Sunday, April 7, 2019

AMD Alarus CH 2000, N239AM: Accident occurred June 20, 2018 at Plum Island Airport (2B2), Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N239AM




Location: Newburyport, MA
Accident Number: ERA18LA175
Date & Time: 06/20/2018, 1245 EDT
Registration: N239AM
Aircraft: AIRCRAFT MFG & DEVELOPMENT CO CH 2000
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The private pilot reported that, after a personal, cross-country flight, he entered the traffic pattern at the destination airport and noted a 20° left crosswind between 9 and 11 knots. The final approach was stable, but after crossing the threshold, the airplane descended and drifted left over grass adjacent to the runway. Because the airplane was not over the runway, the pilot chose to conduct a go-around and added full power, but the left main landing gear struck the grass next to the runway. The airplane did not climb and continued drifting left. The pilot retracted the flaps in an attempt to gain altitude; however, the airplane still did not climb, and the stall warning horn activated. He pushed the yoke forward to avoid a stall, and the airplane touched down on the grass and then impacted trees, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that contributed to the accident. A stand of trees was located left of the runway. It is possible that the trees blocked the crosswind when the airplane descended below treetop level and that the pilot did not adequately compensate for the existing winds during the final approach and landing flare. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to adequately compensate for existing crosswind conditions during the final approach and landing flare, which led to the airplane drifting left of the runway, and his delayed decision to go around, which resulted in the airplane touching down in the grass next to the runway and a subsequent collision with trees.

Findings

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Delayed action - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Response/compensation (Cause)
Tree(s) - Effect on operation (Cause)

History of Flight

Approach
Other weather encounter
Loss of control in flight

Approach-VFR go-around
Attempted remediation/recovery

Landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Runway excursion

On June 20, 2018, about 1245 eastern daylight time, Aircraft Manufacturing and Development Company CH2000, N239AM, was substantially damaged during a go-around at Plum Island Airport (2B2), Newburyport, Massachusetts. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated by Bald Eagle Flying Club under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for flight that originated at Portland International Airport (PWM), Portland, Maine at 1142 and was destined for 2B2.

The pilot reported that he entered at the traffic pattern at 2B2 following an uneventful flight from PWM. The windsock showed a 20° left crosswind between 9 and 11 kts for runway 28. The approach to runway 28 was stable at 65 kts and the airplane was configured properly over the threshold. After crossing the threshold, the airplane descended and drifted to the left. The airplane was no longer over the runway, so the pilot elected to go around. He added full power and the left main gear struck the grass next to the runway. The airplane was not gaining altitude and continued to the left. He retracted the flaps with the hope of gaining altitude; however, the airplane did not climb and the stall warning horn activated. He pushed the yoke forward to avoid a stall and the airplane touched down on the grass and then collided with trees.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the airplane came to rest in an area of thick brush and trees. There was no fire. The wings and fuselage sustained structural damage. The nose when was separated and found about 8 ft west of the main wreckage. The propeller and spinner were separated from the engine.

An examination of the runway revealed no skid or tire marks that would indicate touchdown on the paved surface. The first indication of touchdown was found in the grass, about ½ way down the 2,105 ft runway and 200 feet left of the runway edge. Several propeller slash marks were found in the ground, 20 ft west of the initial touchdown point. A stand of trees was located south and west of runway 28.

The pilot reported 149 hours of total flight time, including 22 hours in the accident airplane make and model. He reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions of failures with the airplane prior to the accident.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/22/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/02/2017
Flight Time:  149 hours (Total, all aircraft), 22 hours (Total, this make and model), 55 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AIRCRAFT MFG & DEVELOPMENT CO
Registration: N239AM
Model/Series: CH 2000 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 20-1039
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/05/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1692 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235
Registered Owner: BALD EAGLE FLYING CLUB
Rated Power: 117 hp
Operator: BALD EAGLE FLYING CLUB
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BVY, 107 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Portland, ME (PWM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Newburyport, MA (2B2)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1142 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E



Airport Information

Airport: Plum Island (2B2)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 11 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2105 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 42.796389, -70.839444 (est)

Hard Landing: Jabiru J250-SP, N722BL, accident occurred June 18, 2018 at Meadow Mist Airport (WN35), Ferndale, Whatcom County, Washington

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N722BL

Location: Ferndale, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA380
Date & Time: 06/18/2018, 1420 PDT
Registration: N722BL
Aircraft: JABIRU J250
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that after accepting delivery of his recently purchased airplane, he requested the ferry pilot to "show me how to operate the aircraft." During his second approach, he felt that he was low and slow and asked the ferry pilot if he should add power; he received a verbal response, "your fine." Shortly after, the aircraft landed hard on the runway, collapsed the nose wheel and right main landing gear and the right wing struck the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that prior to the accident flight, he does not have any experience flying the accident airplane.

The ferry pilot stated that he agreed to only be a passenger and not act as a certified flight instructor. He added that the airplane was configured for only a left seated pilot. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 93, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/01/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 5500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: JABIRU
Registration: N722BL
Model/Series: J250 SP
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 379
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/17/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 191 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Jabiru
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 3300A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 120 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBLI, 149 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 171°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Ferndale, WA (WN35)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Ferndale, WA (WN35)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1330 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Meadow Mist (WN35)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 55 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2000 ft / 80 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 48.908611, -122.564722 (est)

Piper PA-30-160 Twin Comanche, operated by a private pilot as personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N8674Y: Accident occurred June 17, 2018 at Vero Beach Regional Airport (KVRB), Indian River County, Florida


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8674Y



Location: Vero Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA171
Date & Time: 06/17/2018, 1120 EDT
Registration: N8674Y
Aircraft: PIPER PA 30
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 17, 2018, about 1120 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-30, N8674Y, was substantially damaged while landing at Vero Beach Regional Airport (VRB), Vero Beach, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed VRB about 1040.

The pilot reported that after a local flight, he returned to VRB and entered the right base leg of the airport traffic pattern for landing on runway 4. Due to traffic ahead of him, the pilot extended the landing gear early to decrease airspeed. He confirmed that the landing gear was extended via the green light indication in the cockpit and by utilizing the reflective mirror on the left engine nacelle to see the nosegear extended. The pilot again confirmed that the landing gear was extended on short final approach and the airplane touched down near the touchdown markings. After about 500 feet of landing roll, the nosegear collapsed and the airplane came to rest upright on the runway.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that all three landing gear were collapsed. The inspector also noted substantial damage to the underside of the fuselage. The airplane was subsequently recovered to a hangar and placed on jacks. A mechanic examined the airplane for the purpose of providing a repair estimate to the insurance adjuster. During the examination, no anomalies or damage were found to the landing gear system, with the exception of bent main landing gear extension rods.

The recorded weather at VRB, at 1153, included wind from 030° at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles and clear sky.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/14/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/03/2016
Flight Time:  449 hours (Total, all aircraft), 109 hours (Total, this make and model), 347 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8674Y
Model/Series: PA 30 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 30-1818
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/05/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2381 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7865 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-320-B1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VRB, 24 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Vero Beach, FL (VRB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Vero Beach, FL (VRB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1040 EDT
Type of Airspace:



Airport Information

Airport: Vero Beach Regional (VRB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 24 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 4
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4974 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  27.655556, -80.418056 (est)
















Cessna T210F Turbo Centurion, registered to the pilot and operated as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N6107R: Accident occurred June 17, 2018 in Desdemona, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Dallas, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N6107R 



Location: Desdemona, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA229
Date & Time: 06/17/2018, 0830 CDT
Registration: N6107R
Aircraft: CESSNA T210F
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 17, 2018, at 0830 central daylight time, a Cessna T210F airplane, N6107R, nosed over during an off airport forced landing in Desdemona, Texas. The private pilot and one passenger received minor injuries, and a second passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed for the flight. The airplane departed the Dublin Municipal Airport (9F0), Dublin, Texas, about 0820, en route to the Gregory M. Simmons Memorial Airport (GZN), Cisco, Texas.

The pilot stated that the engine began running rough during cruise flight at 2,400 ft above mean sea level. He leaned the fuel mixture and the engine roughness subsided. A few minutes later, the engine began running rough once again. He switched fuel tanks and there was no change in the engine operation. Shortly thereafter, the engine lost power. The pilot made a forced landing in a soft, sandy field and the airplane nosed over.

The initial postaccident engine examination revealed the engine remained attached to the airframe. Various wires, cables, and hoses remained attached to the engine. The top spark plugs exhibited normal wear but were dark in color and oily. The cylinders were examined using a boroscope were unremarkable.

The engine was then removed from the airframe and shipped to the manufacturer for a test run.

The engine was placed in the test cell and started without hesitation. The engine ran at 1,200 rpm and 1,600 rpm with the fuel pump mixture control at full. After 2 minutes of run time, the engine power started to oscillate. The engine was shut down and the mixture control was adjusted to about half of where it was originally set. The engine was started again and after 1 minute and 20 seconds the engine power again began to decrease, with the fuel pressure reaching 40 psi, which was 8 psi higher than the maximum unmetered flow limit of 32 psi.

The fuel pump was removed and placed on a test bench. At full power, 2,700 rpm, the fuel flow was about 170 pounds per hour with a fuel pressure of 92 psi. According to the engine manufacturer, the fuel pressure should have been between 29 and 32 psi. The adjustment screw was set to a fuel pressure of 30 psi and the pump was reinstalled on the engine for another test run.

The engine was restarted and run up to 1,600 rpm. The rpm slowly dropped to 1,498 rpm. The engine power was increased to 2,552 rpm and the fuel pressure stabilized at 30.18 psi with smooth engine operation.

During the initial engine run the engine was observed to have excessive manifold pressure. During the second engine run the turbocharger controller was adjusted to maintain normal manifold pressures. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/03/2017
Flight Time:   332 hours (Total, all aircraft), 276 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 42 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6107R
Model/Series: T210F F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: T210-0007
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/22/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2725 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 35 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5315 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SEP, 1321 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1135 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 100°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dublin, TX (9F0)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Cisco, TX (3F2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0820 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 32.219444, -98.510000

McDonnell Douglas 369FF, registered to and operated by Northwest Helicopters LLC, N900FF: Accident occurred June 16, 2018 in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Juan, Puerto Rico

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N900FF 

Location: Yabucoa, PR
Accident Number: GAA18CA378
Date & Time: 06/16/2018, 1700 EDT
Registration: N900FF
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELI CO 369
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load 

According to the helicopter pilot, he dropped off a lineman on top of a power line tower, to install fiber lines. The lineman completed the task and informed the pilot by radio that he was ready to be recovered from the tower.

During the recovery, the pilot hovered next to the tower and signaled to the lineman that he was ready for him to transfer from the tower to the left skid of the helicopter. When the lineman reached out to attach his lanyard to the helicopter, the pilot felt the main rotor blades strike the fiber line that was just installed. The helicopter remained controllable and the pilot made a precautionary landing without recovering the lineman.

After discussing the event with the lineman, the fiber line was raised to a higher position on the tower prior to the recovery of the lineman.

Upon returning to base, a post-accident examination of the helicopter revealed that the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor blades.

The pilot reported that the accident could have been prevented by assessing each approach and landing individually, while looking for any possible new hazards or obstructions.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/31/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 16564 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4227 hours (Total, this make and model), 15358 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 172 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 37 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELI CO
Registration: N900FF
Model/Series: 369 FF
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0100FF
Landing Gear Type: High Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/08/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2250 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 5509.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250C30
Registered Owner: NORTHWEST HELICOPTERS LLC
Rated Power: 650 hp
Operator: NORTHWEST HELICOPTERS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137); Rotorcraft External Load (133); On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TJNR, 38 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 48°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 110°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 25°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:

No Obscuration; No Precipitation

Departure Point: Palmas Del Mar, PR
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Yabucoa, PR
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1600 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 18.051111, -65.879444 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, N66ML, accident occurred June 03, 2018 in Clovis, Curry County, New Mexico

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N66ML


Location: Clovis, NM
Accident Number: CEN18LA207
Date & Time: 06/03/2018, 1130 MDT
Registration: N66ML
Aircraft: CESSNA T210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The private pilot reported that he departed for the local flight in the airplane with 17 gallons of fuel in the right fuel tank and 22 gallons of fuel in the left fuel tank. While he was descending the airplane through 6,500 ft mean sea level and drawing fuel from the right tank, the engine lost total power. The pilot switched to the left fuel tank, turned on the fuel pump, and engaged the engine starter in an attempt to restart the engine to no avail. The pilot subsequently conducted a forced landing, during which the airplane collided with a power line, and the left aileron and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

Examinations of the airframe, fuel system, and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation, and the engine was test-run successfully. At recovery, 2 gallons of fuel were found in the left fuel tank (although a small amount had leaked from the damaged fuel drain), and 9 gallons of fuel were found in the right fuel tank. The investigation could not determine the reason for the engine power loss.

The Pilot’s Operating Handbook engine restart procedures stated, in part, to select the fuller fuel tank. Given that there was adequate fuel onboard when the engine lost power, if the pilot had properly conducted the engine restart procedures by selecting the fuller fuel tank, it is possible that engine power could have been restored.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Findings

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)


Factual Information

On June 3, 2018, about 1130 mountain daylight time, a Cessna T210M airplane, N66ML, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Clovis, New Mexico. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The local flight departed Clovis Municipal Airport (CVN), Clovis, New Mexico, about 1040.

According to the written statement submitted by the pilot, he was descending to land, and was at an altitude of 6,500 ft mean sea level. He had just made an engine throttle adjustment, when the engine lost power. The pilot changed to the left fuel tank, turned the electric auxiliary fuel pump on, and engaged the engine starter in attempted to restart the engine. The engine did not restart. During the forced landing the airplane collided with a wire from powerlines adjacent to the road the pilot was attempting to land on. The left aileron and the fuselage were substantially damaged during the forced landing.

The pilot added that he had departed with 17 gallons of fuel in the right fuel tank and 22 gallons of fuel in the left fuel tank. According to the team that recovered the airplane, 2 gallons of fuel were recovered from the left fuel tank and 9 gallons of fuel were recovered from the right fuel tank. The FAA inspector who responded to the accident reported that the fuel drain on the left wing was impact damaged and a small amount of fuel had leaked out of that wing.

An examination of the fuel system revealed no anomalies or contamination that would have obstructed the fuel flow. An engine run was conducted on the engine and the engine started and ran without interruption. There were no mechanical anomalies with the airframe, fuel system, or engine that would have precluded normal operations.

The Pilot Operating Handbook for the Cessna T210M, Operating Limitations, listed 90 gallons total fuel; 45 gallons in each tank and 1 gallon unusable fuel. In the Emergency Procedures Section, the engine restart procedures during flight were outlined as:

1. Airspeed – 85 KIAS
2. Fuel Quantity – CHECK
3. Fuel Selector Valve – FULLER TANK
4. Mixture – RICH
5. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – ON for 3-5 seconds with throttle ½ open; then OFF
6. Ignition Switch – BOTH (or START if propeller is stopped)
7. Throttle – ADVANCE slowly

The Airplane & Systems Description, Fuel System, goes on to state in part that

"…When the fuel tanks are ¼ full or less, prolonged uncoordinated flight such as slips or skids can uncover the fuel tank outlets, causing fuel starvation and engine stoppage. Therefore, with low fuel reserves, do not allow the airplane to remain in uncoordinated flight for periods in excess of one minute."

It goes on to caution that "Excessive use of the ON position [auxiliary fuel pump] at high altitude and full rich mixture can cause flooding of the engine as indicated by a short period of power followed by a loss of power." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/06/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/08/2017
Flight Time: 3551 hours (Total, all aircraft), 180 hours (Total, this make and model), 3551 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N66ML
Model/Series: T210 M 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21062598
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/03/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1550 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520R
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCVS, 4215 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 65 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1058 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 318°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots / 17 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.33 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / -3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Clovis, NM (CVN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clovis, NM (CVN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1040 MDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Clovis (CVN)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 4215 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.506111, -103.169722