Wednesday, May 25, 2022

New study for Venice Municipal Airport (KVNC) master plan to weigh merits adding a control tower

VENICE, Florida – With an eye toward determining whether an air traffic control tower is needed because of increasing traffic at the Venice Municipal Airport, the Venice City Council is launching an update of the airport's master plan.

Such an update would include an assessment of whether a control tower is warranted. 

The decision came following a presentation Tuesday by Dave Wimberly and Paul Hollowell of Venice Aviation Society, Inc., which included discussion of the airport's increased use.

“What was once a nice small-town airport has been discovered,” said Wimberly, the VASI president.

Hollowell, the VASI treasurer, pointed out that there are about 90,000 takeoffs or landings – logged collectively as “operations” – every year at the airport, as tracked by Vector airport systems cameras.

Hollowell noted that an air traffic control tower directs flow around the airport in the same way that either a roundabout or traffic signals control vehicular traffic on roads.

Both speakers stressed that the airport is currently safe.

“As far as the airport now, the pilots are on their game,” Hollowell said “When you enter the pattern you are on your game to maintain the perspective, the situational awareness.”

The current master plan was developed in 2008 and approved in 2011.

VASI made a request in March 2008 for the city to apply to the FAA for a tower under its contract tower program, in anticipation of aviation growth.

That council did not act on the request.

Venice Airport Director Mark Cervasio noted that the airport had slotted a request for funding to conduct a new master plan in the 2025 fiscal year, so the council is asking for funding from the Federal Aviation Administration, which would cover up to 90% of the plan's cost.

The findings would then be used by the FAA to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of building a control tower.

The city could have also hired a consultant at anywhere from $8,000 to $10,000 to collect the data the FAA would use as the basis for its analysis but the master plan rewrite offers a more comprehensive solution.

If the FAA decides a tower is warranted, it could build and operate it, but a more likely scenario – such as at Punta Gorda Airport – would have it established as a contract tower that would be built by the city and paid for out of the airport enterprise fund.

It would then be staffed by FAA-certified contractors.

A third operation would be e remote tower, where an off-site contractor directs air traffic remotely and monitors it through a series of cameras and infrared sensors.

That option is primarily being used in Europe but is currently in operation as pilot projects at airports in Loveland, Colorado, and Leesburg, Virginia.

Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, N8221R: Incident occurred May 20, 2022 at Enterprise Municipal Airport (KEDN), Coffee County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft landed in the grass adjacent to the runway gear up. 

Creel Air LLC


Date: 20-MAY-22
Time: 14:17:00Z
Regis#: N8221R
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 17-30A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ENTERPRISE
State: ALABAMA

Aviat A-1B Husky, N305AM: Incident occurred May 22, 2022 at Seldovia Airport (PASO), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft exited runway and ended up in a swamp inverted.  


Date: 22-MAY-22
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N305AM
Aircraft Make: AVIAT
Aircraft Model: A-1B
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: SELDOVIA
State:  ALASKA

Cessna 182C Skylane, N757R: Incident occurred May 22, 2022 in Port Moller, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft had a mishap at Port Moller Airport (PAAL), Cold Bay, Alaska


Date:  22-MAY-22
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N757R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: PORT MOLLER
State:  ALASKA

Cessna P172D Skyhawk, N8540X: Accident occurred May 22, 2022 near Prescott Regional Airport (KPRC), Yavapai County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona


Location: Prescott, Arizona
Accident Number: WPR22LA186
Date and Time: May 22, 2022, 09:13 Local
Registration: N8540X
Aircraft: Cessna P172D 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 22, 2022, about 0913 mountain standard time, a Cessna P172D airplane, N8540X, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Prescott, Arizona. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff from Prescott Regional Airport, while climbing over the airport perimeter fence, the airplane’s engine lost power and suddenly stopped. He immediately cycled the magnetos, pushed the mixture to full rich, and pushed the nose down. Despite his efforts, the engine did not restart. Subsequently, the pilot initiated a forced landing in a field about 1 mile beyond the runway threshold. During the landing roll, the airplane impacted a tree stump, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

The airplane was recovered to a secured facility for future examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N8540X
Model/Series: P172D 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLG,7018 ft msl 
Observation Time: 08:57 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C /2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Prescott, AZ 
Destination: Prescott, AZ

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.140316,-111.66924 (est)
 
 




Aircraft departed, experienced engine issues and tried returning to the airport and failed. 

Date: 22-MAY-22
Time: 16:13:00Z
Regis#: N8540X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: P172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity:  PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: PRESCOTT
State: ARIZONA

Pilatus PC-12/47E, N79NX: Fatal accident occurred February 13, 2022 in Beaufort, Carteret County, North Carolina

Case No. 22-CVS-446 



Defendant Dillon’s Aviation is vicariously liable, by operation of law, for Mr. Rawls’ act or omissions in the following respects:

a. Mr. Rawls failed to fly the subject aircraft safely;

b. Mr. Rawls failed to maintain control over the subject aircraft;

c. Mr. Rawls improperly flew into IFR conditions;

d. Mr. Rawls failed to properly avoid restricted airspace, leading to an erratic and irregular flight path;

e. Mr. Rawls improperly relied on a co-pilot with inadequate training and experience to fly around the restrict airspace, and to fly in the weather conditions that were present on the day of the subject flight;

f. Mr. Rawls’ training of Jeffery Worthington Rawls during the subject flight diverted Mr. Rawls’s attention from flying the aircraft safely;

g. Mr. Rawls failed to maintain adequate communication with air traffic control;

h. Mr. Rawls failed to conduct a proper weight and balance evaluation prior to take off;

i. Mr. Rawls’ negligent piloting led to his subsequent spatial disorientation; and

j. Mr. Rawls failed to properly and safely operate the aircraft, resulting in a crash.


Ernest Durwood Rawls



The families of four people — including three teens — who died in a February plane crash off the North Carolina coast are suing the companies that owned the plane and employed the pilot, who also died. The suit claims the pilot failed to properly fly the single-engine plane in weather conditions with limited visibility, making the firms liable.
All eight people onboard the Pilatus PC-12/47E died when it descended into the Atlantic Ocean off the Outer Banks. Four teenagers and two adults on the plane were returning from a hunting trip. The two others were the pilot and his adult son, who was a student pilot, the suit said.

The wrongful death suit was filed Tuesday in Carteret County against EDP Management Group LLC and Green Assets, both of Wilmington, and Dillon’s Aviation of Greenville.

The plane took off February 13 in the early afternoon from Hyde County Airport, which is on the mainland near the Pamlico Sound. The plane's destination was southwest across the sound to Beaufort, which is along the southern edge of the Outer Banks in Carteret County.

The suit alleges that pilot Ernest "Teen" Rawls failed to maintain control over the plane and improperly flew into weather conditions with limited visibility that required the use of instrumentation.

The suit also asserts that Rawls failed to maintain adequate communication with air traffic control and failed to avoid restricted military airspace, “leading to an erratic and irregular flight path.”

The suit alleges that Rawls improperly relied on a co-pilot with “inadequate training and experience” to fly around the restricted airspace and in those weather conditions. Rawls’ son, Jeffrey Rawls, reportedly, had 20 hours of flight experience, the suit stated.

The suit also claims that Rawls failed to conduct a proper weight and balance evaluation before taking off.

A person who answered the phone at a number for Green Assets said the company was declining comment. The website for Green Assets listed Hunter Parks, one of the people who died in the crash, as its founder and chairman. His family is not among those who sued.

Email and phone messages seeking comment from Dillon’s Aviation and EDP Management Group were not immediately returned.

In late February, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary accident report that the pilot had made no distress calls and no declarations of an emergency.

The airplane had reached 4,700 feet (1,430 meters) and was climbing quickly, the NTSB's report stated. There was no response to calls from an air traffic controller, and radar contact was lost.

A final report from the NTSB has not been issued.

Andrew Robb, a Kansas City-based aviation attorney who filed the lawsuit on behalf of the four families, said by phone that the plane's lack of distress calls and climbing altitude were hallmarks of a pilot becoming spatially disoriented.

“If there was a problem with the mechanics or the electronics or something on that airplane that caused this 3,000-foot ascent, you would think that the pilot would have made some kind of communication,” Robb said.

The lawsuit was filed by the families of passengers Noah Styron, 15; Michael Shepherd, 15; Jacob Taylor, 16; and Stephanie Fulcher, 42.

Others who were onboard included Parks, 45, and Jonathan Kole McInnis, 15.

Rawls and his son lived in Greenville, authorities said in February. Fulcher, Parks and the four teens lived in Carteret County. The mostly rural county is home to older fishing villages as well as touristy areas that include Emerald Isle and Cape Lookout National Seashore.

The four teenagers went to East Carteret High School, which has about 600 students.

Charlie Snow, a close friend of the pilot, told The Associated Press in February that Rawls had previously flown for Snow’s company, Outer Banks Airlines, and was highly trained and extremely capable.

“If anybody could get out of something, if it was possible to get out of it, he could have done it,” Snow said.



 

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina
Hartzell Propellers; Piqua, Ohio
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Gatineau,  Quebec, Canada
Pratt & Whitney Canada; Saint-Hubert,  Quebec, Canada
Swiss Transportation Safety Investigation Board; Payerne, Switzerland
Pilatus Aircraft Ltd; Stans, Switzerland

EDP Management Group LLC


Location: Beaufort, North Carolina
Accident Number: ERA22LA120
Date and Time: February 13, 2022, 14:02 Local
Registration: N79NX
Aircraft: PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD PC-12/47E 
Injuries: 8 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 13, 2022, about 1402 eastern standard time, a Pilatus PC-12, N79NX, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Beaufort, North Carolina. The commercial pilot, student pilot, and 6 passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane departed Pitt-Greenville Airport (PGV), Greenville, North Carolina, about 1235, and landed at Hyde County Airport (7W6), Engelhard, North Carolina, at 1255. Then, the airplane departed runway 29 from 7W6, about 1335.

After departure, the pilot contacted air traffic control, reported they were going to level off at 3,500 ft mean sea level (msl), and requested visual flight rules (VFR) flight following as well as an instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance into Michael J. Smith Field Airport (MRH), Beaufort, North Carolina. At 1338, the controller advised the pilot that nearby restricted airspace was active, and the pilot confirmed that they would remain clear of the airspace and fly to the east. At 1341, the controller called the pilot and indicated that they were about to enter the restricted airspace. After multiple calls with no response from the pilot, the controller instructed the military aircraft in the restricted airspace to remain above 4,000 ft msl. At 1349, the pilot called the controller and requested the RNAV approach to runway 26 but was denied the request because of the active restricted airspace. Furthermore, the controller queried the pilot as to why he did not respond to the earlier radio calls, and the pilot responded that he “was trying to get out” and was unable to receive the radio transmissions. The controller offered an approach to runway 8 or runway 3, and the pilot chose runway 8.

At 1352, the controller reported that the restricted airspace was not active anymore and asked if the pilot wanted the RNAV approach to runway 26 instead. The pilot responded that he would appreciate that, and the controller cleared the pilot direct to CIGOR, the initial approach fix for the RNAV 26 approach. At 1355, the controller called the airplane and asked to verify if they were direct to CIGOR because the airplane was still on a southwesterly heading. The pilot responded “roger” and the controller said the airplane could proceed direct to CIGOR, to cross the waypoint at or above 1,900 ft msl and was cleared for the runway 26 RNAV approach. The pilot read back the instructions correctly and then at 1358, the controller contacted the airplane and issued a heading to CIGOR, but then indicated the airplane was “correcting now.” At 1358:46, the controller called the pilot and issued the local altimeter setting because the airplane was at 1,700 ft msl and was supposed to maintain 1,900 ft msl. The pilot read back the altimeter setting correctly, and that was the last transmission from the airplane.

At 1401, the controller called the airplane and asked what altitude it was at because the airplane was at 4,700 ft msl and climbing quickly. There was no response. Radar contact was lost with the airplane at 1402 and an ALNOT was issued at 1429. Throughout the communication with air traffic control, there were no distress calls or a declaration of emergency from the airplane.

The airplane impacted the Atlantic Ocean and was located by the US Coast Guard 3 miles offshore in about 60 ft of water. Dive crews recovered an ELT and a Light Data Recorder (LDR). The LDR was sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for data download.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot seated in the left seat held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. In addition, he held a ground instructor certificate and held a mechanic certificate for airframe and powerplant. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued June 28, 2021. At that time, he reported 3,000 hours of flight experience.

According to FAA airman records, the passenger seated in the right seat held a student pilot certificate. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on July 6, 2021, and at that time he reported 20 hours of flight experience.

An examination of the wreckage is pending recovery.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD
Registration: N79NX
Model/Series: PC-12/47E 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MRH,8 ft msl
Observation Time: 13:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C /6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 18 knots, 20°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 900 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Engelhard, NC (7W6)
Destination: Beaufort, NC (MRH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 6 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 8 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 34.81355,-76.2871

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 


Jeffrey Worthington Rawls and Ernest (Teen) Durwood Rawls 


Ernest "Teen" Durwood Rawls 

Jonathan "Kole" McInnis

Jacob "Jake" Nolan Taylor

Michael Daily Shepherd

Noah Lee Styron

Stephanie Anne Fulcher

Douglas Hunter Parks

Ernest Durwood Rawls



Pilot Ernest "Teen" Rawls and passenger Jake Taylor

Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster, N875FE: Incident occurred May 20, 2022 at Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (KFLG), Coconino County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft struck fence pole with leading edge of left wing during taxi. 

Federal Express Corporation


Date: 20-MAY-22
Time: 15:05:00Z
Regis#:  N875FE
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 208
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Aircraft Operator:  FEDERAL EXPRESS
Flight Number: CFS8775
City: FLAGSTAFF
State: ARIZONA

Airbus A321-211, N705FR: Incident occurred May 18, 2022 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft struck a bird on landing damaging radome. 

Frontier Airlines


Date: 18-MAY-22
Time: 05:27:00Z
Regis#: N705FR
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: FRONTIER AIRLINES
Flight Number: FFT519
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 310R, N310DC: Accident occurred May 23, 2022 in Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft experienced engine issues, landed in a field, struck a barbed wire fence and caught on fire. 


Date: 23-MAY-22
Time: 00:55:00Z
Regis#: N310DC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: PANAMA CITY
State: FLORIDA

Piaggio P.180 Avanti, N268TA: Incident occurred May 20, 2022 at Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Hendry County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft veered off runway during landing. 

Pierwest Aviation LLC


Date:  20-MAY-22
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N268TA
Aircraft Make: PIAGGIO AERO
Aircraft Model: P180
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: CLEWISTON
State:  FLORIDA

Piper PA-28-140, N6021W: Incident occurred May 22, 2022 at Gwinnett County Airport (KLZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft landed, porpoised and the right wing touched the runway.  


Date: 22-MAY-22
Time: 22:37:00Z
Regis#: N6021W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAWRENCEVILLE
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, N516AP: Incident occurred May 20, 2022 at Dillant/Hopkins Airport (KEEN), Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing. 


Date: 20-MAY-22
Time: 17:40:00Z
Regis#: N516AP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177RG
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KEENE
State:  NEW HAMPSHIRE

Wilderness Flyer SQ3, N123SQ: Incident occurred May 21, 2022 in Millbrook, Dutchess County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft landed and flipped over.  

Black Dog Holdings Inc


Date:  21-MAY-22
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N123SQ
Aircraft Make: WILDERNESS FLYER
Aircraft Model: SQ3
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MILLBROOK
State:  NEW YORK

Evektor EV-97 SportStar, N503RK: Accident occurred May 21, 2022 in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio

National Transportation Safety Board accident report number: ERA22LA241

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aircraft crashed in a field under unknown circumstances.  

Ajilix Aerospace LLC


Date: 21-MAY-22
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N503RK
Aircraft Make: EVEKTOR-AEROTECHNIK
Aircraft Model: SPORTSTAR
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: LANCASTER
State: OHIO

Van's RV-6A, N811RF: Accident occurred May 21, 2022 at Prineville Airport (S39), Crook County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft during a crosswind landing veered off the runway and left wing struck a tree. 


Date: 21-MAY-22
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N811RF
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PRINEVILLE
State: OREGON

Maule M-4-210 C Rocket, N9840M: Incident occurred May 23, 2022 in Portland, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft veered off runway during takeoff and landing gear collapsed. 


Date: 23-MAY-22
Time: 00:40:00Z
Regis#: N9840M
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON

Boeing A75N1, N422DE: Accident occurred May 22, 2022 in Marion, Guadalupe County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Cibolo Creek Aviation LLC


Location: Marion, Texas
Accident Number: CEN22LA213
Date and Time: May 22, 2022, 17:30 Local
Registration: N422DE
Aircraft: Boeing A75N1
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Boeing 
Registration: N422DE
Model/Series: A75N1
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.495509,-98.157787 (est)

Aircraft bounced after landing on grass strip, ground looped, exited the runway and came to rest on a gravel road.

Date: 22-MAY-22
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N422DE
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: A75N1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MARION
State: TEXAS

Socata TBM700, N940FR: Incident occurred May 21, 2022 at Winchester Regional Airport (KOKV), Frederick County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing. 

Lets Go 2 LLC


Date: 21-MAY-22
Time: 21:25:00Z
Regis#: N940FR
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TBM700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WINCHESTER
State: VIRGINIA

Piper PA-28-140, N56887: Incident occurred May 22, 2022 at Felts Field Airport (KSFF), Spokane County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.  


Date: 22-MAY-22
Time: 22:12:00Z
Regis#: N56887
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SPOKANE
State: WASHINGTON

Fremont Municipal Airport (KFET) advisory committee talks about grass runway possibility




An advisory committee talked about the possibility of having a grass runway when they met Friday morning at Fremont Municipal Airport.

Members of the airport advisory committee also talked about items – including a maintenance hangar and updated Airport Layout Plan (ALP) – which they’d like to see regularly listed as discussion items on the monthly agenda.

In January, board members talked about reconstruction of portions of the runway and a connecting taxiway.

Concrete in these portions has been deteriorating — from within — due to an adverse chemical reaction. This deterioration is occurring at multiple sites in Nebraska and other states.

Board members and Jim Kjeldgaard, president of Fremont Aviation which operates the airport, have estimated it could take nine months for concrete removal and replacement.

Not using the runway for this amount of time would seriously impact Fremont Aviation along with other businesses that use the airport, Kjeldgaard said, and board members discussed possible alternatives.

“The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) is apparently approving a number of grass runways,” said Bill Dugan, board member. “We have plenty of space for a north-south grass runway, which would be a very little expense I would think.”

A new FAA advisory acknowledges it will allow turf operations within Runway Safety Areas.

Dugan asked Dave Goedeken, director of public works for the City of Fremont, if he could look into this possibility for the local airport.

Goedeken said he could speak to Anna Lannin, engineering division manager of the Nebraska Department of Transportation, Division of Aeronautics.

Members added that though larger aircraft couldn’t use the grass runway, smaller ones could. At this time, the grass runway is open at Wahoo Airport and its paved one is closed for reconstruction.

During past meetings, the committee discussed whether the former Runway 1-19 could be used when the main runway is shut down due to reconstruction or rehabilitation.

Goedeken previously said Lannin wasn’t very hopeful about that alternative because the FAA had decommissioned that runway.

At Friday’s meeting, board member Jeff Peterson wondered if the runway actually was decommissioned.

Peterson said he researched online what it would take to decommission a runway – and found an extensive list.

“It was like a three-page checklist,” Peterson said. “There’s a lot of stuff.”

Peterson said, however, if the FAA actually did decommission Runway 1-19 and is approving grass runways, he believes the latter is an excellent option.

Eric Johnson, board member, added that they’d need to make sure the grass runway meets FAA standards for safety and wouldn’t interfere with any future pavement.

Like members at previous meetings, Peterson expressed concern about the airport being closed during runway work.

“If I’ve learned anything the last two years, you don’t shut business down,” Peterson said. “I know it’s hard. We want to try and do what we have to do, but I think shutting a business down is a disaster – even if it’s for three months.”

In talking about runways, Alison Adams, board member, asked if work on the ALP was moved forward.

By definition, this plan shows existing facilities and intended development of an airport and Johnson previously has said the FAA looks at an ALP like a bible for the airport.

Goedeken said work on the ALP has been moved ahead.

Initially, ALP work was suggested for 2026 in the Airport’s Capital Improvement Plan (CIP).

The board voted in January to recommend moving that work to 2024 when presenting the airport’s CIP to the Fremont City Council.

As members discussed maintenance items – such as hangar repair and replacement of lights—interim Fremont City Administrator Jody Sanders posed a question.

Instead of reporting a list of repairs at a meeting, Sanders wondered about members reporting them on an as-needed basis.

That way, meeting discussion could focus on what had been accomplished.

Johnson said an Iowa airport has maintenance item discussion on its agendas with a checklist of major projects.

Tom Randall, board vice chairman, wondered if members could submit repair requests online and liked the idea of a written checklist with follow-up.

Dugan wondered about reporting repair requests to Fremont Aviation personnel. Goedeken said the personnel then could contact him.

Randall also advocated for putting a proposed maintenance hangar on each monthly agenda.

“It seems like to me if we’re going to get something done on the maintenance hangar, it’s going to have to be a grassroots effort on our part and, to me, the viability of the airport depends on getting a maintenance hangar,” Randall said.

The maintenance hangar would house incoming planes and serve as a place where aircraft are inspected and repaired. The current maintenance hangar is too small to house aircraft, a concern for people who fly here.

Business owners and other guests don’t want their planes outdoors when hail or other storms occur.

That’s especially true of multi-million dollar corporate jets that bring people to Fremont on business or to look at the city as a company’s future site.

The board repeatedly has talked about a shortage of smaller hangars at the airport.

Dugan asked if there is space to build more hangars.

Goedeken said there is space and he will ask Lannin how the airport could expand based on its current ALP.

Kjeldgaard asked about possible grants.

Unless funds could be provided through recent legislation that will provide money for airport-related projects, there are loans, Goedeken said. But he cited a past instance when the city, under a former administrator, came in upside down on a payback.

Kjeldgaard contended that the airport is part of Fremont and pilot Ken Cox robustly expressed his thoughts in regard to getting funding for projects.

“The airport actually brings in money and it’s a very small percentage that screams about things out here, where you’ve got 90 percent of the city that will holler if a park needs mowed—or this or that—that doesn’t actually make any money. This is the red-headed stepchild of the city,” Cox said.

In other business, Goedeken said some work still needs to be done on the new airport terminal. Operations will continue in the existing terminal until such time as permanent occupancy can take place in the new one.

Goedeken said furnishings have been ordered.

“As we get things, we will move in,” Goedeken said. “We’ve got a beautiful building.”

Members met at the new building on Friday.

Dugan asked about plans for the existing terminal. Peterson recommended determining what the building is worth rent wise and receiving income from it.

The Fremont Airport Advisory Committee meets at 8:15 a.m. the third Friday of each month. Meetings are open to the public.



de Havilland Canada DHC-3T Turbine Otter, N703TH: Accident occurred May 24, 2022 in Yakutat, Alaska

National Transportation Safety Board accident report number: ANC22LA035 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. 

Yakutat Coastal Airlines


Date: 24-MAY-22
Time: 23:40:00Z
Regis#: N703TH
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC-3
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
City: YAKUTAT
State: ALASKA

Cozy Mark IV, N944CZ: Incident occurred May 24, 2022 at Page Municipal Airport (KPGA), Coconino County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed with nose gear retracted. 


Date: 25-MAY-22
Time: 02:40:00Z
Regis#: N944CZ
Aircraft Make: COZY
Aircraft Model: MARK IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PAGE
State: ARIZONA

Boeing 737-4K5, N708DA: Incident occurred May 24, 2022

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft departed Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (KCVG) and tire fragments were discovered, continued to Minneapolis–Saint Paul International Airport (KMSP) and after landing required a tow as landing gear was damaged.  

Mesa Airlines


Date: 24-MAY-22
Time: 23:25:00Z
Regis#: N708DA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: ASH1585
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MINNESOTA

Pilatus PC-12/47E, N911MN: Incident occurred May 24, 2022 at Eureka Municipal Airport (3W8), McPherson County, South Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aircraft struck a deer on landing.  


Date: 24-MAY-22
Time: 01:45:00Z
Regis#: N911MN
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AMBULANCE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EUREKA
State: SOUTH DAKOTA