Sunday, June 25, 2017

Spewing fuel prompts two to sue Star Marianas

Two passengers bound for Tinian to attend a funeral in July 2016 are now suing Star Marianas Air Inc. after its aircraft allegedly turned around and made an emergency landing at the Saipan airport for failing to secure the fuel tank after refueling.

Ricky Gene Mendiola Lizama and a minor, through his representative, Remy Mendiola Forhad, accuse Star Marianas Air of negligence, violation of the CNMI Consumer Protection Act, and negligent infliction of emotional distress.

Star Marianas Air, through its counsel Timothy H. Bellas, however, asserted that the plaintiffs have no basis to suppose that the fuel leak was due to a failure to secure the gas tank.

Star Marianas also pointed out that the plane landed on Saipan without any damage to the aircraft or its occupants.

Lizama and Forhad, though counsel Robert J. O’Connor, want a jury trial and are demanding unspecified damages.

According to the complaint, Lizama and the child were going to Tinian aboard a Star Marianas flight on July 17, 2016, to attend a funeral.

O’Connor said the aircraft was airborne when Lizama noticed fuel spewing out of the plane behind its wing. The lawyer said Lizama alerted the two pilots who turned the plane around and made an emergency landing at the Saipan airport. While disembarking from the plane, Lizama and the minor child allegedly smelled fuel fumes.

The lawyer said that improperly securing a fuel tank on the airplane was a serious and egregious mistake that should never have occurred.

O’Connor said the failure to secure such an item, considering the fragility of a small plane, the preciousness of its cargo, and the heightened and strict standards that apply to aircraft safety and maintenance, was “an extraordinary reckless act.”

“As a result of this incident, plaintiffs suffered physical injuries, trauma, emotional distress and suffering. They were in a state of shock and were very nervous and frightened,” he said.

O’Connor said Star Marianas’ failure to properly care for, maintain, and make safe a passenger airplane constitutes an unfair business practice for which plaintiffs are entitled to damages and attorney’s fees pursuant to the Consumer Protection Act.

In Star Marianas’ motion to dismiss, Bellas said there is no factual basis to substantiate the plaintiffs’ labeling of the landing back on Saipan as an “emergency landing.”

Bellas said Star Marianas does not challenge plaintiffs’ negligence claim even though there are other equally plausible factual scenarios such as the fuel cap could have failed or come loose during take-off.

However, Bellas said, plaintiffs have not and cannot plead that Star Marianas knew that the fuel tank was not properly secured or purposely failed to secure the fuel cap.

Therefore, the lawyer said, plaintiffs’ suggestion that Star Marianas knew about the open condition, but failed to warn the passengers of that fact, is pleaded solely to bolster an inappropriate Consumer Protection Act claim.

http://www.saipantribune.com

Drones continue to cause problems for wildfire crews



Unauthorized drones continued to vex crews battling wildfires, with another spotted on Sunday that temporarily halted aerial efforts to put out a fire northwest of Flagstaff.

It was the second drone that has been observed at the fire, known as the Boundary Fire, said Dennis Godfrey, a public information officer with the Bureau of Land Management.

It was unknown how long efforts were stopped due to the drone, Godfrey said. The fire, started by lightning on June 1, was 88 percent contained, officials said.

Firefighters were unable to recover the drone or identify the operator.

Since drones became popular among hobbyists, wildfire officials have warned against their use.

"I think it's happening all over," he said. "And it's a problem if people don't abide by restrictions."

In May, four drones were spotted as crews battled the Pinal Fire near Globe, grounding aerial suppression efforts. One hobbyist was cited, according to a news release.

On Friday, another drone was spotted near the Bonita Fire in New Mexico, according to a news release.


http://www.azcentral.com

Opinion: Low cost airlines like AirAsia mean a higher safety risk




Geoffrey Thomas


 

The latest incident involving AirAsia X in Australian skies is a severe blow to the AirAsia Group — the biggest low-cost airline conglomerate in Asia. Once again passengers will ask should we fly AirAsia to our favorite holiday destinations of Bali or Kuala Lumpur?

Surveys show that while 60 percent of passengers have a fear of flying, only 27 percent choose safety over price as low-cost airlines lure the thrifty. AirAsia brought the low-cost concept to Asia in 2002. It has been a huge success, with more than 250 million passengers carried on the group’s services.

It has joint venture partners in Indonesia, Thailand, Japan and the Philippines, as well as long-range partner AirAsia X in Kuala Lumpur.

But low-cost airlines have a downside. They usually have tighter schedules with less back-up. So, when a plane breaks down, the disruptions can be longer.

They work with fewer ground staff, which manifests as less customer service.

Low-cost airlines now make up 20 percent of all travel into and out of Australia.

However, of more serious concern is operational safety and many low-cost airlines have not done the International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit.

Airlines that have done the IOSA have a 4.3 times better safety record than those that have not, although that ratio is distorted by the big number of Third World airlines with terrible crash records that have also ignored the audit.

In the AirAsia Group, only AirAsia X has completed the audit. The audit is an internationally recognized evaluation designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline.

The AirAsia Group is a very successful operation, but it needs to take stock to ensure that its rapid growth is not compromising safety.

Five major incidents or accidents in the past three years is not a good record by any measure and most of these have involved pilot issues.

https://thewest.com.au/opinion

Beechcraft 95, N2799Y: Right engine caught fire during startup












AIRCRAFT – M&M, S/N:       1958 Beechcraft 95, N2799Y, Serial No. TD-175

ENGINE(S) – M&M, S/N:    Right Engine: Lycoming O-360A1A, Serial No. RL-40286-36A

Left Engine:  Lycoming O-360A1A, Serial No. RL-9820-36A

PROPELLER(S) – M&M, S/N:       Right: Hartzell HC-C2YK-2CUF,
Left: Hartzell HC-C2YK-2CUF,

TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE(S):   Right: 2265.7 SMOH, 2265.7 TT
Left: 3075.3 SMOH, 3075.3 TT

 PROPELLER(S):    Right: 2265.77 TT and 164.2 SPOH
Left:  2265.77 TT

AIRFRAME:   8609.2 hours

OTHER EQUIPMENT: GNS 430, GMA 340, KX170B

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Right engine caught fire during startup. 

 DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Right engine suffered heat and fire damages. The cowling require replacement along with hoses and cables. Unknown internal damages to engine or propeller from heat damage.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:    Aviation Specialties, 300 County Airport Rd, Hangar A, Vacaville, CA 95688   707-451-2860
                                                     
 REMARKS:     Sold AS IS/WHERE IS.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N2799Y.htm

Houston-bound flight diverted after woman tries to open emergency exit door



A flight to Houston from Los Angeles, California was diverted to Corpus Christi, Texas on Sunday after a woman reportedly tried to open an emergency exit door and jump out of the plane.

The plane was supposed to land at Hobby Airport in Houston around 1:30 p.m. but as of 6 p.m. it was still in Corpus Christi after making an emergency landing.

One of the passengers on the plane told KHOU 11 News, the woman was acting strangely before the plane was even boarded at LAX Sunday morning.

According to the passenger, once on the plane, the woman wouldn't stay seated and was pacing up and down the aisle.

She reportedly wrote the words, "Help me" on beverage napkins.

The passenger said toward the end of the flight, the woman tried to open one of the emergency exit doors near the back of the plane.


 
Cleveland ISD officer Pamela Michew


A Cleveland ISD police officer, Pamela Michew, was on board the flight and was traveling with her children from Sacramento.

Michew detained the woman and subdued her until the plane was able to land safely in Corpus Christi.

Once the plane was on the ground, the woman was taken into custody.

http://www.khou.com

Public to get chance to weigh in on Danville Regional Airport (KDAN) operator

Members of the public have an opportunity to speak out on who will provide fixed-base operations at Danville Regional Airport.

Danville City Council formed a special committee in the spring to review proposals from Averett University and General Aviation to operate the airport.

The committee will make a recommendation to City Council whether to choose Averett or General Aviation. The decision will be up to council.
 

During a meeting with the Danville Regional Airport Commission last week, the committee decided to hold a meeting this week to allow the public to provide comment.

The meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Danville Regional Airport in the East Conference Room.

The city owns the airport, but has a contract with General Aviation for operator services such as fuel sales, aircraft maintenance, flight instruction and other services. The current lease, which includes an option for a one-year renewal, expires June 30.

General Aviation has been the airport’s fixed-base operator since 1948.

Lease negotiations between General Aviation and the airport commission took place between April and October 2016 but failed to reach an agreement. After they couldn’t reach an agreement, the commission sent out a Request for Proposals, which is a legal notice to solicit bids for entities to provide fixed-based operations at the airport.

General Aviation and Averett University both responded by the March 10 deadline and after reviewing the proposals, the eight-member airport commission voted on April 10 to recommend Averett to City Council.

City Council formed a special committee to review the proposals from Averett and General Aviation.


http://www.godanriver.com

Pilots and plane enthusiasts fly, drive to Shumway Innernational Airport (IL05), Effingham County, Illinois




SHUMWAY− Dozens of pilots and aviation enthusiasts attended the Fly-in and Drive-in Pancake Breakfast at the Shumway “Inner”national Airport on Saturday morning to raise money for a local aircraft group.

Jack and Darlene Poff hosted the eighth breakfast fundraiser for Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 16 over the weekend at their hangar-turned-home airstrip. Darlene Poff said the fundraiser is one of two events that supports programs such as the Young Eagles flight event which allows children ages 8 to 17 to take flight with an experienced pilot.

The Poffs’ airport features a half-mile sod landing strip, a hangar and the couple’s home. Darlene Poff said her husband’s love of aviation drove them to purchase the piece of farmland in Shumway where they built the small airport.




“We built the hangar because Jack got his pilot’s license in college but had to put his aviation dreams aside when life got in the way,” Darlene Poff said. “Once the kids got older, we sold our lake house and bought this property.”

Darlene Poff added that her husband has been building a kit plane of his own, and his project is nearing completion. The couple eventually added onto the hangar, making their residence a permanent part of the airport.

Darlene Poff estimated that the couple and a group of volunteers serve around 200 people each year at the event, and 50 to 55 planes make a stop to devour pancakes, sausage and biscuits and gravy.

The breakfast has grown throughout its duration, Darlene Poff said, as pilots from Illinois, Indiana and Missouri participate each year. Darlene Poff said the breakfast is not just a joy for her and her husband and the pilots.




“I think it’s something for the community. It’s open to the public, and everyone is welcome,” Darlene Poff said.

Dale Lener of Olney and Fred Berger of Noble each flew into the airport in their Piper Warrior planes. Lener, a pilot for 17 years, said the two attend the event because of their love of aviation.

“We like to see the airplanes take off and land. It also gives us a reason to go fly. It’s fun,” Lener said.

Lener and Berger said they dreamed of flying as kids. Lener wanted to fly so badly that, when he was young, he leaped from his family’s shed with a sheet tied to his arms to act as a parachute. Berger had constructed a child’s version of a plane using cloth and wood when he was young, an idea that never actually saw air time.




Stan Bahrns of Effingham and Perry Testory of Urbana landed their Van’s-model aircrafts on the grass runway Saturday as well. Bahrns said he had been flying since 1959 while Testory said he began flying ten years after Bahrns.

Testory and Bahrns agreed that the ride into Shumway was beautiful and calm despite occasional wind gusts. Testory said he enjoys coming this event because he’s surrounding by people who love to fly.

“It’s the comradery (and) the like-thinking. If you don’t like airplanes, you’re not going to be here,” Testory said.

Dean Wetherall and Ron Stoldt of Shumway attended the breakfast with two relatives. Wetherall said he comes to the event almost every year because it’s close to his home while Stoldt said Saturday was his first time at the breakfast.

 



Wetherall said he enjoyed seeing the variety of planes as well as watching them land and take off. He said he had brought his grandchildren out last year, and they enjoyed it.

Charleston pilots Keith Walker, Roger Songer and Steve Laribee each journeyed to Shumway in their post-World War II Taylorcraft and Aeronca planes. Laribee said this event is special to him because there are not too many like it around.

“I personally like coming out here because there’s not very many places for us to fly to anymore. You can see that the people who wanted to fly since they were younger are here,” Laribee said.

http://www.effinghamdailynews.com

German-based company to bring $12 million aviation-related plant, jobs, to Auburn, Alabama



Winkelmann Group, a German-based manufacturer serving the aerospace industry and others, soon will begin production at its first United States production facility in the Auburn Industrial Park.

The company plans to invest $12 million to establish the metal-forming plant and expects to create approximately 50 jobs over the next five years, according to a city of Auburn release.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey and Winkelmann Group CEO Heinrich Winkelmann announced the new location, called Winkelmann Flowform Technology LP, in France at the Paris Air Show on Monday.

“As we declare to the world that Alabama is open for business, we welcome Winkelmann to our family of aerospace and defense-related companies in Alabama,” Ivey said in the release.

Equipment installation has begun at 229 Teague Court, the former site of Cumberland Plastic Systems, in Auburn. Production is expected to begin in about two to three months, according to Arndt Siepmann, industrial development director for Auburn’s Economic Development Department.

Winkelmann Group is a fourth-generation German company that has three divisions: automotive, building and industry, and flowforming, which is a metal-forming technique. The company has more than 45 years of experience in the space flight and aviation business.

The Auburn site will use the company’s flowform technology that primarily builds high-precision, high-strength, thin wall roto-symmetrical parts from various metals, according to the release.

“With the North America operation, my team will be able to better serve the aerospace and defense industry, as well as the commercial automotive and oil and gas industry in the U.S.,” CEO Heinrich Winkelmann said in the release. “Our flow-forming engineering and manufacturing knowhow combined with the one-of-a-kind machinery equipment installed at our Auburn facility creates solutions for our customers who demand and deserve only the highest quality.”

Aerospace, defense and petroleum materials created at the plant likely will be delivered throughout the U.S. from the plant while automotive materials could remain in the Southeast, Siepmann said.

The company is “truly technology-based” and will bring high-paying jobs for well-trained people to the area, supporting the local economy, Siepmann said. The company’s advanced technology also positions it for “sustainable, long-term growth” in Auburn, said Alabama Department of Commerce Secretary Greg Canfield on Monday.

“Since Winkelmann is a recognized leader in innovation and manufacturing, its choice of Auburn represents a powerful endorsement of the city’s advantages for business,” Canfield said.

One of these advantages is Auburn University’s engineering school, which provides a “talent pipeline” for companies like Winkelmann along with advantages for students, Canfield said.

The Auburn plant will add to Winkelmann Group’s more than 4,000 employees and 26 independent business units worldwide.

"The announcement today is great news for Auburn,” Mayor Bill Ham said in the release. “I am extremely grateful for the support we’ve received from the state of Alabama, and I’m proud to welcome Winkelmann to the Auburn family."

http://www.oanow.com

Eurocopter EC-130B-4 (AS-350B-4), N974BR, Jayhawk Inc: Accident occurred July 03, 2015 in Somerset, Gunnison County, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered Owner: Jayhawk Inc
Operator: Jayhawk Inc
Operator Does Business As: Aspen Heli Charter

Jayhawk Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N974BR

NTSB Identification: CEN15CA312
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, July 03, 2015 in Somerset, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/11/2015
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER EC 130 B4, registration: N974BR
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had flown multiple trips into and out of the ranch prior to the accident. He also had seen wires in the area and had a discussion with local fishing guides regarding the location of wires in the area. As the pilot was preparing to depart the ranch with the last load of passengers he was approached by a guide who wanted to video the helicopter for their website. The pilot agreed and after lifting off, made a pass near the ranch for the video. The pilot stated he was flying toward the mountains when he heard a "small ting" and he knew the helicopter contacted a wire. He made an uneventful off airport landing in a nearby clearing. Although the pilot stated he never saw the wire it was later determined the helicopter contacted was a small copper static wire. A postaccident inspection of the helicopter revealed two of the three main rotor blades were beyond repair, at least two of the Fenestron blades were beyond repair, and the entire Fenestron stator blade assembly needed to be replaced.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to fly at a low altitude when he was aware that there were wires in the area which resulted in the helicopter contacting a wire.

The pilot stated he made two flights to the ranch to drop passengers off and was on his second flight transporting the passengers out of the ranch when the accident occurred. The pilot stated he had seen some wires in the area and had a discussion with the local fishing guides about the location of wires in the area, how dangerous the wires were, and how hard they were to see. The pilot reported that as he was preparing to depart with the last load of passenger, one of the fishing guides asked if he could video the helicopter for their website. The pilot reported he agreed and discussed where he would fly so the helicopter could be filmed. The pilot took off and flew a pass for the video. He stated he was flying toward the mountains when he heard a "small ting." The pilot reported he knew he hit a wire from the sound, but he did not see it. He made an uneventful off airport landing in the nearest clearing. The pilot reported the wire that the helicopter contacted was a small copper static wire. A postaccident inspection of the helicopter revealed two of the three main rotor blades were beyond repair, at least two of the Fenestron blades were beyond repair, and the entire Fenestron stator blade assembly needed to be replaced.

Buckeye Dream Machine 582, N50130: Fatal accident occurred June 25, 2017 in Federalsburg, Caroline County, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Michael L. Malick: http://registry.faa.gov/N50130

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA211
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 25, 2017 in Federalsburg, MD
Aircraft: BUCKEYE POWERED PARACHUTES INC DREAM MACHINE 582, registration: N50130
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 25, 2017, at 0906 eastern daylight time, an experimental light-sport Buckeye Powered Parachutes Inc. Dream Machine 582, N50130, was substantially damaged after it impacted power lines and terrain near Federalsburg, Maryland. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from a private airstrip, at the time of the accident. The local personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

A neighbor and friend assisted the pilot with the aircraft and watched the accident flight. He provided a written statement and was interviewed at the scene. According to the witness, the pilot taxied into position for takeoff to the north from his turf airstrip, which was orientated 33/15. The pilot "gave more throttle" after liftoff and the aircraft turned to its left. The aircraft climbed to about 35 feet above ground level, turned approximately 60 degrees to the left, and collided with the wires along the roadway which were about 245 feet left of the runway centerline. During the entire flight, the engine sounded smooth, continuous, and "normal" with no interruption of power. The aircraft struck the wires on the near side of the roadway, the pilot was ejected, and both the pilot and the aircraft came to rest on the far side of the road.

In a written statement, a neighbor reported she watched the initial ground run of accident aircraft "parallel to the road," and believed it might be a "4-wheeler or something." When she looked again, she saw the aircraft in flight, and watched as it collided with power lines that ran along the roadway. 

The aircraft came to rest upright, and except for some structural tubing and landing gear which was fractured, it remained largely intact. Flight and engine control continuity was confirmed, and the engine was secure in its mounts. The blades of the three-bladed propeller were fractured near their roots, but the propeller hub was securely mounted to the crankshaft. The battery was out of its tray, and the positive lead was disconnected. The 'aft' carburetor was separated from its rubber intake manifold/mount. All fuel lines remained connected and intact. There was no odor of fuel, and no evidence of fuel leakage anywhere in the fuel system. A test run of the engine revealed that it ran smoothly and continuously with no anomalies noted.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued March 27, 1984, he reported 400 total hours of flight experience on that date. 

Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed a single entry which reflected an instructional flight of 1.2 hours in a powered parachute. He annotated 6.5 hours of ground instruction in July 2016. There was no solo endorsement for powered parachutes annotated in the logbook. 

The tandem-seat, parachute-wing, tricycle-gear aircraft was manufactured in 1995 and was powered by a Rotax 582, 66-horsepower engine. The maintenance records for the aircraft were not located during an extensive search, and therefore the maintenance history of the aircraft could not be determined. 

At 0845, weather conditions reported at Easton/Newnam Field Airport (ESN), Easton, Maryland, 12 nautical miles northwest of the accident site included scattered clouds at 7,000 feet, 10 statute miles of visibility, and wind from 330° at 4 knots. The temperature was 25° C, the dew point was 19° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.05 inches of mercury.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Michael L. Malick
1945 - 2017


Michael L. Malick

FEDERALSBURG - Michael L. Malick, 71, of Federalsburg, MD, passed away on June 25, 2017 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford, DE. He was born in Maryland on Dec. 9, 1945, to the late Andrew Malick and Hazel Hughes Malick.

Mr. Malick attended high school in Cincinnati, and he earned his Bachelor's Degree in Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. On May 23, 1998, Mr. Malick married the former Toni Thomas, better known as Mickie, who passed away in 2014. Together, they enjoyed tending to their home in Federalsburg. Mr. Malick served in the Army during the Vietnam War, where he attended Airborne School. After being discharged, he earned his pilot's license, which he was very proud of. Mr. Malick also worked for many years at Cambridge Wire Cloth as a Mechanical Engineer.

Mr. Malick had many passions in his life. He was an environmentalist, and when he discovered so many Bald Eagles near his property, he built the Maple Lane Conservatory to ensure that they were safe.

He enjoyed racing horses, and was very active in harness racing. Mr. Malick was a numismatist, and he continued collecting coins throughout his life. He also loved collecting blown glass paperweights. He was a very talented trap and skeet shooter, a skilled woodworker, and was very crafty. He also enjoyed walks in the woods and exploring, as well as bird watching. Mr. Malick was a former member of the Federalsburg United Methodist Church, a former member of the Lions Club, was a current member of the Choptank Lodge #138 in East New Market for 36 years and the Worshipful Master of the lodge four times. He was also a member of the York rite in Denton, where he was a past Commander.

Mr. Malick is survived by three children: Sara Bowman and fiancé Brian Fisher of Easton; Zachary Bowman and partner Whitney Starrett of Federalsburg; Adora Bowman and fiancé Jessica Zell of Baltimore; a granddaughter, Naomi Cook of Easton; father-in-law, James Thomas of Cambridge; and several cousins. He is preceded in death by his wife Mickie and his parents.

Pallbearers will be Zachary Bowman, Adora Bowman, Granville "Tuck" Hales, Brian Fisher, Luke Thomas, and Sean Gollman. Honorary pallbearers will be David Tibbetts and Ralph Schmidt.

A funeral service will be held at the Cambridge Wesleyan Church on Friday, June 30, 11 a.m., with Pastor Jack Diehl officiating. A viewing will be held Thursday from 6-8 with a Masonic service at 7:30 p.m. as well as an hour prior to the service. Burial will follow the service on Friday at Dorchester Memorial Park.


In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgley, MD 21660.
=========

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The pilot of a powered parachute was killed when his aircraft crashed Sunday morning.

According to Maryland State Police, the crash happened just after 9 a.m., at a privately owned residential landing strip in the 3000-block of Seippes Rd. in Federalsburg.

The pilot, 71-year-old Michael Malick, was taken to a hospital following the crash, but was later pronounced dead.

Authorities say the preliminary investigation shows that shortly after takeoff, Malick lost control of the Buckeye Dream Machine 582, and as the aircraft was ascending, investigators believe it hit a power line.

Witnesses told police they saw the aircraft spiral to the ground.

No further injuries have been reported. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is on scene to continue the investigation into what caused the crash.

http://baltimore.cbslocal.com

FEDERALSBURG — A powered parachute crashed near Federalsburg Sunday, June 25, claiming the life of the pilot.

According to Maryland State Police, the pilot is identified as Michael Malick, 71, of Federalsburg. 

Police said he was the sole occupant of the powered parachute and was transported to Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford, Del., where he succumbed to injuries sustained in the crash. 

State police said shortly after 9 a.m. Sunday, troopers at the Easton Barrack were dispatched to the report of an aircraft crash at a privately owned residential landing strip in the 3000-block of Seippes Road in Federalsburg. 

Police believe the pilot is the owner of the grass airfield where the incident occurred, and there no injuries reported on the ground.

Investigators said shortly after takeoff, the pilot lost control of the aircraft for reasons unknown at this time, and as he was ascending, investigators believe the plane hit a power line.

Police said witnesses informed police the plane spiraled to the ground, and a parachute appeared to have deployed from the aircraft.

State police notified officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. 

Federal Aviation Administration officials will be responding to the scene to continue the investigation.

http://www.stardem.com

MD State Police
June 25, 2017
(FEDERALSBURG, MD)

An ultralight aircraft crashed in Caroline County claiming the life of the pilot.

The pilot is identified as Michael Malick, 71, of Federalsburg. He was the sole occupant of the aircraft and was transported to Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford where he succumbed to injuries sustained in the crash. The model of the aircraft involved is a Dream Machine 582.

Shortly after 9:00 a.m. this morning today, Maryland State Police at the Easton Barrack were dispatched to the report of an aircraft crash at a privately owned residential landing strip in the 3000-block of Seippes Road in Federalsburg, Md. Police believe the pilot is the owner of the grass airfield where the incident occurred. There no injuries reported on the ground.

The preliminary investigation indicates shortly after takeoff, the pilot lost control of the aircraft for reasons unknown at this time. As he was ascending, investigators believe the plane hit a power line. Witnesses informed police the plane spiraled to the ground. A parachute appeared to have deployed from the aircraft.

State Police notified officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. FAA officials will be responding to the scene to continue the investigation.

Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking, N14728: Accident occurred June 25, 2017 near Grove Municipal Airport (GMJ), Delaware County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N14728

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA242
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 25, 2017 in Grove, OK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17 30, registration: N14728
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 25, 2017, about 1400 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-30A airplane, N14728, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field 1/2 mile south of the Grove Municipal Airport (GMJ), Grove, Oklahoma. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight had departed Bollinger-Crass Memorial Airport (MO5), Van Buren, Missouri, about 1230 and was en route to GMJ. 


According to the FAA inspector who responded to the accident, during a right turn from base to final approach the engine started to sputter and lost power. The pilot performed a forced landing to a field. During the landing both the left and right wing spar were substantially damaged.

SpaceX Seeks to Execute Back-to-Back Launches in Roughly 48 Hours: Elon Musk’s company aims to pull off two commercial satellite launches from opposite coasts



The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
June 25, 2017 10:27 a.m. ET


Elon Musk’s SpaceX on Sunday will seek to complete a two-day, bicoastal demonstration of launch capability, completing its second unmanned mission since Friday in what would be the high-water mark for the company’s operational prowess.

After using previously-flown main engines to blast a Bulgarian telecommunications satellite into orbit Friday from a Florida launchpad, the closely held company is slated Sunday afternoon to use a California Air Force base to send a batch of 10 smaller satellites into space for Iridium Communications Inc. Iridium is SpaceX’s largest commercial customer.

If successful, Sunday’s blastoff would mark the shortest time between launches in SpaceX’s history. As the ninth launch of 2017, it also would represent a record for annual launches by the company, officially called Space Exploration Technologies Corp. It launched successfully eight times in 2016, before an explosion during routine ground testing temporarily grounded the Falcon 9 fleet.

SpaceX has rebounded strongly since that accident, alleviating many of the reliability concerns expressed privately by government and industry officials. But perhaps more than any previous benchmark, this weekend’s activities are expected to provide the strongest sign yet that SpaceX is on track to overcome years of nagging schedule slips by continuing to ramp up its launch tempo.

The main portion of the rocket that flew Friday made a successful vertical landing on a floating platform, a once-unimagined feat that is increasingly becoming a routine ending for SpaceX launches. Sunday’s mission also is slated to feature such a return.

With an aggressive summer and fall launch schedule, SpaceX officials are looking to rack up a total of roughly two dozen launches by the of the year. Previous internal projections showed as many as 27 launches for all of 2017, nearly doubling to a total of 52 in 2019.

But the financial results of flying used boosters remain uncertain. Mr. Musk and some of his top lieutenants initially projected huge price cuts. Then SpaceX officials talked about price reductions of slightly more than one-tenth of the $62 million official Falcon 9 launch price tag. Internal financial documents prepared more than a year ago projected that the combination of reduced prices and refurbishment costs would trim the company’s net income by roughly 20% between 2016 and 2020.

More recently, according to rivals and industry officials tracking the company’s launch prices, SpaceX officials aren’t offering any discounts to entice some customers to put their satellites on top of refurbished boosters. Instead, the company is offering to move them up in the packed schedule for getting a ride to space, these officials said.

A SpaceX spokesman couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

Matt Desch, Iridium’s CEO, has made no secret of his willingness to accept refurbished boosters if that would speed up deployment of his 70-plus satellite constellation, which is currently expected to be completed by mid-2018. Mr. Desch also told reporters on a recent conference call that further price cuts could help persuade him to switch to reused hardware, according to trade publication Space News.

https://www.wsj.com

Cessna 182A Skylane, N524BF, Thinking Cap Aviation LLC, San Jose Skydiving Center: Accident occurred June 25, 2017 near San Martin Airport (E16), Santa Clara County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Thinking Cap Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N524BF


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA367
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in San Martin, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N524BF

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft force landed short of the runway.

Date: 24-JUN-17
Time: 00:09:00Z
Regis#: N524BF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C182
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: SKYDIVING
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAN MARTIN
State: CALIFORNIA




A single-engine plane used for skydiving crashed near the San Martin Airport Saturday evening, according to the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Department.

The Cessna 182A Skylane built in 1957 had just released four skydivers and was on its way back to the airport when it went down just before 5:15 p.m. near the southbound on-ramp from East San Martin Avenue to Highway 101, according to officials. 

The 30-year-old pilot, who was the only person inside the plane at the time of the crash, told the California Highway Patrol that he suffered cuts to his face and a black eye.

Dhar Mrityunjoy of San Jose was piloting the plane, which is operated by the San Jose Skydiving Center.

Mrityunjoy said the plane's engine quit on the final approach to the airport. 

"His intention was to land the plane and he lost power on his approach to the runway," CHP Officer Jason Smith said.

Footage from the scene showed the plane come to rest next to the southbound on-ramp beneath highway metering lights. 

There were no flames, but the plane was damaged. 

A witness said the plane bounced on the shoulder of the on-ramp, sheared a traffic metering light and smashed into another pole.

The crash completely blocked the southbound on-ramp, but both directions of Highway 101 remained open while authorities investigated the incident.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash. 

There appears to be no questions about the plane's ability to fly safely, according to the Federal Aviation Administration registry.

San Martin is located just south of Morgan Hill and north of Gilroy.

http://www.nbcbayarea.com






MORGAN HILL — A small plane crashed on southbound Highway 101 Saturday evening in an unincorporated part of Santa Clara County near Morgan Hill, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The single-engine Cessna 182 crashed after departing from San Martin Airport, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said. 

The pilot was intending to return to San Martin Airport, but reported engine trouble shortly before the crash.

The pilot was the only person on board.

The crash was reported to the California Highway Patrol at about 5:15 p.m. just south of East San Martin Avenue.

The pilot had missed a runway at the San Martin Airport, Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Sgt. Rich Glennon told Bay City News.

Glennon said the pilot is OK, though it was immediately unclear if the pilot was injured.

A spokesman for San Jose Skydiving Center confirmed that the plane was one of theirs.

According to Federal Aviation Administration registries, the plane was registered to Thinking Cap Aviation LLC out of Whitefish, Montana.

http://www.mercurynews.com







San Martin, Calif. —  A single-engine plane used for skydiving, crashes onto a Highway 101 on-ramp, near the San Martin Airport Saturday night. 

According to the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, the plane had just released four skydivers and was on its way back to the airport, when it went down just before 5:15. 

It ended up crashing near the southbound on-ramp from East San Martin Avenue to Highway 101. 

The pilot told CHP the plane's engine quit on the final approach to the airport. 

He suffered only minor injuries: cuts to his face and a black eye.

The crash completely blocked the southbound on-ramp, but both directions of Highway 101 remained open, while authorities investigated the incident.

http://www.ksbw.com