Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Cessna 180D, N6479X: Accident occurred May 03, 2016 at Naknek Airport (5NK), Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/26/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot stated that, during the landing rollout in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. The left landing gear leg then dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. 
An examination of the fractured left axle revealed features consistent with a bending overstress fracture. High magnification optical examination of the fracture also revealed several small fatigue cracks within the crack origin area. Although several fatigue initiation sites were present along the fracture origin area, none of them were large enough to have led to the failure or to have significantly lowered the ultimate strength of the axle enough for a bending overstress failure to occur under normal loading conditions. Therefore, it is likely the landing gear axle failed as a result of bending overstress due to a hard landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The overstress fracture and subsequent separation of the left main landing gear axle due to a hard landing, which resulted in the pilot’s inability to maintain directional control of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N6479X

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 3, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N6479X, sustained substantial damage following a separation of the left main wheel and axle from the landing gear strut during the landing rollout at the Naknek airport, Naknek, Alaska. The commercial pilot and sole occupant were not injured. The airplane was registered to Skol-Alaska, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed and activated.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 3, 2016, the pilot stated that during the landing roll out, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. As the left landing gear leg dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. 

The fractured wheel axle was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for further examination. The fracture surface showed several areas of post-fracture damage. The undamaged portions of the fracture surface were optically, matte grey and highly textured consistent with a bending overstress fracture. Radial lines visible on the fracture indicated a wide area initiation at the outer diameter surface near the inboard end of the axle. High magnification optical examination of the fracture also revealed several small fatigue cracks within the crack origin area.

A Materials Laboratory Factual Report is located in the public docket for this accident.

The closest weather reporting facility is King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 12 miles east of the accident site. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the King Salmon Airport was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 4 knots; sky condition, scattered at 2,700 feet AGL, broken at 5,000 feet AGL, broken at 7,500 feet AGL, broken at 20,000 AGL; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 52° F; dewpoint 36° F; barometric pressure 29.70 inHG.

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 3, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N6479X, sustained substantial damage following a separation of the left main wheel and axle from the landing gear strut during the landing rollout at the Naknek Airport, Naknek, Alaska. The commercial pilot and sole occupant was not injured. The airplane was registered to Skol-Alaska, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed and activated.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 3, 2016, the pilot stated that during the landing roll out, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. As the left landing gear leg dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. 

The closest weather reporting facility is King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 12 miles east of the accident site. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the King Salmon Airport was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 4 knots; sky condition scattered at 2,700 feet agl, broken at 5,000 feet agl, broken at 7,500 feet agl, broken at 20,000 agl; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 52 degrees F; dew point 36 degrees F; barometric pressure 29.70 inHg.

Homeland Security Developing New Airport Security Standards: Foreign airports that meet them wouldn’t be hit by electronics ban, official says

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing in Washington, D.C. Tuesday. 



The Wall Street Journal 
By Susan Carey
June 7, 2017 7:54 p.m. ET


An expanded ban of carry-on laptops on international flights could extend to flights headed to the U.S. from 71 airports around the world, a top security official told lawmakers on Wednesday.

But Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly also said that the agency is trying to develop security standards that airports could meet to avoid the ban on laptops, tablets and other electronic devices.

The secretary, who spoke at a House Homeland Security Committee hearing, said foreign terrorists “are trying every day to knock down one of our airplanes coming over here from—right now—Europe and the Middle East.” He called the threat “very serious “and “constant.”

The latest comments on the proposal under consideration by the Trump administration come after the agency previously hinted a ban may be expanded to all inbound flights to the U.S. from Europe. Recently, Mr. Kelly suggested the ban could affect all international flights in and out of the U.S.

Two months ago, the U.S. and the U.K. imposed a ban on some flights coming from the Middle East and North Africa. The U.S. rule affected 10 airports. Mr. Kelly didn’t say where the additional 71 airports are located.

Mr. Kelly said he was behind the decision to install the initial ban, and said intelligence reports indicated that those airports were most at risk and airport security personnel didn’t have sufficient ability to guard against explosives in electronic devices.

“It was a very, very real threat, a very sophisticated threat…and not just one” emanating from the Middle East to take out an airplane in flight, Mr. Kelly said.

On Wednesday, Mr. Kelly said a complication in a broader ban is a fire risk from lithium batteries that would have to be stored in the cargo holds of aircraft. He said there was disagreement among experts about the severity of that risk, and his agency is consulting with the Transportation Department on the issue.

He said DHS has consulted with officials in the European Union. The department is sending an official to a meeting in Malta next week to discuss the possible new security standards. The message is: “These are the new minimum security things you need to do at your airports so you can fly to the U.S. direct,” he said.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

United Parcel Service (UPS) flight 357, Boeing 767-300 and Cessna C750 Citation, N900QS: Incident occurred April 12, 2015 at Miami International Airport (KMIA), Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this incident.

OPS15IA017A Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: OPS15IA017A
Incident occurred Sunday, April 12, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: BOEING 767 34AF, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

OPS15IA017B  Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: OPS15IA017B
Incident occurred Sunday, April 12, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 750, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On April 12, 2015 at 0821, a loss of required air traffic control separation occurred when United Parcel Service (UPS) flight 357, a Boeing 767-300, overflew N900QS, a Cessna C750 Citation holding in position on runway 8L at Miami International Airport (MIA), Miami, Florida. The conflict was detected when the tower's airport surface detection equipment, model X (ASDE-X) alarmed. The local controller (LC) instructed UPS357 to go around and turn 10 degrees left. UPS357 was at an altitude of 200 feet and approximately ½ mile from the runway 8L threshold when the crew was told to go-around. UPS357 overflew N900QS by 475 feet. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

What was helicopter doing at Gettysburg National Military Park?

Officials at Gettysburg National Military Park are still trying to determine what a low-flying helicopter was doing over Devil's Den Sunday morning.

Katie Lawhon, park spokeswoman, said they're asking the public to share any information they have with park law enforcement officers.

The park received reports Sunday about a helicopter flying low over Devil's Den around 10:15 a.m. possibly dropping materials.

With an estimated 100,000 followers on Facebook, Lawhon said that's where they reached out for information from the public.

There have been prior reports of low-flying helicopters at the park Lawhon said, but none recently.

The incident was reported to the FAA for investigation, and Lawhon said the public has responded with tips.

While some are wondering if the helicopter was dropping a deceased person's ashes, Lawhon said she has no information to support that hypotheses.

Lawhon said she's never heard of anyone asking for permission to spread remains by air.

"I do not think it's something we would permit," she said.

"Human remains may only be scattered at the park by permit, and only in certain areas," Lawhon said, which are a prescribed distance from monuments. "It is a broad area," she added.

It is not an uncommon occurrence, she added.

While there are no new interment sites available at the national cemetery at Gettysburg, Lawhon said there are occasional burials at graves of predeceased spouses.

Here's the post you can see on the park's Facebook page:

On Sunday June 4th, at approximately 10:15 AM, an incident was reported to park law enforcement where a helicopter was observed operating at low altitudes and possibly dropping materials while in flight in the vicinity of Devil's Den. Anyone having knowledge this incident is asked to please contact NPS Law Enforcement Ranger Dan Holler by email at dan_holler@nps.gov or by phone at 717-338-4498

Original article can be found here: http://www.pennlive.com

Ravn Alaska commits to highest international safety standards

Corvus Airlines, Inc. d/b/a Ravn Alaska announced today its plans to begin the process of obtaining the International Air Transport Association’s Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) certification. IOSA commits Ravn Alaska to being held to the highest standards of safety in the airline industry. Once achieved, Ravn Alaska will be the first and only Alaska-based airline to hold the certification.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) represents 265 airlines across the globe, 83 percent of total air traffic. Its mission is to represent, lead and serve the airline industry and drive a safe, secure and profitable air transportation industry.

“We carry more than a million passengers and 41 million pounds of cargo each year and every passenger trusts us to get them safely to where they need to be,” said Ravn Alaska’s CEO, Bob Hajdukovich. “At Ravn Alaska, safety is our highest priority; we’re constantly making improvements to our safety procedures at every stage of our operation.”

IOSA is an internationally recognized standard that assesses an airline’s operational management and control systems. IOSA-certified airlines are held to the most stringent rules and practices for aviation safety. There are 34 other airlines in the United States that are IOSA certified and registering for IOSA certification is a non-mandated choice for carriers. Once Ravn Alaska is certified, it will be included in the IOSA registry. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.akbizmag.com




Ravn Alaska could be the first Alaska-based airline to be certified under international safety standards.

Bruce Joseph is Ravn Alaska’s Executive Vice President of Safety, Security, and Compliance. He says the airline has begun the process of becoming certified with the International Air Transport Association’s Operational Safety Audit (I-OSA):

“One of the things that is noteworthy about the I-OSA standard is that it is the gold standard worldwide. It is worldwide best practices and operation. It’s many, many years of history and cycles and repetition by some pretty major hitters around the world: British Airways, CafĂ© Pacific, those kind of operations. And what it does is, it brings the benefit of their experience from worldwide best practices to us.”

If Ravn Alaska is successfully I-OSA certified, then they will be the first Alaska-based airline to have that status. Joseph says Ravn and other Alaska planes need these specific safety requirements to reduce the number of future crashes:

“The decision was made before a couple of those accidents that just helped shed some light on the need to enhance safety all around. The interesting statistic that goes with it that I’ve heard is, although only a quarter of 1% of the U.S. population lives in the State of Alaska, 20% of aviation accidents occur here. That’s somewhat of a skewed statistic, because it doesn’t take into consideration that there’s probably 50% more aviation in Alaska than there is in every other state in the lower 48.”

Joseph believes other Alaska-based airlines haven’t gone through the International certification yet because I-OSA imposes “rigorous” standards on their operations.

“It’s every aspect of the operation, from flight maintenance, cabin flight attendants, how we handle airplanes on the ground, how we ship cargo, how we handle the luggage that our passengers check, how we fuel the airplane, how we de-ice the plane. It is a top-to-bottom, very rigorous standard.”

For Ravn Alaska passengers, Joseph says these standards and audits will make for a more consistently operated flight from any Ravn terminal, including Ted Stevens International Airport and the Ravn terminal in Nome.

It is expected that the IOSA certification could be a year-long process for Ravn, and Joseph says the airline took its first steps towards this international safety status three weeks ago.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.knom.org

Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport (KPKB) Manager Jeff McDougle to retire: Authority approves 2017-18 budget

Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Manager Jeff McDougle presents the 2017-18 fiscal year budget to the Wood County Airport Authority during its meeting Tuesday. The budget was approved as presented. Earlier in the meeting, McDougle announced his plans to retire this fall. 



WILLIAMSTOWN — Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Manager Jeff McDougle announced his impending retirement at Tuesday’s Wood County Airport Authority meeting, during which the 2017-18 budget was approved.

The budget includes $5,000 to pay the incoming manager during September to shadow McDougle and learn the ropes before McDougle steps down in October after four years on the job.

“If there’s trouble finding a replacement, I’m here. I’m not going anywhere,” he said.

Authority President Bill Richardson, reappointed to the group by the county commission Monday, thanked McDougle for his service.

“You’ve done a great job here, and we appreciate everything you’ve done,” Richardson said.

McDougle was retired when he and his wife returned to the area 10 years ago. With his experience in aviation, he wound up serving on both the Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Authority, the airport’s marketing arm, and the Wood County authority, which oversees day-to-day operations.

In the fall of 2013, he was hired as manager, succeeding Terry Moore, who now serves on the Wood County Airport Authority.

Moore said perhaps McDougle’s most notable accomplishment was paying off the $283,000 debt the airport had when he took over.

“That was such an albatross, and it no longer exists,” Moore said.

McDougle said he feels good knowing his successor won’t be dealing with the same issue.

Moore said the authority should begin accepting resumes immediately, as well as formally advertise the position by next week. Richardson suggested a deadline to receive resumes of 45 days after the job is advertised.

“That gives you to the end of July,” Moore said. “Then you go through your process in August and hopefully have someone in place” by September.

The lack of debt gives the airport the ability to replace its annual contribution from the county, which was eliminated this year as the commission struggled to balance its budget in the face of rising regional jail bills. The current year’s contribution was $50,000 and before that it was $100,000, so McDougle suggested using $100,000 in airport funds to help offset an estimated $177,000 in one-time projects this year, more than half of which is expected to go toward repairs to the roof of Hangar 5.

Multiple private aircraft are stored in that hangar. The repairs could allow the authority to consider raising the rates on the space, McDougle said.

Some authority members were initially hesitant to approve using so much money from what McDougle described as the airport’s rainy day fund, which has about $585,000 in it.

“So what do we do next year with that?” Moore said.

McDougle said the money is intended to address the one-time expenditures that wouldn’t be repeated in the next year’s budget. Richardson asked what other one-time expenditures are coming up, and McDougle said some are known and some are not. However, he said $500,000 is a good number to have in the fund.

Payroll and benefits are projected to rise by a little over $75,000, due in large part to the airport taking over operations at its restaurant, which employs a manager and multiple part-time workers, for total personnel expenses of $50,888.

McDougle included in the budget a 50-cents-an-hour wage for hourly, full-time employees, bringing their average rate of pay to $13.54 an hour. With benefits, that represents an increase of $15,182 per year.

Members also discussed whether a new car for the manager was needed. McDougle has been using his own vehicle and recommended the authority advise his replacement to expect the same. However, he noted that’s something they will have to consider as they try to attract a new manager.

“You’re also going to have to consider the salary,” he said.

McDougle’s annual salary is $55,000. He did not change that in the budget, leaving any adjustment up to the authority in the future.

The budget projects income of $1,219,291 and expenses of $1,211,621, both up about 7 percent from the current year. Some of that is due to money carried over for items, like the Hangar 5 roof, that were not addressed this year.

The budget does not include any revenue from a proposed leasing of the former National Guard facility, an updated proposal for which could be considered at its July 11 meeting.

“So if that comes through, that’s a little icing,” Richardson said.

The authority approved the budget 4-0, with member John Pfalzgraf absent.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.newsandsentinel.com

Low-cost airlines shake up market for long haul flights



Low-cost, long-haul air travel has taken off across the Atlantic, shaking a club of major airlines meeting in Mexico this week and forcing established flag carriers to set up budget subsidiaries or lower fares.

Transatlantic routes are among the industry's most popular and profitable, and budget carriers are trying to grab a slice of that business by boosting capacity on them by 68 percent this summer, according to data from air travel intelligence company OAG.

A looming fare war has gained fresh momentum from lightweight new planes with fresh, appealing interiors that help to keep costs down.

Norwegian Air Shuttle and Icelandic rival Wow have grabbed headlines with fares as low as $69 and $55 this summer, although Wow's flights involve a stop in Reykjavik.

Legacy carriers are not idly standing by, and executives at the International Air Transport Association meeting in Cancun, Mexico, said in interviews they were confident their plans to offer low-cost long-haul flights would succeed.

"Disrupters such as Norwegian Air Shuttle and AirAsia X  have shaken up the airline market and forced scheduled operators to rethink their transatlantic strategies," Euromonitor travel project manager Nadejda Popova said.

Lufthansa's Eurowings budget carrier is in its second year of long-haul flying, while Air France is planning to launch a lower-cost long haul brand this fall in a project dubbed Boost.

"It confirms our decision that others are following," Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr said, adding that the German carrier would not have invested in Eurowings without the potential for profit.

International Airlines Group, the holding company for British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingus and Vueling, launched low-cost long-haul brand Level on Thursday with surprisingly strong ticket sales.

IAG CEO Willie Walsh said at the launch that Level would fly five planes next summer and expand to other European cities.

Level's hub is in Barcelona, where Norwegian will also launch U.S. flights this summer with two A330s.

British Airways is putting more seats on its 777 planes, moving to 10 abreast in economy.

"BA's seat cost will be lower than Norwegian's by this time next year," Malaysia Airlines CEO Peter Bellew predicted.

U.S. carriers, stung by previous efforts to set up low-cost units in the 1990s, have introduced new, no-frills fare classes that let passengers pay for extras while booking online.




PROFIT DOUBTS AND LAKER LEGACY

The 68 percent increase in low-cost transatlantic capacity equates to a 5 percent market share, up from 3 percent last year.

Aviation consultant John Strickland said he doubted whether low-cost long-haul can be profitable, especially on some less popular destinations.

He pointed out that even Michael O'Leary, CEO of the highly profitable European low-cost carrier Ryanair has held back because he said he could not get planes at the right price.

"On the North Atlantic you have volume markets where it can work. Asia can work, but the extent to which the model can be delivered at levels of sustainable profitability is far from clear," Strickland said.

Air France-KLM CEO Jean-Marc Janaillac said low-cost carriers would have a hard time on transatlantic routes unless they also offer an attractive business travel service.

"It's not just about the seats. It's whether you have the right frequencies, the air miles, the connections with other destinations," Janaillac said.

In September 1977, Freddie Laker challenged legacy carriers by offering cut-price Skytrain flights between London's Gatwick Airport and New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. But it went bust in 1982 after established rivals cut fares and forced it out of the market.

Norwegian is pressing on anyway, shifting away from short-haul routes to focus on long-haul. It is deploying narrow body 737 Max planes on transatlantic routes and has converted some Airbus orders to larger A321neo planes that can fly longer routes.

In homage to Laker and in a pointed signal to established rivals, his portrait will adorn the tail fin of Norwegian's new 737 Max planes taking off this summer on transatlantic routes.

It is also in talks with Ryanair over the Irish carrier feeding its own short-haul customers to Norwegian's long-haul flights, which would help fill planes.

Younger travellers especially find the new budget carriers appealing.

Qubilah Huddleston, a 26-year-old graduate student from Baltimore, Maryland, in January flew Norwegian Air roundtrip from Boston to London for about $300.

"The first time I flew to Europe, I flew Delta, and I think I paid like $1,000," Huddleston said. "And I got way better service on Norwegian." 

Original article can be found here: http://www.reuters.com

Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. model PC-12/47E airplanes

This document is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on 06/08/2017 and available online at https://federalregister.gov/d/2017-11411, and on FDsys.gov

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2017-0194; Directorate Identifier 2017-CE-006-AD; Amendment 39-18915; AD 2017-11-16]
RIN 2120-AA64

Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION:Final rule.

SUMMARY:We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Model PC-12/47E airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product.The MCAI describes the unsafe condition a san error within the flight management system caused by installing Primus APEX software Build 10 or 10.9, which could cause deviation from the correctly calculated barometric vertical navigation nominal glide path. We are issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

Read more here:  https://s3.amazonaws.com/pdf

Boeing studies 'mild to wild' design for pivotal mid-market jet

CANCUN, Mexico, June 7 (Reuters) - Boeing has looked at options "from mild to wild" for the design of a proposed mid-market jet, a senior executive said, hinting at a breakthrough that industry sources say will create building blocks for future models.

Marketing Vice President Randy Tinseth said Boeing would leapfrog reported plans by Airbus to update its hot-selling A321neo, as Boeing eyes a gap between narrow-body jets and long-haul aircraft for a potential new mid-market airplane.

"We have looked at the mild and we have looked at the wild and I can tell you we know that if you are going to address that market, you need a new airplane," Tinseth told Reuters after a two-day meeting of airline leaders in Mexico.

Industry sources have said the mid-market development is pivotal for Boeing since it will spawn the industrial jigsaw, systems and cockpits likely to be used for the next plane after that, a three-aircraft replacement of Boeing's 737 cash cow.

Getting the "production system" right now would partially allow Boeing to develop the next jet, which is expected to revolve around a model carrying 180 passengers, as an industrial spin-off of the mid-market one, albeit with major differences.

This would result in significant cost savings and avoid repeating a patchwork of different production architectures.

Two further derivatives could extend that post-737 jet family to 160-210 seats, based on current market forecasts.

Boeing has not yet talked about its plans beyond the mid-market plane, which is expected to enter service by 2025.

Boeing officials declined comment on the long-term options or specific details of the mid-market project, which one leasing company has dubbed "797".

GOODBYE STEAM ENGINE

For the mid-market jet, industry sources have said Boeing is settling on a family of two wide-body aircraft.

These would effectively combine a twin-aisle cabin sitting on top of the reduced belly space of a single-aisle jet.

The aim is to reduce wind resistance or drag and therefore operating costs.

However, it involves a risky gamble that airlines will not need to carry much paid cargo on the routes for which the airplane is designed, delegates at the airlines meeting in Cancun said.

The two mid-market models, designed to carry about 220-260 passengers over 3,500 to 5,000 nautical miles (6,400-9,260 km), will also have a wing resembling the distinctive stiletto design of the 787 Dreamliner but with significant internal differences.

Seen from the front, the outline of traditional metal airplane fuselages is usually closer to a true circle.

That allows pressurised air inside the cabin to push out uniformly in all directions, easing loads and removing the need for heavy strengthening materials.

That well-tested concept is as old as the steam engine.

Carbon composites allow manufacturers to make complex pieces in one shape and are well suited to the more elliptical design that Boeing has in mind for the new mid-market fuselage.

However, composites are more expensive to produce.

Reuters reported last month that the new aircraft could be built using cheaper and faster new production techniques without costly pressurised ovens, or autoclaves.

That technology was used to weave the carbon wings of Russia's new MS-21 jet, which first flew last month.

Airbus this week played down a project called A321neo-plus-plus in response to the Boeing mid-market jet, first reported by Reuters, and said it was always reviewing options.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.businessinsider.com

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N302DB: Minor hail damage to wings, control surfaces and right-hand side of rudder/vertical stabilizer




































































AIRCRAFT:   1968 Cessna 177 Cardinal N302DB

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:  Lycoming O-320-E2D S/N L-21812-27A

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N: McCauley Ic172/TM7650 Serial# E16832

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information): 3998.30 TT and 602.65 SMOH

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Hail damage while aircraft was parked outside.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Minor hail damage to wings, control surfaces and RH side of rudder/vertical stabilizer

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:       Private Grass Strip in Scottsburg, IN     

REMARKS: B/K KLX 135, KN 53 NAV, Narco MK12D NAV/COMM, GTX 320A Transponder- Seats come with the aircraft and can be reinstalled upon request.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N302DB.htm

Cessna 182P Skylane, registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, N20844: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N20844



Location: Gilbert, AZ
Accident Number: WPR16FA183
Date & Time: 09/17/2016, 1918 MST
Registration: N20844
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Explosion (non-impact)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On September 17, 2016, about 1918 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N20844, was destroyed when it impacted a residential structure, following an inflight fire near Gilbert, Arizona. The commercial pilot was seriously injured, and the four passengers were not injured. One of the two occupants of the house sustained a minor injury. The airplane was registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight that departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD) Chandler, Arizona, about 1904.

The airplane was participating in the Gilbert's Annual Constitution Fair, a private event, which involved a night aerial pyrotechnic display and four skydivers parachuting into a predetermined drop zone. According to the pilot and the lead jumper, as the airplane arrived at the planned jump area and altitude of 5,000 ft mean sea level (msl), they were given the go-ahead to jump. The sparklers in a pyrotechnic box located on the left side of the airplane, were activated by a jumper, and shortly thereafter they heard a loud boom off to the left of the airplane, which the pilot described as an explosion. Afterwards, both the pilot and the lead jumper noticed damage to the underside of the airplane's left wing, evidenced by fuel pouring out. The lead jumper stated that there was jagged metal protruding out of a big hole about 2 ft from the pilot's left window. As the leaking fuel and the left wing became engulfed with flames, the skydivers successfully jumped out of the airplane's right-side door. The pilot stated he shut off fuel to the airplane's left tank and attempted a slip maneuver, which he thought might extinguish the fire. He initially considered landing at CHD but realized he would not make the airport, since the fire and resulting heat had worsened. The pilot then radioed a distress call and egressed and parachuted out of the airplane as it was becoming unflyable. The airplane subsequently impacted a house in a residential area about 4 miles north of CHD.

On the night of the accident, one of the airplane's co-owners, who was also the lead jumper, stated to an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), that he thought it was possible that an issue with the pyrotechnic box had caused the puncture in the wing and resultant fire. Further, during an interview with a law enforcement officer on the night of the accident, the pilot stated that he believed there was a malfunction or premature deployment of the pyrotechnics that caused the airplane to catch fire. He further reported that there were no mechanical issues with the airplane prior to the explosion.

Radar data showed the airplane departing CHD and performing a climbing right turn towards Gilbert, Arizona. Two clockwise patterns were flown around the vicinity of the Gilbert Civic Center, where the landing zone for the skydivers was located. At 1916:44, a peak altitude of 5,725 ft mean sea level (msl) was attained, and the groundspeed indicated 96 knots. At 1917:27, the altitude began to decrease and the pilot advises air traffic control that he has an emergency situation and fire on the wings. The controller acknowledges the transmission and asks the pilot if he wants to go to Chandler. The pilot does not respond and there are no further transmissions from the pilot. The last recorded data was at 1917:55, at an altitude of 3,350 ft msl, and a groundspeed of 105 knots. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/20/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 875 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model)

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane multi-engine land, single-engine land, single-engine sea, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a second-class airman medical certificate on October 9, 2015, without limitations/waivers. The pilot reported that he had accumulated about 875 total flight hours, with about 200 hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N20844
Model/Series: 182P NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 182261251
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/23/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3458 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 U
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 215 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The high-wing all metal airplane was manufactured in 1972. A review of the airframe logbooks revealed that the last annual inspection was accomplished on November 23, 2015, at a total airframe time of 3,458.0 hours.

During interviews with NTSB investigators, the airplane co-owner stated that the airplane was equipped with a pyrotechnic box that was mounted to the airframe step on the left side of the airplane. He stated that the pyrotechnic box would typically be operated during the night jumps for a visual effect for those observing on the ground, and that there were no previous problems with the box. He further stated that two pyrotechnic devices were installed in the box that would sparkle as the jumpers egressed. He estimated that the pyrotechnic devices to be about 8 inches long and have a diameter of about 2 ½ inches. The devices had between a 22-30 second burn duration and were activated by a switch box on the airplane's floor by one of the jumpers about 30 seconds prior to the jump.

The airplane was modified and converted for use in skydiving operations by the current owners in what they described as a standard configuration of an airplane used in the skydiving industry. A total of eight modifications were accomplished in accordance with Title 14 CFR Part 43 through the use of two Major Repair and Alteration, FAA Form 337's, both dated September 19, 2012. A separate FAA Form 337, dated January 11, 2014, located in the airworthiness history for the airplane stated, "this document is an amendment for FAA Form 337, dated 19 Sept. 2012." This form did not stipulate which previous Form 337 was being amended, however it appeared to encompass all areas contained within the previous two 337s, and referenced FAA Form 8110-3, which was not previously mentioned. It was approved by the FAA on November 5, 2014. However, a review of the airplane's maintenance logbook found no supporting documentation for a Supplemental Type Certificate, field approval, or logbook entry, for the installation of the pyrotechnic box on the factory equipped left step located on the left main landing gear spring assembly (leg).

According to the airplane's co-owner and the accident pilot, the pyrotechnic box was attached to the airplane's left main landing gear step, just prior to the accident flight. The pilot stated that the co-owner told him that the box was approved and properly tested. When he asked the co-owner about the installed box, the co-owner said that it was a sparkler box that was considered a minor alteration and did not need a field approval since it could easily be removed. The pilot stated he checked the security of the box on his preflight but did not check for its approval in the airplane's paperwork based on the co-owner's statements. The pilot stated that this was his second skydiving night flight that used pyrotechnics with the company. The co-owner stated that three bolts and nuts were used to secure the box and that the FAA was not aware of the box installation.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCHD, 1243 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1918 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 206°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  15 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chander, AZ (CHD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Chander, AZ (CHD)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1904 MST
Type of Airspace: Class B

A review of data from the CHD automated weather observation station, located about 4 miles south of the accident site revealed that at 1918 conditions were winds variable at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 35° C, dew point -1° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86. inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: CHANDLER MUNI (CHD)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 1243 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight and On-Ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Explosion: In-Flight
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.324722, -111.780278 (est) 

Examination of the accident site by the NTSB investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane penetrated through a roof of a single-story residential house at an elevation of about 1,247 ft msl. A postimpact fire ensued, which consumed most of the airplane and interior of the house. The airplane impacted the residence at a steep nose down attitude. All major components of the airplane were contained within the wreckage site. Most of the wreckage debris was scattered in the back half of the house and backyard. Behind the backyard fence there was an open field.

The majority of both wings were located in the backyard. The wings sustained thermal damage and substantial leading-edge compression. The engine and parts of the propeller dome were located at the point of ground impact. Due to thermal damage, flight control continuity could not be established. The instrument control panel and cabin area were mostly consumed by the postimpact fire. Following the on-scene examination, the airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Further examination of the airplane revealed that the remnants of the interior structure of the left wing, where the fuel tank was located, showed no outward buckling or other similar damage. Portions of the upper and lower left wing skins and all of the left main fuel tank were destroyed by thermal damage.

Examination of the left main landing gear leg revealed holes with wires that ran from the pyrotechnic box along the gear leg, under the gear leg fairing, through a hole in the landing gear bulkhead, and then through a hole drilled in the cabin floor inspection plate, into the cabin. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. Testing was negative for ethanol. The following drugs were tested for: amphetamines, opiates, marijuana, cocaine, phencyclidine, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antidepressants, and antihistamines. Positive results for morphine and ondansetron were present. Tests were negative for the remainder of the drugs.

A review of the pilot's postaccident medical care by the NTSB's Chief Medical Officer revealed that the pilot was administered amounts of morphine for pain during his evacuation from the accident scene and ondansetron during his evaluation at the emergency department. The positive toxicology results were consistent with the medications administered to the pilot during his postaccident treatment.

Tests And Research

Several pieces of aluminum sheet metal, the mounting bracket, and remnants of a pyrotechnic device, were located on the ground near the drop zone. The aluminum metal pieces were examined by specialists in the NTSB Materials Laboratory. A complete report is contained in the public docket. The recovered aluminum metal pieces were consistent with the pyrotechnic box that was constructed with folded and riveted aluminum sheet metal, to contain two pyrotechnics devices, and attached to the airplane, on a step, on the left main landing gear leg.

Two recovered aluminum pieces of the sheet metal had circular holes in them, consistent with those used to mount the pyrotechnic box to the step on the left main landing gear leg. The top of the pyrotechnic box appeared to have a top with a long piano hinge on one side, presumably to access the box. Three recovered pieces of aluminum sheet metal had screw holes for the piano hinge distributed along their top edge.

Examination of the aluminum metal pieces revealed a high degree of fragmentation, fractures along the fold lines, outward deformation, pedaling and curling of some of the edges, and cratering from high velocity particle impact, that were consistent with an explosion that originated from the inside of the pyrotechnics box. The aluminum metal pieces were consistent with shrapnel from the explosion.

Additional Information

According to Title 14 CFR Part 105, section 105.21: "no person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute operation to be conducted from that aircraft, over or into a congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or open-air assembly of persons, unless a certificate of authorization for that parachute operation has been issued."

An FAA Certificate of Authorization (COA) was approved for the night of the accident flight that authorized parachute operations at Gilbert, Arizona, between 19:00 to 20:00 by the Arizona Skyhawk Parachute Demonstration Team. The planned parachute operation listed was for one pass with four jumpers, at an altitude of 4,000 ft msl, or as authorized by ATC (higher if possible). The FAA National Aviation Events Program's website lists examples of night airborne pyrotechnic special provisions that should be included in the COA for those events conducted at night. However, there was no special provision in the approved COA for the accident night, that authorized the use of pyrotechnics by the airplane.

The authorization included a provision where the airplane owner would contact Lockheed Martin Prescott Flight Service Station (FSS) of the date, time, place, areas, altitudes, nature of activity, duration, and request a NOTAM be issued. However, a NOTAM search by the FSS failed to locate any NOTAMs issued for the accident flight and jump.

The pilot stated that he was unaware that the use of pyrotechnics during the flight was not authorized by the FAA. He further stated that he did not read the COA for the parachute jump event. The airplane's co-owner and lead jumper also stated that the four jumpers had a small pyrotechnic device that they mounted to their ankle, similar but smaller to that on the airplane, that would sparkle as they jumped.

According to Title 14 CFR Chapter 1, Subchapter A, Part 1, section 1.1, the definition of the pilot-in-command (PIC): "means the person who has the final authority and responsibility for the operation and safety of the flight." The PIC is responsible for the overall safety of the flight, including ensuring the flight is in compliance with all applicable regulations. The language of a former NTSB decision stated factors to consider when determining the extent of a PIC's responsibilities: "As a general rule, the PIC is responsible for the overall safe operation of the aircraft. However, a particular task is the responsibility of another, if the PIC has no independent obligation (e.g. based on operating procedures or manuals) or ability to ascertain the information, and if the captain has no reason to question the other's performance, then and only then will no violation be found." (FAA letter to Mr. Johnson, February 13, 1997).




It's been nearly nine months since a Cessna 182 slammed into Peter and Sharon Lebeau's Gilbert home, but the couple is still living in temporary housing.

There's a shell of a new home sitting where their home of 20 years once sat undisturbed in their neighborhood near Ray and Lindsey Roads. Just the walls, foundation and a portion of the roofing have been rebuilt so far.

Affixed to the chain-link fence that surrounds the lot is a sign that reads, "Please Share & Donate," followed by a Go Fund Me website address to help the Lebeaus.

On Sept. 17, 2016, the wing of an airplane that was part of a skydiving display headed for the annual Constitution Fair at the Gilbert Civic Center caught fire. 

All four passengers and eventually the pilot were able to parachute to safety, leaving the empty aircraft to plummet into the roof of the Lebeau's home. Miraculously, both Peter and Sharon were uninjured.

But their home of 20 years was a "total loss," according to a legal notice filed with the city in March.

In the days following the crash, the couple told the media they were "grateful to God to be alive." But now the couple is reeling with the realities that accompany an unanticipated emergency. 

The Lebeaus filed the notice of claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against Gilbert seeking $20 million for their pain and suffering and emotional and psychological trauma. Their insurance company filed a separate $507,000 claim for the home and vehicle damage. 

The town is not a sponsor of the event, but does issue a special event permit to allow Constitution Week USA to hold the fair on town property, according to town spokeswoman Dana Berchman. 

In a written statement, the town's attorney Robert Grasso said, "The Town has considered the claim and concluded that the claim asserted against the Town is completely meritless."

But the couple's attorney argues in the notice of claim that the town was responsible for ensuring safety at the event, and its negligence "essentially uprooted and wreaked havoc on a family."

The notice of claim reveals poignant details of the accident. 

Just after 7 p.m., Peter was sitting in his recliner in the "TV room." His wife was across the house in the couple's bedrooms with their two dogs, Motek and Sheba.

The Lebeaus heard a loud crash as the plane ripped through the roof of their home. Fire, glass and debris filled the living room, which separated Peter and Sharon. 

"Neither Peter nor Sharon knew if the other, or their pets were alive," according to the notice of claim.

They both made their way out of the home and into the front yard where they reunited — but the dogs were missing. Peter ran to the back of the burning home and found both pets alive, but covered in shards of glass.

Onlookers had assembled while the couple escaped the home and lined the street with cellphones "not to call for help as one might imagine, rather to eerily take recordings and video of the Lebeau's (sic) and their home," according to the notice of claim.

Family friends escorted the Lebeaus away from the accident scene, but the couple, unable to sleep, returned to their home a few hours later at 1 a.m. They saw the massive hole in the middle of the home and smoke, fire and water damage everywhere.

"The years in the home, their settled and comfortable lifestyle, the priceless memories and heirlooms, the souvenirs they had acquired from all of their world adventures were now debris," according to the notice of claim.

The aftermath

The Lebeaus struggled emotionally in the days and months following the accident, according to the notice of claim. 

Sharon broke down at San Tan Shopping Center as she attempted to replace some of her belongings before a trip. Both Peter and Sharon faced "trepidation" as they prepared to ride in an airplane for the first time following the crash. And each time they heard a siren or saw an emergency vehicle, they were transported back to the night of the accident, the claim says. 

The Lebeaus total damages to date, including the loss of property, medical visits and counseling, tops $800,000, but will continue to climb, according to the claim.

The Lebeaus offered to settle their claims for $10 million each. Their insurance company offered to settle for just over $507,000. Neither party has filed a suit in court.

The town's attorney said Gilbert is not exploring the settlement of these claims as it believes the claims are "meritless." 

The Lebeaus, reached through their attorney, did not comment on the notice of claim.

Constitution Fair will continue

While the legal ramifications of last year's Constitution Fair accident are still to be decided, this year's event is just around the corner, and organizers say it will be "exactly the same" as it was last year — with one notable difference.

There will be no skydivers or aerial displays when the fair comes alive on Sept. 16, according to Constitution Week USA President Dwayne Farnsworth. 

Farnsworth said Constitution Week USA has always used the same skydivers for the fair, and that group no longer has a plane because of last year's accident.

Constitution Week began in Gilbert in 2002. Along with the fair, organizers put on educational events to remind young and old of the often forgotten "Constitution Day" holiday.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.azcentral.com

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Gilbert, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N20844
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1918 Mountain standard time, a Cessna 182P, N20844, was destroyed when it impacted a residential structure, following a reported inflight fire near Gilbert, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the 4 passengers sustained minor injuries. One of the two occupants of the house sustained a minor injury. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD) Chandler, Arizona, at an unknown time.

The airplane was participating in the Gilbert's annual Constitution Fair, which involved an aerial pyro technic display and four skydivers parachuting into a predetermined drop zone about 1 mile northwest from the accident site. According to one of the skydivers, as the airplane arrived at the planned jump area and altitude, about 5,000 feet, mean sea level, he heard a loud noise and noticed damage to the airplane's left wing. Shortly thereafter, the skydivers successfully jumped out of the airplane as its left wing became engulfed with flames. The pilot radioed a distress call and then egressed out of the airplane. The airplane subsequently impacted in a residential area about 4 miles from the north of CHD.

Examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane struck through the house's roof and a post impact fire consumed a majority of the airplane and the interior of the house. 

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.