Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Dynamic Rollover: Bell 206B-3 JetRanger III, N218GH; accident occurred August 27, 2019 at Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), El Cajon, San Diego County, California

View of damage to the tail rotor drive system. 
Federal Aviation Administration


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N218GH

Location: San Diego, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA519
Date & Time: 08/27/2019, 1410 PDT
Registration: N218GH
Aircraft: Bell 206
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Dynamic rollover
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business

The helicopter pilot reported that, after landing on the helicopter landing platform, he decided to reposition the helicopter on the platform. He increased collective and, "felt as if the nose was turning or yawing to the right."

To correct the right yaw he applied, "more left pedal but the aircraft continued in its movement." The helicopter rolled to the right and the main rotor blades struck the ground. The helicopter came to rest on its right side.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main and tail rotor drive system.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/17/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/10/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2313 hours (Total, all aircraft), 392 hours (Total, this make and model), 2238 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 85 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 22 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N218GH
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Other
Serial Number: 3470
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/08/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 15412 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250C20
Registered Owner: Helicopters Unlimited Llc
Rated Power: 420 hp
Operator: Angel City Air, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSEE, 387 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2120 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 255°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.83 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: San Diego, CA (SEE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: San Diego, CA (SEE)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1325 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Gillespie Field (SEE)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 387 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 32.826111, -116.972500 (est)







EL CAJON, California (KGTV) - A news helicopter had what County of San Diego officials called a “troubled” landing in El Cajon Tuesday.

The incident with the Bell 206B helicopter was reported about 2:15 p.m. in the parking area of Gillespie Field at 681 Kenney St., Santee Fire reported.

Video recorded by the news helicopter appears that it was a normal landing in which the helicopter skids land on a movable platform called a dolly. The dolly can then be pulled into a hangar. It seems from the last seconds of the video clip that one of the helicopter skids may have missed the platform and the chopper then tipped over.

When emergency crews arrived, the helicopter was on its side.

The pilot was not hurt but the passenger was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, officials said.

Hazardous Materials teams were notified of a small fire and fuel spill, according to the County.

"The aircraft rolled over while landing, caught fire and sustained substantial damage. The degree of damage means this will be classified as an accident," said Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Ian McGregor.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the landing.

The news helicopter is operated by a third party and shared by five San Diego media outlets, including 10News.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.10news.com





SANTEE —  A television news helicopter rolled onto its side while landing Tuesday afternoon at a hangar on Gillespie Field, sending the pilot to a hospital with minor injuries, authorities said.

The Bell 206B helicopter — wrapped with CBS News 8 graphics, but shared by several local news stations — crashed about 2:10 p.m. at a hangar off Kenney Street in Santee, on the north end of El Cajon’s Gillespie Field, according to Santee Fire Chief John Garlow and Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer.

Two people on board the rotorcraft were able to free themselves, Garlow said, adding that at least one was reportedly taken by medics to Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego.

“Preliminary reports are neither (occupant) was seriously injured,” Kenitzer said in an email.

The chopper “went down within the grounds of the airport” and the pilot suffered minor injuries, El Cajon police Lt. Royal Bates said in an email.

Santee firefighters extinguished a small fire at the scene and were dealing with a fuel spill, Garlow said. Hazardous material crews from the city and county of San Diego also responded to the scene to help deal with the fuel spill.

The tail section of the helicopter broke off, and its top rotor blades appeared mangled.

According to local television stations, the helicopter is operated by a third party and shared by five San Diego media outlets, including 10News, CBS 8, NBC 7 San Diego and others.

By about 3:30 p.m., a small crane had lifted the helicopter upright onto its skids.

Kenitzer said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

Original article ➤ https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com




SAN DIEGO -- A television news helicopter rolled onto its side and caught fire Tuesday afternoon during a hard landing at Gillespie Field, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The hard landing happened around 2:15 p.m. There were two people on board the aircraft but neither were seriously injured, according to preliminary reports.

Multiple news stations, including FOX 5, share the helicopter video for news coverage.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Story and video ➤ https://fox5sandiego.com

Dassault Falcon 7X: Incident occurred August 27, 2019 at New Castle Airport (KILG), Wilmington, Delaware



Just before 8:45 this morning, Tuesday, August 27th, 2019, firefighters from the Wilmington Manor Fire Company responded to the New Castle Airport for what was dispatched as an aircraft emergency.

Just prior to Wilmington Manor making their response, New Castle County 911 Dispatch was contacted by Engine 33 crews with the Aircraft Rescue Firefighting units stationed at the airport.

Aircraft Rescue Firefighting crews told Dispatch that they had been placed on alert by Wilmington Tower. 

Crews were told that a small civilian aircraft with nine souls on board was experiencing possible mechanical issues.

Delaware River and Bay Authority Spokesman James Salmon said that the jet aircraft that departed Teterboro Airport contacted Wilmington-New Castle Airport Control Tower regarding a possible braking and nose gear steering issue with aircraft.

The aircraft did not declare an emergency, however, Aircraft Rescue Firefighting and Wilmington Manor staged as a precaution, according to Salmon.

The aircraft originally scheduled to land at Dallas-Love Field landed at approximately 9:05 am. on Runway 9 without incident.  

Dassault Aircraft Services towed the aircraft off the runway.

No injuries were reported and normal airport operations were not impacted.

Story and video ➤ http://firststateupdate.com

Cessna 560 Citation V, N188CW: Fatal accident occurred December 20, 2018 near Fulton County Airport (KFTY), Atlanta, Georgia

Wei Chen


Judge Says Pioneering Asian Pilot Can Sue Award Offeree’s Estate 

A woman who maintains that she’s the first Asian person of her gender to fly a single-engine plane around the world and was wrongfully denied a promised award by a man who later died in a plane crash can proceed with her legal case against his estate, a Los Angeles judge has ruled.

Zheng (Julie) Wang sued Wei Chen in March 2018, alleging he reneged on a 2014 promise of a six-figure award to the initial Chinese female to accomplish the task.

Chen was a passenger on a small plane headed to Memphis when it crashed in a northwest Atlanta park, killing him and everyone else on board on December 20th, 2018. A well-known Memphis businessman, he founded Sunshine Enterprises, which focuses on the wholesale distribution of Chinese construction and industrial equipment, in 1998. He also had a home in Rowland Heights.

On August 20th, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dennis Landin granted Wang’s motion to substitute Chen’s wife, Zhaohui Xu, as the defendant in the lawsuit. Xu is the executor of Chen’s estate, which was opened in Memphis.

Wang is seeking triple and punitive damages, including the $163,000 prize money, on allegations of fraud, negligent misrepresentation and breach of contract. The promoter that helped prepare her financially for the flight, China General Aviation LLC, also is named as a plaintiff.

Chen had a net worth of more than $30 million, according to the plaintiff’s court papers.

According to Wang’s complaint, Chen announced in September 2014 at the International Aircraft Owner and Pilot Association in Beijing that he was willing to pay the prize — which amounts to a million Chinese yuan — to the “first Chinese woman to complete an around-the-world flight.”

Wang, then 43, embarked on her flight from Addison Airport near Dallas on August 17th, 2016, and successfully returned from the global trip at the same airport on September 19th, 2016, according to her lawsuit.

Wang says she became not only the first Asian woman to accomplish such a task, but also the first person of Chinese descent to do so by herself and the eighth woman of any ethnicity to fly around the world solo.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://mynewsla.com

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N188CW 

Location: Atlanta, GA

Accident Number: ERA19FA071
Date & Time: 12/20/2018, 1210 EST
Registration: N188CW
Aircraft: CESSNA 560
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 20, 2018, about 1210 eastern standard time, a Cessna C560, N188CW, was destroyed when it impacted a field after takeoff from Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia. The air transport pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Chen Aircrafts LLC. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Millington-Memphis Airport (NQA), Millington, Tennessee.

A review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after departing from runway 8 at FTY, the airplane turned left toward the north climbing to about 3,225 ft msl (2,385 ft agl), then made a descending right 180-degree right turn to the south before radar contact was lost at an altitude of about 1,175 feet msl (335 ft agl).

A video obtained from a security camera positioned on top of a building, located about a half mile from the accident site, captured the airplane in a descending left turn prior to rolling inverted until it was lost from view behind a tree line.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held an air transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multiengine land and a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. The pilot was issued a second-class medical certificate on May 31, 2018 and reported 2,300 hours of total flight experience and 150 hours of flight experience in the previous 6 months.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1991, and was most-recently registered to a corporation in July 2017. It was equipped with two Pratt & Whitney Canada, JT15D series engines, which could each produce 3,050 pounds of thrust.

The 1216 recorded weather observation at FTY, which was about 1 mile to the southwest of the accident location, included wind from 050° at 10 knots, visibility 7 miles, overcast clouds at 600 ft above ground level (agl), temperature 8° C, dew point 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.52 inches of mercury.

The airplane impacted a tree prior to impacting the field about 50 feet beyond the initial tree strike. All major components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the wreckage. The debris path was about 325 ft long and was located on a 142° heading.

The airplane was highly fragmented and dispersed along the debris path. The main wing spar was separated from the airframe and came to rest about 200 ft from the initial ground impact point. The empennage was impact-separated and located about 275 ft from the initial impact crater. Both engines were impact-separated from the airplane. The cockpit, cabin, and wings were highly fragmented.

A cockpit voice recorder and an enhanced ground proximity warning system were located along the debris path and retained for data download.

The airplane was moved to a secure facility and retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N188CW
Model/Series: 560 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Chen Aircrafts Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FTY, 840 ft msl
Observation Time: 1716 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.52 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Atlanta, GA (FTY)
Destination: Millington, TN (NQA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.790556, -84.495000

Beechcraft 35 Bonanza, N6245V: Accident occurred August 27, 2019 near Monroe Municipal Airport (KEFT), Green County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6245V

Location: Monroe, WI
Accident Number: CEN19LA290
Date & Time: 08/27/2019, 1200 CDT
Registration: N6245V
Aircraft: Beech 35
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 27, 2019, about 1200 central daylight time, a Beech V35 Bonanza airplane, N6245V, experienced a total loss of engine power in cruise flight and made a forced landing in a field near Monroe Municipal Airport (EFT), Monroe, Wisconsin. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and the passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and the flight was operated on a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan. The flight departed Rochester International Airport (RST), Rochester, Minnesota, and was en route to Chicago Midway International Airport (MDW), Chicago, Illinois.

After the accident, the pilot stated that while in cruise flight the oil pressure decreased to 5 psi and the engine failed suddenly. The pilot diverted toward EFT and was unable to make the airport so he made a forced landing to a mature corn field (figure 1).

Figure 1 – Airplane in a corn field

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector completed a preliminary examination of the wreckage and reported that there was no sign of an oil leak or any oil streaking on the cowling. There was a large hole on the top of the engine crankcase and a significant amount of metallic debris inside the case.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N6245V
Model/Series: 35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEFT, 1085 ft msl
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Rochester, MN (RST)
Destination: Chicago, IL (MDW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:1 Serious 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 42.663056, -89.529722 (est)



GREEN COUNTY, Wisconsin (WMTV) -- Two people are injured after a plane went down in Green County on Tuesday afternoon.

The pilot of the plane used a cellphone to call the 911 and report their plane had crashed in an unknown field at 12:20 p.m., according to the Green County Sheriff's Department.

Using GPS tracking, the location of the call was determined to be from a farm field along County Highway FF, east of Balls Mill Road, between Monroe and Albany, according to the Green County Sheriff's Department

Deputies, along with ambulances from Green County EMS and Albany EMS helped the married couple out. The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and is investigating why the plane went down.

"They figured the corn might have saved their life because it cushioned the crash," the farmer who owns the corn field where the crash happened, Steve Kubly said.

Kubly was among the neighbors that helped the couple after the crash. He said the pilot could walk after the crash but his wife had to be taken out on a stretcher. Both are being treated for non-life threatening injuries, according to the Green County Sheriff's Department.

Information regarding where the plane departed from or was heading to, what kind of plane it was that crashed and how the plane crashed are all unknown at this time.

The Green County Sheriff's Department plans to release more information regarding the crash later Tuesday or Wednesday morning.

Story and video ➤ https://www.nbc15.com



MONROE – Two adult occupants were injured in an aircraft crash reported about 12:20 p.m. today in a farm field along County FF, east of Balls Mill Road between Monroe and Albany.

Green County Sheriff Jeff Skatrud said Green County dispatch received the call from the plane’s pilot using a cellular phone. The call was initially transferred from the Rock County 911 Center. The pilot reported that he and his passenger sustained injuries but both were alert and conscious.

Deputies, along with ambulances from Green County EMS and Albany EMS were dispatched to the scene, as were Albany Fire Department personnel. The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and personnel were dispatched out of Milwaukee to respond to the crash.

The type of aircraft or how the crash happened has not been confirmed. According to Skatrud, additional information will likely be released later today or Wednesday morning as it becomes available.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://themonroetimes.com





MONROE, Wisconsin - A pilot who crashed into a farm field in Green County Tuesday afternoon claims the plane had mechanical problems, according to Green County Sheriff Jeff Skatrud. 

Skatrud said two people suffered non-life threatening injuries in the crash, which was reported by the pilot via cell phone Tuesday afternoon around 12:20 p.m.

It happened on County Road FF between Monroe and Albany. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.channel3000.com


A Rochester, Minnesota, couple was injured in a crash of a small plane Tuesday afternoon near Monroe in Green County, authorities reported.

Pilot Luc E. Vanherle, 66, and passenger Nancy L. ILbuga-Vanherle, 58, were traveling from Rochester to Chicago when their Beechcraft 35 Bonanza had mechanical problems, and the plane crashed in a cornfield along Highway FF, east of Balls Mill Road, between Monroe and Albany, the Green County Sheriff's Office said in a statement.

Luc Vanherle reported the crash in a 911 cell phone call from the cornfield about 12:20 p.m. Tuesday, telling authorities that they were injured but alert and conscious.

Both were taken by ambulance to Monroe Clinic Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

Deputies provided security at the crash scene overnight and the Federal Aviation Administration will be continuing its investigation into the crash. The plane is expected to be removed from the scene Wednesday, the statement said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://madison.com

Hard Landing: Lindstrand Balloons 77A, N370LB; accident occurred September 02, 2018 in Brookfield, Linn County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N370LB

Location: Brookfield, MO
Accident Number: CEN18LA364
Date & Time: 09/02/2018, 0835 CDT
Registration: N370LB
Aircraft: Lindstrand 77A
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 2, 2018, at 0835 central daylight time, a Lindstrand Balloons 77A, N370LB, experienced a hard landing in a field during the Great Pershing Balloon Derby, Brookfield Missouri. The commercial pilot was ejected from the balloon basket and was uninjured. The passenger sustained serious injuries. The balloon was undamaged. The balloon was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight originated 0751.

The pilot stated that he obtained a weather briefing from the Great Pershing Balloon Derby event staff before the flight. The reported and forecast winds in the area were less than 10 knots, and the reported and forecast winds "a couple of 100 feet above ground level" were 10-20 knots with no increase of surface winds. He and several other pilots at the launch site launched pibals to confirm the wind conditions.

After departure, the pilot flew to target locations and began navigating to find a good landing site. The other balloons had landed when he started to notice an increase in wind shear. He attempted an approach to a landing at a site but aborted the landing due to a fence line and his concerns about landing on private property. He continued flying across a tree line and bean field at which point the passenger told him that the balloon's speed was 10 miles per hour (mph), based upon information from the passenger's cellular phone. The pilot said he again encountered wind shear and climbed the balloon to a "safe" altitude. He said that the next suitable field for landing was ahead. He descended the balloon through wind shear over a crop field, and the passenger said the cellular phone now indicated the balloon's speed as 17 mph. He said that he re-briefed hard landing procedures to the passenger in preparation for a landing on an approaching field, which had powerlines along a road on the upwind side of the field. He climbed the balloon to about 40 feet above ground level (agl) to clear the powerlines and then began a descent to the field, which had a "slight" downslope, following by a "small" ditch, and then an upslope. In preparation for a hard landing, he turned off the fuel and pilot lights. About 10 feet agl, he pulled the deflation port line (commonly called rip line and is colored red) and braced for impact. The balloon impacted the ground on the downslope of the field, and the pilot was ejected from the front of the basket. He held onto the rip line for a "few" moments, as the balloon climbed with the passenger aboard, and yelled to the passenger to grab the rip line. The passenger grabbed the rip line, and the balloon entered a "rapid" descent from about tree top level in the field where it experienced a hard landing.

The pilot stated there was no mechanical malfunction/failure of the balloon.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: None
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Balloon
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/05/2018
Flight Time:  115 hours (Total, all aircraft), 113 hours (Total, this make and model), 103 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Lindstrand
Registration: N370LB
Model/Series: 77A No Series
Aircraft Category: Balloon
Year of Manufacture: 1996
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Balloon
Serial Number: 5005
Landing Gear Type: None
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1367 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 0
Airframe Total Time: 227 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power:
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CDJ, 783 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 26 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0852 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brookfield, MO
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Brookfield, MO
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.908056, -93.143889 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Diamond DA-40 Star, N388MA; accident occurred September 01, 2018 near Maury County Airport (MRC), Columbia/Mount Pleasant, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N388MA




Location: Mount Pleasant, TN
Accident Number: ERA18LA241
Date & Time: 09/01/2018, 1715 CDT
Registration: N388MA
Aircraft: Diamond DA40
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 1, 2018, about 1715 central daylight time, a Diamond Aircraft DA 40, N388MA, operated by the private pilot, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field, following a total loss of engine power during approach to Maury County Airport (MRC), Mount Pleasant, Tennessee. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed MRC about 1615.

The pilot reported that after flying over the local area for approximately 40 minutes, he returned to MRC and entered the airport traffic pattern for landing on runway 6. While on a downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern, he reduced the engine power in preparation for landing; however, the engine lost all power. The pilot then advanced the throttle in unsuccessful attempt to regain power. He subsequently attempted an engine restart with no success and at that time realized that the airplane would not be able to glide to the runway. The pilot then performed a forced landing to a field about 1 mile prior to the runway 6 threshold.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that during the landing, the nose landing gear and left main landing gear collapsed, and the empennage separated from the airframe. The inspector added that although there was some damage to the wings, though their respective fuel tank remained intact. He drained approximately 4 gallons of fuel from the left fuel tank and 10 to 11 gallons of fuel from the right fuel tank. The fuel was 100-low-lead aviation fuel and appeared bright, clear, and absent of any visible contamination. Additionally, the fuel selector was found positioned to the left fuel tank prior to being moved to the off position by rescue personnel.

The inspector further examined the wreckage following its recovery to a storage facility. He was able to rotate the engine's crankshaft by hand and confirm crankshaft, camshaft, and valve train continuity to the rear accessory section of the engine. The engine had sat for almost 10 months and thumb compression was not attained on three of the four cylinders; however, a borescope examination of the cylinders did not reveal any anomalies. The mechanical fuel pump and magnetos tested satisfactorily. Air was blown through the fuel lines and no blockages were observed. No anomalies were noted with the fuel servo and it contained residual fuel. Its filter was absent of debris and the oil filter was absent of metallic contamination.

The four-seat, low-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, was manufactured in 2005. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-M1A, 180-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed, two-blade Hartzell propeller. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 9, 2018. At that time, the airframe and engine had accrued 1,346 hours since new. The airplane flew an additional 40 hours from the time of the most recent inspection, until the accident. Review of a make and model airplane flight manual revealed that the left and right fuel tank each held 20.6 gallons of fuel, with .5 gallon unusable in each tank. According to a representative from the aircraft manufacturer, fuel unporting is possible with 4 to 6 gallons remaining in a fuel tank; however, it's more probable if the airplane is in a bank greater than a 45° angle.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/03/2018
Flight Time:   121 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model), 61 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Diamond
Registration: N388MA
Model/Series: DA40 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 40.522
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/09/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2535 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 40 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1386 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-M1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MRC, 681 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1715 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 60°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 110°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Mount Pleasant, TN (MRC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mount Pleasant, TN (MRC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1615 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Maury County Airport (MRC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 681 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 06
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 35.550278, -87.206667 (est)

Cessna P206 Super Skylane, N131DV: Accident occurred July 14, 2019 at Sulphur Creek Ranch Airport (ID74), Cascade, Valley County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N131DV

Location: Cascade, ID
Accident Number: WPR19LA190
Date & Time: 07/14/2019, 0630 MDT
Registration: N131DV
Aircraft: Cessna P206
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 14, 2019 about 0630 mountain daylight time, a Cessna P206, N131DV, collided with willow brush shortly after departing from Sulphur Creek Ranch Airport, Cascade, Idaho. The pilot, the brother-in-law of the registered owner, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and two passengers were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing. The personal cross-country flight was originating from Sulphur Creek Ranch with a planned destination of Driggs-Reed Memorial Airport, Driggs, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot's family owned the remote ranch, which was only accessible by hike or flying to the private-use landing strip near the property. On the afternoon prior to the accident, the pilot's brother-in-law passed away from a heart attack while hiking with his wife near the ranch. The purpose of the accident flight was for the pilot to transport his sister and grandson in his brother-in-law's airplane back to their home in Wyoming. The pilot stated that he had intended to first land in Driggs to obtain more fuel before continuing to Gillette, Wyoming.

The pilot stated that after a normal preflight and engine run-up, he taxied for a departure to the east (totaling a 7-8 minute engine operating time). After the airplane departed and reached about 75 feet above ground level (agl), the engine rpm smoothly deteriorated to a total loss of power. The pilot relieved the control column back pressure, configuring the airplane in a nose-low pitch attitude in an attempt to avoid stalling and to make an off-airstrip landing. The pilot could not recall his next actions, but thought he may have unintentionally turned the fuel selector to the "off" position after the loss of power thinking he was switching to the other (more full) wing tank. The airplane collided with the thick brush off the end of the runway and nosed over, coming to rest inverted.

The pilot estimated that there were about 30 gallons of fuel in each tank. He did not know the reason for the loss of engine power but opined that he possibly leaned the engine too aggressively for the density altitude.

A post-accident examination revealed that there was minimal propeller blade damage, consistent with low or no engine power at impact. Control continuity between the cockpit's engine controls and the engine was confirmed. An external engine examination of the Continental Motors IO-550-F engine (installed in July 2010) revealed no anomalies. The integrity of the fuel system was confirmed between the fuel selector and the engine by operating the electric fuel pump and observing fuel flow from the line to the manifold. The fuel screen on the fuel control was removed and free of debris.

The top spark plugs were removed and photographed. The spark plug electrodes were undamaged, displaying a gray coloration, which the Continental representative stated was consistent with normal operation. Investigators examined the cylinder combustion chambers utilizing a lighted borescope; the cylinders all displayed normal deposits and the valves appeared to seat uniformly. The engine was turned by hand; internal continuity was established and compression and suction was confirmed an all six cylinders.

To ascertain the functionality of the powerplant, a test run of the engine was performed at the recovery facility. The propeller, damaged from the accident, was removed from the engine and a comparable propeller was installed on the engine. A fuel source was attached to the right inlet fuel line prior to entering the fuel selector. The engine was successfully started and run for over 5 minutes at various power settings from idle to about 1,500 to 1,600 rpm. A magneto check was conducted on the left and right magnetos with a minimal rpm drop on each magneto noted. The engine was shut down utilizing the mixture control lever.

During the engine run, when the auxiliary fuel pump was turned on "high," the engine ran rough and began to lose rpm until the mixture was leaned. When the fuel selector handle was changed to the "off" position, the engine would run for about 10 seconds, and then would have a temporary decline in rpm (about 5 seconds) before completely losing power.

No mechanical anomalies were noted with the recovered engine or airframe that would have precluded normal operation.

According to the airplane Owner's Manual, the auxiliary fuel pump was a split switch with two sides. If the LOW side were turned on, the fuel pump would not operate unless the engine starter was engaged. The HIGH side was used for failure of the engine driven pump. In that position, the output of the pump was dependent upon the throttle position. With the throttle at high settings, the auxiliary fuel pump output was high. When the throttle was reduced or closed, the output of the auxiliary fuel pump was designed to be reduced to prevent flooding the engine.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N131DV
Model/Series: P206
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLLJ, 5835 ft msl
Observation Time: 0630 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cascade, ID (ID74)
Destination: Driggs, ID (DIJ) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 44.536667, -115.350833 (est)