Saturday, June 20, 2015

Turkish Airlines cabin manager dies of malaria after flight to Nigeria

THY cabin crew chief Selda Durmaz is seen in this undated photo. 
(Photo: Cihan)


A Turkish Airlines (THY) cabin crew chief died early on Saturday of malaria, after returning from a flight to Lagos, Nigeria.

Selda Durmaz was initially diagnosed with flu when she went to a hospital after her return to İstanbul, suffering from high fever, private Doğan news agency said.

Durmaz has sought another examination at the THY’s medical unit as the symptoms persisted. She was then diagnosed with malaria and later admitted into a private hospital in Bahçelievler district.

She had been receiving treatment at the hospital’s intensive care unit. Durmaz died of the disease at 1:30 a.m. early on Saturday.

Her body is due to be buried in the northeastern province of Bartın, Doğan said.

Source:  http://www.todayszaman.com

Bell 47G-5, Gomes Farm Air Service Inc., N4427F: Accident occurred June 20, 2015 near Salinas Municipal Airport (KSNS), California

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA193 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, June 20, 2015 in Salinas, CA
Aircraft: BELL 47G 5, registration: N4427F
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 20, 2015, at 0715 Pacific daylight time (PDT), a Bell 47G 5 helicopter, N4427F, was substantially damaged when it impacted a fence and terrain while maneuvering about 5 miles southwest of the Salinas Municipal Airport, Salinas, California. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Gomes Farm Air Service, Inc., under provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the helicopter, was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local aerial application flight originated from a loading area near the accident site about 0650.

Ground crewmen who worked for the operator had just refilled the fertilizer tank on the helicopter prior to its last departure. When the helicopter did not return for its scheduled rinse load the crewmen drove out to the field to be sprayed and observed that the helicopter had crashed on a road near a field. Neither ground crewmen witnessed the crash but stated that the fog was thick and visibility was between 10 and 20 feet at the time of the accident.

A postaccident examination of the helicopter was conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration, on June 20, 2015. The examination revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

FAA FSDO: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

GOMES FARM AIR SERVICE INC:   http://registry.faa.govN4427F



SALINAS, Calif. - The Associated Press is reporting Frank Gomes Jr. is the name of the crop dusting pilot who died in a helicopter crash in Salinas Saturday morning.

Gomes was the co-owner of Gomes Farm Air Service operating out of the Salinas Municipal Airport.

Back in 2010, Gomes was involved in another crash that occurred when bad visibility forced his helicopter down on Highway 101. He walked away with four broken ribs and a bruised lung.

A month later, he was back in sky flying again.

Gomes started flying in 1972, according to our archives.

Saturday's crash is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration.







NTSB Identification: WPR10LA446
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 03, 2010 in Salinas, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2011
Aircraft: BELL 47G, registration: N4427F
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After taking off on a visual flight rules flight in instrument meterological conditions, with a reported 2 1/2 miles visibility with mist and overcast clouds at 100 feet, the pilot proceeded westbound about 50 feet above ground level (agl) then, while approaching an interstate highway, climbed to 100 feet agl in order to avoid power lines. During the climb, the helicopter entered the fog. The pilot stated that after entering the fog he turned on the landing light, which blinded him and caused him to become disoriented as he attempted to make a 180-degree turn back to the airport. The pilot added that he subsequently lost control of the helicopter and impacted a highway guardrail with the tail section of the helicopter. The helicopter then came to rest inverted and partially in the southbound lane of the highway. The pilot reported no helicopter mechanical failures or malfunctions. A truck driver who witnessed the accident reported that the forward visibility was about 250 feet at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's visual flight rules flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in his spatial disorientation and loss of helicopter control.

On September 3, 2010, about 0600 Pacific daylight time, a Bell 47G-5 helicopter, N4427F, was substantially damaged following impact with terrain near Salinas, California. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was seriously injured. Gomes Farm Air Service of Salinas, was operating the helicopter under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The repositioning flight had departed the Salinas Municipal Airport (SNS) about 0550, with its destination being an off-airport work site about 3 miles west of SNS.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector who conducted a telephone interview with the pilot shortly after the accident, the pilot stated that he was flying about 50 feet above the ground and was concerned about the power lines that were hidden by the fog. The pilot reported that he then climbed up to about 80 feet above ground level (agl), which put him in the fog, and when he turned on the landing light in an attempt to illuminate the ground references and identify the power lines, it caused a temporary blinding condition that caused him to become disoriented. The pilot stated that he then attempted a 180-degree turn toward the airport, which resulted in a loss of control and impact with the highway pavement. The pilot reported no mechanical problems with the helicopter.

In a written report submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) several days after the accident, the pilot reported that abeam the airport’s control tower at an altitude of about 75 feet mean sea level (msl) and after turning west toward the interstate highway that borders the airport on the west, he could clearly see a [sugar plant] about 2 miles away. The pilot stated that after reaching the interstate highway he climbed to 100 feet msl and remained clear of clouds, with visibility “2 miles plus.” The pilot revealed that when the helicopter was over the interstate highway’s median strip between the north and southbound lanes, visibility began to deteriorate. The pilot reported that at this time he decided to turn around and return to the airport, as well as to descend in an attempt to re-establish visual contact [with ground references]. The pilot stated that during the descent and course reversal the tail section of the helicopter collided with a guard rail on the highway. The helicopter subsequently impacted the highway pavement and came to rest inverted partially in a southbound lane. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to its airframe.


A truck driver who was traveling southbound on the interstate highway reported seeing the helicopter approaching her position from the right side; it was moving from side to side. The witness stated that the helicopter subsequently impacted the terrain and rolled over, coming to rest partially inverted. The witness added that the forward visibility at the time of the accident was about 250 feet, and it was also very foggy.

At 0546, a special observation was reported by the SNS Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), which revealed wind calm, visibility 2 ½ miles, mist, overcast clouds at 100 feet, temperature 13 degrees Celsius, dew point 12 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of Mercury.

At 0553, the SNS ASOS reported wind calm, visibility 2 ½ miles, mist, overcast clouds at 100 feet, temperature 13 degrees Celsius, dew point 12 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of Mercury.


==========

SALINAS, Calif. -- Graham Gomes said he heard about his father's helicopter crash on the radio and hopped the fence from his nearby business to survey the damage.

According to the California Highway Patrol (CHP), 62-year-old Frank Gomes, Jr., crash landed an agriculture helicopter on Highway 101 southbound a little after 6:00 Friday morning.

He was taken to Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital complaining of pain to his ribs. His stunned sons showed up at the scene, which shut down southbound lanes of 101 for about an hour and a half.

Graham said he only had one question: "Is my dad okay? That's all I really cared about."

After he was told his father walked away from the crash, he said he was relieved and wanted to help clean up. As Graham and his brother, Evan, picked up the shattered pieces of the helicopter, they knew it could be replaced.

"Material things are material things," reflected Graham.

Frank Gomes, Jr., is co-owner of Gomes Farm Air Service, based out of the Salinas airport. A worker at his company said Gomes was heading towards Castroville to spray a field off Highway 68 when he crashed.

Incident occurred June 20, 2015 at LaGrande/Union County Airport (KLGD), Oregon


A single-engine airplane crashed Saturday morning at the La Grande/Union County Airport outside of La Grande.

The crash occurred around 8 a.m., according to witnesses. 

The accident sent one to Grande Ronde Hospital with "minor injuries," according to a Union County Sheriff's Office deputy on the scene. 

No other information was available pending an investigation.

See Monday's Observer for more information. 

Flagstaff Boy Scout builds memorial for helicopter crash victims: Bell 407, Air Methods, N407GA and Bell 407, Classic Helicopter Services, N407MJ



Seven people died in a mid-air collision between two medical helicopters over Flagstaff in 2008. Now, a local Boy Scout is working to make sure those victims are never forgotten.

Scott Gourley, 17, was only 7 years old when two helicopters, each carrying a patient to Flagstaff Medical Center, crashed into each other on the afternoon of June 29, 2008. They hit about a half-mile from the hospital and crashed into a forested area on McMillan Mesa. All seven aboard the two aircraft died.

Classic Lifeguard Aeromedical Services of Page operated one of the helicopters. The other was part of Flagstaff Medical Center’s Guardian Air Transport and operated by Air Methods of Englewood, Colo.

Last Saturday, employees from both Classic Lifeguard Aeromedical Services and Guardian Medical Transport joined Gourley on Sunset Trail, part of the Flagstaff Urban Trails System near Basis Flagstaff, on McMillan Mesa to install two red, custom-made memorial benches — one for each helicopter involved in the crash — along with two plaques listing the victims’ names. The memorial is located on top of a hill that overlooks the site where the Classic helicopter crashed. There is also a view across the meadow to the crash site of the Guardian helicopter.

Gourley did not know any of the victims who died in the 2008 helicopter crash. But he knows someone who did.

“A good friend of ours works for Guardian Air and he told us that there was never a memorial done for the victims of the crash,” Gourley said. “It kind of went off from there that we finally got started doing a memorial for them.”

Gourley is a Life Scout with Boy Scout Troop 31 in Flagstaff and has been involved with the Scouts for 11 years. He created the memorial as his Eagle Scout project, which is a service project every Life Scout has to complete to move up to the Eagle Scout rank within the Boy Scouts organization.

“I believe this project will be beneficial to the victims’ families and the community as it will honor the memory of the brave men that lost their lives in this accident,” Gourley said in his proposal to the Boy Scouts. “It will also provide a place that the members of the Flagstaff community can come and pay their respects.”

Early in the process, Gourley contacted officials with the city of Flagstaff to get permission to construct the memorial.

“They actually were very helpful,” Gourley said. “They laid a lot of the dirt down for us to build in the area that we were working in.”

Gourley and volunteers spent a day in April laying and tamping down the local rocks and other fill material the city provided to create a flat foundation for the benches that matched the existing FUTS trail terrain. He also asked his former Boy Scout troop leader, retired Flagstaff High School wielding teacher Dennis Rust, to construct the metal benches by hand. Then, Iron Horse Coatings powder coated them for free.

“We actually didn’t have to do any fundraising or anything because we got all the materials donated,” Gourley said. “People are very generous to Boy Scouts.”

Last Saturday, Gourley and about a dozen volunteers spent the day digging post holes, laying concrete, and placing the plaques and benches. He said he and his father just have a couple of touch-ups to finish before the memorial will be complete.

Gourley worked closely with representatives from Guardian and Classic throughout the project, and asked the companies to contact the families of the crash victims.

“All the families were really excited about him doing this project,” said Gourley’s father, whose name is also Scott. “In fact, a couple of them came out to the site while we did the work on it and thanked us for it.”

He added that he is proud his son took on the project.

“My son took it and ran with it,” he said. “I’m very proud with how he’s done that.”

Gourley said he will say a few words about the memorial before opening up the ceremony to anyone who would like to share their thoughts or memories about the victims.

“It’s a great Boy Scout project,” said Guardian Medical Transport Executive Director Mark Venuti. “It’s absolutely amazing that they chose that as a project and they put a lot of work into it. I think it’s going to be a beautiful memorial.”

If you go...

There will be a dedication ceremony June 29 at 3 p.m., which will be the seventh anniversary of the crash. Families of the victims and employees of both Guardian and Classic are expected to attend. Parking will be available at Basis Flagstaff, located at 1700 N. Gemini Road, and at the dermatology center, located at 1490 N. Turquoise Drive, which is a roughly 5 minute walk from the memorial on Sunset Trail.

Original article can be found here:  http://azdailysun.com


Scott Gourley, 17, an Eagle Scout candidate from Troop 31, digs holes for the installation of a pair of commemorative benches along the FUTS trail near Turquoise Drive. The benches and an accompanying plaque are a memorial for the two medical helicopters that crashed near the area in 2008



NTSB Identification: DEN08MA116A
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, June 29, 2008 in Flagstaff, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/07/2009
Aircraft: BELL 407, registration: N407GA
Injuries: 7 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: DEN08MA116B

Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, June 29, 2008 in Flagstaff, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/07/2009
Aircraft: BELL 407, registration: N407MJ
Injuries: 7 Fatal.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Both Emergency Medical Services (EMS) helicopters were on approach to the Flagstaff Medical Center (FMC) helipad to drop off patients. During the flights, the N407MJ pilot had established two-way communications with his communications center and provided position reports, and the N407GA pilot had established two-way communications with FMC's communications center (which was his company's communication center and which also monitored and advised all traffic at the helipad) and provided position reports. The FMC communications center transportation coordinator advised the N407GA pilot that N407MJ would also be dropping off a patient at FMC. The coordinator also advised N407MJ's communication center that N407GA would be landing at FMC, but the N407MJ's communication center did not inform the N407MJ pilot nor was it required to do so.


Established arrival and departure procedures for the FMC helipad required pilots to contact the FMC communications center at the earliest opportunity or at a minimum of 5 miles from the helipad. According to the FMC communications center's staff, N407MJ's pilot did not make the required contact with the communications center at any time during the flight.


About 3 minutes before the collision, N407GA dropped off a medical crewmember at the local airport (about 5 miles south of the medical center) to reduce the weight on the aircraft and to improve aircraft performance during landing at the medical center. According to witness information, flight-track data, and a hospital surveillance video, N407GA approached the helipad from the south, flying past or slightly inside the southeast tip of the noise abatement area on a direct line toward a final approach position just east of the helipad. However, according to helipad arrival guidelines and company procedures, N407GA should have approached the helipad from farther to the east. (After the on-scene accident site investigation, the Air Methods regional chief pilot, accompanied by NTSB investigators, flew the accident route in another Air Methods Bell 407 using GPS data retrieved from N407GA. According to the regional chief pilot, the “trained route” was much farther to the east and not in a direct line to the hospital.) N407MJ approached the helipad from the northeast, and it is likely that the pilot would have been visually scanning the typical flight paths, as described in the noise abatement and helipad arrival guidelines, that other aircraft approaching the medical center would have used. Thus, if N407GA had approached from a more typical direction, the pilot of N407MJ may have been more likely to see and avoid it.


At the time of the collision, both pilots were at a point in the approach where their visual attention typically would have been more focused on the helipad in preparation for landing, rather than on scanning the surrounding area for other traffic. The helicopters collided approximately 1/4 mile east of the helipad. There were no communications from either helicopter just prior to or after the collision.


Neither helicopter was equipped with a traffic collision avoidance system, nor was such a system required. Had such a system been on board, it likely would have alerted the pilots to the traffic conflict so they could take evasive action before collision. No radar or air traffic control services were available for the helipad operations to ensure separation. However, if N407MJ's pilot had contacted the FMC communications center, as required, the FMC transportation coordinator likely would have told him directly that another aircraft was expected at the helipad. If the pilot had known to expect another aircraft in the area, he would have been more likely to look for the other aircraft.


Nevertheless, the pilots were responsible for maintaining vigilance and to see and avoid other aircraft at all times. Under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Sections 91.111 and 91.113, all pilots are responsible for keeping a safe distance from other aircraft and for maintaining vigilance so as to see and avoid other aircraft. Advisory Circular 90-48C, "Pilots' Role in Collision Avoidance," amplifies the see-and-avoid concept by stating that all pilots should remain constantly alert to all traffic movement within their field of vision and that they should scan the entire visual field outside of their aircraft to ensure that conflicting traffic would be detected.


Examination of the wreckages revealed that N407MJ's tail rotor contacted the forward fuselage of N407GA, and N407GA's main rotor blades contacted and separated N407MJ's tail boom. The recovered wreckages showed no evidence of any preimpact structural, engine, or system failures.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

Both helicopter pilots’ failure to see and avoid the other helicopter on approach to the helipad. Contributing to the accident were the failure of N407GA’s pilot to follow flight arrival route guidelines, and the failure of N407MJ’s pilot to follow communications guidelines requiring him to report his position within a minimum of 5 miles from the helipad.



Donald Boyd Fitzwater

Donald Boyd Fitzwater 
1931-2015


Donald Boyd Fitzwater, 83 years of age, of Beatrice, passed away at the Beatrice Good Samaritan Center Friday morning, June 19, 2015. He was born on December 06, 1931 at Filley, Neb., to Ben and Gertrude (Thomsen) Fitzwater. He moved to Beatrice at the age of 4, attended Country School through the eighth grade and graduated from Beatrice High School in 1949. He earned his private pilot license in 1951. The commercial and flight instructor ratings he achieved in 1953.

He worked with his father building houses until 1954 when he was hired by the Beatrice Airport to be airport manager, a position he held for 46 years, retiring January 1, 2000. Don held the title of being the only airport manager at the same airport for 46 years and served as chairman of the Airport Authority from 2000 to 2014. He married Evalyn Barnard May 21, 1955.

During the 50s, 60s and 70s, Don did flight instruction and flew charters throughout the Midwest. He was squadron commander of the Civil Air Patrol Chapter, one of the founders of the Flying Conestogas (an aviation and airport booster organization), instrumental in putting up the Air Force Jet at the Airport, and was one of first weather observers in the Nebraska Observation System starting in 1956. In 1993, Don was awarded the Nebraska and International Flying Farmers and Ranchers “Airport Operator”Award. He believed in efficient service, a neat and clean facility and a friendly atmosphere at the Beatrice Municipal Airport for which he received the first award given for “The Nebraska Airport of the Year." Don believed and was heard to say “The Beatrice Airport is the Front Door to Beatrice,” making the airport what it is today. Don was awarded the Presidential Citation by the AOPA in 1991, the highest AOPA award given in the field of aviation.

Through the years, Don held all of the offices of the Nebraska Association of Airport Officials and was inducted in the Nebraska Aviation Hall of Fame in 2001. He was member of Elks, Eagles, sons of the American Legion, Jaycees, NRA, AOPA, Masons and Sesostris Shrine, re-organized the Jayhusker Antique Car Club and started the first Swap meet, was instrumental in forming the Gage County Historical Society in 1971 as President and served on the board for many years, and organized and served as President of the Beatrice Airport Foundation, which was organized in 1991.

Don invented and patented the Fitzhook, a hook to tie down airplanes, and the Evaring, a vegetation protector around runway lights. Don had many interests and was a collector of many things -- antique and classic cars, old carpenter tools, gas engines, guns and airplane paraphernalia, and anything connected with aviation. He was known by many in the field of aviation and by his numerous interests.

Survivors include his wife, Evalyn; children, Scott W. and wife Janene of Beatrice, Pamela S. Fitzwater-Johanson of Houston, Texas, and Todd B. and wife Patty of Wichita, Kan.; grandchildren, Benjamin D., Robert S. Fitzwater of Beatrice. Zachary W. Fitzwater, Wichitia, Kan. He was preceded in death by his parents.

Funeral service will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at the First Presbyterian Church in Beatrice with Rev. Kelly Karges and Rev. Sharon Schuster officiating. Interment will be in the Evergreen Home Cemetery. The body will lie in state Monday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the Griffiths-Hovendick Chapel in Beatrice and at the church one hour preceding the service. A memorial has been established to the family's choice with the funeral home in charge. A family prayer service will be held at 10:15 a.m. at the church. Sign Don's online guest book at www.ghchapel.com.

These services have been entrusted to the Griffiths-Hovendick Chapel in Beatrice.

Source:  http://beatricedailysun.com

Diamond DA-20C-1 Eclipse, N353DC

http://registry.faa.gov/N353DC

NTSB Identification: ERA15CA243
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 17, 2015 in Moreland, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/11/2015
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 20 C1, registration: N353DC
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor stated that he and the private pilot receiving instruction had planned a long cross-country flight to build flight time. The cross-country flight was uneventful and they landed back at their home airport; however, they performed a touch-and-go to fly more and practice instrument approaches. After two approaches, the pilots were again approaching their home airport when the engine lost all power. The flight instructor was unable to restart the engine and performed a forced landing to a field. He further stated that he had miscalculated fuel consumption and that the engine lost power due to fuel exhaustion. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing. The inspector noted that the single fuel tank remained intact and was absent of fuel. One gallon of fuel was then added to the fuel tank and the engine started without hesitation and ran continuously. The inspector stated that according to Hobbs time, the airplane was operated for 3.6 hours since its last fueling.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor's inaccurate fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

The flight instructor stated that he and the private pilot receiving instruction had planned a long cross-country flight to build flight time. The cross-country flight was uneventful and they landed back at their home airport; however, they performed a touch-and-go to fly more and practice instrument approaches. After two approaches, the pilots were again approaching their home airport when the engine lost all power. The flight instructor was unable to restart the engine and performed a forced landing to a field. He further stated that he had miscalculated fuel consumption and that the engine lost power due to fuel exhaustion. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing. The inspector noted that the single fuel tank remained intact and was absent of fuel. One gallon of fuel was then added to the fuel tank and the engine started without hesitation and ran continuously. The inspector stated that according to Hobbs time, the airplane was operated for 3.6 hours since its last fueling.

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 16, 2014 in Milledgeville, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/01/2014
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA 20 C1, registration: N353DC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the student pilot, while flying the final leg of the traffic pattern, during his solo flight, he noticed that the airplane was "too high," and pulled the power to idle. Then he noted that the airplane was "too fast" and applied back pressure to the control yoke. The airplane then ballooned and subsequently the student pilot added power to go around; however, the airplane impacted the runway in a nose down attitude, became airborne, impacted the runway again, the nose gear assembly collapsed, and the airplane came to rest in the dirt on the left side of the runway. The accident sequence resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage. There were no reported preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilots inadequate landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

According to the student pilot, while flying the final leg of the traffic pattern, during his solo flight, he noticed that the airplane was "too high," and pulled the power to idle. Then he noted that the airplane was "too fast" and applied back pressure to the control yoke. The airplane then ballooned and subsequently the student pilot added power to go around; however, the airplane impacted the runway in a nose down attitude, became airborne, impacted the runway again, the nose gear assembly collapsed, and the airplane came to rest in the dirt on the left side of the runway. The accident sequence resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage. There were no reported preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.



A Diamond DA-20C-1 Eclipse plane force landed near the Newnan-Coweta County Airport late Wednesday, but the two men aboard were not injured.

Shortly before 8:40 p.m., emergency units with the Coweta County Fire Department and Coweta County Sheriff’s Office responded to Henry Camp Road near the airport to check on a small plane that had crashed.

According to Lt. Col. Jimmy Yarbrough with the sheriff’s office, the sheriff’s office was actually conducting FLIR, forward looking infrared, training with its helicopter nearby, so units were able to arrive at the scene of the crash in less than two minutes and land next to the plane.  By the time they landed, though, the men were already climbing out of the plane and appeared to be uninjured, Yarbrough said. 

The 50-year-old pilot, who was actually training another man during the flight, was able to land the plane without much trouble in a clearing near the power lines off South Highway 29.

Both men refused emergency transport, and the investigation was turned over to authorities with the Federal Aviation Administration, Yarbrough said. 

According to the pilot, it appeared the engine was not getting enough fuel and started sputtering, which led to him having to make the emergency landing.