Monday, October 22, 2018

Piper PA-32R-300 Lance, N2920Q: Incident occurred October 21, 2018 in Marion County, Indiana -and- Incident occurred February 24, 2008 in Greenfield, Indiana

https://registry.faa.gov/N2920Q


Pilot Greg Mahler said too many vehicles were on Zionsville Road to try land the aircraft there.

“My heart is still racing," the pilot's wife, Marianne Mahler, said.

As high winds buffeted the area Saturday, Marianne Mahler waited anxiously as her husband, Greg, flew from Washington, D.C., to Indianapolis in his six-seat Piper Lance with two friends. But Greg, an experienced flight instructor, landed safely after deciding it would be better to set down at Metropolitan Airport in Fishers than at Eagle Creek Airpark, where he usually stores his plane.

So on Sunday — when the wind had died down and the sky was a cloudless blue — Marianne Mahler had no worries when she dropped her husband at the Fishers airport to make for the 10-minute or so solo flight to the plane’s home base.


Then, as she waited at the Eagle Creek airport for him to arrive, a call came.


I’m OK. I just missed the runway by a bit... I just crashed the plane.


Actually, Greg had landed more than 8 miles short of the airpark, skidding through a mall parking lot on the northwest side and avoiding injury to anyone, including himself.


About an hour after the crash on Sunday afternoon, Marianne Mahler tried to still her nerves as her husband walked calmly near his plane and called students to tell them what had happened.


“My heart is still racing. He’s OK,” she said. “I’m shocked that something like this would happen. … He doesn’t have a scratch on him.”


Under other circumstances, Marianne might have been in the plane with her husband. But the plan had called for her to meet him at Eagle Creek and then take him back to their northwest-side home.


The short flight started out uneventful. But about halfway through, the plane’s engine suddenly shut off. Mahler tried unsuccessfully to restart it. He went through all of the emergency procedures. A less experienced pilot might have looked through a checklist, but not Mahler.


“I didn’t have to pull the book because I knew it from memory,” said Mahler, who has been a pilot for 30 years and a light instructor for 20.      


Realizing he would have to execute a crash landing, Mahler looked down for the best site. Zionsville Road looked good at first, but then he decided there were too many cars.


He looked down again and noticed the Traders Point Shopping Center with its relatively empty parking lot and came in for the landing.


At Traders Mill Grill on the east side of the shopping center, some of the staff noticed the plane come in low, too low, over the building. Owner Ron Watson, a former pilot, later said he heard nothing as the plane glided past. Watson realized the engine had died.


“I was expecting the worst,” he said and jumped into his car to follow the plane.


But he did not realize how skilled a pilot Mahler is. Mahler hit the ground, slid through the parking lot, avoided cars and light poles, and landed in a grassy bank near Dick’s Sporting Goods.


“Let’s get this stopped safely,” he said to himself, as he did just that.


Watson ran over and helped him find his glasses in the plane.


On Sunday as emergency personnel cordoned off Mahler’s plane as they waited for it to be towed to Eagle Creek Airpark, Mahler wondered what had gone wrong with the engine, which he said he had just bought last winter.


But the seasoned instructor said he would not have done anything different in hindsight.


“This is the first time I’ve had an offsite landing,” he said. “I teach emergency landings. … I found a safe place to land away from people, buildings, and safely. This is what an offsite landing is meant to be.”     


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.indystar.com



INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – A pilot was forced to make an emergency landing Sunday afternoon at Dick’s Sporting Goods on the northwest side.

Just after 2:45 p.m., authorities were dispatched to the store on the report of an aircraft malfunction.


The pilot, identified Greg Mahler, was was forced to make an emergency landing and landed in a ditch near the parking lot and I-465.


He was uninjured as a result of the crash and told us he had engine failure near Eagle Creek.


Mahler originally planned to land near Zionsville Rd. but the said there were too many cars. Then, he saw the ditch near Dick’s Sporting Goods and executed a successful emergency landing.


Mahler said he was gliding the entire way.


The FAA released the following statement after the emergency landing:


“The pilot of a Piper PA32 aircraft reported engine issues while on the way to Indianapolis Metro Airport. The plane landed in a shopping center parking lot about 4 miles west of the airport. No injuries were reported. No information on damages to vehicles on the ground. The FAA will be on the scene to begin an investigation.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox59.com



INDIANAPOLIS – A small aircraft crashed near the parking lot of a northwest Indianapolis Dick’s Sporting Goods Sunday afternoon.

Emergency responders were called around 2:45 p.m to the 6000 block of West 86th Street on the report of an aircraft emergency.


Greg Mahler was flying from an airport in Hamilton County to Eagle Creek Airpark in Indianapolis when his single-engine plane failed at 1,800 feet. 


Mahler said he began looking for a place to land because he didn't think he was going to make it to the Eagle Creek Airpark. The plane stopped when he crashed into a tree near the parking lot.


No injuries were reported.


Original article ➤ https://www.theindychannel.com



February 24th, 2008: Piper PA-32R-300 Lance, N2920Q

Force-landed on Interstate 70 east of Indianapolis, Indiana.

  
 February 24th, 2008: Piper PA-32R-300 Lance, N2920Q

The pilot of a troubled single-engine plane safely landed on Interstate 70 in Hancock County on February 24, 2008.

The plane, which developed engine trouble, came down about two miles east of the Greenfield exit, 6News' Tanya Spencer reported.

Motorists were dumbfounded as the six-seater plane made its approach and after it landed. Many stopped alongside the road to snap pictures and take video.

The plane, piloted by Babar Suleman, of Plainfield, had taken off from Eagle Creek Airpark and was at about 7,000 feet when the engine stopped working.

With no power, Suleman said he couldn't possibly make it to the nearest airport, Mount Comfort, which was about seven miles away.

"I saw two trucks and there were two cars. I let the trucks go and I squeezed in between the two cars," Suleman said. "The rear car, he saw what was happening and he was smart enough he hit the brakes. The guy in front, he was just surprised by what was going on."

Suleman, who has been a pilot for four years, said keeping a calm head was critical to landing safely.

"After I touched down, the one (car) in front came pretty close. I could see the guy's face in the rear view mirror," Suleman said. "I was scared after I got out of the plane. My knees shook really bad."

After a mechanic checked out the craft and determined that ice had caused the temporary engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration cleared it to take off, again using I-70 as a runway.

Police stopped traffic in both directions for about 15 minutes as the plane took to the skies again.

Suleman credited excellent training at Greenwood and Eagle Creek airports for allowing him to keep calm during the ordeal.

Original article ➤ https://www.theindychannel.com

Sunday, October 21, 2018

Cessna 170B, N2766D: Accident occurred November 08, 2017 at Dacy Airport (0C0), Harvard, McHenry County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration; DuPage; Chicago, Illinois
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
McFarlane Aviation, Inc; Baldwin City, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N2766D


Location: Harvard, IL
Accident Number: CEN18LA044
Date & Time: 11/08/2017, 1630 CST
Registration: N2766D
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 8, 2017, about 1630 central standard time, a Cessna 170B airplane, N2766D, experienced a flight control failure while landing at Dacy Airport (0C0), Harvard, Illinois. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight departed Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Poplar Grove, Illinois, about 1615 and was en route to 0C0.

According to the pilot, during the landing flare to runway 27 (3,589 ft. by 105 ft., turf), about 6 to 12 inches above the runway, he experienced a "complete loss of flight controls," and the nose of the airplane dropped. The main landing gear settled to the runway; during the landing roll the pilot was able to reach the copilot control yoke and completed the landing roll without further incident.

An examination of the airplane revealed that the rivet in the universal joint (u-joint) for the pilot-side control tee (flight control yoke) had failed. The u-joint assembly was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C., for further examination and testing.

As received, the swivel block on half of the u-joint could be rotated. However, hand-applied torque of the close-fitting gage pin installed in the cross-drilled hole in the center pin revealed that the center pin could not be rotated about its main axis. Galling and material transfer wear scars were observed on the mating surfaces of the swivel block. The center pin exhibited wear scars and accumulated particulate debris consistent with adhesive wear. The outside diameter of the half pins exhibited material loss and wear debris deposits. The ends of the half pins that contacted the center pin exhibited adhesive wear. The rivet shank fractured due to fatigue crack propagation consistent with reversed bending. The vertical and horizontal yoke ears exhibited galling and adhesive wear signatures. Similar wear signatures were observed on the mating portions of the center pin. No lubricant was visible during the examination.

According to engineering data provided by McFarlane Aviation and confirmed during the examination, the block was manufactured out of 17-4PH stainless steel alloy. The rivet was manufactured from 300-series stainless steel with a nominal diameter of 3/32.

According to the airplane maintenance records, the universal joint had been replaced with a McFarlane Aviation, Inc. universal joint (part number MC6183) on April 1, 2016. The airplane had accumulated 119.1 hours of flight time between the time of replacement and the failure. Additionally, the airplane was sold in October of 2017 and the new owners had flown the airplane approximately 6 hours prior to the failure. The new owners did not detect any change in the control characteristics during that time.

According to the Cessna Service Manual, the joint should be inspected at every annual/100-hour inspection, for "…security, binding, cracks, looseness, and restricted travel…" The lubrication requirements according to the Cessna 170B owner's manual are as required or every 1,000 hours.

McFarlane Aviation, Inc., reported 500 u-joints were manufactured in a batch that could potentially experience this seizure and subsequent failure. On December 11, 2017, McFarlane Aviation, Inc., issued Service Bulletin SB-9, Revision A. This service bulletin called for the "mandatory and immediate" inspection of the u-joint, and replacement within 100 flight hours (or 1 calendar year) after the initial inspection, if the u-joint passed the initial inspection requirements. Immediate replacement was required for u-joints that did not pass the inspection.

The SB-9 also recommended the use of a rubber boot or sleeve to prevent debris from entering the joint and to maintain the level of lubrication. The rubber boot or sleeve was not a part of the original design from Cessna for this year, make, or model, and was not required to be installed.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/03/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/17/2016
Flight Time: 1650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 75 hours (Total, this make and model), 170 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N2766D
Model/Series: 170B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1952
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 25308
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1451 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2945 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300-D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBUU, 780 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1630 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 45°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Poplar Grove, IL (C77)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Harvard, IL (0C0)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1615 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Dacy Airport (0C0)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 913 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3589 ft / 105 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.402222, -88.632222 (est)

Location: Harvard, IL
Accident Number: CEN18LA044
Date & Time: 11/08/2017, 1630 CST
Registration: N2766D
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 8, 2017, about 1630 central standard time, a Cessna 170B airplane, N2766D, experienced a flight control failure while landing at Dacy Airport (0C0), Harvard, Illinois. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was not damaged. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight departed Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Poplar Grove, Illinois, about 1615 and was en route to 0C0.

According to the pilot, during the landing flare to runway 27 (3,589 ft. by 105 ft., turf), about 6 to 12 inches off of the runway, the flight controls failed and the nose of the airplane dropped. The pilot was able to reach over to the copilot control yoke and completed the landing without further incident. The airplane was not damaged during the landing.

An examination of the airplane revealed that the pin in the universal joint for the pilot-side control tee (flight control yoke) had failed. The part has been retained for further examination and testing by the National Transportation Safety Board Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2766D
Model/Series: 170B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBUU, 780 ft msl
Observation Time: 1630 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Poplar Grove, IL (C77)
Destination: Harvard, IL (0C0)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.402222, -88.632222 (est)

Piper PA-28-180, registered to and operated by the pilot, N10GJ: Accident occurred November 08, 2017 in Carroll, Fairfield County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio 
 
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


http://registry.faa.gov/N10GJ


Location: Carol, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA036
Date & Time: 11/08/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N10GJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 8, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N10GJ, was damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Carroll, Ohio. The pilot was not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to its left wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Fairfield County Airport(LHQ), Lancaster, Ohio, about 1200.

The pilot reported that he was performing takeoff and landing practice and while on the downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern he applied carburetor heat, 10° flaps, turned on the fuel pump, and reduced throttle to 1,500 rpm to set up for the base leg. He stated that the engine suddenly stopped producing power and was unresponsive to throttle input. He attempted to restart the engine without success. He turned the airplane onto a base leg but had insufficient altitude to make it back to the airport and landed in a field.

Subsequent examination of the airplane revealed that it had about 36 gallons of fuel remaining. A ground run of the engine was performed and the engine started and was run for several minutes at power setting from 1,500 to 1,700 rpm. Additional testing of the airplane's electric fuel boost pump and engine driven fuel pump revealed that both pumps were capable of pumping fuel. No anomalies were discovered that would explain the loss of engine power.

The temperature and dew point recorded at the accident airport about the time of the accident were 9° and 2° Celsius respectively. The recorded temperature and dew point were in the range of susceptibility for serious carburetor icing at any power setting. An article on carburetor icing published by Flight Safety Australia stated that if ice forms in the carburetor of a fixed pitch propeller aircraft, the restriction to the induction airflow will reduce power and force a drop in rpm, which might be accompanied or followed by rough running as the fuel/air mixture ratio is upset. Applying carburetor heat introduces less dense hot air which will cause a further drop in rpm.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 450 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N10GJ
Model/Series: PA 28-180 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 287205192
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LHQ, 868 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 60°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LANCASTER, OH (LHQ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: LANCASTER, OH (LHQ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: FAIRFIELD COUNTY (LHQ)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 868 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5004 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.755556, -82.657222

Location: Carol, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA036
Date & Time: 11/08/2017, 1345 EST
Registration: N10GJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 8, 2017, about 1345 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-180 airplane, N10GJ, was damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Carroll, Ohio. The pilot was not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to its left wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Fairfield County Airport(LHQ), Lancaster, Ohio, at an undetermined time. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N10GJ
Model/Series: PA 28-180 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LHQ, 868 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots/ 14 knots, 30°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: LANCASTER, OH (LHQ)
Destination: LANCASTER, OH (LHQ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, registered to Peavy LLC, N4213F: Accident occurred October 30, 2017 in Dawsonville, Dawson County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N4213F



Location: Dawsonville, GA
Accident Number: ANC18LA006
Date & Time: 10/30/2017, 0826 EDT
Registration: N4213F
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 30, 2017, about 0826 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-300 airplane, N4213F, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing on an asphalt-covered automobile race track about 4 miles west-northwest of Dawsonville, Georgia. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to Peavy LLC and was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instrument flight rules (IFR) flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an IFR flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Gainesville, Georgia (GVL) about 0807, destined for Gary, Indiana (GYY).

According to the pilot, while climbing through 8,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to an assigned altitude of 10,000 ft msl, he heard a sound consistent with a propeller overspeed, which lasted about 5 seconds before returning to normal. Coinciding with the sound, was a low oil quantity light and a reading of zero on the oil pressure gauge. After declaring an emergency, the pilot began a descent for an emergency landing. As the airplane descended through about 5,000 ft msl, the pilot heard a loud "pop or bang" and saw a puff of smoke emit from under the engine cowling, and smoke entered the cockpit through the cabin heat system. Around 3,500 ft msl, the pilot tried to add some power before sensing a "bad vibration" that felt as if a propeller blade had separated. About the same time as the vibration, the engine lost all power.

Seeing an asphalt-covered automobile racetrack below, the pilot selected one of the straight sections of track for landing. As the airplane neared the surface, a white truck moved in the way, and the pilot veered the airplane left to avoid a collision. Following the maneuver, the airplane's right wing struck a dirt berm, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

An on-site examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector revealed that the bottom of the fuselage was coated in oil and the engine crank case was fractured at the upper aft attach bolts of the number six cylinder. All three propeller blades were present, with only one blade exhibiting signs of damage. The damaged blade was bent aft with no significant signs of leading edge damage or scaring. The two remaining blades were free of impact damage.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540 series engine, which was examined on November 16, 2017. The engine is a six-cylinder, air cooled, direct drive, horizontally opposed, normally aspirated, fuel injected, internal combustion engine. Extensive fracturing of the engine crankcase above the #6 cylinder was present. The engine was disassembled for inspection and the crankcase was opened. The #3 and #4 main bearings on both the left and right side of the crankcase were wiped with copper flashing and bearing material was extruding. The connecting rod and crankshaft journals for the #5 cylinder exhibited signs consistent with thermal damage with the bearing extruded. The connecting rod and crankshaft journals for the #6 cylinder were fragmented, however both connecting rod bolts remained in place and attached. The piston and wrist pin remained attached with about 3 inches of the fractured connecting rod.

The airplane was equipped with an Air Wolf remote mounted oil filter (P/N 0FB 10). The kit consists of two hoses, an adapter that mounts to the engine's accessory case, and an oil filter bracket that mounts to the airplane's firewall. When the kit is installed, the oil filter is remotely mounted to the airplane's firewall. A B-nut on one of the remote mounted oil filter lines was observed to be loose with about 2 ½ threads showing. The B-nut was tightened by hand and rotated about 1 and ¾ turns with about ½ thread showing.

According to the pilot, he was not an airframe or powerplant mechanic, but he said that he replaced the line about a week before the accident, and this was the first flight since that installation.

The closest official weather observation station is GVL, which is located about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 0753, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 270° at 8 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 36° F; dew point 28° F; altimeter 29.96 inches of Mercury. 


Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/15/2016
Flight Time:  1300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model), 1200 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N4213F
Model/Series: PA 32R-300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32R-7680432
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/31/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 15 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5527.91 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO540-K165D
Registered Owner: PEAVY LLC
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGVL, 1275 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 119°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GAINESVILLE, GA (GVL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR/IFR
Destination: GARY, IN (GYY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0800 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  34.434444, -84.176667

Location: Dawsonville, GA
Accident Number: ANC18LA006
Date & Time: 10/30/2017, 0826 EDT
Registration: N4213F
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 30, 2017, about 0826 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R airplane, N4213F, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing on an asphalt race track about 4 miles west-northwest of Dawsonville, Georgia. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to Peavy LLC and was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 instrument flight rules (IFR) flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an IFR flight had been filed. The flight departed Gainesville, Georgia (GVL) about 0807 destined for Gary, Indiana (GYY).

According to the pilot, while climbing through 8,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to an assigned altitude of 10,000 ft msl, he heard a sound consistent with a prop governor overspeed which lasted about 5 seconds before returning to normal. Coinciding with the sound, was a low oil quantity light and a reading of zero on the oil pressure gauge. After declaring an emergency, the pilot began a descent for an emergency landing. When the aircraft was passing through about 5,000 ft msl, the pilot heard a loud "pop or bang" and saw a puff of smoke emit from under the engine cowling and smoke entered the cockpit through the cabin heat system. Around 3,500 ft msl, the pilot tried to add some power before sensing a "bad vibration" that felt as if a propeller blade had separated. About the same time as the vibration, the engine lost power.

Seeing an asphalt racetrack below, the pilot selected one of the straight sections of track for landing. As the airplane neared the surface, a white truck moved in the way and the pilot veered the airplane left to avoid a collision. Following the maneuver, the airplane's right wing struck a dirt berm, resulting in substantial damage.

An on-site examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector revealed that the bottom of the fuselage was coated in oil and the engine crank case was fractured at the upper aft attach bolts of the number six cylinder. All three propeller blades were present, with only one blade exhibiting signs of damage. The damaged blade was bent aft with no significant signs of leading edge damage or scaring. The two remaining blades were free of impact damage.

The closest official weather observation station is GVL, which is located about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 0753, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 270° at 8 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 36° F; dew point 28° F; altimeter 29.96 inches of Mercury.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming TIO-540 series engine. A detailed examination is pending.

Schweizer G-164B, registered to and operated by Haley Flying Service, N8494K: Accident occurred October 24, 2017 in Tracy, San Joaquin County -and- Accident occurred February 23, 2010 in Byron, Contra Costa County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8494K

Location: Tracy, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA015
Date & Time: 10/24/2017, 1000 PDT
Registration: N8494K
Aircraft: SCHWEIZER AIRCRAFT CORP G 164B
Aircraft Damage:  Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 24, 2017, about 1000 Pacific daylight time, a Schweizer Corp G-164B airplane, N8494K, was substantially damaged during the landing roll at a private airstrip near Tracy, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Haley Flying Service of Tracy as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 familiarization flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed the private airstrip about 0900.

In a written statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that upon returning to the airport he flew around to the east end of the runway, got the [air]plane slowed down, trimmed for landing and made his approach. The pilot stated that after he had cleared the wires and made the runway, he pulled the power back to idle and glided down the runway, flared and made a smooth landing. The pilot opined that after landing he thought that he had hit a bump, which caused the airplane to bounce, followed by the airplane veering to the left. The pilot added that he tried to use right brake to bring the [air]plane back [to the right], but it felt as though the right brake was [not] effective. The airplane subsequently went off the left side of the runway and into a ditch, which resulted in a sudden engine stoppage, the separation of the right main landing gear, and damage to the lower right wing panel. The pilot reported no mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2016
Flight Time: 547 hours (Total, all aircraft), 110 hours (Total, this make and model), 449 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SCHWEIZER AIRCRAFT CORP
Registration: N8494K
Model/Series: G 164B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1983
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 713B
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/17/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6162 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 1 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 11561 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: R-1340
Registered Owner: HALEY FLYING SERVICE INC
Rated Power: 600 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SCK, 33 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0955 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 50°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tracy, CA (NA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Tracy, CA (NA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Delta Strip (NA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 25 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2700 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  37.816667, -121.456389

NTSB Identification: WPR18LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 24, 2017 in Tracy, CA
Aircraft: SCHWEIZER AIRCRAFT CORP G 164B, registration: N8494K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 24, 2017, about 1000 Pacific daylight time, a Schweizer Aircraft Corp G-164B, N8494K,was substantially damaged due to impact with terrain during the landing roll at a private airstrip near Tracy, California. The airplane was owned and operated by Haley Flying Service of Tracy. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The familiarization flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed the private airstrip about 0900.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge shortly after the accident, the pilot said this was his first flight in the make and model of the accident airplane. The pilot stated that after making a smooth touchdown, during which he thought he had hit a bump on the runway, the airplane veered to the left. The pilot opined that he attempted to correct back to the right by using right rudder and then right brake, each of which was ineffective in stopping the airplane from veering further to the left. The airplane subsequently exited the left side of the runway and collided with a ditch, which resulted in the airplane spinning around to the left. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that both the upper and lower right wing panels had sustained substantial damage, and that the right main landing gear had collapsed. The pilot stated that while trying to correct back to the right, the right brake seemed "mushy". The airplane has been recovered and secured for further examination.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR10LA125
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 23, 2010 in Byron, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/18/2011
Aircraft: Schweizer Aircraft Corp G164B, registration: N8494K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After an aerial application flight, the pilot initiated a turn back toward the airstrip. The airplane's engine started to run rough and lose power. The pilot turned the airplane into the wind and initiated a forced landing into a deeply furrowed field. As the airplane touched down the landing gear sunk into the soft ground and the airplane nosed over, coming to a rest inverted. Postaccident examination of the airframe and an engine test run revealed no anomalies. The nearest weather reporting station reported a temperature of 9 degrees Celsius (C) and a dew point of 7 degrees C at the time of the accident. Review of the carburetor icing probability chart revealed that this temperature and dew point were conducive to serious icing at cruise power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to carburetor icing as a result of the pilot's failure to use carburetor heat.

On February 23, 2010, about 1330 Pacific standard time, a Schweizer Aircraft Corporation G-164B, N8494K, experienced a loss of engine power near Byron, California. Haley Flying Service, Inc., operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural crop dusting operation. The airplane sustained substantial damage after making a forced landing on a soft dirt field and nosing over onto its back. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions were prevalent in the area, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that after finishing the application flight he initiated a turn towards the airstrip when the engine started to run rough and lose significant power. The pilot turned the airplane into the wind and initiated a forced landing into a deeply furrowed field. As the airplane touched down, the landing gear sunk into the soft ground and the airplane nosed over, coming to rest inverted. 

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed substantial damage to three of the four airplane’s wings, along with the vertical stabilizer and rudder. No visual anomalies were observed with the engine. The spark plugs were removed and appeared normal. The fuel system was examined and found to be clear of water and debris. The engine was started and no anomalies were noted. 

The nearest weather reporting station was located at Livermore Municipal Airport, Livermore, California, about 12 nautical miles southwest of the accident site. At 1253 it reported, overcast skies at 400 feet; light rain showers; temperature 9 degrees Celsius (C); dew point 7 degrees C; and an altimeter setting of 30.19 inches of mercury. 

Review of the carburetor icing probability chart revealed that the temperature and dew point at the time of the accident were conducive to serious icing at cruise power.