Thursday, April 5, 2018

Criquet Storch FI-156, N429BB: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2016 in Fordsville, Kentucky

Dr. Robert "Bob" C. Dalzell, Jr. 
October 11, 1945 - May 30, 2016

Dr. Robert “Bob” C. Dalzell Jr., 70, gained his eternal wings Monday, May 30, 2016, doing what he enjoyed most..flying his plane. He was a member of numerous flying clubs and associations. Robert began flying as a student at Kentucky Wesleyan College and his love of feeling one with the sky never stopped growing throughout the years. If he was not at work, you could find him hanging out in the airport hangars, at The Ayer Flying Club or out to eat with his fellow flying brothers. 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky
Austrian Civil Aviation Safety Investigation Authority; Vienna, Austria
Rotech Motor Ltd; Vernon, BC, Canada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N429BB



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Fordsville, KY
Accident Number: ERA16LA201
Date & Time: 05/30/2016, CDT
Registration: N429BB
Aircraft: CRIQUET AVIATION BOGOTA COLUMB STORCH FI-156
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 30, 2016, at an unknown time, an experimental amateur-built Storch FI-156 airplane, N429BB, crashed in a wooded area near Fordsville, Kentucky. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight originated about 1133 central daylight time from Rough River State Park Airport (2I3), Falls of Rough, Kentucky.

According to another pilot, who was a friend of the accident pilot, earlier on the day of the accident, the accident pilot flew his airplane from Owensboro-Daviess County Airport (OWB), Owensboro, Kentucky, to 2I3 and landed about 0945. The friend flew his airplane to 2I3 and met the accident pilot there. The two pilots ate at a local restaurant, and then they prepared to depart from 2I3 in their airplanes. The friend reported hearing the accident pilot perform an engine run-up before takeoff, and he noted that the magneto drops were normal and that the engine was "running strong." After takeoff, the accident pilot turned to a heading of 315°, and the friend lost sight of the airplane when it was about 1.5 miles away. The friend departed in his airplane and attempted to contact the accident pilot via radio, but he did not receive a reply to any of his transmissions. The friend then proceeded to the Ohio County Airport, Hartford, Kentucky, and landed uneventfully.

The pilot's friend indicated that the accident pilot might have intended to fly to a nearby ultralight airstrip before returning to OWB. When the airplane did not arrive at OWB by sunset, the friend contacted law enforcement. A search for the missing airplane was initiated, and the wreckage was located on the afternoon of June 1, 2016, about 6.7 nautical miles west-northwest from 2I3.

Review of all recorded radar targets below 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl) in the vicinity of the departure airport and the accident location between 1030 and 1230 revealed no targets that could be associated with the accident flight. 


 Dr. Robert "Bob" C. Dalzell, Jr. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private; Sport Pilot
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/22/1998
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 3500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6 hours (Total, this make and model) 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 70, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, instrument airplane, and glider and a sport endorsement for airplane single-engine sea. His most recent medical certificate was a special issuance third-class medical certificate dated December 22, 1998. This medical certificate required that the pilot use corrective lenses and was valid only for 15 months from the date it was issued. At the time of the accident, the pilot was exercising sport pilot privileges and was not required to hold a medical certificate. During a telephone interview, a friend of the pilot estimated that the pilot's total flight time was about 3,500 hours, and he had flown about 6 hours in the accident airplane.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CRIQUET AVIATION BOGOTA COLUMB
Registration: N429BB
Model/Series: STORCH FI-156 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: CS 09008
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/15/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 5 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 105.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912ULS
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-place experimental amateur-built airplane was manufactured in 2012. It was powered by a Rotax 912 ULS engine driving a Tennessee Propellers, Inc., 72-48 fixed-pitch propeller. It was equipped with fixed leading-edge slats that spanned nearly the entire length of each wing and manually-operated fowler flaps. The previous owner reported that the airplane's stall speed was 20 mph.

Review of the maintenance records indicated a condition inspection was completed on February 15, 2016, at an airplane total time since manufacture of 105.8 hours.

The pilot purchased the airplane on May 28, 2016. The mechanic who performed an inspection of the airplane before purchase indicated that there were no unairworthy items found. At the time of the pre-purchase inspection, the airframe and engine total times were 110 and 220 hours, respectively. 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FTK, 755 ft msl
Observation Time: 1158 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 35 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 66°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:  6 knots, 350°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Falls of Rough, KY (2I3)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1133 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

The 1158 automated surface observation taken at Godman Army Airfield (FTK), Fort Knox, KY, located about 35 nautical miles from the accident site, reported wind from 350° at 6 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, and clear skies. The temperature and dew point were 28°C and 16°C, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.04 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.672222, -86.636389 

The airplane crashed in a heavily wooded area. A postcrash fire consumed most of the airplane and damaged the immediate surrounding area. Treetop damage was not detected outside of the immediate impact area, and evidence of bird remains was not noted during examination of the accident site and the surrounding area.

Examination of the airplane revealed that it was resting in an upright position, with the engine detached and laying about 3 to 4 ft to the left of the firewall. All components necessary to sustain flight remained attached or were found near the main wreckage.

Extensive thermal damage precluded determination of switch positions and instrument readings. Determination of pre-impact engine control positions was not possible due to the separation of the engine during the impact sequence. The flaps were found retracted.

Examination of the flight controls for roll, pitch, and yaw revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction; the pitch trim was set to mid-travel.

The engine was recovered for further examination by a representative of the engine manufacturer with Federal Aviation Administration oversight. Due to the extensive heat damage to the engine, rotation of the crankshaft could not be performed, and the flywheel could not be removed. A limited examination of the power section was performed, and no anomalies were noted. The fuel, ignition, and lubrication system components sustained heat damage. There was no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction of these systems.

The majority of the wood propeller was consumed by fire, leaving about 10% of the hub area. The propeller mounting hardware was in-place and secured. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Louisville, Kentucky, performed an autopsy of the pilot. According to the autopsy report, the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The report also noted a large transmural scar of the anterolateral left ventricle wall, and that ischemic/atherosclerotic coronary artery disease was a significant factor contributing to the pilot's death. The report referenced medical records that indicated the pilot had undergone 4-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting and had a history of hypertension and high cholesterol. The examination of the body for natural disease was limited by the extent of injury.


The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of specimens from the pilot. The toxicology report indicated that no ethanol was detected in the submitted muscle and brain specimens, and no tested drugs were detected in the submitted muscle specimen.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 30, 2016 in Fordsville, KY
Aircraft: CRIQUET AVIATION BOGOTA COLUMB STORCH FI-156, registration: N429BB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 30, 2016, at an unknown time, an experimental amateur-built Storch FI-156 airplane, N429BB, crashed in a wooded area near Fordsville, Kentucky. The private pilot, the sole occupant was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed by impact and a postcrash fire. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as a Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed on that day, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated about 1130 central daylight time, from Rough River State Park Airport (2I3), Falls of Rough, Kentucky.

According to a friend of the accident pilot, since purchasing the airplane 2 days prior, the pilot flew it on several flights, including a flight earlier in the day from Owensboro-Daviess County Airport (OWB), Owensboro, Kentucky to 2I3, landing there about 0945. After landing, he and the pilot ate at a local restaurant and then prepared to depart from 2I3. The friend reported hearing an engine run-up before takeoff, and noted that the magneto drops were normal and the engine was "running strong." After takeoff he watched as the pilot turned to a heading of 315 degrees (normal) and lost sight of the airplane when it was about 1.5 miles away.

The pilot's friend indicated that the pilot might have intended to fly to a nearby ultralight airstrip, or return to OWB. The pilot's friend then departed 2I3 in his airplane, and attempted to contact the pilot via radio, but the pilot did not reply to any of his transmissions. He proceeded to the Ohio County Airport (JQD), Hartford, Kentucky and landed uneventfully. He later contacted law enforcement because the pilot had not returned to OWB, and met with law enforcement later that evening. The following day he performed an air search himself but did not locate the wreckage. Personnel of the Civil Air Patrol were also involved in a search for the missing airplane; the wreckage was located on the afternoon of June 1st.

Stolp Acroduster II, N380JA: Fatal accident occurred April 24, 2016 near Oakhill Airpark (SC82), Greenville County, South Carolina

Bruce Alden Ryskamp Jr. 
 1953 - 2016
Passionate about aviation, Bruce was a private pilot and built experimental aircraft. He also enjoyed spending time with his wife, children, and grandchildren.



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Belton, SC
Accident Number: ERA16FA168
Date & Time: 04/24/2016, 1745 EDT
Registration: N380JA
Aircraft: RYSKAMP BRUCE A ACRODUSTER
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 24, 2016, about 1745 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Acroduster, N380JA, impacted terrain while maneuvering in the traffic pattern at the Oakhill Airpark (SC82), Belton, South Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The pilot was the registered owner of the airplane and was operating it under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which originated from SC82 about 1645.

According to a pilot witness at SC82, the accident pilot taxied the airplane to the approach end of runway 28, performed an engine run up, which included "cycling the prop[eller]," and then departed without incident. About 30 minutes later, the witness heard the airplane return to the airport. The accident pilot completed two low approaches to runway 28; following the second approach, he made a left turn to reenter the traffic pattern. The witness stated that the pilot "usually" performed several low approaches before landing "in order to make sure he had the landing made." When the airplane was on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, the witness heard the it's propeller pitch change to a "low pitch, high rpm sound." This witness did not see the accident.

Another witness reported that the airplane was on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern when the engine "sputtered" and "cut out" several times. The airplane then banked to the left, descended, and impacted the ground nose down.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on March 3, 2016. At that time, he reported 420 hours of total flight time of which 28 hours were in the six months before the medical examination. In addition, the pilot held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate for the airplane that was issued on May 13, 2013.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the two-seat, tailwheel biplane was built by the pilot, and an airworthiness certificate was issued for the airplane on April 21, 2013. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-360-series, 210-horsepower engine that was equipped with a two-blade McCauley constant-speed propeller. According to the airplane's maintenance logs, when the accident occurred, the airplane had a total flight time of about 24.7 hours. An entry dated December 20, 2014, at a total time of 22.9 hours, stated that there was a "landing incident," and the wings, engine, and propeller were removed for repairs. An entry dated January 2, 2016, detailed the repairs made to the airframe, engine, and propeller. An entry dated April 10, 2016, stated that the pilot performed a condition inspection of the airplane at a total time of 22.9 hours. An additional entry dated April 10, 2016, stated, "first flight ok after rebuild."
No fueling information was located during the investigation. The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 36 gallons.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1747 recorded weather observation at Donaldson Airport (GYH), Greenville, South Carolina, located about 10 nautical miles north of the accident location, included calm wind, visibility 10 miles, clear skies below 12,000 ft above ground level, temperature 25°C, dew point 8°C, and barometric altimeter setting of 30.03 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

SC82 was a private-use airport that did not have an operating control tower. The airport was equipped with one runway designated as 10/28, which was 2,400 ft-long by 100 ft-wide. The runway was reported as a turf runway "in good condition" at the time of the accident. The airport was 837 ft mean sea level (msl).

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage was located in a hay field about 1,225 ft south of the centerpoint of the runway, at an elevation of 796 ft msl. The airplane came to rest on a 158° heading. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. A burn pattern that measured about 12 ft by 18 ft was noted on the ground co-located with the main wreckage.

The left wings were bent aft and consumed by postimpact fire. The right wings were bent forward, and the inboard sections of the wings were consumed by postimpact fire. The fuselage and cockpit were consumed by postimpact fire. The fuel tank located above the forward cockpit position was partially consumed by postimpact fire. The fuel cap remained seated in the filler neck but was thermally damaged, and the tank was separated from the top wing. The empennage remained intact and attached to the fuselage. The inboard skins of the left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were consumed by postimpact fire. The vertical stabilizer and rudder skins were consumed by postimpact fire. The right horizontal stabilizer and elevator exhibited heat damage to their inboard sections. Control continuity was confirmed from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft; one blade was bent aft about 45°; and the other blade was undamaged. The spinner exhibited crush damage on the upward facing side, and the other side was undamaged. One propeller blade pitch change link was fractured. The other blade pitch change link remained secure. The propeller control cable remained attached to the propeller control in the cockpit.

The engine was removed from the airframe for further examination. Crankshaft and valve train continuity and piston movement were confirmed by rotating the crankshaft. The top spark plugs were removed. Their electrodes were intact, dark gray in color, and displayed normal wear. An internal boroscope examination of all cylinders noted no anomalies. Both magnetos were impact-separated and exhibited thermal damage when disassembled. The propeller governor remained attached to the engine. The fuel pump was removed and disassembled, and thermal damage was noted to the components. The fuel lines forward of the firewall remained intact and attached. All fuel injector lines remained attached to the nozzles, and the nozzles were free of debris.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner of the County of Greenville performed the autopsy on the pilot in Greenville, South Carolina. The autopsy report indicated that the pilot died as a result of thermal injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of the pilot. Fluid and tissue specimens from the pilot tested negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Diphenhydramine was detected in the urine and 0.024 (ug/ml, ug/g) of diphenhydramine was detected in the heart blood.

Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under various names including Benadryl and Unisom. The therapeutic range of diphenhydramine in blood is 0.0250 to 0.1120 ug/ml.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The propeller governor was removed and retained for further examination. An examination at the manufacturer's facility revealed that the pump cavity exhibited a scrape mark; there were corresponding scrape marks on both the idler gear and the drive gear of the pump. According to the manufacturer, the scrape marks were made when the gears were turning opposite the direction of normal rotation, indicating that the propeller was not rotating with speed in the forward direction when the marks were made. There were no anomalies found that would have precluded normal operation of the propeller governor before the impact. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/03/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  420 hours (Total, all aircraft), 28 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: RYSKAMP BRUCE A
Registration: N380JA
Model/Series: ACRODUSTER NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 3838
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/10/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 24.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc.
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 Series
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 210 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GYH, 955 ft msl
Observation Time: 1747 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 354°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Belton, SC (SC82)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Belton, SC (SC82)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1645 EDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: OAKHILL AIRPARK (SC82)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 837 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2400 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.582778, -82.352500

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA168 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 24, 2016 in Belton, SC
Aircraft: RYSKAMP BRUCE A ACRODUSTER, registration: N380JA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2016, about 1745 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Acroduster, N380JA, operated by a private individual, was destroyed after impacting terrain while maneuvering near Belton, South Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Oakhill Airpark (SC82), Belton, South Carolina, around 1645. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the two seat, tail-wheel, bi-plane was owned by the pilot, and issued an airworthiness certificate on April 21, 2013. It was equipped with a Continental Motors Inc. IO-360 series, 210-horsepower engine, and driven by a two-blade McCauley constant-speed propeller.

According to a witness at SC82, the pilot taxied the airplane to the approach end of runway 28, performed an engine run up, which included "cycling the [propeller]" and then departed without incident. Approximately 30 minutes later, the witness heard the airplane return to the airport. The airplane completed two aborted landings to runway 28, and then made a left turn to reenter the traffic pattern. While on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, he heard the airplane propeller pitch change to a "low pitch, high rpm sound."

Another witness reported that the airplane was on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, when the engine "sputtered," and "cut out" several times. The airplane then banked to the left, and impacted "the ground nose first."

The main wreckage was located in a hay field about 1,225 feet abeam the centerpoint of the runway, at an elevation of 796 feet above mean sea level. The airplane impacted the field and came to rest on a 158 degree heading. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. The left wings and fuselage were consumed by fire. The right wing and empennage were partially consumed by fire. Control continuity was confirmed from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces.

The engine was removed from the airframe for further examination. Crankshaft and valve train continuity, and piston movement were confirmed by rotating the crankshaft. The top spark plugs were removed. Their electrodes were intact and dark gray in color. Internal examination of all cylinders with a boroscope was performed with no anomalies noted. Both magnetos were impact separated and exhibited thermal damage when disassembled. The propeller governor remained attached to the engine. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft, one blade was bent aft approximately 45 degrees, and the other blade remained straight.

The propeller and propeller governor were removed and retained for further examination.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate for airplane single engine land. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on March 3, 2016. At that time he reported 420 hours of total flight time, of which, 28 hours were in the previous 90 days. In addition, the pilot held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate that was issued on May 13, 2013.

According to airplane maintenance logs, the airplane had a total time of about 24.7 hours of flight time. In addition, a condition inspection was performed on the airplane by the pilot/owner on April 10, 2016, at a total time of 22.9 hours.

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N1438U: Accident occurred April 05, 2018 at Livermore Municipal Airport (KLVK), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Francisco

http://registry.faa.gov/N1438U


NTSB Identification: GAA18CA201
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 05, 2018 in Livermore, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1438U

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft lost control on landing, ran off runway, left wing impacted surface and aircraft nosed up.

Date: 05-APR-18
Time: 19:03:00Z
Regis#: N1438U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172M
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LIVERMORE
State: CALIFORNIA








LIVERMORE — No injuries were reported after a single-engine plane crash landed at the Livermore Municipal Airport Thursday afternoon, authorities said.

A plane crashed on a runway at Livermore Municipal Airport on Thursday. No one was injured, fire officials said. Courtesy of the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department

The crash was reported about 12:10 p.m. Thursday.

Livermore-Pleasant Fire Department Battalion Chief Aaron Lacey said the single-engine Cessna bounced while attempting to land on a runway and ended up on its nose partially off the runway.

The pilot and passenger were not injured and there was no fire, he said.

The crash shutdown the runway and taxiway, officials said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.eastbaytimes.com

Quicksilver GT400, N2433Z: Accident occurred April 05, 2018 in Maxwell, Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines

Aircraft hit a tree branch and landed in a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2433Z

Date: 05-APR-18
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N2433Z
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL QUICKSILVER
Aircraft Model: GT 400
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MAXWELL
State: IOWA



NEAR MAXWELL, Iowa (KCCI) —  A man was taken to a Des Moines-area hospital Thursday afternoon after authorities said he crashed his newly purchased ultralight aircraft in rural north Polk County.

The accident happened around 4:15 p.m. near Northeast 104th Street near the town of Maxwell, about 1 mile south of the Story County border.

Capt. Jana Abens, with the Polk County Sheriff's Office, said the sole occupant of the plane, 43-year-old Jason Beckman, of Lake View, suffered leg injuries and what appeared to be minor lacerations to his harms. He was flown to the hospital for treatment. He is expected to survive.

Ruth Williams, who lives across the street, said she saw the events unfold.

"I saw the plane go down and then hit that tree down there and bang!" Williams said.

The plane took off from a grass airstrip and got a few hundred feet before going into the trees and crashing into the rural farmstead.

"I was hoping he wasn't hurt," Williams said.

Crews remained on scene Friday afternoon, combing through the mangled wreckage of the Quicksilver GT-400.

The owner of the private airstrip told KCCI that Beckman had just bought the aircraft Thursday and was flying it for the first time.

A classified ad shows what the plane looked like before the crash. The asking price is $6,500.

It is unclear what caused the plane to crash, but Williams said she has an idea: "I think the wind took it."

An investigator with the Federal Aviation Administration said crews will be investigating the crash site Friday, and it could take up to six months for a full report to be released.

FAA records show the plane was still registered to the airstrip owner.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kcci.com



A small airplane crashed Thursday afternoon in northeastern Polk County, sending its pilot to a hospital by helicopter, authorities said. 

Deputies responded about 4 p.m. to NE 150th Ave and NE 104 St., about five miles south of Maxwell, Sgt. Nathan Ludwig of State Patrol said. The person injured, the pilot, was the only occupant in the aircraft; he was expected to live.

The adult pilot, whose age was not known, crashed in a corn field after he took off about 150 yards south, Capt. Jana Abens with the Polk County Sheriff's Office said.

The pilot suffered a visible leg injury, which Abens said may have been broken, and lacerations to his arms. He was conscious and speaking with first responders, she said.

No one else was injured. The pilot was airlifted to a Des Moines hospital. 

It was not clear what kind of plane the man crashed. Ludwig called it a homemade aircraft and Abens described it as similar to an Ultralight. The single-seat aircraft was "mangled," Abens said. 

The scene was cleared by 5:30 p.m. 

Authorities in Story County and Polk County responded to the scene. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash. 

Original article ➤  https://www.desmoinesregister.com

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N803BW: Accident occurred March 29, 2018 at New Bedford Regional Airport (KEWB), Bristol County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston

Bridgewater State University

http://registry.faa.gov/N803BW

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA199
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 29, 2018 in New Bedford, MA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N803BW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed hard sustaining a prop strike and firewall damage.

Date: 29-MAR-18
Time: 13:50:00Z
Regis#: N803BW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NEW BEDFORD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N7709H and Diamond DA42 NG, N621ZC: Incident occurred April 04, 2018 at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (KBZN), Gallatin County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena

N7709H taxied into N621ZC.

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N7709H, Valhalla Aviation LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N7709H

Diamond DA42 NG, N621ZC, Summit Aviation Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N621ZC

Date: 04-APR-18
Time: 18:29:00Z
Regis#: 7709H
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA12
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: BOZEMAN
State: MONTANA

Cub Crafters PA-18-150, N444GB, registered to the Wyoming Wool Growers Association and operated by the United States Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service: Fatal accident occurred December 07, 2016 in Basin, Big Horn County, Wyoming

Grant Ewing Belden 
December 7, 1982 ~ December 7, 2016 (age 34)

Grant took his first flying lesson at the age of 13 and then soloed at 16. He continued to fly and took additional training in Cedar City, Utah. He earned both private and commercial pilot licenses. Grant was an avid outdoorsman who loved raising his young family in Wyoming. He was renowned for his keen eyesight and hearing, along with his expert marksmanship.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming
United States Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Cedar City, Utah
Lycoming Engines; Pennsylvania
Cubcrafters; Yakima, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N444GB

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Basin, WY
Accident Number: CEN17FA050
Date & Time: 12/07/2016, 1015 MST
Registration: N444GB
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS PA18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Public Aircraft 

On December 7, 2016, about 1015 mountain standard time, a Cub Crafters PA18-150 airplane, N444GB, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while maneuvering 15 miles southeast of Basin, Wyoming. The commercial-rated pilot was fatally injured, and the commercial pilot-rated crewmember was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to the Wyoming Wool Growers Association and operated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan was filed for the flight. The animal damage management flight departed Worland Municipal Airport (WRL), Worland, Wyoming, about 0800.

According to the USDA APHIS Wildlife Services ground crew that worked with the flight, the airplane arrived in the area around 0820 for animal damage management. The ground crew members were positioned west, north, and east of the area where the airplane was operating. Ground crew members had occasional visual contact with the airplane, radio communications with the pilot and crewmember, and they could hear the engine of the airplane operating until about 1000. One ground crew member reported hearing several passes consistent with a mitigation aspect of the flight. These passes were heard just prior to 1000.

About 1015, the ground crew attempted to contact the pilot and/or crewmember via radio to change the area of focus, but they did not receive a response. The ground crew tried multiple locations and means to make contact without success. At 1100, the agency search and rescue plan was activated, and about 1330 the airplane was located by aerial search and rescue teams.

A review of FAA air traffic control radar data did not reveal any primary or secondary radar targets consistent with the accident airplane. A handheld global positioning system (GPS) device was reportedly on board; however, a GPS was not found at the accident site. The airplane's exact route of flight, after contact by the ground crew was lost, could not be determined.

Months after the accident, the crewmember on board the airplane did not recall the specific events of the accident or accident flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/19/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/28/2016
Flight Time:  1828.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 315 hours (Total, this make and model), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Other Flight Crew Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/20/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/28/2016
Flight Time:  22000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Pilot Information

The pilot was based in Worland, Wyoming, and had initially started working for the USDA APHIS as a flight crewmember (gunner) in 2007. In March of 2016, he started flying for the program as a pilot. He completed his initial flight training, at the USDA flight training center, in May of 2016, in Cedar City, Utah. He then moved to the field to continue the remainder of the training program which was scheduled to last for a year. During this time the pilot would fly with an instructor pilot and experienced flight crewmember; in this case, the same crew member injured in the accident. The accident flight was still within the year training program with the USDA APHIS.

The USDA flight training officer in Cedar City reported that the pilot was level-headed with good character and one of the best pilots to come through the program. He had no concerns or reservations about the pilot or his ability to safely operate the airplane. Neither the State Director nor the ground crew that worked with the pilot expressed any concerns or reservations about the pilot or his abilities.

Other Flight Crewmember Information

The flight crewmember's medical certificate contained the limitations "must have available glasses for near vision."

The flight crewmember was based in Worland, Wyoming, had been with the USDA APHIS for over 30 years, and a pilot for the USDA APHIS for at least 20 years. He was currently qualified as both a pilot and a flight crewmember (gunner) and served as a flight instructor for the region. Neither the State Director nor the ground crew that worked with the flight crewmember expressed any concerns or reservations about the flight crewmember's abilities.

The flight crewmember was serving as both a flight instructor and a flight crewmember during the accident flight. He was the only instructor pilot in the program who had flown with the accident pilot in the field. His duties included familiarizing the pilot with the pilot responsibilities and reporting back to the training center on a regular basis regarding the pilot's performance. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CUB CRAFTERS
Registration: N444GB
Model/Series: PA18 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 9961CC
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/02/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 92 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 241.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-C4P
Registered Owner: Wyoming Wool Growers Association
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: US Department of Agriculture
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The airplane was purchased by the Wyoming Wool Growers Association in September 2016. The airplane then underwent alterations to configure the airplane for the animal damage management flights. These alterations included the installation of clear windshields, a skylight, "D" windows, and a right-side swing-up window. According to USDA personnel, the airplane was configured the same as the previous airplane flown by the pilot and flight crewmember.

The airplane was equipped with a stall warning indicator which sounded a horn in the cockpit when the airplane approached the critical angle of attack. The airplane was not equipped, nor was it required to be equipped with a visual angle of attack indicator. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGEY, 3941 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 50°
Lowest Cloud Condition:  / 6500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: -13°C / -19°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 350°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Worland, WY (KWRL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Worland, WY (KWRL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0800 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Weather conditions recorded at the Yellowstone Regional Airport (COD), Cody, Wyoming, located 38 miles northwest of the accident site at 0953 were: wind 350° at 8 kts, visibility 10 miles, sky condition 6,500 ft overcast, temperature -13° C, dewpoint temperature -19° C, altimeter setting 30.35 inches of mercury.

Weather conditions recorded at WRL, located 28 miles southeast of the accident site at 0953 were: wind 340° at 8 kts, visibility 10 miles, sky condition 6,000 ft overcast, temperature -13° C, dewpoint temperature -18° C, altimeter setting 30.57 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 44.321944, -108.336389 

The wreckage was located in steep hilly terrain, just below a ridgeline that extended from northeast to southwest, increasing in elevation to the south. The elevation at the accident site was about 4,400 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane wreckage included the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine and propeller assembly. The airplane came to rest in a ravine in a near-vertical, nose down attitude, with the right wing uphill and the left wing downhill. There was a strong smell of fuel on scene.

The initial impact point was uphill and north northwest from the main wreckage. Yellow paint chips, the fragments from the green navigation light, vortex generators, and plexiglass were located at the crest and down the north side of the hill.

The right wing exhibited accordion crushing along the leading edge from the wing root outboard to the forward strut. The entire span was crushed and buckled and the fabric was torn. The right aileron and right flap remained attached. The right flap was bent, buckled, and wrinkled along the entire span. The right aileron was bent down about 45° at the inboard portion of the control. The right aileron cables remained attached at the flight control and were continuous through the pulley inboard to the fuselage and to the flight control stick. The forward cable was separated at the fuselage and exhibited broomstraw signatures consistent with overload. The right trailing strut/aft strut was buckled about 8 inches outboard of the fuselage attach point. The right wing fuel tank was compromised. The pitot tube was clear of any visible contamination.

The left wing exhibited accordion crushing along the leading edge, from the wing root outboard to about midspan. The entire span was crushed and buckled and the fabric was torn. The left aileron and left flap remained attached. The left aileron was bent, buckled, and wrinkled along the entire span. The left flap was unremarkable. The left aileron cable remained attached at the aileron and was continuous through the pulley inboard to the fuselage.

The right main landing gear remained partially attached and was bent aft. The left main landing gear remained partially attached and was bent slightly outward.

The fuselage from the baggage compartment, aft, to the empennage was unremarkable. The flight control cables and tubing were continuous and correctly rigged from the control stick aft to the elevator and rudder. The rudder and trim cables on the left side were cut for extrication purposes by first responders. The elevator trim measured 5 threads on the top and 10 threads on the bottom. According to CubCrafters, this position, for the entire horizontal stabilizer, was consistent with 1° leading edge up from takeoff position, also consistent with the airplane being flown at slower airspeeds, or an aft center of gravity.

The fuselage remained attached to the empennage and both wings, and included the cabin and instrument panel. The left side of the fuselage was crushed inward and to the right. The right window and door were broken. The forward windscreen was fragmented. The left window and fuselage were impact damaged and cut further for extrication purposes. The instrument panel separated partially from the fuselage. The circuit breaker panel and switch panel did not provide any reliable readings.

The propeller separated from the engine at the propeller flange and was partially buried in the ground directly beneath the wreckage. The blades were labeled "A" and "B" for identification purposes. Blade A was uphill. Blade B was downhill and covered in dirt/earth. Both blades were bent and twisted along their entire span and exhibited chordwise scratches along the face of the blade and a few leading-edge nicks. The spinner was crushed aft with rotational crushing and scoring.

The airplane wreckage was recovered and relocated to a facility in Greeley, Colorado, for further examination.

The forward lap belt and two-point shoulder harness remained buckled. The lap belt webbing was cut by first responders to aid in extrication of the pilot. The inertia reel functioned as designed when tested. The rear lap belt and two-point shoulder harness were not buckled. The inertia real functioned as designed when tested.

The following was documented on the instrument panel:

Airspeed Indicator - zero
Attitude Indicator - inverted
Vertical Speed Indicator - 1,650 fpm down
Kollsman Window - 30.27
Altimeter - 9,000 ft 
Hobbs Meter - 67.1
The digital tachometer was powered by an external power supply and did not provide a current tachometer setting.

The engine controls were documented as follows:

Primer - in and locked
Mixture - out 1/4 inch and free to move without binding
Carburetor heat - out 1/2 inch and free to move without binding

The forward and aft throttle controls in the cabin were impact damaged and the positions were unreliable. The knob and the lever on the aft throttle was not located. The fuel selector valve was set at both.

The stall warning horn was removed and functionally tested. No anomalies were noted and it functioned as designed.

The engine remained partially attached to the airframe. The top spark plug and intake rod on the No. 2 cylinder were impact damage. The exhaust tubing was impact damaged and oil was observed on the oil dip stick. The valve covers, and the top spark plugs on the Nos. 1, 3, and 4, and the bottom spark plug on the No. 2 cylinder were removed to facilitate the examination.

The magneto P-leads were impact damaged and could not be functionally tested. The magnetos were removed and spark was observed on all points when rotated by hand. The propeller flange was cut to facilitate the examination. The engine was rotated through at the propeller flange. Valve train and engine continuity was confirmed on all cylinders. Air movement was tactically confirmed at the spark plug orifice on all cylinders. Drivetrain continuity was confirmed at the accessory case. The spark plugs exhibited normal operating or combustion signatures when compared to a spark plug chart.

The fuel mixture and throttle cables were attached to the carburetor and were cut to aid in the examination. Their positions were not reliable. The carburetor was removed for examination purposes. About 1/4 cup of fuel was in the bowl and when tested there was no evidence of water or visual contamination. The oil filter was cut and the filter element/media was clear of visual contaminants or metal.

No preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures were found that would have precluded normal operation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The pilot was critically injured and survived for several hours following the accident. He passed away after being extricated from the airplane. Forensic Medicine and Pathology, PLLC, Sheridan, Wyoming, conducted an autopsy of the pilot on December 8, 2016. The autopsy concluded that the cause of death was "multiple acute blunt traumatic injuries" and the report listed the specific injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological tests on specimens that were collected during the autopsy. Results were negative for all tests conducted. 

Organizational And Management Information

The USDA APHIS Wildlife Services program is responsible for animal damage management. The pilots are located in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Texas. Their flight experience ranges between 5,000 and 35,000 hours. The program includes about 35 pilots; 6 of which are based in Wyoming. Five of the pilots in Wyoming are fulltime and one pilot is a contract pilot.

The pilots in the program are salary based – they are not compensated per flight, per flight hour, or per capture during any management flight. The decision to fly lies solely with the pilot. The pilots travel to the training center in Cedar City, Utah, twice a year; once for their annual flight review and once for the annual safety stand down, usually held in late fall or early winter.

The standard animal damage management flight has at least three phases; en route to the location, a surveillance aspect, and a predator mitigation pass. The surveillance aspect of a flight is conducted between 75 and 100 ft agl. A predator mitigation pass would be conducted at an altitude between 20 ft and 40 ft, at an airspeed between 60 and 70 mph. Pilots generally track their target out the side and rear windscreen. The crew member is positioned to shoot from the left side of the airplane and the pilot always positions the airplane so that the target is on the left side. Most maneuvering turns are conducted to the left; however, terrain and environment might dictate the need to make a turn to the right.

USDA Safety Actions

Following the accident, the flight program was grounded while an internal investigation could be conducted. In addition, one internal board and one external board of review were convened. Each board made multiple recommendations regarding safety improvements to reduce the number of accidents. There had been one other fatal accident in New Mexico in 2015.

The following items were implemented as a result of the accident:

- Automatic flight following monitored both on a state level and a dedicated full-time analyst.
- Flight data monitoring system including recorded video and flight parameters for all flights.
- Four full-time check airmen.
- Flight reviews at 6 months intervals.
- Standardized GPS position reporting format.
- Flight plans, including mission profiles, required in all states.
- Across target minimum speeds and minimum observation heights established.

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA050
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 07, 2016 in Basin, WY
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS PA18, registration: N444GB
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 7, 2016, about 1015 mountain standard time, a Cub Crafters PA18-150 airplane, N444GB, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while maneuvering 15 miles southwest of Basin, Wyoming. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and commercial-certificated crewmember was seriously injured. The airplane was owned by the Wyoming Wool Growers Association and operated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a public use flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The animal damage management flight departed Worland Municipal Airport (WRL), Worland, Wyoming, about 0800.

According to the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife Services ground crew that supported the flight, the airplane arrived in the area around 0820 for animal damage management. The crew members were located west, north, and east of the area where the airplane was operating. Crew members had visual contact, voice communication, and/or audio contact (they could hear the airplane operating) until about 1000.

About 1015, the ground crew attempted to contact the airplane to change the area of focus without a response from the airplane. The ground crew tried multiple locations and means to contact the airplane without success. At 1100 the agency search and rescue plan was activated and about 1330 the airplane was located by aerial search and rescue teams.

The wreckage was located within steep hilly terrain, just below a ridge line that extended from northeast to southwest, increasing in elevation to the south. The airplane wreckage included the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine and propeller assembly. The airplane came to rest nearly vertical with the right wing uphill and the left wing downhill. The propeller separated from the engine and was directly beneath the wreckage.

Weather at WRL, located 28 miles southeast of the accident site was recorded at 0953 as wind 340 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky condition 6,000 feet overcast, temperature minus 13 degrees Celsius (C), dewpoint temperature minus 18 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.57 inches of mercury. Weather at the Yellowstone Regional Airport (COD), Cody, Wyoming, located 38 miles northwest of the accident site was recorded at 0953 as wind 350 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky condition 6,500 feet overcast, temperature minus 13 degrees Celsius (C), dewpoint temperature minus 19 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.35 inches of mercury.