disappeared behind the trees.

According to a witness who lived in close proximity to where the accident occurred, the airplane was observed to be very low and slow compared to many of other airplanes that he observed departing from N40. The airplane was then observed to rise slightly, pivot nose down, and then rapidly lose altitude before it was lost from sight behind a barn. According to another witness, while this occurred, the engine was heard to be operating. According to both of the witnesses, moments later the sound of an impact was heard.

Examination of the accident site and airplane revealed the airplane impacted in a nose down attitude and then came to rest against the base of a tree. During the impact sequence, a small tree was struck and knocked down. Propeller strike marks were visible on several of the tree limbs. The leading edge of the right wing displayed crush and compression damage from the tip to approximately mid-span, with the majority of the sheet metal being crushed and accordioned back to the wing spar. The trailing edge of the right wing root also displayed compression damage. The outboard panel of the left wing displayed crush damage and was bent back about 30 degrees.

The engine was separated from its mounting position and was found on the ground forward of the left side of the fuselage. The empennage was almost completely separated from the aft fuselage. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were wrinkled and displayed impact damage at their outboard ends. The vertical stabilizer and rudder displayed impact damage and the rudder was partially separated from its mounting position. The landing gear was down, and the flaps were up. Both fuel caps were closed and locked, and though the fuel tanks were breached, evidence of fuel was present in the form of residual fuel in the bottom of the fuel tanks. The throttle, propeller, and mixture controls, were all in the full-forward position. The cowl flaps were closed.

Examination of the two-bladed propeller revealed that one propeller blade exhibited chordwise scratching. The other propeller blade also exhibited chordwise scratching, and S-bending. Further examination of the propeller blade revealed evidence of tip curling, with an associated area of surface polishing near the curl, consistent with a propeller strike.

Sky Manor Airport was located 2 miles southwest of Pittstown, New Jersey. It was uncontrolled and had one runway, in a 7/25 configuration. Runway 25 was asphalt, and in good condition. It was 2,900 feet-long and 50 feet-wide, and marked with non-precision markings in good condition.

Obstructions existed in the form of electrical transmission lines that crossed the approach path for Runway 25, approximately 99 feet above ground level, 2,070 feet from the beginning of the runway, 210 feet left of centerline. They were equipped with spherical high visibility markers, and took an 18:1 slope to clear.

An operational two-light precision approach path indicator (PAPI) was installed on the left side of the approach end of the runway, which displayed a 4.00-degree glide path to provide pilots with guidance information to help acquire and maintain the correct approach (in the vertical plane) to the runway. Examination of the runway revealed fresh propeller strike marks, 1,747 feet from the beginning of Runway 25, approximately 4 feet, 11 inches, to the right of the runway centerline. Review of video recordings obtained from a security camera at N40 revealed that the airplane during the first landing attempt, at approximately 1219, touched down more than halfway down the length of the runway. Then on the second landing attempt, at approximately 1229, the airplane again touched down more than halfway down the length of the runway. Further review of the video recordings also revealed that the wing flaps were extended during both landing attempts.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and pilot records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 10, 2016. He reported on that date, that he had accrued approximately 185 total flight hours.

According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1980. The airplane's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on August 13, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued approximately 4,690.3 total hours of operation. The engine had accrued approximately 100 hours of operation since major overhaul.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.



Gerald Scott Budge


Gerald Scott Budge -father, clinical psychologist, mentor, caregiver and friend to all he met - died in a plane crash Sept. 25, 2016, in Pittstown, NJ, at the age of 59. A gentle old soul, Scott was an extraordinarily considerate, kind and compassionate man who took a deep interest in people in both his personal and professional life. He devoted his life to caring for others. Whether it was skydiving or fighting range fires in his youth, skiing or climbing heights, he was always adventurous and died doing what he loved, piloting an airplane. Those who love him have imagined a wonderful reunion with his daughter, Zoe, who preceded him in death. Scott leaves behind a remarkably wide-ranging body of work, specializing in therapy for individuals and couples, financial psychology, financial education, wealth management, depression and anxiety, executive coaching, and the challenges of adolescence and early adulthood. He founded several companies and wrote and published numerous professional articles and a book, "The New Financial Advisor." Scott was born and raised in Burley, ID. He earned a psychology degree from Utah State University and completed his doctorate at New York University. He worked as an affiliated expert for RayLign Advisory in Greenwich, CT. He was also a practicing clinical psychologist for Centra Comprehensive Psychotherapy & Psychiatric Associates in Marlton, NJ, and had his own private practice in Robbinsville, NJ. Scott was a loving, dedicated, and devoted father to his three daughters, Hannah, Zoe and Justine. He loved playing basketball and Scrabble and sharing his passion for books with his girls. They were never far from his thoughts. He found his soul mate in Henrietta Renzi, and shared the last 12 years of his life with her and her son, Kevin Carlin, Jr. He also loved supporting Kevin as he participated in Special Olympic sporting events. Scott is survived by his two loving daughters, Justine and Hannah Lamb-Budge; his parents, Gerald Shurtleff and Ruth (McBride) Budge; his long-time soul mate and partner, Henrietta Renzi and her son,Kevin Carlin, Jr.; his siblings, Leslie Blakely (David), and David Budge (Nicole); as well as many nieces, a nephew, and extended family members, and Deborah Lamb, mother of his children. A memorial celebrating Scott's life will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 5, at Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, NJ 08534 from 6 to 9 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to either the Gift of Life, 401 N. 3rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19123 or online at www.donors1.org or to the Princeton Child Development Institute, 300 Cold Soil Rd., Princeton, NJ 08540 or online at www.pcdi.org Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Hamilton Brenna-Cellini Funeral Home, 2365 Whitehorse-Mercerville Rd., Hamilton, NJ 08619. Please visit Scott's tribute page at www.brennacellinifuneralhomes.com Hamilton Brenna-Cellini Funeral Home 2365 Whitehorse- Mercerville Rd. Hamilton, NJ 08619.


Karen Lowe

Karen Leigh Lowe of Telford passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. She was 52.

Born May 29, 1964 in Abington, she was the daughter of the late LeRoy C. and Janet (Holman) Forker.

Karen was a very talented artist. She was a stroke survivor who overcame her physical disabilities and completed her college education later in her life. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Philadelphia, graduating in 2006.

She went on to start a successful interior design business, Lowe Design, and was involved in many renovation projects for both businesses and private homes.

She is survived by three children, Davin L. Lowe, Richelle A. Lowe, and Adeline G. Lowe, all of Harleysville, and four siblings, Robert Forker (Linda) of Tennessee, Lynda J. Finkbeiner (Scott) of Souderton, Paul D. Forker of Souderton, and David R. Forker (Nadine) of Telford. Also surviving are several nieces and nephews.

She loved her three children dearly and was very proud of their accomplishments.

Karen was a born again Christian and was recently attending the Calvary Church of Souderton.

Above all else she will be greatly missed by her family and friends.

The family will receive friends starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 1, at Huff & Lakjer Funeral Home, 701 Derstine Avenue, Lansdale, with the funeral beginning at 10:30 a.m. Interment will be held privately.

For those desiring, donations in Karen's name may be made to the American Diabetes Society, 150 Monument Rd., Suite 100, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004, or Civil Air Patrol, 105 South Hansell St., Maxwell AFB, AL 36112.



ALEXANDRIA — Two people died in a plane crash in a grassy field near Sky Manor Airport Sunday afternoon, police said.

The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Mooney M20 that crashed in a residential neighborhood about half a mile southwest of the runway at the small municipal airport.

"At 12:29 p.m. Hunterdon County 911 Dispatch Center received a call of an aircraft down," Hunterdon County Chief of Detectives John Kuczynski said.

"The aircraft was apparently coming in for a landing and subsequently witnesses saw the aircraft go down," Kuczynski said.

Both the pilot and the passenger died at the scene of the crash, according to the Hunterdon County Prosecutor's Office. Neither victim was identified.

There was no damage to any property near Sky Manor and Oak Summit roads, where the plane was recovered, the prosecutor said.

The exact cause of the crash remains under investigation. The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA will investigate the crash, the prosecutor said.

Alexia Hughes, a Bucks County, Pa. resident, said she was part of a large crowd watching planes take off and land outside the Sky Cafe restaurant at the airport. They saw a small plane try to land and come in too fast.

"Instead of aborting the landing, he continued to try to land and ran out of runway," she said.

The plane then pulled up, barely clearing trees at the end of the runway, Hughes said. It tilted up and to the left before losing lift and crashing.

Source: http://www.nj.com













FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP — Two people were killed Sunday afternoon when a small plane crashed in a residential neighborhood in Hunterdon County.

According to NJ State Police Trooper Alejandro Goez, the crash occurred just after noon near Sky Manor Airport. Police say a small aircraft crashed, killing two people aboard the plane.

“The aircraft crashed approximately one half mile southwest of the runway at Sky Manor Airport. The aircraft was recovered in a residential neighborhood at the intersection of Sky Manor Road and Oak Summit Road,” Hunterdon County Prosecutor Anthony P. Kearns III said.

The prosecutor said there was no damage reported to any residential property. The pilot and passenger were pronounced dead at the scene, he said.

According to the prosecutor, a 911 call was received by Hunterdon County Communications at about 12:29 p.m. The NJ State Police Crime Scene Unit and detectives from the Hunterdon County Prosecutor’s Office responded to investigate the crash, police said.

The prosecutor said Sunday night that the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are conducting a crash investigation.

“Our condolences go out to the families of the victims. The names of the victims will be released pending the notification of the next of kin,” Kearns said. “I commend the quick response of our first responders and their continued service to our community.”

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N73101: Accident occurred September 25, 2016 at Pittsfield Municipal Airport (KPSF), Berkshire County, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Windsor Locks FSDO-63

Munidat Persaud: http://registry.faa.gov/N73101

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA515 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in Pittsfield, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N73101
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that on final, following a cross-country flight, “It was really bumpy”, the airplane was at a “pretty steep angle”, and the stall warning horn was “really going crazy”. He further reported that he tried to avoid a stall, and lowered the nose of the airplane, and the airplane touched down to the left of the runway unexpectedly. The airplane continued to the left of the runway and impacted a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. 

The student pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s failure to maintain an appropriate descent rate and runway alignment during the landing flare, which resulted in the airplane touching down left of the runway and impacting a ditch. 










Pittsfield Municipal Airport Manager Robert Snuck. 


PITTSFIELD >> An unidentified pilot suffered "traumatic" injuries early Sunday after his plane crashed at the Pittsfield Municipal Airport, according to the Pittsfield Fire Department.

The Cessna 172 aircraft veered into a ditch at about 11:45 a.m. Sunday as it was attempting to land on Runway 26, according to a statement from a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman.

The plane sustained substantial damage. The pilot, who is believed to be a student, was the only person on board.

An employee of Lyon Aviation, which fuels and maintains the planes at the airport, extricated the pilot from the aircraft, Pittsfield Fire Chief Robert Czerwinski said.

Pittsfield firefighters responded to the crash at the airport on Tamarack Road.

First aid was administered by emergency responders, assisted by Action Ambulance, and the pilot was transported to Berkshire Medical Center with "traumatic but what [are] believed to be non-life-threatening injuries," according to a prepared release by the fire department.

Response crews remained on the scene as the aircraft was leaking fuel. No other injuries were reported, but by officials' preliminary estimate, the aircraft was totaled.

Rescue procedures worked as designed, said airport manager Robert Snuck. Fire rescue workers arrived quickly and went through the proper gates to access the scene.

The aircraft came from Waterbury-Oxford Airport in Connecticut, Snuck said. The owner of the plane is Munidat Persaud of Waterbury, Conn., according to online records.

Oxford Flight Training, an active flight school at the Waterbury-Oxford airport, is owned by Raj Persaud, according to the school's website.

Snuck, who said he believes the pilot was a student, could not confirm the owner's name or whether he was connected to the flight school. But several online publications have listed a Munidat "Raj" Persaud as the owner of a Guyana-based company called Oxford Aviation, which is affiliated with the Connecticut school.

Larger airports such as Logan Airport in Boston do not allow student pilot access, Snuck said. At Pittsfield Municipal Airport, a public-use airport receiving public funds, any licensed pilot, including students, can take off or land, Snuck said.

The FAA is conducting the preliminary investigation into the accident. The agency will turn over its findings to the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the probable cause of the accident, according to the FAA's statement.

The FAA customarily provides the NTSB with information including statements, pilot's certificates, and weather information to assist in investigations, said Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the NTSB.

The "sole purpose" of the NTSB's investigation is to determine what went wrong to cause the accident, Knudson said.

Source:  http://www.berkshireeagle.com





PITTSFIELD -- One man was taken to the hospital after an incident with a small plane at the Pittsfield Airport Sunday.

It's not clear exactly what happened, but fire department officials received a call for a downed aircraft at the airport.

They found a Cessna 172 off the runway but upright, and the pilot had just been extracted by an airport worker.

The man was taken to Berkshire Medical Center. The FAA, Massachusetts State Police, and Pittsfield Police are investigating.


Story and video:   http://cbs6albany.com

PITTSFIELD, MA (WGGB/WSHM) -  A plane crashed at the Pittsfield Municipal Airport just before noon Sunday morning and the pilot had to be rushed to the hospital.

The Pittsfield Fire Department reports they were called to the scene on Tamarack Road at 11:44 a.m.

The plane was a Cessna 172 light aircraft.  It was completely destroyed in the crash.

The pilot who had to be rescued from the plane by firefighters, suffered trauma but his injuries are believed to be non-life threatening.  There was no one else on-board at the time.

When firefighters got to the runway there was an airport worker pulling the pilot away from the plane.  Firefighters then got the pilot to a safe distance and rendered first aid, stabilizing him on a back board. 

"He was landing and for whatever reason he...sounded like he might have bounced and overshot part of it.  The plane was 30 to 50 feet off the runway. Found him really close to a ditch.  He was lucky the plane didn't end up in that ditch," explained Pittsfield Fire Department Deputy, Daniel Garner. 

An ambulance crew called in to the scene transported the pilot to Berkshire Medical Center.

The plane was leaking fuel while some of the equipment was still on in the plane.  Firefighters had foam ready while emergency crews brought the situation under control.

"Luckily the plane was upright and there was not really any catastrophic damage to the fuel compartment," noted Deputy Garner. 

Firefighters finally cleared the scene at about 2:15 p.m. Sunday, however investigators still remained to continue their work on the situation. 

The accident is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration, State Police, and the Pittsfield Police Department.

Source:   http://www.westernmassnews.com

Piper J3C-65, N91973: Incident occurred September 25, 2016 at Massey Ranch Airpark (X50) Edgewater, Volusia County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N91973

EDGEWATER, Fla. - An airplane crashed at Massey Airpark in Edgewater on Sunday, according to the Edgewater Police Department.

Police said the plane, a single engine Piper Cub was conducting runway power ups after having maintenance completed.

The plane left the runway crashing into the woods along the side of the runway.

The only person in the plane was the owner/pilot, Kevin Black. He did not have any injuries.

Edgewater Police are working in conjunction with the Edgewater Fire Department and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.clickorlando.com



EDGEWATER, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) -   Edgewater police said a plane crashed into the woods at Massey Airpark Sunday morning.

Police said the pilot, Kevin Black, Edgewater, was doing runway powerups after having maintenance done on the aircraft.

When the plane left the runway, it crashed into the woods for unknown reasons, police said.

Black was able to get out of the plane and did not suffer any injuries.

Police said they are working with firefighters and the Federal Aviation Administrations to determine the cause of the crash.

Source:  http://www.fox35orlando.com

Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Body Recommends Cybersecurity Measures: Manufacturers, carriers, maintenance facilities and even airports may eventually need to include cybersecurity factors in routine activities



The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
Updated Sept. 22, 2016 9:47 p.m. ET


WASHINGTON—U.S. aviation authorities on Thursday took the strongest formal action yet to combat potential cyberthreats to planes in the air as well as on the ground.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s top technical advisory group adopted language seeking to ensure that cybersecurity protections will be incorporated into all future industrywide standards—affecting everything from aircraft design to flight operations to maintenance practices.

The move by RTCA Inc.’s program-management committee at a meeting here stops short of mandating detailed engineering requirements or safeguards. Those are reserved for FAA-created committees of experts focused on drafting specific standards for individual industry segments.

But by officially elevating cyber issues to such a high priority for the first time, the decision means manufacturers, carriers, maintenance facilities and even airports eventually will be obligated to include cybersecurity factors in routine activities.

The RTCA committee, among other things, called on manufacturers to rely on “a layered approach to aircraft security risk mitigation,” spanning both software and hardware. That includes consideration of how vulnerabilities “could propagate to existing downstream systems.”

The move is “undoubtedly very important,” according to veteran RTCA committee member George Liger, because such language goes substantially beyond previous generic cyber-protection guidance. “At a high level,” he added, “it makes sure appropriate considerations will be given” to cyber vulnerabilities across the board. From now on, he noted, “this will apply to everything we do.”

The guidelines apply to all aviation standards that ultimately end up as regulations, advisories or guidance documents adopted by the FAA.

Mr. Ligler’s panel piggybacked on more than a year of work by a separate international working group of industry and government officials assembled by the FAA. That earlier panel, among other things, recommended that all airplane systems must be protected from potential hackers or other unauthorized intrusions.

And the FAA ought to formulate new airworthiness regulations, according to the international advisory panel, requiring that such security risks “have been identified, assessed and mitigated as necessary.”

Unlike previous, less-rigorous cybersecurity documents, the international advisory report presented to the FAA emphasized keeping safeguards effective during day-to-day operations. The group highlighted the importance of companies and regulators demonstrating that “security protections are maintained.”

The long-term goal is to “secure the systems up front” by relying on thorough design requirements, Jens Hennig, co-chairman of the international advisory group, said on Thursday. But then “operators have to maintain the same security,” he added.

The final report prepared by Mr. Hennig and more than 30 other cyber experts was presented to senior FAA officials last week, but it hasn’t been released.

The FAA official heading up the agency’s dealings with the RTCA panel declined to comment.

Cybersecurity concerns have escalated lately across the industry, with U.S. and European regulators scrambling to coordinate efforts. “Any cyber attacks should be treated as an accident,” Luc Tygat, a senior official of the European Aviation Safety Agency, said at a conference here in June. He said “contamination can come from any part of the system,” adding that the problem is “quite fluid, and evolving very quickly.”

The document approved Thursday, called a drafting guide for performance standards, lists “signal detection spoofing capabilities” as one technique to guard against potential cyber attacks. Such features typically relate to new cockpit-warning systems that can alert pilots of unauthorized digital transmissions.

To protect cabin entertainment systems, the RTCA panel urged use of tamper-proof connectors “that require special tools to remove.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N612FL and Cessna 120, N3580V: Fatal accident occurred September 25, 2016 in North Collins, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Rochester FSDO-23
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

PAUL A. ROSIEK:  http://registry.faa.gov/N3580V

RICHARD J. WALKER:   http://registry.faa.gov/N612FL 

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA324A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in North Collins, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 120, registration: N3580V
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA324B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in North Collins, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N612FL

Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 25, 2016, at 0923 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 120, N3580V, and a Piper PA-28-140, N612FL, collided in midair while in cruise flight over North Collins, New York. The Cessna was destroyed, and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Piper was destroyed, and the private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by their respective private pilots. Both personal flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plans were filed for the planned flights that both departed Hamburg Airport (4G2), Hamburg, New York, with a planned destination of Saint Mary's Municipal Airport (OYM), Saint Mary's, Pennsylvania.

According to witnesses at 4G2, the accident airplanes were the first two of a flight of six that were travelling to OYM for the pilots and passengers to have breakfast together. The group of pilots regularly flew for breakfast on Sundays, weather permitting. The Cessna departed first as it was a slower airplane and required more time to fly to OYM. The Piper departed second. Two witnesses, who lived near the accident site, stated that they observed one airplane climb into another airplane and shear its tail off, followed by both airplanes descending rapidly to the ground.

Review of radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that a primary target consistent with the first airplane departed runway 19 at 0917:59 and proceeded southeast. A target with a transponder code of 1200, consistent with the second airplane, departed the same runway at 0919:17 and proceeded in the same direction. The targets indicated that the second airplane was behind and to the left of the first airplane until they collided. The last radar target associated with the second airplane was recorded at 0923:22 about 6 miles southeast of 4G2, indicating an altitude of 3,500 ft mean sea level (msl). Further review of the radar data indicated that the second airplane had been level at 3,500 ft msl (plus or minus 100 ft) for about 50 seconds before the end of the data. The first airplane was not equipped with a transponder, nor was it required to be, so no altitude information was available from the primary targets associated with it.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot of the first airplane, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on October 9, 2014. At that time, he reported total flight time of 786 hours. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated total flight time of 828 hours, of which 4 hours were flown during the 30-day period preceding the accident. His most recent flight review was completed on May 14, 2015.

The pilot of the second airplane, age 69, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on June 22, 2016. At that time, he reported total flight time of 793 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered; however, a copy of his last flight review endorsement was obtained through his insurance company. The pilot's most recent flight review was completed on September 16, 2016.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna was a two-seat, high-wing, fixed tailwheel, beige and blue airplane, serial number 14849, manufactured in 1948. It was equipped with a Continental C85, 85-horsepower engine. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Cessna's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 1, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 4,322 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 217 hours since major overhaul.

The Piper was a four-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle gear, red and white airplane, serial number 28-7125491, manufactured in 1971. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320, 160-horsepower engine. Review of maintenance records revealed that the Piper's most recent annual inspection was completed on October 27, 2015. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated about 4,081 total hours of operation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Chautauqua County Dunkirk Airport (DKK) was located 20 miles west of the accident site. The recorded weather at DKK at 0953 was: wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 14° C, dew point 9° C, altimeter 30.26 inches Hg.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination revealed three wreckage sites. The main wreckages of the airplanes were located in fields near the second to last radar target and last radar target, respectively. The empennage of the first airplane and an approximate 4-ft section of the second airplane's left outboard wing were located in a cornfield about 0.3 mile west of the first airplane's main wreckage. The first airplane's empennage exhibited four propeller cuts through its left side. The second airplane's left wing section exhibited black rubber transfer, consistent with contact from one of the first airplane's landing gear tires. The first airplane's empennage exhibited red paint transfer, consistent with contact from the second airplane.

The first airplane's main wreckage exhibited leading edge wing crushing along the entire span.. The cockpit section was destroyed and only two readable instruments were recovered. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the ailerons to the cockpit. Elevator and rudder control continuity were also confirmed from the first airplane's cockpit to the rear cabin area, where the cables had separated and exhibited broomstraw features at the cable ends. The elevator trim tab was found in an approximately neutral position.

The second airplane's main wreckage exhibited leading edge wing crushing along the entire span. The second airplane's cockpit section was destroyed and no instruments were recovered. Due to impact damage, control continuity could not be verified for the second airplane.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Erie County Medical Examiner, Buffalo, New York, performed autopsies on both pilots. The autopsy reports noted the cause of death for both pilots was "multiple blunt force injuries."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on both pilots. The results were negative for alcohol and drugs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Following the accident, a member of the group of pilots stated that the group planned to have the fastest airplane depart first when they flew together again. The group also discussed adding ADS-B to their airplanes.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA324A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in North Collins, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 120, registration: N3580V
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA324B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 25, 2016 in North Collins, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N612FL
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 24, 2016, at 0923 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 120, N3580V, and a Piper PA-28-140, N612FL, collided in midair while in cruise flight over North Collins, New York. The Cessna was destroyed and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Piper was destroyed and the private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by the respective private pilots. Both personal flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plans were filed for the planned flights that departed Hamburg Airport (4G2), Hamburg, New York, to Saint Mary's Municipal Airport (OYM), Saint Mary's Pennsylvania.

According to witnesses, the accident airplanes were the first two, from a flight of six, that were travelling to OYM for the pilots and passengers to have breakfast together. The Cessna departed first as it was a slower airplane and required more time to fly to OYM. The Piper departed second and two witnesses stated that they observed it climb into the Cessna and shear its tail off, followed by both airplanes descending rapidly to the ground.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that a target consistent with the Piper departed runway 19 at 0919, and proceeded southeast. The last radar target was recorded at 0923:31, about 6 miles southeast of 4G2, indicating an altitude of 3,500 feet mean sea level (msl). Further review of the radar data indicated that the Piper had been level at 3,500 feet msl (plus or minus 100 feet), for about 50 seconds prior to the end of the data. The Cessna was not equipped with a transponder, nor was it required to be, and its flight was not recorded in the preliminary radar data; however, additional radar data (primary targets) were requested from the FAA.

Initial examination revealed three wreckage sites. The main wreckages of the Cessna and Piper were located in fields near the second to last radar target and last radar target, respectively. The empennage of the Cessna and an approximate 4-foot section of Piper's left outboard wing were located in a cornfield about .3 mile west of the Cessna's main wreckage. The Cessna's empennage exhibited four propeller cuts through its left side. The Piper's left wing section exhibited black rubber transfer, consistent with contact from one of the Cessna's landing gear tires.

Both main wreckages exhibited leading edge wing crushing along the entire span, consistent with nose-down vertical descents. Both cockpit sections were destroyed and only two readable instruments were recovered from the Cessna. No readable instruments were recovered from the Piper. Aileron control continuity was confirmed for the Cessna. Elevator and rudder control continuity were also confirmed from the Cessna's cockpit to the rear cabin area where the cables were separated and exhibited broomstraw features at the cable ends, consistent with overload. The Cessna's elevator trim tab was found in an approximately neutral position. Due to impact damage, control continuity could not be verified for the Piper.

The Cessna was a two-seat, high-wing, fixed tailwheel airplane, serial number 14849, manufactured in 1948. It was equipped with a Continental C85, 85-horsepower engine. The Piper was a four-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle gear airplane, serial number 28-7125491, manufactured in 1971. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320, 150-horsepower engine.

The pilot of the Cessna, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on October 9, 2014. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 786 hours. The pilot of the Piper, age 69, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on June 22, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 793 hours.

Chautauqua County Dunkirk Airport (DKK) was located 20 miles west of the accident site. The recorded weather at DKK, at 0953, was: wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 14 degrees C, dew point 9 degrees C, altimeter 30.26 inches Hg.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Richard Walker


NORTH COLLINS, N.Y. - The Erie County Sheriffs Department has identified the three people who died when two planes collided over North Collins, N.Y.  on Sunday morning. Paul Rosiek, 60, Hamburg; Richard Walker, 69 and Kathleen Walker, 69, both of Eden, N.Y.

Paul Rosiek was flying solo when his plane collided and crashed in a field.

The crash happened around 9:30 a.m. near School Street, Jennings and Eden Roads in North Collins. The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed a Cessna 120 and Piper PA 28 made contact and crashed.

The two planes were part of a group of six flights headed from Hamburg Airfield  to St. Mary's, Pennsylvania.

"They would go for Sunday morning breakfast," said fellow pilot Jerry Malachowski. "In aviation circles, going to fly to eat is called going to get the $100 hamburger."

Kathleen Walker is a retired school teacher. She spent over three decades in the North Collins Central School District where she was a kindergarten teacher. Her husband Richard retired as a printer from Quebecor. He was also a sailor.   Mike Sendor remembers his friend of 33-years as a person always willing to help others. The Eden couple has one daughter who lives in Portland, Oregon. "They are wonderful parents," said Sendor.

The NTSB is still has investigators on site. They believe a preliminary report will be available within ten days but the investigation could last around one year.

Story and video:   http://www.wgrz.com



National Transportation Safety Board investigator Robert J. Gretz and Erie County Sheriff Det. Capt. Greg Savage spell out the investigation and identify the victims at the scene of the fatal North Collins plane crash on Monday morning. 



They belonged to what came to be known as the Sunday breakfast club – six pilots flying their planes out of Hamburg Airport.

At first, pilot Bill Drew of Eden wasn’t aware of the deadly midair collision involving two of the other planes Sunday morning. He had been the fifth of six pilots to take off for St. Marys, Pa., a little more than 100 miles away. Drew’s wife, Geri, sat beside him.

“The six of us use the same radio frequency, and you always keep the plane ahead of you in sight” and share each other’s altitude level with one another, Drew said.

They belonged to what came to be known as the Sunday breakfast club – six pilots flying their planes out of Hamburg Airport.

At first, pilot Bill Drew of Eden wasn’t aware of the deadly midair collision involving two of the other planes Sunday morning. He had been the fifth of six pilots to take off for St. Marys, Pa., a little more than 100 miles away. Drew’s wife, Geri, sat beside him.

“The six of us use the same radio frequency, and you always keep the plane ahead of you in sight” and share each other’s altitude level with one another, Drew said.

But the usual communication among the pilots was missing as he guided his low-wing Grumman Cheetah through the sky about 9:30 a.m.

Still, that didn’t alarm him initially, because he said the planes climb altitude at different rates.

An Eden couple - Richard and Kathleen Walker, both 69 - took off second in their Piper Cherokee, just a bit behind their friend, Paul Rosiek, 60, of Hamburg, who flew first in his Cessna 120.

“I never heard from Walker or Rosiek on the radio at all, but the other three planes did,” Drew told The News in an interview in his home about nine hours after the crash.

“By the time I got up, and heard no reply from them ... I suspect it had already happened,” Drew said.

The third plane, Drew later learned, had received a phone message from a friend that there had been a small plane accident.

When the pilot of the third plane turned back to Hamburg, so did Drew, who was over the Bradford, Pa., airport at the time.

“The Hamburg airport got a hold of us in the air as we headed back,” Drew said. “An instructor radioed me, and said, ‘Bill, the planes went down.’ The sheriff wanted to know how many souls were on board,” Drew recalled. “I said to him, ‘How bad?’ He said, ‘Real bad.’ ”

The investigation

The planes piloted by Walker and Rosiek collided in the bright blue skies above School Street in North Collins, killing all aboard.

North Collins farmer Mike Stefan called 911 after seeing the aircraft collide.

“I think he lifted up to see where his friend was,” Stefan said of the lower plane. “They were so high up in the air that they looked like they were crawling. It literally took 20 to 30 seconds for them to hit the ground.”
Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and Erie County Sheriff’s Office worked Monday to piece together what went wrong just before 9:30 a.m. Sunday when Stefan saw the planes collide in midair a short distance from his farm at School Street and Jennings Road.

Authorities found wreckage at three sites.

About 80 percent of Rosiek's Cessna landed on the north side of School Street in a small swath of open land between a home at 2860 School and a metal storage building.

Wreckage from Walker’s Piper aircraft was found about 400 yards away on the south side of School Street in a hay field.  The tail of the Cessna and a 4-foot section of the Piper’s wingtip were found about 200 feet apart in a cornfield on nearby Larkin Road, said Robert J. Gretz, senior air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Gretz briefed reporters Monday a short distance from the bulk of Rosiek’s plane wreckage. All of the wreckage was expected to be removed by late Monday.

The NTSB investigation is expected to take six to 12 months, with a preliminary report expected to be filed on the agency’s website in about 10 days. The initial report will address what happened and the location, but not detail the cause.

Gretz also indicated that autopsies and toxicology reports are expected to be done on the three victims.

“We will probably try to match the witness statements with the impact marks on the wreckages,” Gretz said. “We will still be looking at the winds (at the time) and the radar data.”

No distress calls were heard from the pilots, and the other pilots flying in the group did not receive any communication, Gretz said.

Radar contact with the two planes was lost at 9:23 a.m. Sunday, one minute before the farmer's 911 call.

“I don’t believe there was a pre-arranged plan to fly in formation,” Gretz said of the six planes that flew out of Hamburg Airport.

The Cessna was a high-wing plane, making it difficult to see above, he said. The Piper is a low-wing plane, making it difficult to see below.

However, witnesses say the Piper was climbing up into the Cessna, so based on the witness statements, "the blind spots would not be consistent with that collision angle," Gretz said.

None of the other pilots whom sheriff’s investigators interviewed witnessed the crash, said Erie County Sheriff’s Detective Capt. Greg Savage.

The collision occurred about eight to nine miles from where the planes took off from the Hamburg Airport,

Multi-colored tarps were lifted from the mangled pieces of wreckage Monday by sheriff’s deputies for the NTSB to inspect.

Losing friends

For Drew, the crash killed a best friend of some 40 years. Richard Walker lived just 1,000 feet away in the same neighborhood off Eckhardt Road. Walker was the reason Drew took up flying. The two were close sailing and hunting buddies, as well.

Richard Walker was retired from a local publishing company. Kathleen Walker was a retired North Collins kindergarten teacher.

Drew also lost his close flying buddy, Rosiek, who ran a plumbing company and enjoyed target shooting with Drew at the Boston Valley Conservation Club.

The three - Drew, Walker and Rosiek - all learned to fly together at Hamburg Airport about 18 years ago. Drew and Walker were fixtures at the airport off Heltz Road.

“He and I were ‘the twins’ at the Hamburg Airport,” said Drew, 75. “We were always together.”

Their passion for flying was born about 20 years ago when one day, Walker came to visit Drew, who was 55 at the time and recovering from cancer.

“He came over with some books on flying and said we should try it,” Drew recalled.

Drew had not been in a plane since he was 15, but decided to give it a go.

“We took flying lessons together, and before we had our license, we’d go to breakfast and then go flying” on Sunday mornings as we trained at the Hamburg Airport, he said.

The two got their pilot licenses in 1998. Rosiek happened to be taking flying lessons at the same time.

“Once we got our licenses, we both bought planes and we’d get a group together and meet at the airport. If it was flying weather, we’d all go out to breakfast,” Drew said. Sometimes, their wives came, and other times, just a few of them came.

‘Emotions in check’

With Drew knowing the grave circumstances, he piloted his plane back to Hamburg, knowing he’d likely lost three friends.

How did he stay calm?

“The first thing they teach you is, ‘Fly the plane,’ ” Drew said.

“You have to keep your emotions in check. Sullenberger did it,” Drew said, recalling how Chesley Sullenberger III, captain of US Airways Flight 1549 successfully landed his disabled aircraft on the Hudson River off Manhattan in January 2009.

After landing in Hamburg, the Drews learned all three had died in the crash. They went to visit Rosiek’s wife and then drove back to the airport, where pilots and friends gathered to grieve and reminisce.

What went wrong in the North Collins skies remains a mystery. Drew noted how it’s difficult to see “out of a plane, up or down” and not “behind you at all.”

He also does not suspect there were any stunts going on in the air at the time of the crash.

“They do not do stunts. Rosiek was adamant about that,” Drew said.

Drew, retired from construction work, vowed to keep flying despite Sunday’s tragedy.

In fact, he expects some of the pilots will continue their breakfast tradition next weekend.

“I think there will be breakfast club next Sunday. They would want it,” he said of the Walkers and Rosiek


Source:   http://live.buffalonews.com




LAKE VIEW, N.Y. -- The three people who died Sunday when two small planes collided over North Collins were a part of the local pilot community, members of which said the collision appears to be a tragic accident. 

Authorities said Paul Rosiek, 60, of Hamburg was piloting a Cessna 120 that collided with another plane, a Piper PA 28, around 9:25 a.m. Sunday carrying Richard and Kathleen Walker, both 69, of Eden. Witnesses told police Kathleen was a local teacher.

The planes were two of six that took off from an airport in Hamburg headed to Saint Mary's Airport in Pennsylvania. 

"They did this regularly. They were a close-knit group. They did things like having a movie night, hot dogs. It was a nice social group," Jerry Malahowski said. 

Malachowski learned to fly at the Hamburg Airport 50 years ago and has kept his plane there for nearly a decade. 

"These things just happen. There are angles at which when you're flying an airplane that you can't see anything, especially if you're flying over somebody or under somebody," said Malahowski. "You just can't see it.

"There's airplane in the way. Of course, with the wings, if you have a high wing airplane like one of these was, then you can't see up because you got this like umbrella over you." 

The Hamburg Airport is located on Heltz Road. The owners, Rod and Charlotte Walsh, have been here for 26 years and they say they've never seen an accident like this before.

"It's such a blow that this should happen. They're very capable. They looked after their plane. This was just very unusual," Rod Walsh said.  

Though this is a tough loss for the Hamburg community, Walsh says more regulation isn't necessary. 

"They're not in a big traffic area where there's a problem with heavy traffic. This is away from the major airports and there's no need for it."

The Hamburg Airport currently serves about 30 small airplanes each year.

The NTSB stated the planes were not in contact with air traffic control and were not required to be because they were in a rural airspace and were not close to the Buffalo Niagara International Airport.

The preliminary report on the crash will be due in about 10 days. The final report won't be completed for about six to 12 months.


Story and video:   http://www.twcnews.com






NORTH COLLINS, N.Y. (WIVB) — A local aviation expert is weighing in on the North Collins plane crash.

Pilot Bob Miller calls this an extremely rare event. Miller tells News 4 there are less than a dozen similar crashes in the United States each year.

He said the planes that collided Sunday were flying in formation, which means two or more aircraft are flying together.

“Formation flying is a skill and it requires a bit of training,” he said. 

“Unfortunately, it’s something that pilots can see as easy to do, ‘let’s just go off and fly together’, much like two cars going down the Thruway at the same time. But things happen a bit quicker in the air, and if they get too close or if one isn’t watching the other one, if they do collide, generally there’s airframe damage to one or both airplanes.”

Miller said in a crash like this one, it comes down to pilot error.

“Sometimes on a bright day like today, you can lose the other aircraft in the sun, and when that happens, there’s temporary blindness,” Miller said. “There are blind spots on an airplane, and flying in formation, of course, both pilots are constantly looking out for each other. But when you’re flying in a pattern where you’re not expecting anyone real close, your attention maybe diverted momentarily to something else.”

Miller said planes like this fly at about two miles a minute so an accident can happen very quickly.

Sunday’s plane crash comes just two years after 14-year-old James Metz and his 78-year-old pilot Anthony Mercurio were killed when their small plane collided with another one in Lancaster. It happened in 2014 in mid-air during an event organized by the local chapter of Experimental Aircraft Association. Authorities said pilot error caused that crash.


Story and video:   http://wivb.com





NORTH COLLINS, N.Y. (WKBW) - The Erie County Sheriff's Office tells 7 Eyewitness News there has been some kind of an aircraft accident in North Collins.

According to reports, one of the planes was located near School Street. 

School Street is closed between Jennings and Larkin Roads.

There are reports of a fatality involved with this crash, but 7 Eyewitness News has not been able to confirm any fatalities or injuries.

Reports also indicate 'heavy wreckage' with this crash.

Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified, and the Erie County Sheriff's Office is securing the scene for them.


Story and video:   http://www.wkbw.com



NORTH COLLINS, N.Y. - Emergency crews are at the scene of a plane crash involving two small planes.

It happened around 9 a.m. Sunday morning. The Erie Co. Sheriff's Department was alerted to the crash by a witness who called 911.  The scene is centered around School Street, Jennings and Eden Roads.  The debris from one of the two planes is on the north side of Jennings Road, the other plane is located on the south side of Jennings Road. 

The NTSB says three people died.  Two on one plane, one on the other.  Officials say they were headed to St. Mary, Pennsylvania.   No names are being released at this time. 

A witness told a Channel 2 photographer at the scene that he saw two planes collide.  Deputies believe the planes took off from the Hamburg Airport and were headed to Pennsylvania when the crash occurred.  The FAA confirmed to 2 On Your Side that a Cessna 120 and a Piper PA 28 made contact in flight and crashed.

Deputies believe the planes took off from the Hamburg Airport and were headed to Pennsylvania when the crash occurred. 


They are asking people to avoid the area while they continue their investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.wgrz.com















Mike Stefan regularly sees small aircraft soaring over his hay farm in North Collins, so he wasn’t surprised to see a group of planes flying far overhead on Sunday, a clear, bright morning.

But then he saw two of the planes, flying side by side, appear to come together, one on top of the other.

What happened next horrified him.

“And then the bottom one came up into the top one, and his wing hit, maybe, the tail of the other plane,” Stefan said. “The top plane literally disintegrated.”

Three people died in the midair collision and crash, which are under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration. The crash left a debris field over a one-quarter to one-half-mile section of School Street, between Larkin and Eden roads in North Collins, officials said.

One of the victims was flying a Cessna 120, and the other two victims were flying in a Piper PA-28-140, according to an administrator at Hamburg Airport and aircraft registration records.

The victims were among a group of six aircraft flying from the Hamburg Airport to a small airport in Pennsylvania to get a meal on Sunday morning, officials said.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation, with the NTSB investigator likely to issue his preliminary report within two weeks.

But veteran pilots said collisions can happen even in ideal flying conditions, and the crash has rattled the close-knit community of flyers at Hamburg Airport.

“We’re all shaking in our boots now,” Larry Walsh, the airport’s vice president, told The Buffalo News.

The group of six aircraft took off into blue skies at about 9 a.m. Sunday from the airport in Lake View, Walsh said, on their way to St. Marys Municipal Airport in St. Marys, Pa.

The two pilots were experienced amateur pilots, each with at least 15 years of flying, Walsh said. Both planes, the Cessna and the Piper, are single-engine, fixed-wing planes.

Walsh said he didn’t know the cause of the crash but even on a clear day, with good visibility, one pilot can lose sight of another; for example, if one flies underneath or above the other.

“There are a number of blind spots,” Walsh said.

The first 911 call came in from a cellphone at 9:24 a.m., sheriff’s officials said.

“We have several eyewitnesses who saw the planes approaching before there was contact,” said Scott Joslyn, chief of patrol services.

Stefan was one of them. He said he made the 911 call after watching the two planes collide. He said the planes took more than 20 seconds to fall to the ground.

A third plane remained overhead, circling the crash site for a time, Stefan said, while the fourth plane traveled on, appearing to not have realized what had happened. Stefan never saw the fifth and sixth planes that took off from Hamburg.

Stefan and his 12-year-old son, Ryan, raced over to the crash site.

“My immediate thought was, how are we going to find it? The corn is 10 feet high out here,” Mike Stefan said.

Karen Ricotta, a North Collins town justice who lives on School Street, said she heard a noise at about 9:30 a.m. “And when I looked outside, you could see something next door on a mowed farm field. I couldn’t identify what it was,” Ricotta told The News. “But when I went outside, another man driving by pulled in my yard and told me it was a plane in the field. I called 911, but they already had been called.”

The crash sites for the two aircraft are about 400 yards apart, Joslyn said, one on the south side of School Street and one on the north side.

North Collins Supervisor John M. Tobia said the devastation from the crash could have been worse.

“It missed a house by 100 feet,” Tobia said. One aircraft landed in a field and the other landed between a metal storage building and a wooded area, the supervisor said.

“It’s like a pancake; it’s crushed,” Tobia said. “You can’t tell it’s an aircraft.”

Brian Schmitt lives at School Street and Jennings Road near the two crash sites. “I’m upset. I’m shocked that you could be in the air one minute and dead the next,” said Schmitt, a member of Langford Volunteer Fire Company, which responded to the crash.

Erie County sheriff’s personnel preserved the scene until federal investigators could get to the area. They were assisted by the North Collins and Langford fire companies, Eden police and North Collins rescue.

The Erie County medical examiner also was called. Roads in the immediate area were closed for several hours Sunday.

“Locating any piece of those crafts all tell a tale,” Joslyn said. “It’s going to be real important to have a good search of the area.”

The FAA sent a team from Rochester and the NTSB investigator was driving in Sunday from New York City, said Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the safety board.

The safety board investigator would begin work either Sunday evening, if he arrived while it was still daylight, or first thing Monday morning, Knudson said.

The investigator will collect perishable evidence, including any relevant radar images of the flights, recorded conversations with the pilots, witness interviews, flight plans, data from GPS or other electronic devices in the planes or that the passengers were carrying, Knudson said.

“They want to get that stuff documented,” he said.

A preliminary report should be available within two weeks, but the entire accident investigation likely will take 12 months, Knudson said.

Not much was immediately known about the two pilots.

However, the passenger was identified as a retired kindergarten teacher at North Collins Elementary School by Schmitt and by Stefan, who is on the North Collins School Board.

Sunday's tragedy isn't the first time that two planes have collided in Western New York skies with deadly consequences. Almost exactly two years ago – on Sept. 27, 2014 – two people died in a crash in Lancaster when one single-engine aircraft clipped another.

“It was a perfect clear day,” Sheriff’s Detective Capt. Greg Savage said at a media briefing Sunday, “just like it was in the Lancaster crash.”

The two small planes were preparing to land at Buffalo-Lancaster Regional Airport, one in front of the other on the same flight path, just like countless planes on other landing paths at airports every day. Coming up from behind, the bigger, faster Cessna descended and struck a smaller experimental aircraft, called a Searey, before spiraling out of control to the ground.

Anthony Mercurio, 78, was flying in a small plane with James Metz, 14. Both were killed. The pilot of the other plane and that plane's passenger, a 9-year-old girl, survived.

The two youngsters and volunteer pilots were taking part in an event at the Buffalo-Lancaster Regional Airport designed to introduce young people to the thrill of flying.