Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport Authority hires DLZ Michigan for $1 to conduct environmental conditions assessment

Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport Manager Gary Kellan shows members of the Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport Authority sections of the airport where tenants wish to potentially construct new hangar facilities.


OSCODA – The Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport Authority (OWAA) voted 4-2 to retain the services of DLZ Michigan, Inc. for $1 to conduct an environmental condition assessments on a parcel of airport property. The action was conducted Thursday during the authority’s monthly meeting. 

The company will work to create an assessment that will then be used to help retain grant funding from the state’s Brownfield Redevelopment program, to help clean up any possible pollution, according to airport Manager Gary Kellan.

Voting against the measure were members Aaron Weed and David Daily, with Chairman Kevin Boyat and members John Swise, Rob Huebel and Mike Munson supporting the measure. 

Before the measure’s approval, Kellan explained that OWAA representatives sought statements of proposals from companies to conduct the work in anticipation of more construction at the airport.

According to Kellan, there are areas near the currant hangar array that Kalitta Air, one of the largest tenants and employers at the airport, would like to construct more facilities to accommodate the expanding business.

“The issue of water and soil contamination from PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances) was highlighted by the air force, they wanted to assure that there was a health and safety plan and a due care plan, and part of that was soil sampling,” Kellan said.

He said officials at the company spent between $10,000 and $15,000 to evaluate a patch of pavement that could be the location of the next hangar, which could be as large as 100,000 square feet. With the cost of site evaluation, Kellan said the decision went forward to seek funding from Brownfield if the site needed cleaned up, in an effort to defray costs for Kalitta, which has been putting a lot of its own funding into the effort.

Kellan said the first step is to get a site assessment, and then a clean up proposal, which would then be used for a grant application to Brownfield. He said the solicitation efforts resulted in five companies coming forward with proposals, including DLZ, which proposed to do the initial assessment for $1.

The other companies included AKT Peerless of Saginaw for $1,250; SME of Bay City for $2,200; Envirologic Technologies, Inc. of Kalamazoo for $4,250 and Sagassar & Associates of Gaylord for $4,830. 

Kellan said he discussed DLZ’s proposal with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), and said he was informed that the company probably submitted the small proposal in order to compete for the potential larger project funding that could come out of the site assessment work.

Munson asked Kellan if the company came recommended and Kellan said they had unique aspects that could help with work at the airport.

“Not only are they well thought of by the MDEQ — all of the proposals were strong — but in my estimation what brings DLZ above the rest is they have served as a direct contractor for the MDEQ for 20 or more years, specifically for the Wurtsmith project,” Kellan said. “They have a lot of historical data for the property because they are serving the MDEQ for the project.”

Kellan said hiring that company would essentially get a “free first step” for the OWAA and asked for authorization to hire the company.

Others on the authority, however, were not so keen to give the company the go ahead. Weed, who is also the supervisor of Oscoda Township, which has been dealing with PFAS issues for more than a year, was dubious on hiring a company that is a direct contractor for the MDEQ.

Weed asked whether hiring the company would be a conflict of interest and said he did not have a lot of faith in the MDEQ, currently.

 “If [DLZ does] a great job, I’m all for it, but with my dealings with upper level MDEQ I have a lot of mistrust right now,” he said.

Swise said there was not much OWAA officials could do with a finished report, as members were not environmental experts. He added that DLZ must know there are existing issues with the property as it would not make sense to bid out the project for $1. 

“It’s in everyone’s best interest to get the money,” he said.

Weed said he saw a benefit to have an outside company, a non-contractor for the MDEQ, to take on the project. Dailey suggested that since DLZ was proposing to do the work for $1, OWAA officials should hire that firm, and a second on the list, to get two different reports.

“Why don’t we just do two? Then we can compare our own notes,” he said. 

Huebel said if DLZ heard that OWAA hired two companies, they might be apt to back out of doing any work. Swise said he was confident that DLZ would do the work and said they submitted the bid because they can see “money down the road” on work.

After discussion Swise moved to hire DLZ, and was supported by Huebel, with the measure passing 4-2.

Dailey said he would have liked to know what two different companies would have had in their assessments.

In other business of the OWAA included:

• Kellan gave a few comments on the cost of maintaining the runway during times of heavy snow, like Thursday’s snowstorm, which blanketed the county in many inches of snow. He said it could cost as much as $4,000 per snow event to keep the surfaces plowed. According to Kellan, upgrades in plowing equipment have reduced fuel costs, however. He said working with Kalitta Air, crews from that company will often help keep areas of the airport clear, such as the apron. Sometimes, like in the case of the most recent snowstorm, aircraft can be diverted to help keep crews from having to keep the runway clean during heavy parts of storms. Kellan said working with the company has helped in snowy situations over the years.

“We have had situations where we needed all hands on deck and we brought their trucks into the air field with us,” he said.

• Kellan informed the board that they have received a letter from the Michigan Department of Treasury asking for the OWAA to submit a corrective action plan for having expenditures exceeding revenues on annual audits. Kellan told the board he is formulating a response. He said the issue concerns the type of work, facilities and nature of the OWA.

“The explanation is we’re heavily laden with capital assets that depreciate over time,” Kellan said. “It ranges in about $1.8 to 1.9 million, well exceeding the actual cash revenues to the OWAA.” 

Kellan said as a response for corrective actions he said he will look at where capital assets can be adjusted to avoid the issue. Member Swise said if the agency had actually read the audit they would have seen the issue Kellan described.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.iosconews.com

Piper PA28R-201 Arrow III, N36458: Accident occurred April 09, 2017 and Incident occurred December 05, 2016 at Oakland County International Airport (KPTK), Pontiac, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Charter Township, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N36458

Location: Pontiac, MI
Accident Number: CEN17LA150
Date & Time: 04/09/2017, 1015 CDT
Registration: N36458
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On April 9, 2017, about 1015 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201 airplane, N36458, experienced a landing gear collapse at the Oakland County International Airport (KPTK), Pontiac, Michigan. The pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to IXI LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan.

While conducting touch and go landings, the pilot landed the airplane for the third time when the right main landing gear and nose landing gear collapsed. The right wing was partially separated from the airplane resulting in substantial damage. Postaccident examination of the airplane by the responding Federal Aviation Administration inspector found an unused instrument lamp socket was improperly secured during recent maintenance allowing it to short the landing gear controls. The landing gear control circuit breaker was tripped, stopping the landing gear from transitioning to the down position and the landing gear indicators and warnings became inoperative. No other anomalies were found with the airplane. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/23/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 400 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N36458
Model/Series: PA 28R-201 201
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28R-7837279
Landing Gear Type:  Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  2749 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 SER
Registered Owner: IXI LLC
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTK, 976 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 106°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 16000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 0°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 23000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 16 knots, 200°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  29.92 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Pontiac, MI (PTK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Destination: Pontiac, MI (PTK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport:  OAKLAND COUNTY INTL (PTK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 980 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27R
IFR Approach:  Unknown
Runway Length/Width: 5676 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.665556, -83.420556 (est)


December 05, 2016:  Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.



December 05, 2016:  Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Date:  05-DEC-16
Time:  20:32:00Z
Regis#:  N36458
Aircraft Make:  PIPER
Aircraft Model:  PA28R
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Activity:  Instruction
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  PONTIAC
State:  Michigan

American Airlines, McDonnell Douglas MD-83, N9615W: Accident occurred March 09, 2017 at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW), Texas



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9615W

Location:  Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW), TX
Accident Number: DCA17CA079
Date & Time: 03/09/2017, 1915 CST
Registration: N9615W
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC 9 83(MD-83)
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Turbulence encounter
Injuries: 1 Serious, 106 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

On March 9, 2017 at 1915 central standard time, American Airlines flight 2588, a Boeing MD-83, N9615W, from Toronto, Ontario, Canada to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), encountered turbulence at flight level 280 (FL280) during cruise flight from Toronto, Ontario, Canada to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), Dallas, Texas, resulting in a serious injury to one of the flight attendants (FA). None of the other passengers and crew members were injured and the airplane received minor damage.

According to the operator, while enroute to DFW at FL 280, in intermittent IMC conditions at 0.74 Mach, the flight crew was deviating left of assigned course to avoid weather and was northeast of Memphis . The seat belt sign was on and the on-board radar was not depicting any precipitation. The aircraft experienced unexpected turbulence. The #2 and the #4 FAs were seated in their jumpseats in the rear of the aircraft, however, their seatbelts were not fastened. Both the #2 and the #4 FAs struck the overhead ceiling panel and fell to the floor. No passengers reported injuries and the FAs were able to complete their duties. Emergency Medical Service personnel met the FAs at the gate and transported to the hospital. Both FAs were treated and released from the hospital that evening, however, the #2 FA was later diagnosed with fractures to her vertebrae. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
an inadvertent encounter with convective turbulence.

Findings

Environmental issues
Convective turbulence - Effect on personnel (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute
Turbulence encounter (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 61
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/12/2016
Flight Time:  14147 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model), 2500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 33
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:  Class 1 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/06/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/08/2016
Flight Time:  756 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Registration: N9615W
Model/Series: DC 9 83(MD-83) 83
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 53562
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 146
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 160000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time:  56242 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: JT8D-219
Registered Owner: Wells Fargo
Rated Power: 21000 lbs
Operator: American Airlines
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: AALA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:  Thin Overcast
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point:  Toronto, ON (YYZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Dallas-Fort Worth, TX (DFW)
Type of Clearance:  IFR
Departure Time: 1820
Type of Airspace: Unknown 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 6 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: 100 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 Serious, 106 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.900000, -97.040556

Commutair, Bombardier Dash 8-Q311, N838CA: Accident occurred February 13, 2017 in Dulles, Loudoun County, Virginia



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/838CAN

Location: Dulles, VA
Accident Number: DCA17CA071
Date & Time: 02/13/2017, 1115 EST
Registration: N838CA
Aircraft: BOMBARDIER INC DHC 8 311
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Turbulence encounter
Injuries: 1 Serious, 52 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

On February 13, 2017, at 1115 eastern standard time, a Bombardier DHC-8, operated by Commutair as a scheduled flight from Fayetteville, North Carolina, to Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), encountered turbulence resulting in a serious injury to the flight attendant. The airplane was not damaged and there were no other injuries.

According to the operator, the flight was in smooth conditions during the cruise portion and initial descent. The Captain stated that as he finished the before-landing checklist at 4,000 feet, approximately 50 miles south of IAD, the flight encountered a "pocket" of moderate turbulence resulting in a descent rate of about 600 feet per minute and an altitude loss of about 400 feet. The Captain called to the cabin to check on the passengers and the flight attendant reported she injured her leg and could not walk.

The flight attendant reported that she was in the final stages of preparing the cabin for landing when the turbulence occurred. Passengers assisted her until landing and paramedics met the aircraft at the gate. The flight attendant was diagnosed with a broken ankle. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
an inadvertent encounter with clear air turbulence.

Findings

Environmental issues
Clear air turbulence - Effect on personnel (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute-descent
Turbulence encounter (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 35
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/25/2016
Flight Time:   3094 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1414 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 25
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:  Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/14/2016
Flight Time:  1407 hours (Total, all aircraft), 405 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOMBARDIER INC
Registration: N838CA
Model/Series: DHC 8 311 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1998
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 527
Landing Gear Type:  Retractable -
Seats: 55
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  01/30/2017,
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 42000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 35111.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: P&W CANADA
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PW123
Registered Owner: Wells Fargo Bank Northwest,
Rated Power: hp
Operator: Commutair
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: JJBA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 5°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  30 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point:  Fayetteville, NC (KFAY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Dulles, VA (KIAD)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0950 EST
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: Washington Dulles International (KIAD)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 200 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 50 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 Serious, 52 None
Latitude, Longitude:   38.953056, -77.456389 (est)

Dog Dies in United’s Overhead Luggage Bin: The incident is a new challenge for the airline trying to rebuild passenger confidence



The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron
Updated March 13, 2018 8:44 p.m. ET


United Continental Holdings Inc. again angered some fliers on Tuesday after a passenger’s dog died in an overhead luggage bin.

The incident on a Monday flight from Houston to New York is a new challenge for United executives trying to rebuild passenger confidence following a series of on-board altercations over the past year.

“This was a tragic accident that should never have occurred, as pets should never be placed in the overhead bin,” said a United spokesman. “We assume full responsibility for this tragedy and express our deepest condolences to the family and are committed to supporting them.”

Passengers who said they were on the flight expressed frustration with United and the attendant who they say insisted the dog be stowed overhead.

“I heard the dog barking a little and we didn’t know it was barking a cry for help,” passenger Maggie Gremminger said in a Twitter message. “At the end of the flight the dog was found dead in the carrier. I am heartbroken now.”

Ms. Gremminger didn’t respond to an interview request.

Airport police forcibly removed a passenger from a United flight at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport last April, prompting lawmakers to call a hearing over the airline industry’s treatment of passengers.

The death later that month of a large rabbit transported in the hold of United jet flying to the U.S. from the U.K. prompted further tirades against the airline on social media.

On Tuesday, United said it was investigating this week’s incident involving a dog traveling in the cabin of a flight to New York’s La Guardia Airport.

The transport of animals on flights has attracted controversy in recent months as a number of airlines tightened rules on their carriage after a series of incidents involving passengers and flight crew.

United last month tightened its requirements for passengers flying with emotional-support animals following a surge in numbers and onboard incidents such as urinations across the industry.

Other carriers are reviewing their policies after an effort by the Transportation Department to create new industrywide rules stalled last year.

United shares were slightly lower in after-hours trade on Tuesday, though shares in other carriers including American Airlines Group Inc. saw larger declines.

Chicago-based United has been under pressure from investors after announcing plans in January to grow its annual flying by 4% to 6% over the next several years. That prompted concerns over a possible fare war that could dent profits.

United President Scott Kirby said at an industry conference earlier Tuesday that its plans had been misunderstood.

“All capacity is not created equal,” he said. “Growing in a hub and growing connectivity in a hub is dramatically different than point-to-point flying.”

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.wsj.com

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Canadair CL-600-2B19 Regional Jet CRJ-200ER, N261PS: Accident occurred September 13, 2017 at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (KCLT), North Carolina

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N261PS



Location: Charlotte, NC
Accident Number: DCA17CA197
Date & Time: 09/13/2017, 1545 EDT
Registration: N261PS
Aircraft: BOMBARDIER INC CL 600 2B19
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 1 Serious, 53 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

On September 13, 2017, at 3:45 pm eastern daylight time, PSA Airlines flight 5233, a Bombardier CRJ-200, N261PS, collided with a TLD Jet-16 baggage tug operated by Piedmont Airlines while taxiing at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (KCLT), Charlotte, North Carolina. The airplane received substantial damage to the left wing and the tug canopy section was damaged. The tug driver was seriously injured and there were no injuries to the 53 passengers and crew onboard the CRJ-200. Weather was daytime visual meteorological conditions.

After landing on runway 18R, the airplane was instructed to taxi to Gate E4. While taxiing in a narrow alleyway near the north end of concourse E, between the concourse and the baggage transfer point, the ground tug impacted the left wingtip.

The tug was driving on non-movement area of the terminal ramp. The baggage tug was slightly in front of the aircraft at about a 10 o'clock position to the captain of the aircraft. A terminal road crosses the taxi alleyway from near Gate E38 to the beginning of area designated as the baggage transfer point. The transfer point is located outside the alleyway and is lined with concrete barriers. Airplane taxi within the alleyway and ground equipment travel perpendicular to aircraft movement when accessing the transfer point. As the tug turned onto the service road and began to cross the roadway he noticed the airplane taxing in the alley. The driver indicated that, in order to avoid a collision, he tightened his right turn in the opposite direction the airplane was traveling before colliding with the left hand wing. The canopy of the baggage tug was sheared off and the leading edge and winglet of the airplane was substantially damaged. The final resting place of the tug was just behind the trailing edge of the wing. There were skid marks from the airplane tires consistent with maximum braking starting when the airplane made contact with the baggage tug. According to airline ground movement procedures, an airplane on the non-movement area always has the right of way. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
the tug operator's initiation of a right turn onto the perpendicular terminal road in proximity to the airplane.

Findings

Personnel issues
Incorrect action performance - Ground crew (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

After landing
Ground collision (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate:  Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 34
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1
Last FAA Medical Exam: 
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  6837 hours (Total, all aircraft), 192 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age:
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 29440 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1025 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOMBARDIER INC
Registration: N261PS
Model/Series: CL 600 2B19 100
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 7959
Landing Gear Type:  Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 43100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: GE
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: CF34 SERIES
Registered Owner:  AFS INVESTMENTS 71 LLC
Rated Power: 9140 hp
Operator:  PSA AIRLINES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code:  VNAA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CLT
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots/ 24 knots, 230°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Charleston, WV (CRW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Charlotte, NC (CLT)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1422 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class B 

Airport Information

Airport: CHARLOTTE/DOUGLAS INTL (CLT)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 747 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: Unknown
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 50 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 Serious, 53 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.130000, -80.560000 (est)

United Airlines, Boeing 737-900, N69813 -and- Air Canada, Boeing 767-375, C-GHOZ: Accident occurred September 12, 2017 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California

N69813 Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N69813  Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N69813

Location: Los Angeles, CA
Accident Number: DCA17CA195A
Date & Time: 09/12/2017, 1310 PDT
Registration: N69813
Aircraft: BOEING 737-924ER
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 140 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled 

On September 12, 2017, at 1310 pacific daylight time, United Airlines flight 447, a Boeing 737, N69813, collided with Air Canada flight 785, a Boeing 767, C-GHOZ, while taxiing on taxiway C near gate 69B at the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Los Angeles, California. Both aircraft were regularly scheduled passenger flights and there were no injuries aboard either airplane. The right winglet of the B737 had minor damage and the right horizontal stabilizer of the B767 was substantially damaged.

The B767 was being marshaled onto gate 69B and was instructed to stop approximately 15 feet short of the stop line because it is normally a tow-in gate. The flight crew shut down the engines and awaited the ground crew to hook up the tow bar. There are white lines painted around each gate area to aid ground vehicles driving on the ramp. The B767 tail protruded beyond the white lines perpendicular to, and adjacent to, taxiway C.

The B737 was taxiing out for departure via taxiway C in accordance with ATC instructions. The captain reported that he saw the B767 and maneuvered left of centerline for more clearance. He asked the first officer (FO), who was heads down making FMS entries, to look and verify if they had enough clearance. The FO reported he saw that the B767 was hooked up to the tug but wasn't sure if it was being towed. He judged that there was about 5 feet of clearance. He said he saw no action by the marshallers indicating they thought the airplanes were too close.

As the airplane continued taxiing, the right winglet of the B737 contacted the horizontal stabilizer of the B767. The flight crew reported that they did not feel an impact but were told by ATC that the collision had occurred. The B737 returned to the gate and deplaned passengers normally. The B767 was towed into the gate and deplaned passengers normally.

Surveillance video from Gate 69B was obtained and captured the event. The B737 nosewheel was tracking along the yellow centerline of taxiway C. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 47
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot:  Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/18/2017
Flight Time:  25000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2760 hours (Total, this make and model), 20000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 210 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age:
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:  5-point
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot:  Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  04/18/2017
Flight Time:  8100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1320 hours (Total, this make and model), 220 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N69813
Model/Series: 737-924ER 924
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 43531
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 187
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/28/2017,
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 174198 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2
Airframe Total Time:  13045 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CFM INTL
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: CFM56-7B27E
Registered Owner: United Airlines
Rated Power: 0 hp
Operator: United Airlines
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:  
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point:  Los Angeles, CA (LAX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  IFR
Destination: San Francisco, CA (SFO)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 0 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used:  N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 7 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: 133 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 140 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.000000, -118.000000 (est)

C-GHOZ  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

C-GHOZ  Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Los Angeles, CA
Accident Number: DCA17CA195B
Date & Time: 09/12/2017, 1310 PDT
Registration: C-GHOZ
Aircraft: Boeing 767-375
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 129: Foreign 

On September 12, 2017, at 1310 pacific daylight time, United Airlines flight 447, a Boeing 737, N69813, collided with Air Canada flight 785, a Boeing 767, C-GHOZ, while taxiing on taxiway C near gate 69B at the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Los Angeles, California. Both aircraft were regularly scheduled passenger flights and there were no injuries aboard either airplane. The right winglet of the B737 had minor damage and the right horizontal stabilizer of the B767 was substantially damaged.

The B767 was being marshaled onto gate 69B and was instructed to stop approximately 15 feet short of the stop line because it is normally a tow-in gate. The flight crew shut down the engines and awaited the ground crew to hook up the tow bar. There are white lines painted around each gate area to aid ground vehicles driving on the ramp. The B767 tail protruded beyond the white lines perpendicular to, and adjacent to, taxiway C.

The B737 was taxiing out for departure via taxiway C in accordance with ATC instructions. The captain reported that he saw the B767 and maneuvered left of centerline for more clearance. He asked the first officer (FO), who was heads down making FMS entries, to look and verify if they had enough clearance. The FO reported he saw that the B767 was hooked up to the tug but wasn't sure if it was being towed. He judged that there was about 5 feet of clearance. He said he saw no action by the marshallers indicating they thought the airplanes were too close.

As the airplane continued taxiing, the right winglet of the B737 contacted the horizontal stabilizer of the B767. The flight crew reported that they did not feel an impact but were told by ATC that the collision had occurred. The B737 returned to the gate and deplaned passengers normally. The B767 was towed into the gate and deplaned passengers normally.

Surveillance video from Gate 69B was obtained and captured the event. The B737 nosewheel was tracking along the yellow centerline of taxiway C. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 63
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:  Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/15/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/24/2017
Flight Time:  15343 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7758 hours (Total, this make and model), 7758 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 186.7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 72.32 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 47
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):  Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:  Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/10/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  08/03/2017
Flight Time:  6865.06 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3473.57 hours (Total, this make and model), 3385 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 87.2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 51.35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.08 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: Boeing
Registration: C-GHOZ
Model/Series: 767-375 375
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1989
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24087
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 223
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/23/2017,
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 400004 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  2
Airframe Total Time:  120692 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT:  C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner:  Air Canada
Rated Power:
Operator: Air Canada
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Foreign Air Carrier (129) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point:  Toronto, ON (CYYZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Los Angeles, CA (LAX)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 0 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: N/A

Latitude, Longitude:  33.000000, -118.000000 (est)