Saturday, March 20, 2021

Piper PA-16, N676SC: Accident occurred March 31, 2019 at Afton Municipal Airport (KAFO), Lincoln County, Wyoming





Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Afton, WY
Accident Number: GAA19CA184
Date & Time: 03/31/2019, 1130 MDT
Registration: N676SC
Aircraft: Piper PA 16
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, upon landing, the airplane bounced twice and started to veer left. He immediately applied power to go around, but the main landing gear struck a snowbank, and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left and right wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a bounced landing and loss of directional control and the airplane's subsequent impact with a snowbank and nose-over during an attempted go-around.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Aircraft Landing flare - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Environmental issues Snow/ice - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-aborted after touchdown Abnormal runway contact
Landing-aborted after touchdown Loss of control on ground
Landing-aborted after touchdown Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing-aborted after touchdown Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing-aborted after touchdown Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/13/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2293 hours (Total, all aircraft), 34 hours (Total, this make and model), 2094 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N676SC
Model/Series: PA 16 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1949
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 16-676
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/22/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2405 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAFO, 6221 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1735 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 4°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Afton, WY (AFO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Afton, WY (AFO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Afton Muni (AFO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 6220 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7025 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.708889, -110.942222 (est)

JetBlue considers whether to leave New York City and move to Florida

NEW YORK -- JetBlue Airways is considering whether to stay in New York, where it was founded two decades ago, or move its headquarters to Florida.

A spokeswoman for the airline said Thursday that a decision is expected later this year. She said more than 1,300 employees work at the headquarters in Long Island City, across the East River from Manhattan.

The airline said in a statement that its current lease in expires in July 2023 and it is reviewing its options “and considering how our space requirements may evolve in a hybrid work environment post-pandemic.”

JetBlue said it is exploring a number of options, including staying in its current headquarters, moving elsewhere in New York City, or shifting some New York-based jobs to existing JetBlue facilities in Florida. The airline has a training center in Orlando and a travel-products subsidiary in Fort Lauderdale.

The airline said that no matter what it decides about the headquarters, it still plans to expand at all three New York City-area major airports.

The airline's plans were previously reported by the New York Post, which obtained a memo to headquarters staff.

JetBlue began flying in 2000 and is currently the nation's sixth-largest airline by passenger-carrying capacity. Its strongest routes are up and down the East Coast. It flies to nearby international destinations including the Caribbean, and plans to launch service to London later this year.

Like other carriers, JetBlue has been hit hard by the pandemic. It lost nearly $1.4 billion last year, as revenue fell more than 63% compared with 2019.

Rockwell S-2R-T Turbo Thrush, N4250X: Accident occurred March 28, 2019 near Hermiston Municipal Airport (KHRI), Umatilla County, Oregon







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Hermiston, OR
Accident Number: GAA19CA185
Date & Time: 03/28/2019, 1453 PDT
Registration: N4250X
Aircraft: Rockwell S 2R
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

Analysis

The pilot reported that, after completing an agricultural application flight, he returned to the airport. He added that, on final, he added flaps and became distracted by a spray handle that became open due to vibration. He took his hand off the control stick to close the spray handle, but because the airplane was improperly trimmed, the airplane pitched down severely. He pitched the nose up to about level, but the main landing gear struck the ground. The airplane bounced and impacted an irrigation system, the right main landing gear separated, and the airplane spun around before coming to rest.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's distraction due to a spray handle opening and his improper pitch trim setting during final approach, which resulted in an excessive pitchdown when he took his hand off the controls to close the handle.

Findings

Aircraft Pitch control - Not attained/maintained
Aircraft Elevator tab control system - Incorrect use/operation
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Personnel issues Attention - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern final Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)
Approach-VFR pattern final Attempted remediation/recovery
Approach-VFR pattern final Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Approach-VFR pattern final Part(s) separation from AC

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/28/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/29/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 12744 hours (Total, all aircraft), 11749 hours (Total, this make and model), 12633 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Rockwell
Registration: N4250X
Model/Series: S 2R No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 2030R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/15/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 19154.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: GE Aviation
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: M601E-11
Registered Owner: Pesicka, Theodore J.
Rated Power: 751 hp
Operator: AG Specialties INC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHRI, 641 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 67°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hermiston, OR (HRI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Hermiston, OR (HRI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1421 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: HERMISTON MUNI (HRI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 644 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4501 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 45.820000, -119.280833 (est)

John Yurkovich Jr: New Jersey man accused of causing emergency airplane landing in Charleston federally indicted

A federal grand jury has formally indicted a New Jersey man accused of starting a fight that forced a Florida-bound airliner to make an emergency landing in Charleston last month.

John Yurkovich Jr. faces one count of assault within special aircraft jurisdiction of the United States, according to the indictment, which was filed on April 6. 

Yurkovich’s attorney, Rose Mary Parham, could not be reach by phone or email for comment. 

The 45-year-old Millstone Township, N.J., resident also faces one count of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine. That charge is being handled in state court. 

Yurkovich had been flying from Newark, N.J., to Miami, but pilots made an unplanned landing at Charleston International Airport after a fight broke out in the cabin.

A passenger told police Yurkovich seemed agitated upon returning from the bathroom and took out pills from his carry-on bag. He began screaming and thrashing, according to an incident report, then punched a neighboring passenger and broke the man’s glasses.

Everyone involved declined hospital treatment.

A doctor on board gave Yurkovich a shot of Benadryl to subdue him, authorities said. By the time authorities boarded the plane, they found Yurkovich face down on the floor with a belt and zip ties binding his hands behind his back.

His shirt had been pulled over his head, according to an incident report, and one officer found about 1.5 grams of a white crystal substance in his pocket.


 
John Yurkovich Jr.
Charleston Airport Police Department


A New Jersey man was arrested this week after federal officials say he attacked two people on a plane while he was in possession of methamphetamine.

John Yurkovich Jr., 45, of Middlesex County, was a passenger on Flight 728, which departed Newark Liberty International Airport at 8:14 a.m. Wednesday bound for Miami, according to the FBI and public records.

Less than an hour into the flight, Yurkovich became “unruly and assaulted multiple people,” FBI special agent Joseph Hamski wrote in a criminal complaint on Thursday.

The incident apparently began when Yurkovich got out of his seat and walked to the rear of the plane. When he returned, he “was acting erratic and appeared to be off-balanced,” the complaint states.

Yurkovich demanded a flight attendant bring him water, then he removed a bag from the overhead compartment and appeared to fish out a pill and swallow it, according to the complaint.

When a passenger nearby put his arms up to keep Yurkovich from falling on him, Yurkovich allegedly grew enraged, took off his face mask and shouted: “Don’t f------ talk to me. Don’t f------ touch me,” the complaint states.

The complaint alleges Yurkovich punched the passenger several times in the face and head, breaking his glasses and causing him to bleed from an ear. (The passenger later required seven stitches to close a cut to his ear, the FBI said).

The passenger, who was wearing his seatbelt during the assault, wrapped his arms around Yurkovich and tried to pull his shirt up over his head, the complaint states.

By then, several other passengers jumped up and tried to stop the assault. One of them “was punched in the nose by Yurkovich, causing (the nose) to bleed and swell,” the complaint states, adding that a doctor later determined the passenger’s nose had been broken.

A flight attendant brought the passengers zip-ties, which they used to place on Yurkovich’s wrist and restrain him until the plane could land, according to the complaint.

A doctor aboard the plane, who witnessed the fracas, retrieved his medical bag and injected Yurkovich with a shot of Benadryl® in his buttock “to help sedate him,” according to a report from a police officer with the Charleston County Aviation Authority.

Police at the airport said they found Yurkovich face down on the floor, his shirt covering his face, and his wrists restrained with zip-ties and a belt. Airport police searched Yurkovich, finding 2 grams of methamphetamine on him, the FBI said.

The pilot told the FBI he declared a Level 3 emergency due to “a riot (that) had ensued on the plane,” and he diverted the flight to South Carolina.

Yurkovich was held in South Carolina on drug charges. He also faces federal assault charges and criminal acts on an aircraft, the FBI said.

Public records show Yurkovich has addresses in Middlesex and Monmouth counties. He states on his Facebook profile that he is a branch manager for a mortgage company, attended Piscataway High School, and lives in Old Bridge.

Collision During Takeoff/Landing: Piper PA-28-140, N6412W; accident occurred March 28, 2019 at Barrow County Airport (KWDR), Winder, Georgia






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Flying Otter Aviation LLC


Location: Winder, Georgia
Accident Number: ERA19CA289
Date & Time: March 28, 2019, 09:00 Local
Registration: N6412W
Aircraft: Piper PA28 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

During an instructional flight, the student pilot and flight instructor planned to stay in the traffic pattern to practice touch-and-go landings. During the third approach and just before the landing flare, the airplane began to drift to the right side of the runway. The instructor noticed that the student was cross controlling with the airplane's nose pointed right. He took over the controls and initiated a go-around, but the student did not immediately remove his feet from the rudder pedals, which made the instructor's control inputs "less effective." While still airborne, the airplane struck a runway sign. The instructor continued the go-around and landed without further incident. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The instructor reported that the flight controls were "free and correct" and that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's loss of airplane control, the flight instructor's delayed remedial action, and the student's delay in relinquishing the flight controls, which resulted in the airplane striking a runway sign during a go-around. 

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Personnel issues Delayed action - Student/instructed pilot
Environmental issues Sign/marker - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach Loss of control in flight
Approach Attempted remediation/recovery
Approach-VFR go-around Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Approach-VFR go-around Collision during takeoff/land (Defining event)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 35, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: October 9, 2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 426 hours (Total, all aircraft), 66 hours (Total, this make and model), 64 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: 
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s):
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N6412W
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility 
Serial Number: 28-20481
Landing Gear Type:
Tricycle Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 13, 2019 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3999 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: 
Installed Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: WDR, 943 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 09:35 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 289°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8500 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 270° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Winder, GA (WDR) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Winder, GA (WDR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: BARROW COUNTY WDR 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 934 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 31 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5202 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go around

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A Aircraft
Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.982776,-83.667221(est)

Transportation Security Administration, Law Enforcement Assess Ability to Stop Unauthorized Drones



HARTFORD, Connecticut – Transportation Security Administration (TSA) law enforcement and police departments from Connecticut, and New York recently partnered with the Connecticut State Police (CSP) to assess their ability to hunt and stop unauthorized drones from interfering with commercial aviation.

The teams ran scenarios at Hartford-Brainard Airport where they tested the state police department’s ability to locate a rogue drone as well as its operator by using law enforcement operated drones to find them.

“If you want to fully neutralize the threat from a drone, you need to locate the pilot as well as the device itself,” said Steve Blindbury, TSA’s Connecticut Assistant Federal Security Director for Law Enforcement.

The test showed the team’s ability to quickly find the drone and then guide police forces stationed on the ground to locate and order the operator to land the device.

“We know that it takes time to send out a plane or a helicopter to look for a drone that is in the proximity of an airport or in a flight path,” said Sgt. Eric Hurley, Commanding Officer of the Connecticut State Police Emergency Services Unit/Aviation Section. “Even though we anticipate adding detection equipment to our capabilities soon, we wanted to see if we could dispatch a police operated Unmanned Aviation System quick enough to locate the nefarious drone.”

The collaboration between the National Air Guard, New Haven Police Department, TSA Officers, Directors, Federal Air Marshals and the CSP was instrumental in being able to quickly identify and locate an unauthorized drone from the air with the use of another drone.

“It’s important for TSA elements across the nation to develop these forward leaning relationships with federal, state and local law enforcement in their Areas of Responsibility,” said Kimberley Thompson Supervisory Air Marshal in Charge of Law Enforcement Assessments Section/Unmanned Aircraft Systems. “In an incident involving a potential threat from a UAS incursion at an airport, we are going to need to leverage these partnerships in order to have a well-coordinated expeditious response to mitigate the threat to commercial aviation.”

The Connecticut State Police have several future exercises scheduled throughout 2021, and TSA will continue to play a role in supporting a partner agency as they hone their UAS mitigation strategies and techniques.

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Cessna 140, N76268; accident occurred March 26, 2019 near Newton City-County Airport (KEWK), Harvey County, Kansas



























Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Newton, KS
Accident Number: CEN19LA111
Date & Time: 03/26/2019, 1730 CDT
Registration: N76268
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot reported that no engine issues were detected during the run up. He stated that, during the takeoff, the climbout engine power was "good." On the turn to downwind, the pilot noticed a slight loss of engine power. He checked the throttle position and continued the downwind leg. The pilot considered landing on the crosswind runway but felt he had engine power to make a short 180° approach to the departure runway. During the turn to final, the engine had an additional power drop, "clattered" about 3-4 seconds, and subsequently stopped. The pilot landed straight ahead in a field, where the airplane nosed over and sustained substantial damage.

A disassembly of the engine revealed that the camshaft was fractured in the area abeam the No.1 cylinder. The No. 1 connecting rod end was separated from its crankshaft journal, and the rod end exhibited discoloration consistent with lubrication distress. The liberated sections of connecting rod bearing material were found in the oil sump an exhibited discoloration consistent with lubrication distress. The oil transfer tube orifice for the No. 1 connecting rod bearing was smeared over with migrated connecting rod journal material. The migrated and smeared metal was drilled through to see if any debris was present; only metallic particles were present that were attracted by a magnet. No other blockages were found within the oil system. Scoring consistent with hard particle passage was observed within the oil pump housing. The oil filter was cut open and had one spot of dark-colored debris; no other debris found within the filter pleats. The oil suction pickup tube was disassembled and did not contain any debris.

The No. 1 connecting rod end separation is consistent with oil starvation at the rod end.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of engine power after the No. 1 connecting rod end separated as a result of oil starvation, which led to the forced landing and nose-over.

Findings

Aircraft Recip eng cyl section - Failure
Aircraft Oil - Fluid level


Factual Information

On March 26, 2019, about 1730 central daylight time, a Cessna 140 airplane, N76268, nosed over during a forced landing near the Newton City/County Airport (EWK), near Newton, Kansas, following a loss of engine power. The private pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial wing and empennage damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from EWK.

This was the first flight after an annual inspection of the airplane. According to the pilot's accident report, the engine run up check was conducted, and the magnetos and carburetor heat were "good." During the takeoff, the climb out engine power was "good." On the turn to downwind, the pilot noticed a slight loss of engine power below "normal." He checked the throttle position and continued the downwind leg of the flight. The pilot considered a crosswind landing on runway 8/26. However, he felt he had engine power to make a short 180° approach to runway 17. During the turn to final, the engine power dropped further, it "clattered" about 3-4 seconds, and subsequently stopped. The pilot stated that the only option was to land straight ahead in a field to the north of runway 17.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the engine and found that he could only rotate the propeller through 270° of rotation. The engine was subsequently removed from the airplane, crated, and shipped to Continental Motors for a disassembly inspection. During disassembly, the No. 1 connecting rod end was separated from its crankshaft journal and the rod end exhibited discoloration consistent with lubrication distress. Liberated sections of the No. 1 connecting rod bearing were found in the oil sump and those sections exhibited discoloration consistent with lubrication distress. The oil transfer tube orifice for the No. 1 connecting rod bearing was smeared over with migrated connecting rod journal material. The migrated and smeared metal was drilled through to see if any debris was present. Only metallic particles were present that were attracted by a magnet. The remaining oil transfer tube orifices and oil galleys were not obstructed. The remaining three connecting rods remained attached to the crankshaft. However, the connecting rod ends, and rod bearings all exhibited discoloration consistent with lubrication distress. Scoring consistent with hard particle passage was observed within the oil pump housing. The camshaft was fractured in the area abeam the separated connecting rod and the camshaft fractures surfaces appeared grainy and dull consistent with overload. The oil filter, hand dated March 22, 2019, was cut open and had one spot of dark colored debris and no other debris found within the filter pleats. The oil suction pickup tube was disassembled and it did not contain any debris.

History of Flight

Approach Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)
Emergency descent Off-field or emergency landing
Landing Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/22/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/22/2017
Flight Time: 1339 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N76268
Model/Series: 140 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 10676
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/22/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1451 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C85-12
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEWK, 1532 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1656 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 45°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Newton, KS (EWK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: Newton, KS (EWK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1715 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Newton-City-County (EWK)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 1532 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7003 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.067778, -97.275278 (est)

Fuel Related: Fisher Dakota Hawk, N30271; accident occurred March 26, 2019 near Little River Airport (FL10), McAlpin, Suwannee County, Florida









Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: McAlpin, Florida 
Accident Number: ERA19LA138
Date & Time: March 26, 2019, 17:10 Local
Registration: N30271
Aircraft: FISHER FLYING PRODUCTS Dakota Hawk 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot allowed the engine to idle for 8 to 10 minutes while he waited for it to warm up, then completed the engine runup and taxied the airplane for takeoff. He reported that the takeoff run was longer than usual, and because he was preoccupied watching the airspeed, he passed his previously established takeoff abort point. Upon reaching rotation speed, he determined that it was no longer safe to abort the takeoff and continued, although the engine did not seem to be producing normal power. Shortly after clearing trees at the end of the runway, "the left wing dropped," and he lowered the nose to prevent the airplane from stalling. When he determined that he had insufficient altitude to recover, he landed straight ahead in a young pine tree plantation. He managed to safely egress before a postimpact fire destroyed the airplane.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of serious carburetor icing at low engine power settings. It is likely that carburetor ice developed during the time the engine was operating at idle power before takeoff, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power during the takeoff and initial climb.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to use carburetor heat while operating at idle power in atmospheric conditions conducive to the formation of carburetor ice, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power during takeoff.

Findings

Environmental issues Conducive to carburetor icing - Effect on equipment
Personnel issues Lack of action - Pilot

Factual Information

On March 26, 2019, about 1710 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Fisher Flying Products Dakota Hawk, N30271, impacted terrain during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Little River Airport (FL10), McAlpin, Florida. The private pilot was uninjured, and the airplane was destroyed by a post-impact fire. The airplane was privately owned and operated as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, he intended to fly in the airport traffic pattern to practice touch-and-go landings. He performed a preflight inspection, allowed the engine to idle for 5-7 minutes to warm up, and completed an engine run-up with no anomalies noted. He reported that the engine operated at low power for a total of 8-10 minutes prior to takeoff from the 2,668-ft-long by 50-ft-wide turf runway 27. He stated that the takeoff run was longer than usual, and that he passed his established abort point because he was preoccupied watching his airspeed. Upon reaching rotation speed, he determined that it was no longer safe to abort his takeoff and continued although the engine did not seem to be producing normal power. He barely cleared the trees at the end of the runway and shortly thereafter "the left wing dropped," and he lowered the nose to prevent the airplane from stalling. When he determined that he had
insufficient altitude to recover, he landed straight ahead in a young pine tree plantation. He managed to safely egress before a post-impact fire destroyed the airplane.

The airplane came to rest about 1,000 ft beyond the departure end of runway 27. Most of the airplane, except for a portion of the empennage and the engine, was destroyed by the post-impact fire.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot reported 87 total hours of flight experience of which 18 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane, serial number DH-26, was built in 2002. It was equipped with a Continental O-200-A engine, rated at 100 horsepower, that drove a ground adjustable variable-pitch propeller. According to maintenance records, the last condition inspection was performed on January 30, 2019, at a total time-in-service of 508.9 hours. The engine had accrued 4,502.1 total hours of operation; of which, 523.1 hours were since its last major overhaul.

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site for detailed examination. Examination of the engine revealed that the carburetor was fractured off the engine. Examination of the cylinders with a lighted borescope revealed no damage to the cylinder walls or pistons. The cylinders were oil soaked; however, the engine was rotated several times for transportation. The propeller was rotated by hand and thumb compression was established on all cylinders. Continuity of the power and valvetrains was established throughout the engine. The rocker covers were removed, and the rocker arms, springs, and push rods all appeared to be normal. The right magneto was removed and its input shaft was rotated by hand; spark was observed emanating from all leads. The left magneto was removed and rotated by hand. No spark was present. Examination of the magneto revealed that the post-accident fire melted the internal components.The carburetor was intact and disassembled for examination. Although the carburetor was fire-damaged, all the components appeared intact and serviceable. The inlet screen clear of debris.

The 1715 weather reported at Suwannee County Airport (24J), Live Oak, Florida, located 13 miles northwest of the accident site, included wind from 360° at 6 knots, visibility of 10 miles, few clouds at 8,000 ft, temperature 25° C, dew point 9° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of mercury. The calculated relative humidity at this temperature and dewpoint was 36%.

According to a Carburetor Icing-Probability Chart recommended by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, the atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were "conducive to moderate icing at cruise power and serious icing at descent power." FAA Advisory Circular 20-113 explains, "To prevent accidents due to induction system icing, the pilot should regularly use [carburetor] heat under conditions known to be conducive to atmospheric icing and be alert at all times for indications of icing in the fuel system."

History of Flight

Takeoff Fuel related (Defining event)
Takeoff Loss of engine power (partial)
Emergency descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Post-impact Fire/smoke (post-impact)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 63,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: October 25, 2017
Flight Time: 87 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18 hours (Total, this make and model), 53 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 28 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FISHER FLYING PRODUCTS
Registration: N30271
Model/Series: Dakota Hawk
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental light sport (Special)
Serial Number: DH-26
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: January 30, 2019 Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 523.1 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed 
Engine Model/Series: O-200
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 100 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K24J,1033 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 17:15 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 315°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 8000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: Unknown / None
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: McAlpin, FL (FL10) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: McAlpin, FL (FL10)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 17:00 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Little River FL10
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 90 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2668 ft / 50 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.118055,-82.915275(est)




In Memoriam: James Richard “Dick” Curtis

RICHARD "DICK" CURTIS
February 2, 1930 - March 17, 2021
~

James Richard “Dick” Curtis (age 91), formerly of Champaign, died peacefully at the Odd Fellow Rebekah Home, Mattoon Illinois, surrounded by family on March 17, 2021 after a battle with Alzheimer’s.

Richard was born on February 2, 1930 in Champaign, Illinois to John Wesley and Jessie May (Quackenbush) Curtis.  He married Constance Ann “Connie” Sticher on January 10, 1954.  She died on August 3, 1992.

Richard is survived by his three children: Christie (Tom) McMinn of Mattoon IL; Rich (Katrin) Curtis of Grand Rapids MI; and Steve (Pam) Curtis of Mahomet IL.  He is also survived by 10 grandchildren: Katie (Justin) Hanner of Leander TX; Becky (Stevie) Hall of Gifford IL; Jonathan (Patty) McMinn of Mahomet IL; Nate Curtis and Nick Curtis both of Grand Rapids MI; Lindsay (Paul) Van Hovelyn of Danville IL; Matt Curtis of Champaign IL; Kristi (Rusty) Woliung and Felicia Fordyce of Farmer City IL; and Maranda (Ryan) Harden of Tolono IL.

Additionally, Richard is survived by 18 great-grandchildren: Abbi and Peyton Gordon; Chase and Max Hanner; Caleb Bradbury; Stella Hall; Corban, Liam, Gavin and Adalyn McMinn; Eli and Gabriel Curtis; Makenzie, Sadie and Braelyn Woliung; Rhys Harden; Brody and Logan Fordyce. He is also survived by his sister-in-law JoAnn Curtis and a niece and two nephews.

Richard grew up on the family farm west of Champaign at the southwest corner of Staley Road and Kirby Ave. His grandfather settled the farm after the Civil War. It is now the site of Trails at Brittney subdivision and Countryside School.  He spent most of his adult life living in the house he and Connie built on the farm in 1965.

In addition to his responsibilities on the family farm, Richard went to work for Dean’s Dairy at age 13. He became plant manager while in high school.

Richard graduated from Champaign Senior High School in 1947, where he lettered in wrestling.   Having a love of aviation from a young age, Richard joined the Civil Air Patrol in high school.  He earned his pilot’s license at age 16, flying his first solo flight from the Champaign Airport. Richard attended the University of Illinois 1947-48.

He served in the United States Air Force with the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War 1950-1954. As Master Sargent, he led a crew of six mechanics servicing the B-26 Peacemaker. He was stationed at Carswell AFB in Ft. Worth, Texas along with a temporary assignment to Chanute AFB and artic training in Goosebay, Labrador.

In 1955, Richard followed his dream and went to work for American Airlines as a mechanic and shortly after became a Professional Flight Engineer.  He flew with American for nearly 40 years, based in Chicago; first at Midway and then O’Hare.  During his career with American as a Flight Engineer he sought advanced certification and designations allowing him to serve additional roles as Flight Engineer Instructor, Flight Engineer Check Airman, and Designated FAA Flight Engineer Examiner. In addition to training Flight Engineers for American, Richard also trained engineers for Spantex Airlines of Spain and Middle East Airlines of Lebanon in the 1960’s.  During his career, he accumulated countless hours flying the Douglas DC6 and, DC7, Lockheed Electra, Convair 990, Boeing 707 and 727 and McDonnell Douglas DC 10. He was the 3rd officer on the first international flight of American’s DC 10, flying from Chicago to Mexico City December 19, 1971. He retired from American Airlines in 1995 Richard was highly regarded in the industry and by his peers.  Richard loved his job and took great pride in it.  He often said he was fortunate to have flown in the glory days of the airlines.

Richard and Connie became avid ballroom dancers, spending most Friday and Saturday nights dancing with their friends at the Regent Ballroom.  They were fixtures at the Ribeye restaurant for years, occupying a corner booth every Friday night at 6pm, a tradition Richard continued after Connie’s passing.

They were also enthusiastic golfers and members of Lincolnshire Fields Country Club.  Richard enjoyed hunting and fishing, spending many hours on the lake.  After his retirement he continued to enjoy a good life of family time, dancing, fishing, golfing and traveling.

In addition to his wife Connie, Richard was preceded in death by his parents; brothers John Wesley Curtis, Jr. and George Wayne Curtis; sister Elizabeth Ruth Curtis; his in-laws Lawrence and Inez Sticher; and sister-in-law Martha Curtis.

Funeral services will be Tuesday, March 23 at 12:00, with visitation from 10-12 at Morgan Memorial Home, 1304 Regency Drive West, Savoy. Burial will follow immediately at Woodlawn Cemetery, Urbana, Illinois.

The family wishes to thank the staff of Odd Fellow Rebekah Home, Lincolnland Hospice and Dr. Aja Lystila for their excellent care of Richard and their kindness to the family in his final days.

Memorials may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Condolences may be offered at www.morganmemorialhome.com.