Monday, January 15, 2018

Spirit Launching New Jamaica Flights



Spirit Airlines is expanding its route network in the Caribbean with new service between Baltimore/Washington and Montego Bay, Jamaica.

The new service, which will begin March 22, will operate daily, year round, according to the Miramar, Fla.-based company.

“We are excited to celebrate our growth in these key markets and offer even more ultra-low fares to some of our guests’ favorite destinations,” said Mark Kopczak, Spirit Airlines’  Vice President of Network Planning. “We know these new, nonstop flights will bring more friends together and allow more families to go on vacation.”

Spirit also recently announced the planned launch of new service between Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood and Cap-Haitien, Haiti in April.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.caribjournal.com

Norwegian Air to end service to Connecticut



WINDSOR LOCKS — Norwegian Air, one of two foreign airlines serving Bradley International Airport, announced Monday it is ending service to Connecticut.

Service between Edinburgh Airport and Bradley — New England’s second busiest airport after Boston’s Logan International Airport — will end as of March 25, said Anders Lindstrom, a U.S.-based spokesman for the airline. He said the decision by Norwegian Air was motivated by an ongoing tax dispute with the Scottish government.

“The decision to pull the route, along with decreasing service to Edinburgh from other United States airports, is due to the Scottish Government’s postponement of a reduction to air passenger taxes,” Lindstrom said. “Following Norwegian’s launch of affordable trans-atlantic routes from the U.S. to Edinburgh last year, the prospect of a reduction in air passenger taxes meant we had been planning for continued future growth to Scotland.”

Norwegian Air has “seen great potential” in providing service out of Bradley and “is continuously reviewing other future opportunities in Hartford,” he said..

Lindstrom said all passengers who have been affected by the decision have been informed and offered alternative flights, or full refunds, if they chose to cancel their booking.

Norwegian Air’s decision leaves Aer Lingus as the only foreign-based airline providing international service to Bradley. It also leaves the airport at a distinct disadvantage in its efforts to keep Connecticut residents from choosing other airports in neighboring states.

For example, Rhode Island’s T.F. Green Airport, located in Warwick, is often an attractive travel alternative for residents of eastern Connecticut because of its proximity to the region. T.F. Green is seeing service to Scotland reduced, but not eliminated, according to the Providence Journal.



Bradley is operated by the Connecticut Airport Authority. Kevin Dillon, executive director of the state agency, said airport officials are “disappointed by the discontinuation of Norwegian’s nonstop service.”

“Unfortunately, despite the strength of the Bradley business case for continuing the service, external factors have deteriorated the service’s viability at this time,” Dillon said in a statement. “The United Kingdom’s Air Passenger Duty, which is levied on passengers who utilize Edinburgh Airport, has had a debilitating effect on Norwegian’s business model. For an airline that prides itself on serving as an ultra-low cost option for travelers, the APD incurred by passengers at Edinburgh Airport often essentially doubles the passenger’s total flight costs and undercuts the attractiveness of Norwegian’s low fares.”

Bradley is not the only airport with Norwegian service to Edinburgh that is being impacted by these dynamics, he said.

“We knew from the start that the lack of connecting options at Edinburgh Airport would make the Norwegian service a challenge to maintain,” Dillon said. “However, we were pleased to see that Norwegian’s performance was in line with expectations for a new airline entrant starting operations at Bradley.”

Dillon said Aer Lingus’ route between Dublin and Bradley has shown promising growth, and, after recent discussions, “we are confident that the Bradley route is currently in line for an aircraft upgrade in 2019.”

“This investment is indicative of the strong partnership between Bradley and Aer Lingus, and we look forward to growing together to continue meeting the region’s transatlantic travel needs,” he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nhregister.com

Akron-Canton Regional (KCAK) director bleeds ‘airport blue’

Rick McQueen


GREEN Although he’s announced retirement plans, Rick McQueen isn’t done working as president and chief executive officer at Akron-Canton Airport.

Later this year he hopes see ground broken for several new gates, the last of 10 projects in CAK 2018. He also expects to spend time helping the next CEO transition to the job.

“I will always bleed airport blue,” McQueen said, referring to the color used in the Akron-Canton Airport’s logo.

Deciding to retire hasn’t been an easy decision, but the Akron-Canton staff is a close-knit team that cares about the airport and has made it a success, McQueen said. “I could do none of this by myself,” he said.

McQueen, 58, joined Akron-Canton’s staff as an accountant in 1982. “It’s home to me,” he said. He climbed the ranks and served as assistant airport director before taking the helm after Fred Krum retired as director.

He’s seen and directed plenty of changes over the past 35 years. The CAK 2018 projects — $118 million of capital improvements — started in 2008 as McQueen moved into the lead role. The projects include extending a runway, improving the entrance road and parking lots, new facilities for rescue and fire fighting equipment, and numerous improvements and renovations to the terminal.

When McQueen joined the airport staff, Krum had been director for two years. McQueen said he had the good fortune to spent 26 years working with Krum, who is credited with sparking the string of changes that have transformed the facility. Krum set a course and direction that McQueen followed, making tweaks to adjust with changes in the commercial airline industry.

Because of several factors, the biggest being airline consolidation, Akron-Canton has seen passenger use numbers fall over the past few years. McQueen believes the trend will bottom out and cited the decision by United Airlines to add service to Houston as a sign the situation is changing. McQueen said he hopes the airport’s next CEO will be able to lead the facility to the next level.

The airport’s eight-member board, which is appointed by officials in Stark and Summit counties, plans a nationwide search. McQueen anticipates someone will be hired before the year ends. He hopes to help the next CEO get to know the operation and the community. “I’m committed to making sure we can have a smooth transition,” he said.

Read more here ➤ http://www.cantonrep.com

Vacation Express Expands Flights to Cozumel, Grand Bahama



Sunwing’s Vacation Express is launching new flights from Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport to a pair of Caribbean destinations.

The carrier is slated to launch new nonstop flights from CVG to both Grand Bahama and Cozumel, Mexico.

“We are excited about adding these additional flights from CVG and to return with our Grand Bahama Island program, and we know Cozumel will become a popular destination for us this summer,” said Kevin Hernandez, VP Marketing and Sales at Vacation Express. “We have had requests from many passengers and travel agents looking for great deals on quick and easy four-night packages with non-stop flights to exciting destinations and we are here to deliver.”

The Cozumel flights will operate between May 24 and Aug. 23, while the Grand Bahama flights will operate between May 30 and Aug. 18.

“The addition of Cozumel, Mexico and return of Grand Bahama Island to Vacation Express’ existing service to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic; Montego Bay, Jamaica and Cancun, Mexico provides CVG passengers the most nonstop flight options in the Vacation Express network,” said Candace McGraw, chief executive officer, CVG. “We’re pleased that local travelers now have the opportunity to travel with Vacation Express to five different exotic destinations.”

The flights to Grand Bahama and Cozumel will be operated by Swift Air on Boeing 737-300 aircraft.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.caribjournal.com

Fatal accident occurred January 15, 2018 in Stony Ridge, Troy Township, Wood County, Ohio

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



"The two men who were tragically killed today in a helicopter crash were FirstEnergy contractors doing transmission line inspection work. Their employer is still in the process of notifying family members. FirstEnergy would like to express our sincere condolences to their families and fellow workers."




STONY RIDGE, Ohio — Two men doing work for FirstEnergy were killed Monday when their helicopter crashed into a field near State Rt. 163 and Pemberville Road in Troy Township.

The helicopter crashed about 11:40 a.m. in a large, harvested, snow-covered field east of Pemberville Road, between Route 163 and Recker Road, Wood County Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn said on scene. 

Doug Calafella, a spokesman for FirstEnergy, said the crash victims were employees of a contractor for the utility. He said they were inspecting high-voltage transmission lines.

The company that employed the men were in the process of notifying family members, he added.

Sheriff Wasylyshyn said there was no obvious cause of the crash: no signs of fire or flames, and no indication the aircraft struck any utility lines. The crash was reported by a person in a nearby house who was looking out a window “and just saw the helicopter come down out of the sky and hit the ground,” he said.

The sheriff said his office was told by the National Transportation Safety Board that investigators from the agency will be on the scene on Tuesday, and the Federal Aviation Administration also had been notified.

"We will secure the scene. We are taking initial measurements. The NTSB will haul off the helicopter and do their dissecting to try to determine the cause," he said.

Tony Molinaro, an FAA spokesman, said in an email the helicopter was an MD-369 and the agency is sending investigators to the scene.

NTSB spokesman Christopher O'Neil said Monday afternoon an investigator was en route to the crash scene.

Story, video and slideshow ➤ http://www.toledoblade.com




WOOD COUNTY, Ohio (WTVG) - Two people are dead after a helicopter crash in Wood County.

The crash happened just before noon near Bradner Road, just south of the Ohio Turnpike in Genoa.

Wood County Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn tells 13abc that the helicopter is affiliated with a utility company. They were out doing survey work on lines in the area. Two people were on board, and both of them died. The company is said to not be based in Toledo, and the two killed were not from northwest Ohio.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board are expected on the scene Tuesday morning to being an investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.13abc.com





GENOA, OH (WTOL) -  Two people are dead after a helicopter crash in Wood County Monday.

Deputies were called to the scene of the crash near the Turnpike on Bradner Road. 

The Sheriff's Office says the helicopter was contracted to patrol the power lines by. 

Statement sent from FirstEnergy said both the pilot and the passenger who died in the crash, were FirstEnergy contractors doing transmission line inspection work.

"The two men who were tragically killed today in a helicopter crash were FirstEnergy contractors doing transmission line inspection work. Their employer is still in the process of notifying family members. FirstEnergy would like to express our sincere condolences to their families and fellow workers."

Police say the pilot was not local. It is unsure at this time if the passenger was from the area.

The crash is under investigation.

Story and audio ➤ http://www.wtol.com 




 TROY TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WNWO) —  Wood County authorities are investigating a helicopter crash that killed two men today.

Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn tells NBC24 two men died when their helicopter went down in a field just before noon in the vicinity Pemberville and Bradner Roads in Troy Township.

Wasylyshyn said the pair were working as independent contractors for Toledo Edison and were observing power lines throughout the area.

The men will be identified pending notification. No other details are available at this time.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://nbc24.com

Self-repairing ceramic eyed for aircraft engines



Japanese researchers say they have developed a ceramic material that self-repairs cracks in just a minute and could drastically change manufacturing methods for the transportation industry.

The team from the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and Yokohama National University said the material could be used in plane engines to keep them operating even if they are damaged in collisions with airborne objects.

“When the plane engine suffers a crack during a flight, the ceramic material will enable the aircraft to repair the damage by itself before landing without stopping the engine,” said Toshio Osada, a senior researcher at the NIMS.

Wataru Nakao, an engineering professor at the university, said the material “can be used for a wide variety of products,” and the team is planning studies to commercialize the ceramic.

Ceramics are lighter and more heat-resistant than nickel and titanium.

Ceramic-made engines had been seen as a possible way to significantly improve fuel-efficiency, but the material was considered too fragile for use in aircraft engines.

To solve the problem, the university added silicon carbide to a ceramic material made of aluminum oxide. When the ceramic cracked at high temperatures, the silicon carbide was exposed to air and turned into silicon dioxide that filled in the crack and repaired the damage.

The self-healing process initially required nearly 1,000 hours to complete.

The NIMS later reduced the time to one minute under temperatures of 1,000 degrees by adding a tiny amount of manganese oxide.

When silicon dioxide fills in the cracks, it reacts with the surrounding aluminum oxide and temporarily turns into a liquid-like substance. The manganese oxide promotes the phenomenon, according to the researchers.

The scientists said they are working on improvements so that the material can repair damage even at lower temperatures, making it possible for use in the undercarriages of Shinkansen. The bullet trains could continue running with cracked undercarriages because the material would fix the damage, they said.

Story and photo ➤ http://www.asahi.com

Raw video: Plane flies low over Stafford County, Virginia, before making emergency landing at Washington Dulles International Airport (KIAD)





An Ethiopian Airlines plane flew low over parts of Stafford County Monday as it returned to Dulles International Airport for an emergency landing because of a possible mechanical problem.

The Boeing 777 en route to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, took off from Dulles at 12:24 p.m. before safely returning about two hours later, according to flight tracker website flightradar24. Andrew Trull, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, said the plane turned around “out of an abundance of caution” after a warning light indicated a potential hydraulic failure.

It landed at Dulles without incident.

“Long story short, a mechanical issue caused the plane to return,” Trull said.

The plane was more than 9,000 feet above ground when it entered Stafford airspace, but its altitude dropped to 4,400 feet as it flew over Mountain View Road on its way back to Dulles.

Witnesses said the plane released fuel over Stafford, and a picture appears to back them up. It's not uncommon for pilots to dump fuel—which vaporizes in air—to lower a plane’s weight before an emergency landing.

Trull, the airports authority spokesman, said the plane flew around for about 45 minutes to burn excess fuel, but that it did not dump any fuel.

Story, video and slideshow ➤ http://www.fredericksburg.com

Elko County, Nevada

Paul Graham


ELKO, Nevada (ABC4 News) - Authorities around Elko are searching for an aircraft that was travelling from California to Salt Lake City on Thursday but never arrived. 

Sgt. Nick Czegledi with the Elko Sheriff's Officer said they received a call of possible downed plane somewhere in their area after reports that a 26-year-old Mississippi man flying on his own from California to Salt Lake City went missing.

Czegledi said they started a search on Thursday and into Friday with ground crews and additional air searches in an attempt to locate the missing plane.

At one time authorities thought they had found something in the area during the search on Friday but when they got closer they realized it was not what they were looking for.

The search has covered some area of the Ruby Marshes, just south of Elko, Nevada and along a very long mountainous range.

Czegledi said this is a huge area and may take some time to find him. 

A new search was started Sunday with assistance from several private search parties and law enforcement and search and rescue.A chopper was also among those searching for the missing plane.

So far, have still have not located any aircraft, or evidence of that may have crashed. 

The identity of the man is not being released at this time. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.good4utah.com




ELKO – Searchers from the Elko County Sheriff’s Office and the Civil Air Patrol will be out for the third day today attempting to find a small aircraft that went down near the Ruby Mountains.

Undersheriff Ron Supp said the pilot, a 26-year-old from Mississippi, contacted the airport around 8:30 p.m. Thursday and said his plane was icing up.

There were strong wind gusts in the area at the time.

The twin-engine Piper was reportedly transporting aerial photography equipment from California to Salt Lake City.

The Nevada Department of Emergency Management contacted the sheriff's office about the plane Thursday night. The incident occurred just before an officer-involved shooting in Spring Creek, in which a man shot and killed his wife and was killed by officers.

A ground search was launched but turned up no sightings.

Searchers scoured the vicinity of the Ruby Marshes and Harrison Pass on Friday and believed they had spotted the plane in the Ruby Marshes but that report turned out to be false.

“Right now we’re speculating that he might be further east,” Supp said Monday morning.

Several parties have been helping with the search, according to Sgt. Nick Czegledi. They include Reach air ambulance, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge and volunteers.

The sheriff’s new drone team also has be involved with the search.

Czegledi said winds on Thursday night were measured at 60 knots, which is roughly 70 miles per hour.

It also may have been snowing at the time, and Czegledi said the pilot may have climbed above 9,000 feet to avoid it.

Several peaks in the Ruby Mountains exceed 11,000 feet.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://elkodaily.com

Airbus Delivers Record 718 Aircraft in 2017, Beating Expectations: European company booked more orders than expected, though Boeing retained title of largest plane maker

An Airbus A321neo performing a flight display at Le Bourget airport in June.


The Wall Street Journal
By Robert Wall
January 15, 2018 3:03 a.m. ET


Airbus SE delivered a record number of planes in 2017 and booked more new jetliner orders than expected, marking a positive end to a difficult year for the European plane maker, marred by further allegations of wrongdoing, personnel turmoil, and supplier problems.

Airbus on Monday said it handed over 718 planes last year, meeting its target of more than 700 and topping the previous year’s total of 688 aircraft. The Toulouse, France-based company still trailed Boeing Co., though, which retained the title as largest plane maker by delivering an industry record 763 aircraft in 2017.

Airbus topped Boeing in new deals won, though. It booked 1,109 net orders compared with 912 for Boeing after the Toulouse, France-based company won 776 net orders in December. The total for last year far surpassed its own expectations. Executives began 2017 projecting that after several years of strong bookings new orders would fall short of deliveries.

Airbus instead ended the year with an industry record backlog of 7,265 planes to be built, with production stretching well into the next decade.

The record deliveries and strong backlog come at an important transition period for Airbus. Fabrice BrĂ©gier, chief operating officer and president of the commercial plane business, is departing. The company’s long-serving sales chief, John Leahy, also is leaving. Airbus has said Chief Executive Tom Enders will depart next year.

The departures come amid restructuring at Airbus that has raised tensions among different camps and persistent allegations of wrongdoing the company has been unable to put to bed. Last year, the U.S. began looking at Airbus potentially violating arms export rules, while Kuwait launched a probe into possible corruption on multibillion-dollar helicopter deals.

Investigations in other jurisdictions, including France, Germany and the U.K., also continue. The company has said it is cooperating with the various probes. Airbus Saturday said it was working to resolve the German investigation.

Airbus throughout 2017 struggled with supplier problems that slowed deliveries and raised questions over whether the company could meet targets. It delivered a record 127 planes in December to cross the finishing line.

Even though Airbus met its delivery target, it fell slightly short of an internal goal of building 720 planes. First delivery of two new planes, the A330neo wide-body and A350-1000 long-range jet also slipped into 2018. Airbus is expected to raise output again this year.

Original article can be found here: https://www.wsj.com

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Cessna 182A Skylane, N6193B, Connecticut Parachutists Inc: Accident occurred June 01, 2017 at Ellington Airport (7B9), Tolland County, Connecticut

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Connecticut Parachutists Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N6193B

Location: Ellington, CT
Accident Number: GAA17CA325
Date & Time: 06/01/2017, 1345 UTC
Registration: N6193B
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area overshoot
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving

Analysis

According to the pilot, he landed the airplane on the 1,800-ft-long asphalt runway in the rain at 70 mph with full flaps. He reported that, on final, he had considered conducting a go-around due to wind and weather, but "we were low, slow, and 130 pounds below maximum gross weight with very dynamic wind conditions at the time and …apartment buildings about 400 yards beyond the end of runway 19." During the landing, he touched down with a right crosswind, about 600 ft beyond the runway threshold.

He recalled that he retracted the flaps and pulled the control wheel all the way aft to put as much weight as possible on the main wheels, but he "felt our ground speed was fast and we must have a tailwind." He applied heavy braking, and as the end of the runway approached, he applied full left rudder to avoid a gully that was just beyond the end of the runway. The airplane exited the end of the runway and veered left. The airplane entered the gully and impacted vegetation.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right-wing spar and aileron.

The nearest METAR was 10 nautical miles east of the accident site, and it reported that the wind was from 270° at 13 knots, gusting to 20 knots. The visibility was 10 statute miles with light rain.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Per the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot Aircraft Accident Report, the pilot noted that the accident could have been prevented by initiating a go-around after he realized that he could not land in the first third of the runway. He noted that the approaching rain and wind conditions added personal pressure to land before conditions deteriorated. Additionally, he reported that under normal, dry conditions, heavy braking was required to prevent an overrun. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's unstabilized approach and failure to go around in rainy, gusting crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway overrun. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's self-induced pressure to land due to the deteriorating weather conditions. 

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Landing distance - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Motivation/respond to pressure - Pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Rain - Effect on equipment (Cause)
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Abnormal runway contact
Landing area overshoot (Defining event)
Loss of control on ground
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/22/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 944 hours (Total, all aircraft), 14 hours (Total, this make and model), 832 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 39 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N6193B
Model/Series: 182 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 34193
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/27/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 12792.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470
Registered Owner: CONNECTICUT PARACHUTISTS INC
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: CONNECTICUT PARACHUTISTS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBDL, 179 ft msl
Observation Time: 1751 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 274°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 7000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 20 knots, 270°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: Ellington, CT (7B9)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ellington, CT (7B9)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1345 UTC
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: ELLINGTON (7B9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 253 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 19
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1800 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.925556, -72.457222 (est)

Cessna TU206B Super Skywagon, N10AR, K Airmotive LLC: Accident occurred July 23, 2017 at McKinnon Airpark (OG29), Sandy, Clackamas County, Oregon



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

K Airmotive LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N10AR




Location: Sandy, OR
Accident Number: GAA17CA432
Date & Time: 07/23/2017, 1220 PDT
Registration: N10AR
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

According to the pilot, he checked the wind sock at the airpark and made left traffic for a landing on the turf surface of runway 25.

As the airplane touched down, it encountered a gust of wind from the left. The right-wing struck the ground, followed by the left-wing and the propeller striking the ground. The nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane came to rest upright, on the main landing gear and the fuselage.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right and left-wing spars.

The pilot reported the wind was from 270 degrees at 7 knots, unknown if it was gusting.

The nearest METAR, 10 miles northwest of the airpark, reported that about the time of the accident the wind was variable at 3 knots, the ceiling was overcast at 2,100 feet and the visibility was greater than 10 statute miles.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 



Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/10/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/20/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2360 hours (Total, all aircraft), 630 hours (Total, this make and model), 2360 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N10AR
Model/Series: TU206B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: U206-0738
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/18/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3190.13 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TS10520C
Registered Owner: K AIRMOTIVE LLC
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: K AIRMOTIVE LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTTD, 29 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 316°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SANDY RIVER AIR, OR (0629)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sandy, OR (0629)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1220 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: MC KINNON AIRPARK (OG29)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 658 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.430556, -122.241944 (est)

Piper L-21B, N3907E: Accident occurred July 22, 2017 at Cartersville Airport (KVPC), Bartow County, Georgia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3907E

Analysis

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that the purpose of flight was to meet takeoff and landing requirements necessary to carry passengers. During the pilot's second landing, during the landing roll, the airplane veered right, and he attempted to correct with left rudder. The rudder input was ineffective, and he attempted to gain directional control using differential braking. However, during the brake applications, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the horizontal stabilizer and the rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's loss of directional control during the landing roll and subsequent excessive brake application, which resulted in a nose-over. 

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Brake - Incorrect use/operation (Cause) 

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Runway excursion

Nose over/nose down

Location: CARTERSVILLE, GA
Accident Number: GAA17CA428
Date & Time: 07/22/2017, 1345 EDT
Registration: N3907E
Aircraft: PIPER L 21B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that the purpose of flight was to meet takeoff and landing requirements necessary to carry passengers. During the pilot's second landing, during the landing roll, the airplane veered to the right and he attempted to correct with left rudder. The rudder input was ineffective, and he attempted to gain directional control using differential braking. However, during the brake applications the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the horizontal stabilizer and the rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: 
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/02/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 199 hours (Total, all aircraft), 64 hours (Total, this make and model), 152 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration:  N3907E
Model/Series:  L 21B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 53-7759
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/04/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3670 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320 B2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVPC, 763 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 260°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3400 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 25°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  8 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CARTERSVILLE, GA (VPC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: CARTERSVILLE, GA (VPC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1300 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CARTERSVILLE (VPC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 759 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5760 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 34.123056, -84.848611 (est)