Saturday, September 15, 2018

Swieter Aircraft leaving Waterloo Regional Airport (KALO) after three decades



WATERLOO -- Contractual issues are causing the departure of a 32-year Waterloo Regional Airport mainstay.

Swieter Aircraft Services Inc., which has provided aircraft maintenance in Waterloo since 1986, is moving to the Waverly Municipal Airport beginning in November, along with McCandless Avionics and McCandless Aircraft Sales.

Company president Irv Swieter blamed the Waterloo airport administration for being slow to begin negotiations on a new lease and then proposing a major rent hike for the office, shop and hangar building he occupies on the east side of the airport.

"I anticipated that I would remain here until I decided to retire," Swieter said. "So it was not a very easy decision, and it wasn't a spur-of-the-moment decision.

"I had been trying to get a proposal from (Airport Director Keith Kaspari) since March," he said. "I could not wait and wait and wait. I finally got it in August. The proposal he gave me was not feasible."

Kaspari countered that Swieter's current rent had not increased for 20 years while the city recently used Iowa Department of Transportation grants to make more than $150,000 in building improvements.

He noted the airport has a fiduciary duty to both the Federal Aviation Administration, which subsidizes the airport, to ensure rents are fair. The city of Waterloo also requires the airport to avoid losing money and requiring general fund tax support.

Kaspari delivered an initial lease proposal to Swieter Aug. 7 which called for the rent to jump from $10,600 to $24,000 a year, included a 2.5 percent annual rent increase going forward, and put Swieter in charge of maintaining the shop and office areas of the building.

"My comment to him was to give it a review, and if you find anything out of the ordinary to contact me," Kaspari said. "Let's talk about it so that we can agree to a fee schedule that works for us both, as I do not want to see you leave as an airport tenant.

"I wanted to keep everything open, honest and transparent," he added. "But there is no way that I could give him an extension at the current rates that he is paying today."

Kaspari said he heard nothing back from Swieter before the Waverly City Council voted unanimously Aug. 20 approve a contract for Swieter to operate its airport, taking over for current fixed-base operator Cedar Valley Aviation.

Swieter said he did not sign any agreement with Waverly until after getting Waterloo's initial proposal. The prospect of maintaining a 1961 building which already needed repairs was a bigger concern than the rent, he added.

Hugh Field, chairman of the airport board, also said he was disappointed to see Swieter leave but echoed Kaspari's assessment that it was time for a rent increase.

"Irv has had the same lease at the airport for 20 years," Field said. "He has a lot of facility that we provided and, quite frankly, he was due to have an increase.

"We didn't want him to leave," he added. "He provides a great service for the aviation community."

Swieter said Waterloo's initial proposal came too late because it would have forced him to abandon his option for the Waverly post and take his chances negotiating an acceptable lease in Waterloo.

He began looking at Waverly in June after watching protracted lease negotiations between the Waterloo airport administration and Livingston Aviation, the airport's other fixed-base operator.

"It was very, very clear seeing what Livingston was going through last year trying to renew their lease that I knew it was coming my way," Swieter said.

Tim Newton, at Livingston Aviation, acknowledged his business had a difficult time negotiating a new lease which was eventually approved. He said the initial city offer would have forced Livingston out of business.

"While we're competitors, I really hate to see Irv go," Newton said. "It's a huge loss to the airport. It's a big loss to the community too."

Lynn Moller, who relies on Swieter to service two aircraft he pilots, was also disappointed to see Swieter moving to Waverly, noting his expertise especially on twin-engine Cessnas attracts plane owners seeking maintenance from all over the country and Canada.

"For Waterloo to lose somebody like Irv is totally ridiculous," said Moller, who expects he'll be flying the aircraft to Waverly for maintenance in the future.

Swieter begins managing the Waverly airport Nov. 1. His lease in Waterloo expires Jan. 31, 2019.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wcfcourier.com

Columbia LC41-550FG, N2536T: Fatal accident occurred September 15, 2018 near Laurence G. Hanscom Field (KBED), Bedford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N2536T 


Location: Woburn, MA
Accident Number: ERA18FA251
Date & Time: 09/15/2018, 1103 EDT
Registration: N2536T
Aircraft: COLUMBIA AIRCRAFT Mfg LC41
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 15, 2018, about 1103 eastern daylight time, a Columbia Aircraft Mfg LC41-550FG, N2536T, collided with trees and terrain during an instrument approach at Woburn, Massachusetts. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to the pilot and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York at 0954 and was destined for Laurence G Hanscom Field (BED), Bedford, Massachusetts.


According to preliminary data from air traffic control, the flight was handed off from Boston approach control to BED tower after being cleared for the ILS approach to runway 29. The pilot contacted BED tower and was cleared to land. As the flight crossed the final approach fix (JAYSE), the controller issued a low altitude alert to the pilot. The pilot acknowledged the call and stated, at 1101:50, that he was climbing. About 20 seconds later, the controller advised the pilot that he was drifting north of course. The pilot did not acknowledge the call. At 1102:36, the controller issued another low altitude alert and asked the pilot if he was still on the approach. The pilot responded that he was not. Radar and radio contact were lost about 1103.


The airplane collided with trees and terrain on a heading of about 070° in a wooded area behind a residence. The wreckage path was about 300 ft in length. The airframe was highly fragmented. There was a postaccident fire that consumed about 20% of the wreckage. The engine separated from the firewall and the propeller separated from the engine during the impact sequence. All primary structural components and flight control surfaces were accounted for within the debris field.


The pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument ratings. Federal Aviation Administration records revealed that he purchased the airplane new in 2006. According to his pilot logbook, his total flight time was about 1,945 hours. He completed a flight review on January 15, 2018.


The composite-construction, four-seat airplane was equipped with a Continental TSIO-550-C engine rated at 310 horsepower. The engine was fitted with a three-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller. According to the airplane logbooks, an annual inspection on the airframe and engine was completed on December 14, 2017 at 1,339 hours total aircraft time.


BED was located about 4.8 miles west of the accident site. The 1108 weather observation at BED included wind calm, an overcast ceiling at 600 ft, visibility 2 statute miles with mist, temperature 19°C, dew point 18°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.21 inches of mercury.


The wreckage was retained for further examination.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: COLUMBIA AIRCRAFT Mfg

Registration: N2536T
Model/Series: LC41 550FG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBED, 132 ft msl
Observation Time: 1508 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility: 2 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Farmingdale, NY (FRG)
Destination: Bedford, MA (BED) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  42.454167, -71.182778 (est) 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Dr. L. Michael Graver, right, the chief of adult cardiac surgery at North Shore University Hospital, and his wife, Jodi Cohen, both of Manhasset, were killed when the aircraft Graver was flying crashed behind a home in Woburn, Massachusetts, on September 16, 2018.


Family and friends on Sunday remembered a Long Island surgeon and his real estate broker wife as a loving couple dedicated to their families, their careers and to each other.


Dr. L. Michael Graver, 65, and Jodi Cohen, 55, of Manhasset, died Saturday morning when their small plane crashed behind a home in Woburn, Massachusetts, authorities said. Officials have not said what caused the accident.


The National Transportation Safety Board is in the very early stages of the investigation, which will include a review of the pilot's record and the plane's maintenance, a spokesman said Sunday. 


Graver, the chief of adult cardiac surgery at North Shore University Hospital, was flying a 2006 Columbia Aircraft LC41 and departed with Cohen from Republic Airport in East Farmingdale about 9:30 a.m. They were scheduled to arrive around 11 a.m. at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts, according to the FAA.


The couple was headed to Massachusetts to have lunch with Graver’s son Adam, 33, an orthopedic surgeon, and his wife, of Olympia, Washington, who were attending a medical conference in Boston, friends said Sunday. 


Graver and Cohen were adventurous and loved travel, aviation and the outdoors, friends said. Colleagues remember the couple coming back from weekend jaunts describing the places they’d flown to, including meals on Nantucket and the famed Oshkosh air show in Wisconsin.


They were “terrific together, a super couple” with many friends and a full calender of social and travel plans, said Dr. Robert Palazzo, an attending cardiac surgeon at Northwell Health.


Graver was last issued a private pilot certificate in 2014, FAA records show. Friends described him as an experienced pilot who had flown for more than a decade. Flying was a passion that he shared with his son and also with Cohen. The couple married in September 2010.


Graver and Cohen lived in a gated community of large homes and shaded streets, and they both excelled in their careers, where they were each remembered as successful, hardworking and talented.


Cohen, a certified public accountant, worked as a real estate broker at Douglas Elliman in Manhasset. She grew up in North Woodmere, attending Lawrence High School and then Adelphi University and University of Florida, where she studied accounting, her sister Beth Kotin said Sunday.


“I'm just still shocked that this happened to them,” said Kotin, 58, of Manhattan. “They were both really good people, and very close to us and my kids. So it's terrible."


Colleagues described Graver as a master surgeon whom they would trust to operate on their own loved ones. Dr. Karen Kostroff, chief of breast surgery at Northwell Health and a close family friend, said Graver “fell into the rare subset of extraordinary surgeons” and had operated on thousands of patients over his four decades practicing medicine.


He was recognized earlier this year as one of four cardiothoracic surgeons statewide with the lowest mortality rates.


Graver was “the best of a friend, the best of a physician, the best of a father and the best of a husband,” Kostroff said, adding that he was a “brilliant person" who could talk about any subject.


The couple's eighth wedding anniversary would have been on Sept. 26. A funeral will likely be held in the coming week, friends said.


“They both had a beautiful life together, and it's just a heartbreak,” said Carol Wolowitz, a family friend who lives in Manhasset. “It's just terrible heartbreak.”



Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.newsday.com


The victims were identified as 65-year-old Dr. Michael Graver and his 52-year-old wife, Jodi Cohen, of Manhasset, New York.

A husband and wife died died Saturday morning when their small plane crashed into a wooded area of Woburn, authorities are reporting.


Dr. Michael Graver and his wife Jodi Cohen of New York were killed when their lightweight aircraft went down behind a home in the Minchin Drive area off of Lexington Street around 11 a.m., District Attorney Marian Ryan confirmed in a press conference Saturday afternoon.


“Everybody’s house shook”


Residents congregating on Grace Road after the crash reported feeling a concussion that shook their homes. While there has been ongoing blasting in the area due to construction, this felt different, they said, like something had gone very wrong.


“This was bigger and badder, like there had been an accident,” said a woman who declined to be named. “Everybody’s house shook as far as Parker Street.”


Robert Miguel was working in the yard at his sister’s home on Grace Road when he heard the plane’s sputtering engine.


“Then there was nothing, just silence,” he said. “Then boom.”


Miguel ran to the area where he believed the plane came down, halfway between two houses off of Henderson Drive. He saw black smoke rising up and several fires on the ground. He saw a wheel, and part of the fuselage with the plane’s identifying numbers, he said. The smell of gas was in the air.”


“We were calling out, but there was no response,” he said. “It is very tough to see a loss of life.”


In a press conference held Saturday afternoon, Woburn Mayor Scott Galvin confirmed the two deaths and added that there were no presumed survivors. There were no reported injuries on the ground. The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Columbia LC41-550FG.


Federal Aviation Administration investigators were enroute Saturday afternoon to begin an investigation.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://woburn.wickedlocal.com




A married couple died after their small, two-seater plane crashed in a wooded area in a residential neighborhood in Woburn on Saturday morning, authorities said.

The two were identified as 65-year-old Dr. Michael Graver and 52-year-old Jodi Cohen, according to Middlesex District Attorney Marian Ryan.


The single-engine Columbia Aircraft LC41 crashed at around 11 a.m., four miles from Laurence G. Hanscom Field in Bedford, where it was approaching. The plane had departed from Republic Airport in Farmingdale, New York, around 9:30 a.m., The Associated Press reported.


Graver was a "very experienced pilot" and co-owned the 2016 plane, Ryan said.


Woburn Mayor Scott Galvin said it was a miracle the plane did not hit the residential area, nor anyone on the ground.


Donna Landino, who lives across the street from where the crash happened, was cleaning her house when she "heard a huge bang." She thought a car had crashed into her house.


"I came out, and there was a plane in between two houses with an explosion," Landino said.


"There was some fire," Landino added, which made her nervous, especially after the gas explosions and fires in the Merrimack Valley on Thursday.


Woburn and State Police, as well as FAA officials and the National Transportation Safety Board, are investigating the crash.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbur.org







WOBURN, Massachusetts — A husband and wife died died Saturday morning when their small plane crashed behind a home in a wooded area in Woburn.


Dr. Michael Graver and his wife Jodi Cohen of New York were killed when their lightweight aircraft went down behind a home in the Minchin Drive area off of Lexington Street around 11 a.m., District Attorney Marian Ryan confirmed in a press conference Saturday afternoon.


First responders said there was a large fire when the first firefighters arrived at the scene.


Neighbors described hearing an explosion that “sounded like the end of the world," then a large fire.


“This was bigger and badder, like there had been an accident,” a woman who declined to be named told Wicked Local. “Everybody’s house shook as far as Parker Street.”


Robert Miguel was working in the yard at his sister’s home on Grace Road when he heard the plane’s sputtering engine.


“Then there was nothing, just silence,” he said. “Then boom.”


Miguel ran to the area where he believed the plane came down, halfway between two houses off of Henderson Drive. He saw black smoke rising up and several fires on the ground. He saw a wheel, and part of the fuselage with the plane’s identifying numbers, he said. The smell of gas was in the air.”


“We were calling out, but there was no response,” he said. “It is very tough to see a loss of life.”


There were no reported injuries on the ground.


The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Columbia LC41-550FG. The agency was enroute to the scene to begin the investigation. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wcvb.com

Friday, September 14, 2018

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 757-200, N668DN: Incident occurred September 05, 2018 at Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration; Washington, District of Columbia
Delta Air Lines; Atlanta, Georgia
Boeing; Seal Beach, Washington
Airline Pilots Association; Atlanta, Georgia
Pratt & Whitney; E. Hartford, Connecticut
Federal Aviation Administration; Burlington, Massachusetts

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N668DN

Location: Atlanta, GA
Incident Number: ENG18IA036
Date & Time: 09/05/2018, 2332 EDT
Registration: N668DN
Aircraft: Boeing 757
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled 

On September 05, 2018, about 2332 EDT, a Boeing 757 airplane, N668DN, experienced a right engine failure during climb at ~18,000 feet after departing Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia. The flight crew reported hearing a loud bang and noting right engine failure indications. The right engine was shut down and the flight returned to ATL. The airplane damage was minor, and no injuries were reported. The airplane was being operated as a 14 CFR Part 121 scheduled flight from ATL to Orlando International Airport (MCO). The post-incident airplane inspection found holes in the right nacelle inboard core cowl and in the engine high pressure turbine case. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Boeing
Registration: N668DN
Model/Series: 757 232
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Delta Air Lines
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:  N/A
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: N/A
Latitude, Longitude:

American Airlines, Boeing 737-800, N915NN: Incident occurred October 15, 2019 at LaGuardia Airport (KLGA), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York

Aircraft struck a goose.

https://registry.faa.gov/N915NN

Date: 15-OCT-19
Time: 20:37:00Z
Regis#: AAL1608
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK

Scott's - Bell 47, XB-OSS: Fatal accident occurred May 25, 2018 in Ciudad Valles, Mexico

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA214
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Friday, May 25, 2018 in Ciudad Valles, Mexico
Aircraft: BELL 47, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On May 25, 2018, at 0030 hours universal coordinated time, a Scotts Bell 47 helicopter, Mexican registration XB-OSS, impacted terrain following a loss of engine power during an aerial application flight in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was substantially damaged.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC)
Secretariat of Communications and Transportation
Blvd. Adolfo López Mateos 1990, piso 4
Col. Los Alpes Tlacopac, Del. Álvaro Obregón
Codigo Postal 01010
México, D.F.
Mexico
Tel.: (55) 5001-6413
E-mail: cidaiac@sct.gob.mx

Aero Vodochody L-39C Albatros, operating as Race 13, N139UK and Aero Vodochody L-39 Albatros, operating as Race 37, N139PJ: Accident occurred September 14, 2018 near Reno Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Black Rock Aero LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N139UK

A photo of Reality Czech, piloted by Nathan Harnagel of Friendswood, Texas, taken on September 14th, 2018.

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR18LA267A
Date & Time: 09/14/2018, 1004 PDT
Registration: N139UK
Aircraft: Aero Vodochody L39
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 14, 2018, about 1004 Pacific daylight time, an Aero Vodochody L39C, N139UK, operating as Race 13, and an Aero Vodochody L39, N139PJ, operating as Race 37 collided in midair about 3 miles north of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot of Race 13 and the airline transport pilot of Race 37 were not injured. Race 13 sustained minor damage to the left side of the fuselage and bottom of the left wing; Race 37 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and empennage. Race 13 was registered to Black Rock Aero LLC and Race 37 was registered to MPE Enterprises Corporation. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as air race flights. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either airplane. Both airplanes originated from RTS at 0950.

Information provided by representatives from the Jet Class Air Racing group revealed that during the fifth lap of the closed course air race, Race 13 and Race 37 collided while maneuvering near pylon 4 of the jet race course. Following the collision, both pilots declared a mayday and landed uneventfully.

Examination of Race 37 revealed that the outboard 24 inches of the right wing and right aileron were separated from the airplane. Additional damage to the bottom portion of the vertical stabilizer and the leading edge of the left horizontal stabilizer was observed. Examination of Race 13 revealed damage to two inspection panels and the wing root fairing on the forward left side of the fuselage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aero Vodochody
Registration: N139UK
Model/Series: L39 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5053 ft msl
Observation Time: 1715 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 100°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.713889, -119.866389 (est)


A photo of Race 37, piloted by Alexandre Eckmann of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, taken on September 14th, 2018.


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

MPE Enterprises Corporation


https://registry.faa.gov/N139PJ

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR18LA267B
Date & Time: 09/14/2018, 1004 PDT
Registration: N139PJ
Aircraft: Aero Vodochody L 39
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 14, 2018, about 1004 Pacific daylight time, a Aero Vodochody L39C, N139UK, operating as Race 13, and an Aero Vodochody L39, N139PJ, operating as Race 37 collided in midair about 3 miles north of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot of Race 13 and the airline transport pilot of Race 37 were not injured. Race 13 sustained minor damage to the left side of the fuselage and bottom of the left wing; Race 37 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and empennage. Race 13 was registered to Black Rock Aero LLC and Race 37 was registered to MPE Enterprises Corporation. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as air race flights. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either airplane, which originated from RTS at 0950.

Information provided by representatives from the Jet Class Air Racing group revealed that during the fifth lap of the closed course air race, Race 13 and Race 37 collided while maneuvering near pylon 4 of the jet race course. Following the collision, both pilots declared a mayday and landed uneventfully.

Examination of Race 37 revealed that the outboard 24 inches of the right wing and right aileron were separated from the airplane. Additional damage to the bottom portion of the vertical stabilizer and the leading edge of the left horizontal stabilizer was observed. Examination of Race 13 revealed damage to two inspection panels and the wing root fairing on the forward left side of the fuselage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aero Vodochody
Registration: N139PJ
Model/Series: L 39
Aircraft Category:  Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5053 ft msl
Observation Time: 1715 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:  6 knots / , 100°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.713889, -119.866389 (est)



There was a “mayday” situation Friday when two jets bumped in mid-air during competition at the Reno air races.

The planes were damaged but there was no crash, according to an event spokeswoman.

The two pilots involved in the mid-air collision were Alexandre Eckmann of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, piloting Race 37, pictured above, and Nathan Harnagel of Friendswood, Texas, piloting Reality Czech, event spokeswoman Valerie Glenn confirmed on Friday.

“All the pilots landed safely and all the planes came down safely,” Glenn said Friday afternoon.

“That’s our greatest concern, everybody is just fine," she said.

The incident took place about 10 a.m. during the Jet Heat 2B near Pylon 4, where race judges may have been standing. It was not visible from the stands, Glenn said.

Investigators were at the pylon area soon afterward.

No injuries have been reported, and the rest of the day's racing was not affected.

Few attendees witnessed the incident from the stands. Marc and Cathi Cross, both from Texas, said they were sitting at the top of one of the bleachers when they saw the two jets pull up into the air as the announcer explained what happened. 

"Then they chased one of the pilots with a safety plane so they could see what was wrong with the plane," Cathi Cross, 54, said. "I think they wanted to make sure there was nothing flammable leaking out before landing.

"They did a good job with keeping safety first."   

Cross' husband, Marc, 53, said he also witnessed the jets fly up in the air after the two aircrafts touched midair. But he said he didn't see the moment the two jets touched. 

Cathi Cross said she and her husband witnessed the moment when one of the aircrafts crashed into spectators in September 2011. 

Cross said it took her and her husband time before they decided to revisit the air races. 

"We came back because we like the air races," Cross said. "Life is a risk, right?" 

Melissa Cable, 33, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., also witnessed the incident on Friday. 

"They came around the pylon and all of a sudden pulled straight up," she said as she pointed to the vast field in front of her. "One of the jets circled around and cooled off and landed. The other had a wing pilot check the plane out and then they landed." 

Glenn said the National Transportation Safety Board took over the investigation. 

The NTSB had an investigator out on the field, and both pilots have been interviewed, according to spokesman Terry Williams. 

Little other information was immediately available from the scene of the Stihl National Championship Air Races at Reno-Stead Airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.rgj.com

Beelzebub, N382T: Fatal accident occurred September 14, 2018 in Rochester, Thurston County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N382T 

Location: Rochester, WA
Accident Number: WPR18FA261
Date & Time: 09/14/2018, 1120 PDT
Registration: N382T
Aircraft: GRUBER Beelzabub
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 14, 2018, about 1120 Pacific daylight time, an experimental Gruber Beelzabub, N382T, collided with a tree while maneuvering and impacted the ground near Rochester, Washington. The pilot/owner and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot operated the airplane under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. No flight plan had been filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed Flying B Airport (8WA0), Rainier, Washington.

According to witnesses in the area, the airplane flew overhead completing one circuit at a high altitude. On the second circuit, the airplane was at a lower altitude and made an approach traveling from the north to south followed by a turn toward the east. The airplane dropped below a tree line out of view. The witnesses stated the airplane reappeared as it was climbing over a tree line in a turn toward the south. The witnesses observed the wings wag and the front passenger wave at them just before the airplane's left wing impacted a tree top.

The witnesses stated that the engine was running at the time of the accident. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GRUBER
Registration: N382T
Model/Series: Beelzabub
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  46.713333, -122.946389 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Edan Aspen Lifesong 

Edan Aspen Lifesong died in his beloved plane on Friday, September 14, 2018. He was 34 years old. Edan lived an adventurous life, born under an aspen tree, on 480 acres in Eastern Washington. 

When Edan was 6, his mother, brother and sister moved to Olympia. He was a sweet, considerate and loving man. He had a sense of adventure that took him fishing, crabbing in Alaska, trimming trees and falling timber. During this adventurous life, he traveled extensively, throughout Europe, South America and Asia. He spent a year on the north shore of Kuai, camping and surfing. His dream of becoming a pilot began early in his life, achieving his license in 2017. The absolute highlight of his life was the birth of his son Rafferty Sailor Lifesong in 2012. This blue-eyed boy meant the world to him. Their relationship and love of adventure will be forever remembered. Our family wishes to thank all the friends for their unwavering support, St. Peters Hospital Case Management for feeding us, the coroner for your gentle support over the past few days. We are so blessed with this outpouring of love. Our hearts go out to Brett Lamphere's family during this difficult time. 


Edan leaves behind his young son Rafferty, his parents Ginny Kerr, Mike Coogan and Chuck Smith, grandparents, Tom, Beth and Robbie, sister Tasi, her husband Ryan, brother Trevor, his wife Jamie, nephews Lucas and Elwood and nieces Juniper and Ophelia. An extra thank you to family friend Brenda Stocker who held me up. Memorial will be held September 29, at the Olympia Flight Museum in Tumwater, WA. From 1-5 pm.

Edan Lifesong, age 34

Brett Lamphere, age 19


Key Way Airport (19WA), Stevenson, Washington


The two men who died in a plane crash Friday have been identified as Edan Lifesong, 34, of Olympia and Brett Lamphere, 19, of Centralia, according to the Thurston County Coroner’s Office.

Lifesong and Lamphere were flying an experimental home-built open cockpit plane when it crashed about 3 miles off Old Highway 99.

The crash was witnessed by logging company workers in the area who called 911 at about 11:30 a.m. Both men were dead by the time emergency crews reached the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and investigators were en route Friday to lead the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.theolympian.com

Captain Dyer, EMS Officer/Public Information Officer - West Thurston Regional Fire Authority speaks  with the media regarding the aircraft crash.


A West Thurston Fire Authority command vehicle drives through the forest southwest of Tenino as it leaves the scene of a fatal experimental aircraft crash on September 14th, 2018. 


Two men died Friday in a plane crash in the hills above South Sound Speedway near Rochester.

West Thurston Regional Fire Authority Captain Lanette Dyer said the men were in their mid 20s to 30s and were flying an experimental home-built open cockpit plane.

Dyer said it is unclear where the plane took off from, but it was heading south when it crashed about 3 miles off Old Highway 99.

The crash was witnessed by logging company workers in the area who called 911 at about 11:30 a.m. Both men were dead by the time emergency crews reached the scene.

The men’s names were not released. Dyer said it is unclear if either man was a licensed pilot.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and investigators are en route to lead the investigation.


Story and video ➤ https://www.thenewstribune.com


THURSTON COUNTY, Washington - Crews responded to the report of a downed aircraft in the hills near South Sound Speedway on Friday at about noon.

Officials initially said there were “no details other than two patients.”

At about 1 p.m., officials said two men, 20 to 30 years old, died in the crash. 

West Thurston fire officials said the plane was an "experimental, home-built open cockpit plane."

Chopper 7 flew over the crash. Wreckage could be seen in deep trees, near a logging operation southwest of Bucoda, Washington.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kiro7.com



TENINO, Washington  — Two men were killed when a Beelzebub experimental aircraft crashed Friday in southeast Thurston County.

West Thurston Regional Fire Authority Capt. Lynette Dyer says the men were in their mid-20s to 30s.

Loggers working nearby saw the plane go down and called 911 at about 11:30 a.m. Both men were dead when emergency crews arrived.
The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://q13fox.com



ROCHESTER, Washington - A Beelzebub experimental aircraft crashed in a wooded area in Thurston County Friday morning, killing both men on board, according to fire officials.

The plane was reported to go down in the hills above the South Sound Speedway in Rochester. Firefighters later said they found the small plane in the trees.

Officials said two men in their 20s died in the crash, which involved an Beelzebub with an open cockpit.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The victims' names have not been released.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://komonews.com