Thursday, December 5, 2013

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6595P: Accident occurred December 05, 2013 in Fair Oaks, California

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 05, 2013 in Fair Oaks, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/24/2014
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-250, registration: N6595P
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, after departure on a personal cross-country flight that he had made numerous times, he climbed the airplane to 6,500 feet mean sea level (msl) and then requested flight following services. As he neared the destination airport, he requested and received a descent to 3,500 feet msl from air traffic control (ATC). Upon reaching 3,500 feet msl, he pushed the carburetor heat off, and the engine quit. He reapplied the carburetor heat, but the engine did not restart. He advised ATC of the situation, and the controller gave him a heading to the closest airport. The pilot’s continued attempts to restart the engine failed, and, when he realized the airplane was not going to be able to reach the airport, he executed a forced landing to a soccer field, and the airplane collided with a car, trees, and terrain. Examinations of the airplane and engine did not reveal evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Fuel was found on board the airplane. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the atmospheric conditions were not conducive to the accumulation of carburetor ice at the time of the accident. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of engine power during cruise flight for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examinations of the airplane and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On December 5, 2013, about 1500 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-24 airplane, N6595P, sustained substantial damage during an off-airport forced landing within the city limits of Fair Oaks, California. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal cross-country flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The solo pilot received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the pilot was participating in air traffic control (ATC) flight following. The airplane departed the Salinas Airport (KSNS), Salinas, California, about 1400, and was bound for the Auburn Municipal Airport (KAUN), Auburn, California.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on December 9, the pilot stated that he departed Salinas for his home airport in Auburn. He said that he has made the flight on numerous occasions. Typically he departs Salinas Airport, climbs to 6,500 feet above sea level (msl), and requests flight following services. When he gets close enough to see his destination, he requests a descent to 3,500 feet msl, and continues to the destination airport.

The pilot said the flight proceeded normally until he requested the descent to 3,500 feet msl. After being granted the descent, he throttled the engine back to 2,100 rpm, and applied full carburetor heat, and enriched the mixture. Upon reaching 3,500 feet, he pushed the carburetor heat off, and the engine quit. He said he reapplied the carburetor heat, but the engine did not restart. He advised ATC of the situation, and received a heading to Sacramento Mather Airport (KMHR), the closest airport to his position. He said he made the nearly 180 degree turn toward the airport, and continued attempts to restart the engine.

Unable to restart the engine, and apparent that he was not going to reach the airport, the pilot attempted to land in soccer fields at Phoenix Park, Fair Oaks. He did not extend the retracted landing gear. During the landing, the airplane collided with a car, trees and terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot said he had not experienced any mechanical problems with the airplane prior to the accident.

On December 6, the airplane was examined at the accident site by an FAA air safety inspector, and no mechanical anomalies were found.

An examination of the airplane's maintenance logbooks did not reveal any anomalies or unresolved discrepancies.

An examination of the recovered wreckage was conducted March 28, 2014 by an NTSB air safety investigator. The examination of the engine did not reveal any evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation. A copy of the examination report is contained in the public docket for this accident.

Given the weather conditions at the time of the event, and consulting a Carburetor Icing Chart, it is unlikely carburetor ice was responsible for the engine's loss of power.


http://registry.faa.gov/N6595P  

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA061 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 05, 2013 in Fair Oaks, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24-250, registration: N6595P
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 5, 2013, about 1440 Pacific Standard Time, a Piper PA-24-250 airplane, N6595P, sustained substantial damage during an off-airport forced landing within the city limits of Fair Oaks, California. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR), personal cross-country flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The solo pilot received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the pilot was participating in active air traffic control (ATC) flight following. The airplane departed the Salinas Airport (KSNS), Salinas, California, about 1400, and was bound for the Auburn Municipal Airport (KAUN), Auburn, California.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on December 9, the pilot stated that he departed Salinas for his home airport in Auburn. He said that he has made the flight on numerous occasions. Typically he departs Salinas Airport, climbs to 6,500 feet above sea level (msl), and requests flight following services. When he gets close enough to see his destination, he requests a descent to 3,500 feet msl, and continues to the destination airport.

On the day of the accident he said the flight proceeded normally until he requested the descent to 3,500 feet msl. After being granted the descent, he throttled the engine back to 2,100 rpm, and applied full carburetor heat. Upon reaching 3,500 feet, he pushed the carburetor heat off, and the engine quit. He said he reapplied the carburetor heat, but the engine did not restart. He explained the situation to ATC, and received a heading to Sacramento Mather Airport, the closest airport to his position. He said he made the nearly 180 degree turn toward the airport, and continued attempts to restart the engine.

Unable to restart the engine, and apparent to him, he was not going to reach the airport, he attempted to land in soccer fields at Phoenix Park, Fair Oaks. He did not attempt to extend the retracted landing gear. During the landing, the airplane collided with one car in a parking lot, and trees and terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot said he had not had any mechanical problems with the airplane prior to the accident.





FAIR OAKS (CBS13) – A plane was forced to land in Phoenix Park after experiencing engine trouble, according to Sacramento Metro Fire.  

 Around 2:40 p.m. Thursday, the single-engine plane was forced to land in a soccer field, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

The pilot was flying from Salinas to Auburn. He attempted to divert to Sacramento Mather Airport before landing at the park.

The pilot was the sole passenger and was able to walk away from his landing.

Story, Photos and Video

 http://sacramento.cbslocal.com


SACRAMENTO - Authorities confirm a small aircraft made an emergency landing at a Fair Oaks park about 2:40 Thursday afternoon. 

The small plane landed at 9030 Phoenix Park at 9030 Sunset Boulevard, according to Sacramento Metro Fire District spokesperson Michelle Eidam.

She said one person, later confirmed to be the pilot and only person onboard, walked away.

The plane is a Piper single-engine PA24.

FAA spokesperson Ian Gregor said the pilot was enroute from Salinas to Auburn when he radioed he was experiencing engine trouble. He tried to divert to Mather Field but landed in the park.

Jim Ashen wrote News10: I heard the motor [clearly] right at the moment the engine "let go". It revved a bit then I heard metal crunching. Horrible sound!

Just before the emergency landing, In Flight Emergency reported a plane incoming to Mather Field lost an engine.


Story   Photo Galley and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.news10.net
 


Investigative hearing on San Francisco International Airport airline crash will not include pilots

Survivors of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport last summer, killing three teenage girls and injuring dozens of passengers, will not hear from the pilots who were at the controls of the Boeing 777 when the National Transportation Safety Board convenes an investigative hearing next week. 

The four pilots on board -- including a veteran making his first landing at SFO in a Boeing 777 and his supervisor on his inaugural training flight -- spoke privately to NTSB investigators in the days following the crash but have not publicly addressed why the "Triple 7" slammed into the sea wall that abuts Runway 28 Left on July 6 while trying to land after a nearly 11-hour flight from Seoul.

"Everybody is still scratching their heads wondering why a 'Triple 7' with clear weather and no cross winds just missed the airport," said Walnut Creek attorney Michael Verna, who filed the first lawsuit stemming from the crash and represents three injured passengers. "The ultimate question that everybody has is, 'What were the pilots thinking?"

The only two Asiana pilots who are scheduled to speak at the two-day hearing in Washington, D.C. will be the airline's chief pilot and training manager who will appear on the first day, Tuesday, during a discussion of Asiana pilot training in the Boeing 777 and automated systems and visual approach procedures.

Asked about the absence of the pilots flying the plane, NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said, "The NTSB investigative team formed the witness list. That's who the investigative team decided they wanted to speak at the hearing."

Asiana spokesman Ki Won Suh said in an email to this newspaper that, "We hope that the upcoming investigative hearing will assist in determining the cause of this accident and lead to a productive discussion on actions the entire industry can take to improve the safety of air passengers." 


Source:   http://www.mercurynews.com

The full agenda, including a list of witnesses is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/2013/asiana214_hearing/agenda.html

Investigative exhibits for the hearing will be placed in the electronic docket at the start of the hearing and will be available at http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/2013/asiana214_hearing/index.html

  

NTSB Identification: DCA13MA120
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of Asiana Airlines
Accident occurred Saturday, July 06, 2013 in San Francisco, CA
Aircraft: BOEING 777-200ER, registration: HL7742
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 6, 2013, about 1128 pacific daylight time, Asiana Airlines flight 214, a Boeing 777-200ER, registration HL7742, impacted the sea wall and subsequently the runway during landing on runway 28L at San Francisco International Airport (SFO), San Francisco, California. Of the 4 flight crewmembers, 12 flight attendants, and 291 passengers, about 182 were transported to the hospital with injuries and 3 passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The regularly scheduled passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 129 between Incheon International Airport, Seoul, South Korea, and SFO. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

Plane lands in field near Spruce Creek Fly-In, Florida

Officials say a small plane landed in a field Thursday afternoon, not far from the Spruce Creek Fly-In.

Volusia County dispatchers received the call just after 1:10 p.m. about a little Cessna landing in a field near County Road 415 and Pioneer Trail.

Dispatchers said the pilot didn’t suffer any injuries, but Volusia County deputies and firefighters responded to the scene.

It wasn’t immediately clear why the pilot had to land in a field.